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Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill – Animals, Birds and Marine Life tallied by the Deepwater Horizon Response Fish and Wildlife Team (not all wildlife included)

http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/external/content/document/2931/887931/1/Consolidated%20Wildlife%20Table%20083010.pdf

August 30, 2010

Birds –

Visibly Oiled, Collected Alive – 2,034

Collected Dead – 5,362

Total Collected – 7,396

Total Released – 1,133

Sea Turtles –

Collected Alive – 520

Collected Dead – 553

Total Collected – 1,073

Total Released – 162

Mammals – (Dolphins, specifically)

Collected Alive – 8

Collected Dead – 80

Total Collected – 88

Total Released – 3

Other Reptiles –

Collected Alive – 1

Collected Dead – 1

(there are far more marine animals, and other wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico that are not counted by the Fish and Wildlife – these categories above are supposed to give an indication of the impacts in the area as representative species for comparison according to some of their information about it that I read somewhere. And, I’m not looking up where I found that right now.)

http://www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com/go/doctype/2931/55963

Reports are listed as pdf documents on this page – but they are about to have a new page and may or may not continue this one.

***

It says this at the top of each page of the Deepwater Horizon Response website -in a yellow banner –

Please visit our new website, RestoreTheGulf.gov. During the transition information will be updated here and on the new site.

Also this is available on the site –

CEDAR KEY, Fla.- Retired U.S. Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen The national Incident Commander for the Deepwater Horizon Response, NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco, NOAA National Sea Turtle Coordinator Barbara Schroeder and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Meghan Koperski talk about how NOAA and FWS are striving to ensure fish and wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico are rebounding from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Video by NOAA.

and –

a picture of a shrimper in Louisiana with this caption –

CHAUVIN, La. – Mike Blanchard, a shrimp boat captain, sorts his catch aboard his vessel, Capt. Roy, in the Robinson Canal, Aug. 19, 2010. Blanchard, a 45-year-old veteran to the business, is back at it after a delayed opening to the commercial shrimp season. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan Bradshaw.

***

My Note –

So, they want us to believe that everything is back to “normal” after this event . . .

Despite proof in every other respect including from oil spills of lesser magnitude from around the world that say otherwise.

Figures.

– cricketdiane

***

Feinberg says most spill claims lack documentation

feinberg.jpg

By The Associated Press

August 30, 2010, 8:20AM
The administrator of the new claims process for victims of the Gulf oil spill said Sunday most of the individual claims reviewed in the first week lacked the minimal documentation to be paid. “There are thousands of claims that have been filed with no documentation at all,” Ken Feinberg told state officials at the Southern Governors’ Association convention. Feinberg… Full story »
found here –
(along with other current information about the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill)

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/

***

Risk-reward equation was used in building oil well in Gulf of Mexico, BP worker testifies

brett_cocales.JPG

By The Associated Press

August 28, 2010, 9:00AM
He says his statement had nothing to do with financial considerations, however Full story »
(and)

BP manager, boss both ignored warnings before Deepwater Horizon blew, panel learns at oil spill hearings

david sims.jpg

By David Hammer, The Times-Picayune

August 26, 2010, 5:45PM
Costs ran over by $40 million; protective mud removed earlier than planned Full story »
***
(among other things)

BP engineering manager acknowledges cost a factor in drilling decisions

bp panel.jpg

By David Hammer, The Times-Picayune

August 26, 2010, 12:21PM
Testimony at oil spill hearings breaks from previous company line that cost isn’t considered Full story »
**********
But look at this from April 23, 2010

The Deepwater Horizon burned for more than 30 hours before sinking. Adrian Rose, who oversees Geneva-based Transocean’s quality, health, safety and the environment unit, said yesterday that the disaster unfolded with little or no warning.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-04-22/drillers-risk-deadly-blowouts-to-tap-deeper-oil-gas-riches.html

My Note – apparently there were lots of warnings.

(and this part of that Business Week article appears about two paragraphs after a statement about the great safety record of the oil industry – )

Energy XXI, along with partners that included Nexen Inc., spent $75 million to bring a June 2007 blowout at the Cote de Mer field in Louisiana under control. A surge of gas in the 22,261-foot well blew through a device known as a blowout preventer, burying the rig floor in six feet of sand, rock and seashells. No one was injured, the company said.

and this is interesting –

Some companies aren’t willing to risk the danger of a blowout. Exxon Mobil Corp., the world’s second-largest oil company, abandoned its Blackbeard well in the Gulf of Mexico in 2006 after the company’s engineers became alarmed over the pressure levels and temperatures almost seven miles beneath the seafloor, Dingmann said.

McMoRan Exploration Co. obtained control over Blackbeard in 2007 as part of its $1.1 billion acquisition of offshore assets from Newfield Exploration Co., one of Exxon’s partners in the project. McMoRan of New Orleans extended the well almost 3,000 feet deeper than where Exxon left it.

James “Jim Bob” Moffett, co-chairman of McMoRan, told investors on a January conference call that the risks of dealing with higher-pressure deposits may be worthwhile because those fields have more oil and gas packed into each square yard of rock.

(from)

Drillers Risk Deadly Blowouts to Tap Deeper Oil, Gas Riches

April 22, 2010, 3:15 PM EDT

-With reporting by Jessica Resnick-Ault in New York. Editors: Susan Warren, Tony Cox.

To contact the reporters on this story: Joe Carroll in Chicago at Jcarroll8@bloomberg.net; Jim Polson in New York at jpolson@bloomberg.net; Katarzyna Klimasinska in Kenner, Louisiana, at kklimasinska@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Susan Warren at susanwarren@bloomberg.net

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-04-22/drillers-risk-deadly-blowouts-to-tap-deeper-oil-gas-riches.html

****

And here is a team going out to test the waters for oil and impacts from the oil spill that are going to check the waters where there was no oil spill – that should be good –

http://wjz.com/local/maryland.gulf.oil.2.1886624.html

They should know better –

Aug 30, 2010 1:44 pm US/Eastern

Md. Team Heads To Gulf To Assess Oil Spill Impact

University of Maryland researchers are preparing to spend this week on the Gulf of Mexico assessing the impact of the BP oil spill.

The team from the school’s Horn Point Laboratory in Cambridge will begin collecting data on Tuesday from west of the Mississippi. They will then travel along the Louisiana coast into Texas.

(etc.)

My Note –

That would be funny if it weren’t so sad – because they will use those bits of data to later prove the oil impacts were negligible despite the fact that their team has been studying the “dead zones” in the area for five years. And, I only say that because they would be dragging those sensors along in the waters where the spill actually occurred and where impacts have already been noted – not west of Louisiana and on into Texas waters, if they intended to get a true and accurate reading of it. I don’t know – maybe they are simply adding to figures they’ve already made of the rest of it, but somebody ought to check on some of these things. And, check who is funding a lot of it too.

The existing “dead zone” that has floated around out there for years in the Gulf of Mexico was expected to be more extensive this year before the oil spill. You cannot tell me that between the known dead zone and the addition of millions upon millions of gallons of raw petroleum crude oil and millions of gallons of a known toxic dispersant, thousands of birds and animals and marine wildlife killed – that the Gulf of Mexico is all okay now. Do they really believe that the entire population of the United States and the rest of the world has a third grade level of education – or do they just think none of us give a damn?

I don’t get it. Wouldn’t it just be easier to fix it rather than to spend this much time and money to lie about it?

– cricketdiane

***

Ooh – found some very interesting stuff –

Gov. Nixon appoints acting director at Department of Natural Resources
Monday, August 30, 2010 | 1:01 p.m. CDT; updated 1:18 p.m. CDT, Monday, August 30, 2010
BY Tony Flesor

COLUMBIA — Gov. Jay Nixon appointed Kip Stetzler acting Director of the State Department of Natural Resources on Monday. Stetzler is replacing Mark Templeton.

Stetzler has been a part of Nixon’s administration since January 2009. Since that time, Stetzler has been the acting director of the Missouri Department of Insurance, the director of the Taxation Division of the Missouri Department of Revenue, the director of reporting of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the director of the Western Regional Office of the Governor. Stetzler also was an assistant attorney general from 2000 to 2008.

A news release sent out on Monday said that Templeton, Stetzler’s predecessor, is becoming the executive idrector of the Office of the Independent Trustees of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Trust. He will be responsible for ensuring that funds are available to address the claims of those affected by BP’s Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
»Contact an editor with corrections or additional information

******

Posted on Mon, Aug. 30, 2010 01:32 PM

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2010/08/30/2187702/templeton-leaves-missouris-department.html#ixzz0y7YNlQ00

Templeton leaves Missouri’s Department of Natural Resources
By JASON NOBLE
The Kansas City Star

JEFFERSON CITY | Mark Templeton, the embattled and then marginalized head of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, is leaving state government for a role in the gulf oil spill response effort.

Templeton joined the department in 2009 when Gov. Jay Nixon took office. But he was suspended later that year in the fallout from pollution problems at the Lake of the Ozarks.

Since then, he has continued as director but served in a much-diminished capacity. He was, for example, nowhere to be found at a two-day symposium on lake water held earlier this month.

“I appreciate Mark’s service and leadership of numerous projects critical to the protection of Missouri’s natural resources – from our state parks and historic sites, to the safety of our wastewater treatment systems,” Nixon said in a statement. “Mark’s effective use of Recovery Act funds made it possible for thousands of Missouri families, farms and businesses to reduce their heating and cooling bills and conserve energy.”

Replacing Templeton on an interim basis will be Kip Stetzler, a longtime Nixon aide and johnny-on-the-spot who has previously held short-term leadership positions in the Department of Insurance, Department of Revenue and over the state’s management of stimulus funds.

DNR will conduct a nationwide search for a permanent director.

Templeton, meanwhile, will become the executive director of the Office of the Independent Trustees of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Trust.

In that role, according to the governor’s press release, “he will be responsible for ensuring that funds are available to address the claims of those affected by BP’s Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico.”

To reach Jason Noble, call 573-634-3565 or send e-mail to jnoble@kcstar.com.

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2010/08/30/2187702/templeton-leaves-missouris-department.html#ixzz0y7YTYhxP

***

Meet The Department Director
Mark N.  Templeton

http://www.dnr.mo.gov/dir_bio.htm

Mark N. Templeton is the Director of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.  With a background that incorporates environmental stewardship, alternative energy, and sound business practices that transcend the public, private, and non-profit sectors, he brings a unique skill-set and perspective to the Department.  From 2001 to 2005, Templeton developed environmental and sustainability strategies for clients while with McKinsey & Company, a global management consultancy headquartered in New York.  While there, he worked with clients to explore new “green” markets for products and services and to develop next-generation jobs in the environmental and energy sectors.  While at McKinsey, Templeton advised major organizations including the United Nations Development Programme’s Commission on the Private Sector and Development.  In 2005, Templeton left McKinsey to become associate dean and chief operating officer of Yale Law School, his alma mater.

