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President – Lyndon B. Johnson, Democrat 1963 – 1969

88th Congress 1965 – 1967 – 

255 Democrats

177 Republicans

3 Vacant Seats

Senate – 

65 Democrats

35 Republicans

States Controlled % –

**

President – Lyndon B. Johnson, Democrat 1963 – 1969

89th Congress 1967 – 1969 – 

295 Democrats (end 289)

140 Republicans (end 136)

1 Vacant Seat (end 10)

Senate – 

67 Democrats

33 Republicans

States Controlled % –

**

President – Lyndon B. Johnson, Democrat 1963 – 1969

90th Congress 1967 – 1969 – 

247 Democrats

187 Republicans

1 Vacant Seat

Senate – 

64 Democrats (end 62)

35 Republicans (end 38)

1 Vacant Seat

States Controlled % –

**

President – Richard Milhous Nixon, Republican 1969 – 1974

91st Congress 1969 – 1971 – 

243 Democrats

192 Republicans

Senate – 

57 Democrats

43 Republicans

States Controlled % –

**

President – Richard Milhous Nixon, Republican 1969 – 1974

92nd Congress 1971 – 1973 – 

255 Democrats

180 Republicans

Senate – 

54 Democrats

44 Republicans

1 Independent

1 Conservative (N.Y.)

States Controlled % –

The Nixon shock was a series of economic measures undertaken by United States President Richard Nixon in 1971, in response to increasing inflation, the most significant of which were wage and price freezes, surcharges on imports, and the unilateral cancellation of the direct international convertibility of the United States dollar to gold.[1]

While Nixon’s actions did not formally abolish the existing Bretton Woods system of international financial exchange, the suspension of one of its key components effectively rendered the Bretton Woods system inoperative. While Nixon publicly stated his intention to resume direct convertibility of the dollar after reforms to the Bretton Woods system had been implemented, all attempts at reform proved unsuccessful. By 1973, the Bretton Woods system was replaced de facto by the current regime based on freely floating fiat currencies.[2] 

from – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixon_shock

**

President – Gerald R. Ford, Republican 1974 – 1977

93rd Congress 1973 – 1975 – 

241 Democrats (end 235)

192 Republicans (end 182)

5 Vacant Seats (end 18)

Senate – 

56 Democrats (end 57)

42 Republicans (end 40)

1 Independent

1 Conservative (N.Y.)

States Controlled % –

**

President – Gerald R. Ford, Republican 1974 – 1977

94th Congress 1975 – 1977 – 

291 Democrats

144 Republicans

Senate – 

60 Democrats (end 61)

37 Republicans (end 37)

1 Independent

1 Conservative (N.Y.)

States Controlled % –

**

President – Jimmy Carter, Democrat 1977 – 1981

95th Congress 1977 – 1979 – 

292 Democrats (end 275 – wikipedia)

143 Republicans (end 140 – wikipedia)

(end 20 vacant seats – wikipedia)

Senate – 

61 Democrats

38 Republicans

1 Independent

States Controlled % –

**

President – Jimmy Carter, Democrat 1977 – 1981

96th Congress 1979 – 1981 – 

278 Democrats

157 Republicans

Senate – 

58 Democrats (end 55)

41 Republicans (end 44)

1 Independent

States Controlled % –

**

President – Ronald Reagan, Republican 1981 – 1989

97th Congress 1981 – 1983 – 

243 Democrats (244 wikipedia)

192 Republicans (191 wikipedia)

Senate – 

46 Democrats

53 Republicans

1 Independent

States Controlled % –

**

President – Ronald Reagan, Republican 1981 – 1989

98th Congress 1983 – 1985 – 

269 Democrats (272 – wikipedia)

166 Republicans (163 – wikipedia)

Senate – 

46 Democrats / end 45

54 Republicans/ end 55

**

President – Ronald Reagan, Republican 1981 – 1989

99th Congress 1985 – 1987 – 

254 Democrats

181 Republicans

Senate –

47 Democrats

53 Republicans

States – % Controlled

**

President – Ronald Reagan, Republican 1981 – 1989

100th Congress 1987 – 1989 – 

258 Democrats

177 Republicans

Senate – 

55 Democrats

45 Republicans

States – % Controlled

The biggest stock market crash in U.S. history brought the Reagan administration and Congress together in a “budget summit.” Select committees investigated the arms-for-hostage arrangement now known as Iran-Contra.

https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/100th/

**

President – George W. Bush Sr, Republican 1989 – 1993

101st Congress 1989 – 1991 – 

260 Democrats

175 Republicans

Senate – 

55 Democrats

45 Republicans

States – % Controlled

Despite continued divided-party government, the 101st Congress (1989–1991) increased taxes to stem a growing deficit, created the Resolution Trust Corporation to address the failed Savings and Loan bank industry

https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/101st/

**

President – George W. Bush Sr, Republican 1989 – 1993

102nd Congress 1991 – 1993 – 

267 Democrats

167 Republicans

1 Independent

Senate – 

56 Democrats

44 Republicans

States – % Controlled

(Interesting note – [102nd] Congress also approved a ban on underground nuclear tests beginning in 1996. – https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/102nd/)

**

President – Bill Clinton 1993 – 2001 [William Jefferson Clinton]

103rd Congress 1993 – 1995 – 

258 Democrats

176 Republicans

1 Independent

Senate – 

53 Democrats

47 Republicans

States – % Controlled

Democrats controlled Congress and the White House for the first time in 12 years after the 1992 elections. Congress approved the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/103rd/

**

President – Bill Clinton 1993 – 2001 [William Jefferson Clinton]

104th Congress 1995 – 1997 – 

204 Democrats

230 Republicans

1 Independent

Senate – 

47 Democrats

53 Republicans

States – % Controlled

**

President – Bill Clinton 1993 – 2001 [William Jefferson Clinton]

