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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City -2010

Water barrel towers above a building beyond the trees making an interesting contrast.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - parks and spaces in New York City

View framed by the draping canopy of trees down walk path of park.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - parks and spaces

Sun streaming through the lacy branches and leaves of the trees in the park set against the backdrop of buildings looming behind them.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - parks and spaces

Healthy decorative plantings with the stable building in the background.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - city parks

Park play area with its heavy black safety mat underneath strikes a dramatic contrast with the geologic rocks standing nearby which are part of the bedrock that allows New York to rise to such great heights.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - parks and spaces

Space for people to join in a game of softball or baseball with beautiful well-groomed grass and tall buildings in the background.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - parks and public spaces

Looking into the little garden space shows an amazing scene carefully created by the master gardeners that have tended it.

There is a tiny bench sitting by the tree looking toward the bonsai crimson Japanese elm. Landscaping suggests elves will relax here at some moment when we just aren’t looking . . .

Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - NYC garden spaces and city parks

Elegantly arched bonsai sporting the depth of fall colors in an orange tinged crimson lives in a small garden space tended in this New York City park.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - parks and spaces

Bird bath sits on the side of a small hill certainly used by birds in the area during the springtime and summer.

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First Day Walking New York City cricketdiane - garden spaces

A strange place for a bench facing away from the street to view the garden space.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City -2010

Roses and horse stables on a New York City street at the park's wrought iron gate.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - horses and roses

Roses and horse stables - Inside the doorway, a carriage that will be used to carry riders around New York City waits to have its horse finish warming up before being harnessed for the day's work.

I had the opportunity to watch them walking one of the horses to warm up. Although I was staking out the building to get a picture of the carriage and driver coming out of the building with its magnificent working horse pulling it – I missed the photo because a phone call came at the same time and they were half way down the street when I looked up from it.  It was amazing regardless.

First Day Walking New York City cricketdiane - parks and public spaces

Answering the phone, I had accidentally taken a photo of the street and gate edge just before this photo and noticed the street is made of really old brick rather than asphalt. Then I took this picture of the beautiful leaves laying on the stone steps of the park where I was sitting to catch the carriage coming out of the stables.

How many millions of feet and happy children have walked here? How many neighbors and families have gathered to chatter with one another, play ball and walk through the park behind me? Absolutely amazing.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City -2010

On top of the stables is a newer structure which contains an entirely different world with large plate glass windows that almost matches the building next door.

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First Day Walking New York City cricketdiane - gardens in New York City

Morning glories weaving up the fence around the gardens walking toward the front of the park.

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - gardens and flowers

Richly hued morning glory peers out between the wrought iron posts in a park garden space.

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It would not do for me to be in New York during the springtime – I would need a bigger sd card for my camera at the very least . . .

At the entrance of the park –

Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City - 2010 - City parks

Statue at the park entrance about "Flanders Fields" and a soldier from another time - I've got to look that up . . .

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Cricketdiane First Day Walking Tour New York City -2010

The statue holds red roses that someone has placed there and the stone says, From "Flanders Fields" If ye break faith with those who died we shall not sleep though poppies grow on Flanders Fields.

From wikipedia –

“In Flanders Fields” is one of the most notable poems written during World War I, created in the form of a French rondeau. It has been called “the most popular poem” produced during that period.[1] Canadian physician and Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae is popularly believed to have written it on 3 May 1915 (see 1915 in poetry), after he witnessed the death of his friend, Lieutenant Alexis Helmer, 22 years old, the day before. The poem was first published on 8 December of that year in the London-based magazine Punch.

The poppies referred to in the poem grew in profusion in Flanders in the disturbed earth of the battlefields and cemeteries where war casualties were buried[2] and thus became a symbol of Remembrance Day. The poem is often part of Remembrance Day solemnities in Allied countries which contributed troops to World War I, particularly in countries of the British Empire that did so.

The first chapter of In Flanders Fields and Other Poems (a 1919 collection of poems by John McCrae) gives the text of the poem as follows:

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

In 1918 US professor Moina Michael, inspired by the poem, published a poem of her own in response, called We Shall Keep the Faith.[5] In tribute to the opening lines of McCrae’s poem — “In Flanders fields the poppies blow / Between the crosses row on row,” — Michael vowed to always wear a red poppy as a symbol of remembrance for those who served in the war.[6]

The poem has achieved near-mythical status in contemporary Canada and is one of the nation’s most prominent symbols. Most Remembrance Day ceremonies will feature a reading of the poem in some form (it is also sung in some places), and many Canadian school children memorize the verse. A quotation from the poem appears on the Canadian ten-dollar bill. The poem is part of Remembrance Day ceremonies in the United Kingdom, where it holds as one of the nation’s best-loved, and is occasionally featured in Memorial Day ceremonies in the United States.

The poem is printed in materials published by veterans’ organizations in Canada[7] and the United States.[8]

The use of “grow” in the first line appears in a handwritten and autographed copy for the 1919 edition of McCrae’s poems; the editor, Andrew Macphail, notes in the caption, “This was probably written from memory as “grow” is used in place of “blow” in the first line.” [4] However, a tracing of a holograph copy on the letterhead of Captain Gilbert Tyndale-Lea M.C. now held by the Imperial War Museum claims that the original dates from 29 April 1915 and that it was given to the captain by the poet on that date. This clearly shows ‘grow’ in the first line and would change the publicly-held belief as to its date of composition and original first line.[9] This was certainly changed by the time he submitted it to Punch for publication in December of that year. The truth of whether McCrae originally wrote ‘grow’ or ‘blow’ in the first line might never clearly be established.

(from)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Flanders_Fields

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Roll of Honour of Clan McCrae’s dead of World War I at Eilean Donan castle. In Flanders Fields features prominently.
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