Prior to joining McKinsey, Templeton was special assistant and senior advisor to the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor and an advisor to the U.S. Delegation to U.N. Commission on Human Rights.  He worked as office director of the Human Rights Documentation Center in Bangkok, Thailand from 1999 to 2000 and as a research associate with the South Asia Human Rights Documentation Center in New Delhi, India in 1997.

Hailing from Olivette, Missouri, Templeton earned his bachelor’s degree, magna cum laude, from Harvard College in 1994 and his juris doctorate from Yale Law School in 1999.  He graduated from Horton Watkins High School in Ladue.

My Note -=
Wasn’t Missouri the state where the Mark Twain National Park is being made into a cesspool along with its river being polluted with arsenic and other tailings because the DNR leased it out to be mined and tested for increased mining of its resources?

********

My Note –

Apparently this man below who wrote this never read the COREXIT 9500 safety hazards sheet that comes from the company for the product. I have posted it elsewhere on this site and it clearly states that there are hazards associated with it as do many other studies, even the EPA didn’t compare it favorably – they compared it with some other range of toxic choices – all of which (including raw crude petroleum) are also known to be toxic. Look how this operative of the oil and gas companies left over from the Nixon administration writes about it.

**************

Dispensing Misconceptions on BP’s Oil Dispersant
Opinion by John Rafuse
(2 Hours Ago) in Politics

With oil from BP’s Deepwater Horizon accident all but gone from the Gulf of Mexico’s waters, there has been much ado about nothing concerning the dispersing agents that were used to successfully dissipate the spill. And while environmental activists continue to assault these agents – known in the energy industry as ‘dispersants’ – on the grounds that they are bad for the environment, workers in the Gulf continue to feel the pain of the tragedy these agents helped end.

So, what exactly are dispersants, and how did they help hasten a clean-up effort marred in bureaucratic red tape and political quarreling? When applied during a response to an oil spill, dispersants are chemical compounds that are sprayed from the air and settle onto the effected body of water, where they break apart oil slicks into tiny drops. This then allows water-borne bacteria to digest the oil; this feeding allows the bacteria to multiple rapidly and, thus, consume larger amounts of oil at a quickening pace.

The particular dispersant used by responders in the Gulf of Mexico is a compound manufactured by Illinois-based Nalco Holding Company called COREXIT 9500. This dispersing agent is made up of organic acid salts and a glycol solvent. Despite what environmental activists claim, the dispersant used in the Gulf is safe, and clearly prevented more oil from reaching the vulnerable shorelines of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Had the government heeded activist calls to limit or downright ban the use of the large amount of dispersant deployed to conquer the hundreds of millions of gallons of oil from BP’s Macondo well, the Gulf’s workers and consumers would be if even worse off today.

If environmental safety was a real concern for activists, they would have been wise to consult scientific data and recently-conducted research before advocating the limitation of dispersants in the Gulf. For starters, the safety data report for COREXIT 9500 clearly states that none of the substances in the compound have been found by the International Agency for Research on Cancer to be carcinogenic. What is more, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has concluded peer-reviewed, independent study of the toxicity of dispersants recently used in the Gulf. In a press release this month, EPA stated, “These results confirm that the dispersant used in response to the oil spill in the gulf, Corexit 9500A, when mixed with oil, is generally no more or less toxic than mixtures with the other available alternatives.” Additionally, in a report to EPA, BP stated that the COREXIT deployed was the least toxic dispersant currently available.

Future oil spill responses may also get a big lift from a new species of oil-consuming microbes. As NPR reported last week, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Terry Hazen, along with a team of researchers, has discovered a new species of oil-eating bacteria living half a mile down below the Gulf’s surface. These cold-water loving bacteria are responsible for the recent dissipation of the massive oil plume that stretched for miles underwater until earlier this week. The abundance of microorganisms in our waters, coupled with the safe use of dispersants, will make meeting the challenges of future accidents much more manageable.

With scientists and researchers in agreement that the efficacy of dispersants is substantial, policymakers now need to turn their attention to helping workers recover from the Gulf tragedy. Government’s response to date has been enacting a moratorium on offshore drilling and consideration of new taxes on America’s oil and gas producers. Neither of these policies is helpful, and neither is based on rigorous inquiry.

Hopefully, as policymakers continually weigh in on the future of America’s offshore energy industry, they will think less like politicians and more like scientists. Just like dispersants were a sure fire way to dissipate massive amounts of spilled oil, lifting the deepwater moratorium and rejecting new energy taxes will ensure that workers get back to their jobs and our economy gets back on track.

found here –
http://www.opposingviews.com/i/dispensing-misconceptions-on-bp-s-oil-dispersant

A Nixon Operative – (and for the oil and gas industry)

John Rafuse

John L. (Jack) Rafuse has been involved in national security, energy, trade and the interrelationships of those public policy issues for about 40 years. He worked for the Defense Department, the White House, OMB, the Federal Energy Administration, and for an international oil and gas company (Union Oil of California – Unocal – for 25 years) before turning to private consulting for businesses, think tanks and government entities.

Jack’s experience and familiarity with previous efforts provides perspective on today’s similar efforts, and points out pitfalls and threats to the US economy, national security and welfare of all Americans.

http://www.opposingviews.com/users/john-rafuse/articles_list

#
Dispensing Misconceptions on BP’s Oil Dispersant

Opinion in topic: Politics
Published on Aug 30, 2010
#
Notaxes_tiny
Congress Considering New Taxes that Would Hurt U.S. Economy

Opinion in topic: Politics
Published on Jul 26, 2010
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Obama3452_tiny
Obama’s Double-Talk on Energy Taxes, Jobs

Opinion in topic: Politics
Published on Feb 26, 2010
#
Gm_tiny
Edward Whitacre Stays as GM CEO; What’s Wrong with This Picture?

Opinion in topic: The Recession
Published on Jan 25, 2010
#
Green_tiny
Senate’s “Green” Bill Could Put Americans in the Red

Opinion in topic: Environment
Published on Oct 26, 2009
#
Car_tiny
Government is Not the Best Vehicle for Emissions Reduction

Opinion in topic: Global Warming
Published on Oct 14, 2009
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Istock_000005833306small250x250_main_tiny
Why are Gas Prices Increasing Again?

Opinion in topic: Oil
Published on Jul 15, 2009
#
Offshore_drilling_250x250_main_tiny
Schwarzenegger, Senate Agree Offshore Oil Will Help Gas Prices

Opinion in topic: Oil
Published on Jun 17, 2009
#
Oil_tiny
How the American Oil Industry Can Save Your Retirement

Article in topic: Retirement
Published on May 28, 2009

********

Energy Policy Office (John Love, Charles Dibona, John
December 24, 1936 John Laurence Rafuse born Boston, Massachusetts … group documents the Nixon administration’s energy policies for the early 1970’s. … its functions and responsibilities were transferred to the Federal Energy Office. …
http://www.nixonlibrary.gov › … › White House Central Files

#
Glenn R. Schleede
March 1972-March 1973 U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Environmental … John F. Schaefer, and John Rafuse, and in the White House Central Files, … and Records Administration, a federal agency. View our Privacy Statement. …
http://www.nixonlibrary.gov › … › White House Central Files – Cached – Similar
Show more results from http://www.nixonlibrary.gov
#
John L. “Jack” Rafuse – JackRafuse.com
Jack Rafuse John L. Rafuse, Principal of The Rafuse Organization advises … White House Energy Policy Office, OMB and the Federal Energy Administration. …
http://www.jackrafuse.com/about.shtml
#
Site Map
Silent Majority  Energy Policy  Moon Landing … Energy Policy Office (John Love, Charles Dibona, John Schaefer, John Rafuse, Edward Miller)  Lewis Engman …. and Records Administration, a federal agency. View our Privacy Statement. …
nixon.archives.gov/sitemap.php
#
Release Chronology
Jul 11, 2007 … Energy Policy Office (John Love, Charles Dibona, John Schaefer, … FG 142 Indian Claims Commission  FG 377 Federal Energy Administration …
nixon.archives.gov/aboutus/laws/releases.php?print=yes
# [PDF]
Principal Personnel
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – Quick View
Jack Rafuse joined the Fratelli group in 2003 after more than 25 years … Budget, Federal Energy Administration, the Navy Department and the Center for Naval … He recently returned to the Fratelli Group after six months at the John …
http://www.fratelli.com/bios/bio.pdf
#
U.S. Department of the Interior Library – New Titles – November 2009
Dec 1, 2009 … Rafuse, Ethan Sepp, 1968- Antietam, South Mountain, and Harpers Ferry: a … of John R. Norris, to be a member of the Federal Energy Regulatory … before the Committee on House Administration, House of Representatives, …
library.doi.gov/collections/new/nov09.html
# [PDF]
Availability List – November 2003
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – View as HTML
Federal Energy Administration (FG 377) … John Schaefer, John Rafuse, Edward Miller). 33.3. Lewis Engman. 2.0. Robert Finch. 20.0. Leonard Garment …
whitehousetapes.net/resources/index.php?dir=nixon/findingaids/_…

******

Jack Rafuse joined the Fratelli group in 2003 after more than 25 years with an international oil and gas company.

Earlier he had worked at the White House, the Office of Management and
Budget, Federal Energy Administration, the Navy Department and the Center for Naval Analyses.

Those assignments involved him in hardware engineering projects, military manpower policy, energy and environmental policy, and all phases of public affairs — issues management, coalition building and maintenance, lobbying, editorial briefings, and campaigns on trade, energy,
environment, taxation and health and safety regulations.

http://www.fratelli.com/bios/bio.pdf

****

The Fratelli Group (Washington, DC United States)

The Fratelli Group is a Washington, D.C. public affairs firm with more than 20 years of experience managing the public policy and corporate communications needs of its clients. The Fratelli team consists of professionals with corporate, political and congressional experience who have backgrounds … more like this >>
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The Fratelli Group

Company Homepage: The Fratelli Group
Location: Washington, DC, United States

The Fratelli Group is a Washington, D.C. public affairs firm with more than 20 years of experience managing the public policy and corporate communications needs of its clients. The Fratelli team consists of professionals with corporate, political and congressional experience who have backgrounds ranging from international trade and electoral politics to health care, agriculture and information technology. Our communications services include: – Strategic consulting – Message development – Crisis preparedness/management – Media relations – Event planning – Internal communications – Media training – Litigation support – Coalition management – Web site development/content management At Fratelli, we pride ourselves on exceeding expectations through exceptional service. Whether it’s a local, national or international issue, we succeed in framing the debate and shaping the outcome. Our longstanding client relationships and strong record of success are testaments to our abilities. The Fratelli Group – trusted advice, experience and accomplishment

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*********

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********

About Jack Rafuse

Jack Rafuse John L. Rafuse, Principal of The Rafuse Organization advises government agencies, policy centers, businesses and associations on energy, trade, sanctions, national security and their interrelationships. Prior to 2003, he worked for 25 years with Unocal, an international oil and gas company, with management assignments in corporate planning, regulatory economics, writing and corporate communications, issues analysis and government affairs, plus international and domestic troubleshooting assignments for the CEO.