105th Congress 1997 – 1999 – 

207 Democrats

226 Republicans

2 Independents

Senate – 

45 Democrats

55 Republicans

States – % Controlled

**

President – Bill Clinton 1993 – 2001 [William Jefferson Clinton]

106th Congress 1999 – 2001 –

211 Democrats

223 Republicans

1 Independent

Senate – 

45 Democrats

55 Republicans

0 Independents

States – % Controlled

Republicans retained their majorities in both chambers though their margin in the House eroded after the 1998 elections. Congress overhauled financial services regulation.

https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/106th/

**

President – George W. Bush Jr., Republican 2001 – 2009

107th Congress 2001 – 2003

213 Democrats

220 Republicans

2 Independents

Senate – 

48 Democrats

50 Republicans

1 Independent

States – % Controlled

**

President – George W. Bush, Jr., Republican 2001 – 2009

108th Congress 2003 – 2005 – 

205 Democrats

229 Republicans

1 Independent

Senate –

48 Democrats

55 Republicans

1 Independent

States – % Controlled

 . . and in March 2003 approved military action against Iraq. At home, Congress approved a series of tax reductions. https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/108th/

**

President – George W. Bush, Jr., Republican 2001 – 2009

109th Congress 2005 – 2007 – 

201 Democrats

233 Republicans

1 Independent

Senate – 

44 Democrats

55 Republicans

1 Independent

States – % Controlled

.  . extended tax reductions, and restructured the United States Postal Service for the first time in a generation. https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/109th/

**

President – George W. Bush, Jr., Republican 2001 – 2009

110th Congress 2007 – 2009 – 

233 Democrats

202 Republicans

0 Independent

Senate – 

49 Democrats

49 Republicans

2 Independents

States – % Controlled

The 2006 elections produced Democratic congressional majorities for the first time in 12 years. Democrats and Republicans reduced taxes for economic stimulus. As the economy worsened and the housing market collapsed, the 110th Congress (2007–2009) passed bipartisan measures to stabilize the troubled financial sector. https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/110th/

**

President – Barack Obama, Democrat 2009 – 2017

111th Congress 2009 – 2011

257 Democrats

178 Republicans

0 Independent

Senate – 

56 Democrats

42 Republicans

2 Independents

States – % Controlled

Democrats controlled the 111th Congress (2009–2011) with majorities in both houses of Congress alongside the country’s first African-American president, Democrat Barack Obama. Congress addressed the financial meltdown and subsequent global recession by clearing a stimulus package followed by comprehensive financial regulation. In its last weeks, after Republicans won the House during the 2010 election, the 111th Congress renewed expiring tax cuts . . A number of issues remained unaddressed, however, including deficit reduction, energy and the environment, campaign-finance reform, and regular appropriations. https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/111th/

**

President – Barack Obama, Democrat 2009 – 2017

112th Congress 2011 – 2013 – 

193 Democrats

242 Republicans

Senate – 

51 Democrats

47 Republicans

2 Independents

States – % Controlled

A divided government complicated legislative work during the 112th Congress. Unable to reach deals on a number of issues, the Republican-controlled House and the Democratic Senate passed emergency measures to prevent a government shutdown and avoid defaulting on the country’s debt. After long talks between the Speaker and the President, a “grand bargain” of tax hikes and spending cuts collapsed, leaving a Senate bill to raise the debt ceiling. A House-Senate panel tasked with reducing deficits failed to outline a plan, triggering a series of automatic spending cuts called sequestration. https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/112th/

**

President – Barack Obama, Democrat 2009 – 2017

113th Congress 2013 – 2015 – 

201 Democrats

234 Republicans

Senate – 

53 Democrats

45 Republicans

2 Independents

States – % Controlled

**

President – Barack Obama, Democrat 2009 – 2017

114th Congress 2015 – 2017

188 Democrats

247 Republicans

Senate –

44 Democrats

54 Republicans

2 Independents

States – % Controlled

**

President – Donald Trump, Republican 2017 – 2021

115th Congress 2017 – 2019

194 Democrats

241 Republicans

(by end of this Congress – 196 Democrats, 236 Republicans, 0 Independents & 3 Vacancies)

Senate –

47 Democrats

50 Republicans

2 Independents

1 Vacant Seat

States – % Controlled

**

President – Donald Trump, Republican 2017 – 2021

116th Congress 2019 – 2021

235 Democrats

198 Republicans

2 Vacant Seats

Senate –

45 Democrats

53 Republicans

2 Independents

States – % Controlled –

Republicans currently control the legislatures in 31 states, while Democrats hold 18. In three-quarters of the states, the same party controls both the legislature and the governor’s office. (from) https://www.governing.com/topics/politics/gov-state-politics-governors-2019.html

US States Party % Control – 

Legislators (7,383 total) – 

Democrat – 3,446 / 47%

Republican – 3,830 / 52%

Other – 107 (Independent, Other or Undecided)

Chambers (98 total) – 

Democrat – 37 / 38%

Republican – 61 / 62%

Legislatures (49 total)  – (Nebraska is not included, because Nebraska is unicameral.) –

Democrat – 18 / 37%

Republican – 30 / 61%

1 divided legislature

State Control (49 total) – 

Democrat – 14 / 29%

Republican – 22 / 45%

13 divided states – (When the same party holds both legislative chambers and the governorship, that party has state control. When any of those three points of power is held by another party, state control is divided.)

http://www.ncsl.org/research/about-state-legislatures/partisan-composition.aspx

 

**

https://history.house.gov/Congressional-Overview/Profiles/96th/

http://www.ncsl.org/research/about-state-legislatures/partisan-composition.aspx

 

 

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