Before joining Unocal Jack worked with a Navy Department Project Office, at the Center for Naval Analyses, the White House Energy Policy Office, OMB and the Federal Energy Administration. He has an MA and PhD from Notre Dame and an AB from Stonehill College, and has completed certificate courses at a DOD Training Center, the Sloan School at MIT and the JFK School of Government at Harvard. Jack has lectured and given seminars at colleges and universities including the Harvard Business School and the JFK School, and he currently consults on energy, trade, sanctions and national security.

http://www.jackrafuse.com/about.shtml

******

Here is some more of the twisted nonsense – found when I put the google search terms –

Jack Rafuse Nixon

http://www.nationalcenter.org/TSR082707.html

Anti-“Price Gouging” Laws Hurt Consumers

DATE: August 27, 2007

BACKGROUND: In May, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the “Federal Price Gouging Prevention Act” (H.R. 1252), which would make it illegal for gasoline providers to sell their product at “unconscionably excessive” prices when the President declares an “energy emergency.”  According to the Act’s primary sponsor, Rep. Bart Stupak (D-MI), the bill is designed to protect Americans from being “forced to pay too much at the gas pump.”1

On June 21, the Senate passed a similar provision designed to outlaw gasoline “price gouging” in a comprehensive energy bill, H.R. 6.  Under this bill, an “energy emergency” could be declared by the President for any region of the country where gasoline is either in short supply or projected to be in short supply.

Both the House and Senate bills direct the Federal Trade Commission to enforce the proposed price-gouging edict.  Gasoline wholesalers and retailers who violate the new law would be subject to both civil and criminal penalties that include multimillion-dollar fines and imprisonment.
While this recent proposal from Congress may appeal emotionally to some when gas prices spike, history shows it could actually cause pain at the pump for consumers.

TEN SECOND RESPONSE: Price gouging proposals are de facto price controls that would lead to 1970s-style gasoline shortages and long gas lines.

THIRTY SECOND RESPONSE: Rising gasoline prices during times of short supply are the result of market principles at work.  Allowing gasoline prices to adjust naturally to supply conditions ensures that gas is distributed to consumers who need it most.  Government-imposed price controls only exacerbate and prolong supply shortages.

DISCUSSION: According to the FTC, “price gouging” laws are not only unnecessary, they are counterproductive.  After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused gasoline supply shortages in 2005 (shortages that could have triggered an “energy emergency” declaration under the current proposals in Congress), the FTC conducted a study that “found no instances of illegal market manipulation that led to higher prices.”2

In fact, higher gasoline prices in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita helped solve supply shortages by sending market signals that resulted in “shipment of substantial additional supplies of gasoline to the United States.”3

Should price gouging legislation force gas prices lower than what the market would naturally dictate during a supply shortage, the FTC warns, “wholesalers and retailers will run out of gasoline and consumers will be worse off.”4

Congress appears poised to direct the FTC to enforce a law that the agency has determined to be unwise.  As the FTC states:

[F]ederal gasoline price gouging legislation, in addition to being difficult to enforce, could cause more problems for consumers than it solves, and that competitive market forces should be allowed to determine the price of gasoline drivers pay at the pump.5

Specifically, the FTC analyzed existing state laws that define price gouging as “unconscionably excessive” and found that such vague terminology “may require subjective interpretation that increases the difficulty of both compliance and enforcement.”6

“Given the uncertainty about what constitutes an unconscionable, excessive, or exorbitant price,” the FTC reports, “statutes based on any of these terms are likely to be difficult to enforce.”7

(etc.)

My Note –

But here, said by the man who acutely and probably helped to cause the “energy crisis” of the 1970’s – (pulled from the same article) –

Jack Rafuse, who served as an energy advisor to President Richard Nixon, explains:

For those with memories shorter than mine, President Richard M. Nixon imposed wage and price controls on Aug. 15, 1971.  Oil and gas were two of many commodities affected…

Nixon kept the wage-and-price controls on oil, gasoline and petroleum products in place, as did Presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.  The results were disastrous.  Oil exploration and domestic oil production slowed sharply…

Thanks to this misguided policy, gasoline lines snaked along highways for hours during oil crises in the mid- and late-1970s.  Stations ran out of gasoline and laws told consumers which days they could purchase gas.  A windfall-profits tax compounded all the negative effects, and the shortages lasted until President Ronald Reagan repealed controls in 1981.  The price of a gallon of gas at the pump fell by a third over five years.

With this kind of record, you might wonder what Congress is doing considering price controls and windfall profits taxes on gasoline…

After Katrina, while the market encouraged everyone to cut back, there were no 1970s-style gas lines or closed stations elsewhere in the nation.

Other producers – domestic and international – were motivated by higher prices to take up the slack.  In fact, oil exploration drilling is at a 20-year high and expenditures are at an all-time high.  That’s how markets work.8

***

Doesn’t that mean we have him to thank for the same crap he is blaming on somebody else? While he’s been serving the interests of the oil and gas companies this whole time – and with an inside ear directly to our leaders, decision-makers and government officials all of this time?

What kind of nightmare is that – no wonder we don’t have some alternative energy as our primary energy and fuel choice at this point.

– cricketdiane

And this which I found in the first place from a post on my facebook page –

Ohio State’s Buckeye Bullet Electric Car
Breaks World Speed Record 307MPH

The students from Ohio State University’s Center for Auto Research witnessed their electric-powered racer make history. The Buckeye Bullet 2.5 averaged 307.7 miles per hour in back-to-back runs on Utah’s Bonneville Salt Flats, obliterating the previous record of 245.5 m.p.h., set in 1999.

Roger Schroer, the Bullet 2.5’s driver, celebrates after the 307 mile per hour run.The team is awaiting certification of its accomplishment by the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile, the governing body that ratifies world-record runs. A hydrogen fuel cell-powered version of the 2.5, the Buckeye Bullet 2, owns the record for its propulsion class, attaining an average speed of 302.9 m.p.h. in 2009.

To a casual E.V. enthusiast, the record might have seemed a foregone conclusion, as the 1999 mark was established by a racer running nickel-metal hydride batteries, which pack lower energy density than the lithium-ion unit powering the Buckeye Bullet 2.5. However, David Cooke, Ohio State’s team manager, noted in a telephone interview that the original Bullet also ran nickel-metal hydride batteries in 2004 when its car hit 314.9 m.p.h. (That run was rejected by the F.I.A.)

The record might have been broken years earlier, but electric cars are an obscure category in auto racing and few are interested in developing a battery-powered streamliner when piston-driven cars go much faster, said Dave Petrali, chief steward for U.S. Auto Club and a timer for the international motorsports body, the Federation Internationale de L’Automobile.

“It takes a lot of power and a huge battery pack” for an electric car to attain high speeds, he said.

It could take a few weeks for the FIA to ratify the Buckeye Bullet’s record. But there was no doubt it broke the previous record, set in 1999 by Pat Rummerfield, who conceded defeat and congratulated the Buckeye team, Petrali said.

A professional driver drove the Buckeye Bullet on runs Monday and yesterday. Track sensors measured the vehicle’s speed. The fastest run at 307.905 mph yesterday was an average of back-and-forth runs.

http://www.panacea-usa.org/

***

My Note –

What is wrong with those folks in Washington – when they’ve known all along that these hybrid battery powered electric cars could be powered fast enough and with enough range and acceleration to replace gasoline and diesel fuels entirely? – They’ve known it since the Mercury space program, at the very least where they were studying and researching and designing these systems for application in the first place. (among other things that had gone on before that for submarines to use . . . )

Who are these people? Are they all listening to the Jack Rafuse kinds of people left over from the Nixon and Barry Goldwater groups ad infinitum – do they ever update what they know about anything past that point?

– cricketdiane

*****

Yesterday, Senator Mary Landrieu said that the Federal Government has taken $165 Billion dollars to the US Treasury for the oil and gas down in the Gulf of Mexico that has been pumped out there over the years. That was on an ABC news show about the five year anniversary of hurricane Katrina – and I’ve been thinking that number is only a percentage of all the revenues made from our national assets that have been taken by the oil and gas companies from Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico. I wonder how much money they have pumped out of our natural resources and made from it.

I was looking up the making of the Missouri Mark Twain National Park and River into a cesspool of destruction from mineral mining allowed in the park by their Department of Natural Resources under Mark Templeton and found this – which is very interesting from the Sierra Club –

THE BUSH RECORD

More than 300 Crimes against Nature

Source: Natural Resources Defense Council

JANUARY 20, 2001
White House freezes all rules set at end of Clinton term–including tougher ones for raw sewage

JANUARY 20, 2001
Bush proposes opening Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling

FEBRUARY 12, 2001
Energy Department puts off enforcing new efficiency standards for air conditioners

FEBRUARY 15, 2001
EPA delays new rule protecting wetlands from mining and development

MARCH 7, 2001
Fish and Wildlife Service withdraws report calling for protection of endangered salmonids

MARCH 9, 2001
Bush appoints oil and mining lobbyist as deputy secretary of Interior

MARCH 13, 2001
Bush reneges on campaign promise to reduce carbon dioxide emissions

MARCH 16, 2001
Bush administration refuses to defend in court rule protecting 58 million acres of wild forest

MARCH 20, 2001
Bush withdraws proposed stricter limits on arsenic in drinking water

MARCH 28, 2001
Bush administration rejects Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change

APRIL 9, 2001
Bush budget proposal cuts $500 million from EPA

MAY 10, 2001
Bush administration refuses to name industry participants in Cheney energy task force

MAY 12, 2001
Bureau of Land Management allows continued grazing on endangered-tortoise land in California

MAY 17, 2001
Bush releases energy plan heavily favoring fossil fuels and nukes

MAY 17, 2001
Forest Service reduces citizen and scientific participation in decision-making

MAY 22, 2001
EPA officially suspends stricter limits for arsenic in drinking water

JUNE 19, 2001
States and others sue Energy Department over air-conditioner rules (see FEBRUARY 12, 2001)

JUNE 21, 2001
Timber lobbyist Mark Rey appointed to key post in Forest Service

JULY 2, 2001
Oil drilling off Florida coast proposed by Bush administration

JULY 23, 2001
Bush budget proposes cutting 270 EPA inspector jobs

AUGUST 2, 2001
Army Corps of Engineers kills plan to protect Missouri River wildlife by changing stream flows

AUGUST 8, 2001
Army Corps of Engineers weakens wetlands protections by slackening permit requirements

AUGUST 12, 2001
National forests opened to roadbuilding and logging by Forest Service rule changes

AUGUST 14, 2001
EPA delays tougher rules for toxic power-plant emissions

AUGUST 17, 2001
Federal judge’s decision to ban drilling off California’s coast appealed by administration

AUGUST 27, 2001
Cattle still grazing on tortoise habitat in California, despite BLM agreement to move them

AUGUST 28, 2001
Bush administration proposes missile-defense test installation in Pacific; environmentalists sue

AUGUST 28, 2001
Bush administration reconsiders ban on recycling radioactive metals into consumer products

SEPTEMBER 13, 2001
EPA lies about Manhattan hazards after 9/11, calls area safe despite extreme toxic pollution

SEPTEMBER 20, 2001
Forest Service proposes further reduction in citizen participation in policymaking

OCTOBER 25, 2001
Interior Department weakens environmental rules for mining operations

OCTOBER 31, 2001
Arsenic flip-flop: Under public pressure, EPA adopts higher standard after all (see MAY 22, 2001)

NOVEMBER 2, 2001
Army Corps of Engineers retreats from policy of “no net loss” of wetlands

NOVEMBER 5, 2001
Bush signs bill to boost spending for national forests, but with harmful logging riders

NOVEMBER 29, 2001
Minnesota’s Voyageurs National Park reopens winter lakes to snowmobiles

DECEMBER 3, 2001
Army Corps of Engineers decides not to decommission Snake River dams in Pacific Northwest

DECEMBER 14, 2001
Administration announces weaker standards for nuclear waste storage at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain

DECEMBER 14, 2001
Forest Service announces more roadbuilding on undeveloped forestlands

JANUARY 9, 2002
Administration backs hydrogen-car research, but most hydrogen to come from fossil fuels

JANUARY 10, 2002
Study shows big drop in enforcement of environmental laws under Bush

JANUARY 10, 2002
Bush administration fights in court for new oil drilling off California coast

JANUARY 14, 2002
Report shows Interior secretary squelched her own agency’s criticism of weaker wetlands rules

JANUARY 14, 2002
Wetlands protections weakened nationwide in flip-flop from Bush campaign promise

JANUARY 14, 2002
Park Service okays more oil drilling in Florida’s Big Cypress National Preserve

JANUARY 21, 2002
BLM preliminarily approves gas drilling in Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, Montana

JANUARY 22, 2002
Forest Service sues to overturn ban on salvage logging in Montana’s Bitterroot National Forest

JANUARY 28, 2002
Bush supports Cheney’s refusal to release secret energy-task-force records

FEBRUARY 4, 2002
Bush slashes environmental-education spending

FEBRUARY 4, 2002
Bush budget proposes cutting $1 billion from environmental spending

FEBRUARY 4, 2002
Bush budget proposes $404 million to support timber sales in national forests

FEBRUARY 11, 2002
Environmentalists sue Park Service for allowing motorized vehicles in Georgia wilderness

FEBRUARY 14, 2002
Bush gives power plants ten more years to cut mercury and sulfur dioxide emissions

FEBRUARY 14, 2002
White House unveils global-warming plan that lets C02 emissions continue at present rate

FEBRUARY 15, 2002
Bush endorses plan to store 77,000 tons of nuclear waste in Nevada’s Yucca Mountain

FEBRUARY 15, 2002
Forest Service approves mining exploration in Missouri’s Mark Twain National Forest

FEBRUARY 16, 2002
Bush administration asks court to delay endangered-species protection in California

FEBRUARY 19, 2002
Phaseout of snowmobiles in national parks delayed

FEBRUARY 22, 2002
BLM proposes to let states allow vehicles in previously off-limits federal lands

FEBRUARY 23, 2002
Bush’s budget asks that taxpayers pay for Superfund cleanups instead of polluters

FEBRUARY 27, 2002
Top EPA official resigns to protest Bush’s effort to weaken rules for polluting industries

FEBRUARY 27, 2002
Federal judge orders Bush administration to release Cheney’s secret energy-task-force records

MARCH 12, 2002
Bush administration belatedly complies with court order to protect desert tortoise

MARCH 18, 2002
EPA exempts large category of power plants from lawsuits for Clean Air Act violations

MARCH 25, 2002
Discovery that White House misspent $135,612 of clean-energy funds to print its energy plan

MARCH 29, 2002
Pentagon seeks exemption from environmental laws

APRIL 1, 2002
Deadline passes for administration to set first new fuel-economy standards since 1996

APRIL 11, 2002
Army Corps of Engineers approves mining limestone in 5,400 acres of Florida’s everglades

APRIL 14, 2002
White House kills program that funded environmental research for graduate students

APRIL 22, 2002
EPA citizen-watchdog resigns in protest, charging that agency |officials muzzled him

MAY 3, 2002
New EPA rules allow mining operations to dump waste in waterways

MAY 13, 2002
Administration asks judge not to limit waste-dumping from mountaintop mines

MAY 13, 2002
Bush signs farm bill that pays big subsidies to polluting agricultural operations

MAY 21, 2002
Ban on mining in and around Oregon’s Siskiyou National Forest ends

MAY 23, 2002
Energy Department cuts air-conditioner efficiency standards

MAY 24, 2002
Bush-Putin summit produces nuclear treaty that puts no long-term limit on nuclear weapons

MAY 24, 2002
Bush administration drops plan |for contractors to put environmental protection into projects

JUNE 3, 2002
Oil drilling leases on more than 500,000 acres in Alaska signed by Interior Department

JUNE 7, 2002
Interior secretary rejects proposal to limit offshore oil drilling in California

JUNE 13, 2002
Missouri River restoration halted indefinitely by Army Corps of Engineers

JUNE 13, 2002
EPA proposes weakening clean-air rules for 17,000 power plants

JUNE 13, 2002
Judge halts Bush administration move to end habitat protection on 500,000 acres in California

JUNE 17, 2002
Judge rejects Army Corps of Engineers plan to allow mine-waste dumping

JUNE 24, 2002
EPA abandons plan to clean up storm-water pollution

JUNE 25, 2002
Bush administration blames wildfires on environmentalists

JUNE 25, 2002
Snowmobiling allowed to continue in national parks, though with some restrictions

JUNE 25, 2002
EPA ombudsman testifies Bush administration pressured him to halt study of radiation standards

JULY 1, 2002
Bush administration cuts funding for toxic cleanups to half of that requested by EPA

JULY 2, 2002
Bush administration rescinds 4 million acres of protection for endangered California frog

JULY 10, 2002
Judge orders administration to protect 400,000 Calif. acres for endangered Alameda whipsnake

JULY 15, 2002
Navy given permit to use low-frequency sonar, a known threat to whales

JULY 17, 2002
Bush administration opposes Senate bill to require 10 percent renewable energy by 2020

JULY 22, 2002
Bush’s State Department says it will withhold $34 million from UN family-planning program

JULY 25, 2002
Another top EPA official quits in protest

JULY 26, 2002
Bush administration backs congressional proposal to exempt companies from disclosing hazards

AUGUST 7, 2002
EPA proposes weakened water-cleanups; asks for “voluntary” efforts

AUGUST 15, 2002
Conservatives praise Bush for skipping United Nations summit on sustainable development

AUGUST 22, 2002
Interior Department claims new power plant won’t harm air at Mammoth Cave National Park, Ky.

AUGUST 22, 2002
Bush calls for increased logging in name of fire prevention

AUGUST 27, 2002
U.S. opposes targets for renewable energy use at World Summit on Sustainable Development

AUGUST 29, 2002
Interior Department approves billion-dollar plan to store water under Mojave Desert

AUGUST 30, 2002
Foe of ecological restoration Allan Fitzsimmons named head of federal wildfire prevention

SEPTEMBER 3, 2002
White House asks exemption from Freedom of Information Act in energy-task-force suit

SEPTEMBER 4, 2002
Federal officials reject call to add white marlin to endangered list

SEPTEMBER 9, 2002
States’ EPA air-quality inspections shown to have dropped by 34 percent

SEPTEMBER 13, 2002
EPA weakens proposed anti-pollution standards for off-road vehicles

SEPTEMBER 15, 2002
EPA deletes global-warming section from pollution report

SEPTEMBER 17, 2002
Bush replacing most scientists on chemical-hazard panel with those tied to chemical industry

SEPTEMBER 18, 2002
Bush executive order cuts citizen involvement in review of road and airport projects

SEPTEMBER 21, 2002
Killing of 34,000 salmonids results from federal diversion of Klamath River water in Oregon

SEPTEMBER 27, 2002
Interior secretary okays gold mining on sacred Indian site in California

SEPTEMBER 30, 2002
New EPA water-quality report shows U.S. waters are getting dirtier

OCTOBER 1, 2002
Fish and Wildlife Service reverses order to increase Missouri River flow to protect species

OCTOBER 3, 2002
Conservationists urge White House to release $36.5 million in conservation funds for farmlands

OCTOBER 4, 2002
Bureau of Land Management approves largest oil and gas drilling exploration ever in Utah

OCTOBER 8, 2002
EPA water administrator says war on terror leaves little money for water cleanup

OCTOBER 8, 2002
Bush stacks panel on lead poisoning with people tied to the lead industry

OCTOBER 8, 2002
Federal workers reveal memo from EPA chief encouraging them to support president when off-duty

OCTOBER 9, 2002
Bush administration sides with auto industry in suit against California’s emission rules

OCTOBER 10, 2002
Administration failed to assess vulnerability of chemical facilities to terrorists, GAO says

OCTOBER 15 2002
Superfund cleanups drop to 42 per year from average of 76 under Clinton, report shows

OCTOBER 16, 2002
Judge finds Forest Service violates Endangered Species Act by not protecting spotted-owl habitat

OCTOBER 17, 2002
Bush administration told by federal judge to release energy documents in Sierra Club lawsuit

OCTOBER 31, 2002
EPA halts funding at seven Superfund sites

NOVEMBER 1, 2002
Bush administration threatens withdrawal from historic UN population accord

NOVEMBER 5, 2002
Polluters paid 64 percent less in fines under Bush than in last two Clinton years, report shows

NOVEMBER 11, 2002
Bush administration supports renewed elephant-ivory trade

NOVEMBER 12, 2002
National Park Service proposal would allow 1,100 snowmobiles a day in Yellowstone, Grand Teton

NOVEMBER 21, 2002
Natural-gas drilling at Padre Island National Seashore in Texas approved

NOVEMBER 22, 2002
EPA proceeds with weakening Clean Air Act rules for power plants

NOVEMBER 27, 2002
Forest Service proposes rule changes to increase logging, grazing, mining on 192 million acres

DECEMBER 2, 2002
Bush administration plan for oil drilling off California coast ruled illegal by federal judges

DECEMBER 4, 2002
Bush administration asks for five more years of study before acting on global warming

DECEMBER 12, 2002
Federal court rules against administration, upholds roadless rule for 58.5 million acres

DECEMBER 12, 2002
White House proposes tiny increase in automobile fuel economy: 1.5 mpg in five years

DECEMBER 13, 2002
Federal judge blocks Army Corps of Engineers’ Snake River dredging plan in Pacific Northwest

DECEMBER 16, 2002
EPA’s new factory-farm rule favors big agribusiness polluters

DECEMBER 18, 2002
White House budget office values elderly lives 63 percent less in environmental cost-benefit analysis

DECEMBER 20, 2002
Federal judge blocks Interior Department from permitting oil exploration in eastern Utah

DECEMBER 30, 2002
EPA proposes two-year exemption of oil and gas industry from storm-water pollution rules

JANUARY 6, 2003
Bureau of Land Management rule change gives states leeway for new roads in wildlands

JANUARY 10, 2003
Bush budget requests $6.4 billion for Energy Department’s nuclear weapons activity

JANUARY 10, 2003
Bush administration proposes pulling federal safeguards from 20 percent of U.S. wetlands

JANUARY 13, 2003
Pentagon plans to ask for exemption from environmental laws on millions of acres

JANUARY 16, 2003
Environmental personnel scratched from USAID policy bureau

JANUARY 17, 2003
Interior Department proposes oil exploration on up to 9 million acres of Alaska’s North Slope

JANUARY 19, 2003
Pentagon continues lobbying for exemptions from environmental laws

JANUARY 21, 2003
EPA refuses to ban weed-killer atrazine, a possible carcinogen

JANUARY 22, 2003
EPA retains unsafe limits for toxic perchlorates

JANUARY 24, 2003
Manatees get federal protection, thanks to lawsuit settlement

JANUARY 27, 2003
Bush administration proposes privatizing thousands of National Park Service jobs

JANUARY 27, 2003
California’s giant sequoia threatened by Forest Service proposal to resume logging nearby

JANUARY 29, 2003
Bush administration wins court ruling that legalizes mountaintop-removal mining permits

JANUARY 30, 2003
Bureau of Land Management proposes rollback of Clinton-era restrictions on grazing

JANUARY 30, 2003
Exemptions to phaseout of ozone-destroying methyl bromide planned by Bush administration

FEBRUARY 11, 2003
EPA drafts new rules to relax toxic-air-pollution standards

FEBRUARY 20, 2003
National Park Service finalizes rules allowing snowmobiles in national parks

FEBRUARY 25, 2003
National Academy of Sciences panel strongly criticizes Bush’s global-warming plan

FEBRUARY 27, 2003
Bush’s “Clear Skies” plan allows much more pollution than if Clean Air Act were enforced, critics charge

FEBRUARY 27, 2003
Transportation Department speeds up environmentally harmful road projects

FEBRUARY 28, 2003
Oil drilling in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge his “greatest wish,” says high-ranking Interior official

FEBRUARY 28, 2003
Wilderness protection for millions of acres in Alaska’s Tongass forest rejected by Forest Service

MARCH 4, 2003
National Park Service slaughters 231 Yellowstone bison

MARCH 7, 2003
Paul Wolfowitz tells military leaders to find reasons to exempt military from environmental rules

MARCH 10, 2003
EPA exempts oil and gas industry from President Clinton’s tighter water-pollution rules

MARCH 13, 2003
EPA withdraws another Clinton-era water-pollution cleanup rule

MARCH 13, 2003
EPA official testifies in Congress in favor of exempting military from environmental laws

MARCH 18, 2003
EPA allows sludge dumping in Potomac River to continue for seven more years

MARCH 18, 2003
Fish and Wildlife proposes removing protections from endangered wolves

MARCH 18, 2003
Federal judge orders Interior Department to continue protecting manatees

MARCH 18, 2003
GAO again criticizes Bush administration for failing to reduce security risks at chemical plants

MARCH 25, 2003
Park Service adopts plan for Yellowstone/Teton allowing1,100 snowmobiles a day

APRIL 1, 2003
Bush administration drops court battle to allow California offshore drilling

APRIL 1, 2003
Bush administration barely raises SUV gas mileage requirements, to 1.5 mpg more by 2007

APRIL 3, 2003
Bureau of Reclamation again diverts water from Klamath River, where salmonid kill occurred

APRIL 4, 2003
New U.S.—Mexico pollution treaty signed, but lacks funding

APRIL 7, 2003
Bush administration asks UN to remove Yellowstone from endangered world heritage status

APRIL 8, 2003
Protection plan for 76-mile stretch of California coast abandoned by National Park Service

APRIL 9, 2003
Interior Department paves way for new roads on federal lands in Utah

APRIL 10, 2003
U.S. Fish and Wildlife signs off on plan to reopen Imperial Sand Dunes to off-road vehicles

APRIL 20, 2003
Toxic cleanups still lagging: 41 percent fewer Superfund sites cleaned up by EPA, report says

APRIL 21, 2003
Sharp criticism of Bush administration air-pollution policies by independent panel

APRIL 24, 2003
White House unveils pro-industry chemical security bill

APRIL 28, 2003
White House bans EPA from discussing perchlorate pollution

MAY 2, 2003
Vehicle fuel economy drops to 22-year low of 20.8 mpg, says EPA report

MAY 2, 2003
Permits for cross-border power lines from Mexican power plants illegal, says federal judge

MAY 5, 2003
Navy’s use of sonar causes “stampede”–and possibly death–of marine mammals in Puget Sound

MAY 7, 2003
EPA drops “senior death discount” calculation (see DECEMBER 18, 2002)

MAY 13, 2003
Fish and Wildlife Service signs off on mining in Montana’s Cabinet Mountains Wilderness

MAY 14, 2003
White House’s $247 billion transportation plan slashes environmental protection

MAY 14, 2003
EPA proposes easing, delaying smog-control rules

MAY 21, 2003
Christine Todd Whitman, embattled EPA chief, resigns

MAY 30, 2003
Park Service opens Maryland and Virginia’s Assateague Island National Seashore to Jet Skis

MAY 30, 2003
Forest-fire plan eliminates environmental review of logging projects under 1,000 acres

JUNE 2, 2003
Energy Department announces$2 billion to $4 billion plan to build new “mini” nukes

JUNE 3, 2003
Energy Department funds study on how to ease effects of global warming for Alaska oil drillers

JUNE 5, 2003
Forest Service plan would triple logging limits in California’s Sierra Nevada

JUNE 9, 2003
USDA reverses Clinton ban on most logging and roadbuilding on 58.5 million acres

JUNE 20, 2003
Defense Department reneges on plan to test for perchlorate pollution at U.S. bases

JUNE 23, 2003
Bush administration again deletes references to dangers of global warming from EPA report

JUNE 27, 2003
Federal judge halts timber sale in Montana’s Kootenai National Forest

JULY 1, 2003
Autopsies link Navy sonar to porpoise deaths, environmentalists charge

JULY 8, 2003
Federal court rejects Cheney’s argument for keeping energy-task-force records secret

JULY 12, 2003
EPA refuses to regulate perchlorate and other drinking-water contaminants

JULY 17, 2003
Energy Department lobbies Congress for law to get around court ruling on nuke waste

JULY 17, 2003
Federal judge rules administration must redo water plan for Oregon/California Klamath River

JULY 22, 2003
Army Corps of Engineers ruled in contempt for defying order to change Missouri River flows

JULY 24, 2003
Bush administration softens demand for outsourcing of federal jobs, including at national parks

AUGUST 8, 2003
Bush administration settlement of timber suit could double logging in Northwest

AUGUST 11, 2003
Bush taps anti-environmental Utah governor Mike Leavitt to head EPA

AUGUST 26, 2003
New EPA rules ignore mercury pollution from chlorine plant

AUGUST 27, 2003
EPA excludes 17,000 facilities from upgrading pollution controls when installing new equipment

AUGUST 29, 2003
U.S. court rules against EPA’s loopholes in mountaintop-removal-mining regulations

SEPTEMBER 2, 2003
EPA weakens ban on selling polluted sites by reinterpreting law

SEPTEMBER 2, 2003
EPA refuses to regulate ballast-water discharges from ships

SEPTEMBER 4, 2003
EPA finds 274 violations of laws for dumping mountaintop-mining debris

SEPTEMBER 22, 2003
White House’s own study concludes benefits of environmental regulations far outweigh costs

SEPTEMBER 23, 2003
Forest Service estimates $2 million lost in timber sale from Alaska’s Tongass

SEPTEMBER 24, 2003
White House recommendations would undermine public participation in environmental planning

SEPTEMBER 25, 2003
EPA proposes deal that would let polluting factory farms avoid prosecution

OCTOBER 1, 2003
Bush fails to renew energy-conservation program that saved government $300 million a year

OCTOBER 6, 2003
EPA rules that farmers can’t sue pesticide makers if chemicals fail to meet stated claims

OCTOBER 10, 2003
Interior Department overturns limits on acreage where gold mines can dump waste

OCTOBER 10, 2003
Judge orders Interior Department to stop stalling on owl habitat protection

OCTOBER 10, 2003
EPA proposal to allow warmer waters behind Oregon dams threatens salmonids

OCTOBER 10, 2003
EPA inspector general criticizes agency for lax enforcement

OCTOBER 13, 2003
Bush administration proposes lifting ban on importing endangered species

OCTOBER 13, 2003
$18.6 million Forest Service study says outsourcing its jobs would rarely be cost-effective

OCTOBER 17, 2003
EPA announces it will not regulate dioxins in sewage sludge dumped on land

OCTOBER 31, 2003
EPA declines to restrict use of pesticide atrazine

NOVEMBER 4, 2003
Superfund cleanups lag for third straight year

NOVEMBER 4, 2003
Environmentalists criticize revised everglades-recovery plan for failing to ensure natural water flow

NOVEMBER 13, 2003
Park Service workers charge that Bush policies will “destroy the grand legacy of our national parks”

NOVEMBER 14, 2003
Bush administration loses bid to increase ozone-depleting methyl bromide

NOVEMBER 18, 2003
Administration admits blame for kill of 34,000 salmonids in Klamath River (see SEPTEMBER 21, 2002)

NOVEMBER 18, 2003
EPA proposes looser regulations on dumping low-level radioactive waste in landfills

DECEMBER 3, 2003
Bush signs “Healthy Forests” bill: more logging, less species protection on millions of acres

DECEMBER 4, 2003
EPA seeks to reclassify mercury as “nontoxic”

DECEMBER 5, 2003
Bureau of Land Management proposes weakening rules for grazing livestock on federal land

DECEMBER 9, 2003
Federal violation notices to polluters down almost 60 percent; almost 30 percent fewer fines

DECEMBER 16, 2003
White House abandons plans to weaken Clean Water Act protections for wetlands

DECEMBER 17, 2003
Defense Department urged to protect endangered tortoise during robot race

DECEMBER 17, 2003
Federal judge overturns administration decision not to protect orcas in Puget Sound

DECEMBER 19, 2003
Forest Service opens grizzly bear habitat to snowmobiles in Montana’s Flathead National Forest

DECEMBER 23, 2003
Forest Service continues to allow logging in Tongass, world’s largest temperate rainforest

DECEMBER 24, 2003
Federal court blocks EPA plan to weaken Clean Air Act by exempting power plants from review

JANUARY 1, 2004
Only 50 companies agree to Bush administration’s voluntary plan to cut global-warming emissions

JANUARY 8, 2004
$175 million Superfund shortfall prevents cleanups at 11 sites, slows down others

JANUARY 7, 2004
White House proposes overturning ban on mining near streams

JANUARY 9, 2004
Pentagon to seek more environmental exemptions

JANUARY 9, 2004
Forest Service limits citizens’ right to challenge logging plans by appeal or in court

JANUARY 13, 2004
Federal court overturns Bush administration’s weakening of energy efficiency for air conditioners

JANUARY, 21 2004
Interior secretary asks to triple number of gas-drilling permits in Wyoming

JANUARY 22, 2004
EPA scales back monitoring of smokestack pollution

JANUARY 22, 2004
Interior Department opens 9 million acres on Alaska’s North Slope to oil drilling

JANUARY 23, 2004
Forest Service plans to boost logging on up to 3.2 million acres of Appalachian forests

JANUARY 27, 2004
White House says EPA doesn’t have to study pesticide effects on imperiled wildlife

JANUARY 29, 2004
Bush administration proposes letting contractors police federal nuclear-plant safety

JANUARY 30, 2004
Parts of EPA’s mercury-pollution plan lifted verbatim from industry memos

FEBRUARY 2, 2004
Bush budget proposes $10 million cut in funds for endangered species

FEBRUARY 5, 2004
EPA admits twice as many children (630,000) in danger from mercury exposure

FEBRUARY 6, 2004
Clean Air Act changes undermining enforcement, says former EPA official

FEBRUARY 9, 2004
Energy development allowed inside Colorado and Utah’s Dinosaur National Monument

FEBRUARY 11, 2004
Forest Service plan allows mining, drilling in Alabama’s national forests

FEBRUARY 13, 2004
EPA no longer to require “worst case scenarios” from industry

FEBRUARY 15, 2004
Forest Service allows poisoning of prairie dogs in four states

FEBRUARY 16, 2004
White House ignores threat from gasoline additive MTBE

FEBRUARY 18, 2004
U.S. Navy plans to dredge endangered turtle habitat in Key West

FEBRUARY 18, 2004
20 Nobel Prize—winning scientists say administration distorts science for political gain

FEBRUARY 24, 2004
Federal mine-safety official demoted after questioning mine accident investigation

FEBRUARY 27, 2004
Missouri River management plan ignores fish protections

MARCH 3, 2004
Administration proposes to relax rules on killing wolves in Idaho and Montana

MARCH 9, 2004
358 conservation scientists urge administration to halt plan to import endangered species

MARCH 10, 2004
Forest Service hires PR firm to promote Sierra Nevada plan that would triple logging

MARCH 11, 2004
EPA inspector general says agency’s rosy drinking-water assessments used false data

MARCH 12, 2004
Forest Service relents: no snowmobiles in grizzly habitat in Montana’s Flathead National Forest

MARCH 15, 2004
Court rules BLM illegally opened Montana area to off-road vehicles

MARCH 16, 2004
EPA approves plan to inject toxic waste underground in Michigan wells

MARCH 19, 2004
FDA warnings on mercury in tuna not strong enough, scientists charge

MARCH 24, 2004
NRDC sues Bush administration for withholding records on perchlorate in drinking water

MARCH 25, 2004
BLM suspends plans for energy development at Dinosaur National Monument, Colo. and Utah

MARCH 26, 2004
Delay in phaseout of dangerous methyl bromide pesticide negotiated by United States

MARCH 30, 2004
Federal court orders Bush administration to release forest-planning documents

MARCH 31, 2004
Federal judge orders Energy Department to release more Cheney energy-task-force records

MARCH 31, 2004
EPA prosecution of environmental crimes even weaker under new administrator

APRIL 1, 2004
Bush administration worked behind scenes to weaken European Union chemical safety rules

APRIL 1, 2004
Mining whistleblower accuses Bush administration of cover-up in huge coal-sludge spill

APRIL 2, 2004
Bush administration sells 155 acres in Colorado to Phelps Dodge Corporation for $875

APRIL 6, 2004
EPA weakens safety rules for rat poison at industry’s behest

APRIL 7, 2004
White House downplays effects of mercury from coal-fired power plants

APRIL 8, 2004
Interior secretary allows aerial hunting of Alaska wolves to continue

APRIL 9, 2004
Interior Department blocks release of data on oil drilling to Environmental Working Group

APRIL 11, 2004
Bush administration budget asks for $35 million cut in lead-poisoning prevention

APRIL 13, 2004
Administration spending more on nuclear weapons research than in Cold War, report says

APRIL 15, 2004
Fish and Wildlife Service rejects protection for Yellowstone trumpeter swans

APRIL 19, 2004
39 state attorneys general urge denial of Pentagon’s request for environmental exemptions

APRIL 20, 2004
Yellowstone Park employees advised to wear hearing protection from snowmobile noise

APRIL 22, 2004
National Council of Churches strongly criticizes Bush’s air-pollution policies

APRIL 28, 2004
USDA weakens organic-food standards, allowing hormones, feed raised with pesticides

APRIL 28, 2004
Interior Department limits designations of critical habitat for endangered species

APRIL 29, 2004
Report shows that more than half of all Americans live in areas with hazardous levels of smog

MAY 3, 2004
Power companies have raised $6.6 million for Bush, Republicans, report says

MAY 12, 2004
Scientists say Yucca Mountain nuclear facility could leak far sooner than Energy Department claims

MAY 21, 2004
Whistle-blowing federal biologist quits over politicized decision-making

MAY 21, 2004
EPA officials with timber ties weaken toxic formaldehyde standards for plywood industry

MAY 26, 2004
USDA backs down, keeps organic-food standards (see APRIL 28, 2004)

MAY 27, 2004
U.S. Army retracts order to cut some environmental-protection practices

MAY 28, 2004
Army Corps lets sewers, ditches “mitigate” loss of streams to mountaintop-removal mining

MAY 28, 2004
A dozen major national parks hit by cutbacks to visitor services and staffing

JUNE 1, 2004
Federal court rejects EPA’s proposed snowmobile standards

JUNE 1, 2004
Administration delays greater protection for marbled murrelet to benefit timber industry

JUNE 2, 2004
Exemption of military from migratory-bird-protection rules proposed by administration

JUNE 2, 2004
New EPA rules allow more fine-particle pollution from 1,000 industrial plants

JUNE 3, 2004
Bush’s 2005 budget zeroes out funding for research on abrupt climate change

JUNE 7, 2004
Bush wins ruling to allow Mexican trucks into U.S. without meeting clean-air standards

JUNE 8, 2004
Reduction in Snake and Columbia River water releases, harming Northwest salmon, announced

JUNE 15, 2004
Administration’s pro-oil, pro-nuke energy proposal stalled in Congress

JUNE 24, 2004
Supreme Court ruling allows Cheney to keep energy-task-force secrets until after election

JULY 8, 2004
Bush team pushes one of biggest timber sales in U.S. history under guise of fire protection

JULY 12, 2004
Administration proposes forcing states to pay 2.5 times more for public transit than for roads

JULY 12, 2004
Administration to eliminate Clinton-era roadless rule, ending protections for 58.5 million acres

JULY 16, 2004
Fish and Wildlife Service to end protection for eastern wolves and abandon reintroduction plans

JULY 16, 2004
Bush refuses to release $34 million for international family planning appropriated by Congress

NOVEMBER 2, 2004
ELECTION DAY

from SIERRA magazine, September/October 2004

http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra

(from)

http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/200409/bush_record_print.asp

***

Now, the items on that list show conspiracy and collusion – I don’t care who you are.

My Note –

I wish they had gone all the way back through the Nixon administration who did even more damage, the Reagan administration who did the most damage, the Bush Senior administration who did egregious damage and put all of it into one massive explanation of what we are living with today. It is obscene – and it never had to be done that way at all. It has taken our nation from a top leader in the world to the last runner-up instead.

– cricketdiane

****

DECEMBER 4, 2003
EPA seeks to reclassify mercury as “nontoxic”

DECEMBER 18, 2002
White House budget office values elderly lives 63 percent less in environmental cost-benefit analysis

(all brought to us by the same people who literally worship a lifeless brass bull in the middle of a New York street – didn’t they ever notice anything wrong with doing this stuff?) see all of the above and on top of that, I keep remembering how many of our best, finest, healthy men and women were brought home in pieces, damaged beyond repair by those same decision-makers in pursuit of oil security in the Mid-East and elsewhere).

And, the genocide in New Orleans after hurricane Katrina.

And, the oil spill destruction of multiple places including the Gulf of Mexico recently whose effects will be long-lasting, I don’t care what they say about it or how they present opinions in direct opposition to the known facts about it…

You know what is pathologically psychotic? The Republican Party and its vast minions doing its bidding that serve the interests of industries intent on destroying the quality of life for the entire human race in order to receive short term profits.

That is truly psychotic.

Did they get up in the morning and say, hey let’s pour poisons into the drinking water supply and tell people there’s nothing wrong with doing it that way . … .

No probably not. But, they did the actions which effectively did exactly those things, including telling us it wasn’t really poison despite all scientific evidence of fact that said it is poison.

Do they not understand that the air they are breathing also contains these things – and the water they are drinking is bathed in the same poisons somewhere down the line too?

http://www.epa.gov/oms/regs/toxics/420b06002.pdf

There are chemicals on here whose names are as long as I am tall – and 90% or more of them are toxic – I don’t care who you are – they are still toxic. And, our government is worried about whether we smoke cigarettes and eat sugar? Are they kidding?

and here is part of the information about the Mark Twain National Forest mining operations turning it into a horrific sewage of toxic waste and heavy metals from their operations – along with the fact that they are tearing up the place with roads, logging to make roads and mining operations.

– cricketdiane

Assessment of Elemental Concentrations in Streams of the New Lead Belt in Southeastern Missouri, 2002-05

William G. Brumbaugh, Thomas W. May, John M. Besser, Ann L. Allert, and Christopher J. Schmitt

SIR 2007-5057

Concerns about possible effects of lead-mining activities on the water quality of federally protected streams located in southeastern Missouri prompted a suite of multidisciplinary studies to be conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. As part of this investigation, a series of biological studies were initiated in 2001 for streams in the current mining region and the prospecting area. In this report, results are examined for trace elements and other selected chemical measurements in sediment, surface water, and sediment interstitial (pore) water sampled between 2002 and 2005 in association with these biological studies.

Compared to reference sites, fine sediments collected downstream from mining areas were enriched in metals by factors as large as 75 for cadmium, 62 for cobalt, 171 for nickel, 95 for lead, and 150 for zinc. Greatest metal concentrations in sediments collected in 2002 were from sites downstream from mines on Strother Creek, Courtois Creek, and the West Fork Black River. Sediments from sites on Bee Fork, Logan Creek, and Sweetwater Creek also were noticeably enriched in lead. Sediments in Clearwater Lake, at least 75 kilometers downstream from mining activity, had metal concentrations that were 1.5 to 2.1 times greater than sediments in an area of the lake with no upstream mining activity. Longitudinal sampling along three streams in 2004 indicated that sediment metal concentrations decreased considerably a few kilometers downstream from mining activities; however, in Strother Creek some metals were still enriched by a factor of five or more as far as 13 kilometers downstream from the Buick tailings impoundment. Compared with 2002 samples, metals concentrations were dramatically lower in sediments collected in 2004 at an upper West Fork Black River site, presumably because beneficiation operations at the West Fork mill ceased in 2000.

Concentrations of metals and sulfate in sediment interstitial (pore) waters generally tracked closely with metal concentrations in sediments. Metals, including cobalt, nickel, lead, and zinc, were elevated substantially in laboratory-produced pore waters of fine sediments collected near mining operations in 2002 and 2004. Passive diffusion samplers (peepers) buried 4 to 6 centimeters deep in riffle-run stream sediments during 2003 and 2005 had much lower pore-water metal concentrations than the laboratory-produced pore waters of fine sediments collected in 2002 and 2004, but each sampling method produced similar patterns among sites. The combined mean concentration of lead in peeper samples from selected sites located downstream from mining activities for six streams was about 10-fold greater than the mean of the reference sites. In most instances, metals concentrations in surface water and peeper water were not greatly different, indicating considerable exchange between the surface water and pore water at the depths and locations where peepers were situated.

Passive sampling probes used to assess metal lability in pore waters of selected samples during 2004 sediment toxicity tests indicated that most of the filterable lead in the laboratory-prepared pore water was relatively non-labile, presumably because lead was complexed by organic matter, or was present as colloidal species. In contrast, large percentages of cobalt and nickel in pore water appeared to be labile. Passive integrative samplers deployed in surface water for up to 3 weeks at three sites in July 2005 confirmed the presence of elevated concentrations of labile metals downstream from mining operations on Strother Creek and, to a lesser extent, Bee Fork. These samplers also indicated a considerable increase in metal loadings occurred for a few days at the Strother Creek site, which coincided with moderate increases in stream discharges in the area.


http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2007/5057/

My Note –

Apparently we have Mark Templeton of the Missouri DNR and others to thank for that – now he will be among those “stewards” of the BP oil trust money that is supposed to go to people affected by the oil spill. Yeah, right – stewards of trust . . .

– cricketdiane

*********

(1,1-dimethylethyl)-benzene
00098-06-6

(1,1-dimethylpropyl)-benzene
02049-95-8

(1,2-dimethylpropyl)-benzene
04481-30-5

(1-methylethyl)-benzene
00098-82-8

(1-methylethyl)-cyclohexane
00696-29-7

(1-methylpropyl)-benzene
00135-98-8

(1a,2a,3b)-1,2,3-trimethylcyclopent
15890-40-1

(2-methylbutyl)-benzene
03968-85-2

(2-methylpropyl)-benzene
00538-93-2

(E)-1,3-nonadiene
56700-77-7

(E)-1,3-pentadiene
02004-70-8

(E)-2-butene
00624-64-6

(E)-2-heptene
14686-13-6

(E)-2-hexene
04050-45-7

(E)-2-methyl-3-heptene
00692-96-6

(E)-2-methyl-3-hexene
00692-24-0

(E)-2-nonene
06434-78-2

(E)-2-octene
13389-42-9

(E)-2-pentene
00646-04-8

(E)-3-heptene
14686-14-7

(E)-3-hexene
13269-52-8

(E)-3-methyl-2-pentene
00616-12-6

My Note –

You do not have to be an expert to know that you do not want to breathe, eat or drink any of this stuff – and I guarantee, it does not take a rocket scientist to figure out that this stuff is not supposed to be in the air, in the water, in the food supply or where our children play.

– cricketdiane

There’s more – this thing goes on for like 16 pages of small print or 32 pages of fine print when printed out landscape style – I think the font size is like 3 or something. Takes a magnifying glass to read the print out of it, even if you don’t need glasses.

***

(E)-3-methyl-3-hexene
03899-36-3

(E)-4-methyl-2-hexene
03683-22-5

(E)-4-methyl-2-pentene
00674-76-0

(E)-4-nonene
10405-85-3

(Z)-2-butene
00590-18-1

(Z)-2-heptene
06443-92-1

(Z)-2-hexene
07688-21-3

(Z)-2-octene
07642-04-8

(Z)-2-pentene
00627-20-3

(Z)-3-heptene
07642-10-6

(Z)-3-hexene
07642-09-3

(Z)-3-methyl-2-hexene
10574-36-4

(Z)-3-methyl-2-pentene
00922-62-3

My Note –

Yeah, go get yourself some health foods at the health food store, eat only organically grown stuff, take vitamins, drink bottled water from France or somewhere and go work out at the gym – that’ll make a difference alright, maybe if you don’t breathe any of the air in the United States into your lungs during that time, it might.

– cricketdiane

Yes, there’s more – these chemical toxins in our air from vehicle emissions contains 1162 entries –

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

#639
tetracosane
CAS Number –  00646-31-1

minimum emission rate – 0.0006
maximum emission rate – 13.0916
mg/mi

#640
tetradecane
CAS Number – 00629-59-4

minimum emission rate – 0.0114
maximum emission rate – 87.2487
mg/mi

minimum emission rate – 0.600000024
maximum emission rate – 8.699999809
mg/hp-hr

#641
tetramethylbenzene
CAS Number – 25619-60-7

#642
tetramethylcyclobutene

#643
thallium
CAS Number – 07440-28-0

#644
tin
CAS Number – 07440-31-5

#645
titanium
CAS Number – 07440-32-6

#646
toluene
CAS Number – 00108-88-3

#647
toluene & 2,3-dimethylhexane
CAS Number – 108-88-3; 584-94-1

#656
trans-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane
CAS Number – 06876-23-9

trans-1,2-dimethylcyclopentane
CAS Number – 00822-50-4

#658
trans-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane
CAS Number – 02207-03-6

#659
trans-1,3-dimethylcyclopentane
CAS Number – 01759-58-6

#660
trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane
CAS Number – 02207-04-7

#661
trans-1-ethyl-3-methylcyclopentane
CAS Number – 02613-65-2

#662
trans-1-ethyl-4-methylcyclohexane
CAS Number – 06236-88-0

#663
trans-1-methyl-2-ethylcyclopentane
CAS Number – 00930-90-5

#664
trichloromethane
CAS Number – 00067-66-3

#665
tricosane
CAS Number – 00638-67-5

#666
tridecane
CAS Number – 00629-50-5

#667
trimethylbenzene
CAS Number – 25551-13-7

#668
trimethylcyclohexane
CAS Number – 30498-63-6
X
X
20,21,24
#669
trimethylcyclopentane
CAS Number – 30498-64-7
X
X
24
#670
trimethyldecane
CAS Number – 98060-54-9
X
24
671
trimethylheptane
X
24
672
trimethylhexene
X
24
673
trimethylindane
X
24
674
trimethyloctane
CAS Number – 98060-52-7
X
X
24,180
1
X
675
trimethylpentadiene
X
24
676
trimethylpentane
CAS Number – 29222-48-8
X
24
677
trimethylpentene
CAS Number – 61665-19-8
X
X
31
678
undecane
CAS Number – 01120-21-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2074.8801
mg/mi
0.02
1.5
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,35,36,45,46,48,95,102,131,166,
1
X
X
697
uranium
CAS Number – 07440-61-1
X
0.0020
0.3242
mg/mi
9,166
1
X
698
vanadium
CAS Number – 07440-62-2
X
X
0.0000
0.0092
mg/mi
2,9,24,166
1
X
#700
yttrium
CAS Number – 07440-65-5
X
X
0.0004
0.0689
mg/mi
9,24,166
1
X
#701
zinc
CAS Number – 07440-66-6
X
X
0.0030
5.7280
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,53,62,87,166,177,193
1
X
702
zirconium
07440-67-7
X
X
0.0000
0.0844
mg/mi
2,9,24,166
1
X
#703
diesel VOC
X
X
X
90.0000
59090.0000
mg/mi
26
1573.452637
mg/hp-hr
,87,92,98,99,100,155,166,180,183,187
1
X
X
704
(E)-4-octene
14850-23-8
X
X
X
X
0.0268
43.0757
mg/mi
0.059999999
0.059999999
mg/hp-hr
48,102,131,184,188
1
X
X
705
17a(H),21b(H)-29-norhopane
X
X
0.0000
0.1752
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#706
17a(h),21ß(h)-hopane
CAS Number – 13849-96-21
X
X
0.0000
38.3100
mg/mi
53,62,166,193
1
X
#707
17a(H)-22,29,30-trisnorhopane
CAS Number – 53584-59-1
X
X
0.0006
0.0429
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#708
1-methylphenanthrene
CAS Number – 832-69-9
X
X
0.0002
0.9403
mg/mi
0.00051
15.26000023
mg/hp-hr
53,62,87,166,173,177
1
X
#709
2,6,10-trimethyltridecane
CAS Number – 3891-99-4
X
X
0.0055
0.2280
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#710
20R&S-5a(H),14b(H),17b(H)-sitostane
X
X
0.0016
0.0845
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#711
20R&S-5a(H),14b(H),17b(H)-ergostane
X
X
0.0020
0.0864
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#712
20R-13b(H),17a(H)-diacholestane
X
0.0281
0.0281
mg/mi
53
1
X
#713
20R,5a(H),14b(H),17b(H)-cholesta
CAS Number – 69483-47-2
X
X
0.0005
40.1500
mg/mi
53,62,193
1
X
#714
c27-20r5a(h),14a(h),17a(h)-cholest
CAS Number – 481-21-0
X
X
0.0007
33.1800
mg/mi
53,62,166,193
1
X
#715
20S-13b(H),17a(H)-diacholestane
X
X
0.0009
0.0457
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#716
c27-20s5a(h),14ß(h),17ß(h)-cholestane
X
X
0.0009
0.1018
mg/mi
53,166
1
X
#717
22,29,30-trisnorneohopane
X
0.0000
0.0777
mg/mi
53
1
X
#718
22r&s,17a(h),21b(H)-30-bishomohopane
X
0.1218
0.1218
mg/mi
53
1
X
719
22r&s,17a(H),21b(H)-30-homohopane
X
0.1609
0.1609
mg/mi
53
1
X
720
furfural
CAS Number – 98-01-1
X
1.0563
1.0563
mg/mi
53
1
X
#721
2-methylanthracene

CAS Number – 613-12-7
X
X
0.0007
0.0585
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#722
2-methylphenanthrene
CAS Number – 2531-84-2
X
X
0.0008
0.9020
mg/mi
53,62,87,166,177
1
X
723
3-methylphenanthrene
832-71-3
X
X
0.0018
0.1466
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
724
8b,13a-dimethyl-14b-n-butylpodocarpane
X
X
0.0001
0.0739
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
725
8b,13a-dimethyl-14b-[3′-methylbutyl]podocarpane
X
X
0.0001
0.0472
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
726
anthraquinone
CAS Number – 84-65-1
X
X
0.0005
0.0562
mg/mi
53,166
1
X
727
9-methylphenanthrene

883-20-5
X
X
0.0015
0.0814
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
728
acephenanthrylene
201-06-9
X
X
0.0000
0.0359
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
729
benzo(j)fluoranthene
205-82-3
X
0.0000
0.0009
mg/mi
53
1
X
730
2,3-benzofuran
271-89-6
X
X
0.0181
0.1243
mg/mi
53,62
1
X
#731
benzoic acid
CAS Number – 65-85-0
X
X
X
0.0592
34.7895
mg/mi
0.100000001
1.600000024
mg/hp-hr
53,62,102,166,180,190,193
1
X
X
732
isobutyraldehyde & butyraldehyde
78-84-2 & 123-72-8
X
X
0.0800
19.2625
mg/mi
53,155,193
1
X
733
c2-fluorene
X
0.0065
0.3045
mg/mi
53
1
X
EPA420-B-06-002 9 February 2006

http://www.epa.gov/oms/regs/toxics/420b06002.pdf

(times how many cars and the rest of the 1162 item list every hour, especially during rush hours – and then the wind does what with it – and then the rain takes it down into where which drains into the drinking water as well . . . . )

If anything – in 2010 there are more emissions, more toxic additives and more of them in higher concentrations leftover from the changes in EPA standards made during the Nixon, Reagan, Bush and Bush, Jr. years.

and we could’ve just been doing it some other way the whole time – for at least the last thirty-five years it has been known to be a problem of great magnitude. The air was nothing but filth in Los Angeles and other big cities even in the 50’s and 60’s – this is not a surprise health problem. And go take a look at that list and imagine it amplified by every single car, truck, motorcycle, lawn mower, weed whacker, farm combine, tractor, train, ship, boat, airboat, airliner, industrial plant and assorted power plants every minute of every hour of everyday everywhere across the US and in just about every other country now as well – and across every ocean, lake, stream, river and creek. Don’t tell me there’s not a problem. Even the rich people are breathing this filth – and the police and the politicians and the elected officials and the regular people and the business leaders and the big business people and their families along with everyone else who will live on this planet in the next thirty or fifty or a hundred years.

– cricketdiane

***

oh yeah – add to that the NASCAR races and similar car, truck and motorcycle races, high speed boat races, military vehicles, military aircraft, helicopters, tanks and humvees, for our military and operations of every nation around the world. And, every single diesel truck running down the road every minute of everyday, all the school buses  that are cabins filled with the stuff, all the huge cargo container ships and petroleum tankers on the land and on the sea, all the tugs and barges. But, what if they were all powered by clean energy of any kind – what if that energy were cheaper than gasoline and diesel fuel with better performance and better “thrust”?

Imagine all the business and all the varieties of jobs that would be made available just by transforming our fleets of every kind of vehicle into clean energy solutions . . .

Wow. That would be nifty. There wouldn’t be a person unemployed in the nation, maybe in the entire world . . .

Or maybe it is better to keep breathing this stuff –

tetramethylbenzene
00527-53-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
46.5671
mg/mi
0.119999997
9.479999542
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,95,102,131,166,184,188
1
X
X
57
1,2,3,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzo-p-di
57653-85-7
X
9
58
1,2,3,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran
57117-44-9
X
9
59
1,2,3,7,8,9-hexachlorodibenzo-p-di
19408-74-3
X
X
0.0000
0.0000
mg/mi
9,92
1
X
60
1,2,3,7,8,9-hexachlorodibenzofuran
72918-21-9
X
9
EPA420-B-06-002

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
x
3
z
2
b
1
1
8
2
61
1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dio
40321-76-4
X
9
62
1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran
57117-41-6
X
9
63
1,2,3-trimethylbenzene
00526-73-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
96.0359
mg/mi
0.079999998
0.330000013
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,95,102,131,147,166,184,
1
1X
X
64
1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene
00095-93-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
32.4638
mg/mi
0.01
2.190000057
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,95,102,131,166,180,184,
1
1X
X
65
1,2,4-trimethylbenzene
00095-63-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
473.1192
mg/mi
0.01
184.3800049
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,53,62,101,102,1
1
X
X
66
1,2,4-trimethylcyclopentane
02815-58-9
X
X
0.0197
86.8983
mg/mi
46,131,188
1
X
67
1,2-butadiene
00590-19-2
X
X
X
0.0000
47.5548
mg/mi
46,95,166,188
1
X
68
1,2-dibromoethane
00106-93-4
X
X
X
17
69
1,2-dichlorobenzene
00095-50-1
X
X
8
70
1,2-diethylbenzene
00135-01-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
20.7000
mg/mi
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,131,188,193
1
X
71
1,2-dihydronaphthalene
00447-53-0
X
X
0.1911
2.8563
mg/mi
24,166
1
X
72
1,2-dimethyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-ben
04132-77-8
X
X
31
73
1,2-dimethylnaphthalene
00573-98-8
X
X
X
0.0001
1.2314
mg/mi
24,35,87,166,177
1
X
74
1,2-propadiene
00463-49-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
48.5604
mg/mi
0.441572487
3.623102903
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,47,131,138,188
1
X
X
75
1,3,5-trimethylbenzene
00108-67-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
163.7585
mg/mi
0.029999999
66.62999725
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,10
1
X
X
76
1,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane
01839-63-0
X
0.0000
60.0663
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
77
1,3-bis(1-methylethyl)-benzene
00099-62-7
X
22
78
1,3-butadiene
00106-99-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
338.6232
mg/mi
0.059999999
1569
mg/hp-hr
1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11,12,13,14,16,17,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,
2
1X
X
79
1,3-butadiyne
00460-12-8
X
0.0000
50.8974
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
80
1,3-cyclopentadiene
00542-92-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
101.1908
mg/mi
0.050000001
55.06999969
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,29,31,45,48,102,147,180,184
1
X
X
81
1,3-diethylbenzene
00141-93-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
31.4894
mg/mi
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,95,131,166,188,193
1
X
82
1,3-dimethylcyclopentane
02453-00-1
X
X
24
83
1,3-dipropylbenzene
17171-72-1
X
0.0000
7.7444
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
84
1,4-bis(1-methylethyl)-benzene
00100-18-5
X
22
85
1,4-diethylbenzene
00105-05-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
44.8000
mg/mi
0.219999999
4.380000114
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,95,102,131,147,166,180,
1
1X
X
86
1,cis-2,trans-4-trimethylcyclopentan
04850-28-6
X
X
X
0.0131
0.0131
mg/mi
0.109999999
4.980000019
mg/hp-hr
31,131,184,189
1
X
X
87
1,trans-2,cis-3-trimethylcyclopentane
X
X
0.680000007
0.949999988
mg/hp-hr
31,184
1
X
88
1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2-methylbenz
e01074-92-6
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
10.2000
mg/mi
0.090000004
0.550000012
mg/hp-hr
9,45,46,48,102,180,184,188
1
X
X
89
1-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3,5-dimethyl
00098-19-1
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
10.6626
mg/mi
0.159999996
0.389999986
mg/hp-hr
9,45,46,48,102,180,184,188
1
X
X
90
1-buten-3-yne
00689-97-4
X
0.0173
23.7668
mg/mi
29,46,188
1
X
91
1-butene
00106-98-9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
89.5100
mg/mi
0.050000001
37.59000015
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,36,45,46,47,48,102,131,147,
1
X
X
92
1-butene & 1,3-butadiene
106-98-8; 106-99-0
X
35
93
1-butyl-2-methylbenzene
01595-11-5
X
0.0000
10.7905
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
94
1-butyne
00107-00-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
14.1873
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,131,138,188,193
1
X
95
1-decene
00872-05-9
X
X
X
X
0.119999997
0.119999997
mg/hp-hr
24,36,102,131
1
X
96
1-dodecene
00112-41-4
X
X
X
X
0.5
0.5
mg/hp-hr
22,24,102
1
X
97
1-ethenyl-2-methylbenzene
00611-15-4
X
X
8,29
98
1-ethyl-1-methylcyclopentane
16747-50-5
X
X
0.0189
45.8699
mg/mi
31,188,193
1
X
99
1-ethyl-2,3-dimethylbenzene
00933-98-2
X
X
X
X
0.0000
12.4233
mg/mi
9,45,46,188
1
X
100
1-ethyl-2,4-dimethylbenzene
00874-41-9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
32.5585
mg/mi
0.029999999
8.670000076
mg/hp-hr
8,9,22,24,29,45,46,48,102,180,184,188,193
1
X
X
101
1-ethyl-2-methylbenzene
00611-14-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
136.8769
mg/mi
0.050000001
38.11000061
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,95,101,102,131,
1
X
X
102
1-ethyl-2-propylbenzene
16021-20-8
X
0.0000
6.8396
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
103
1-ethyl-3,5-dimethylbenzene
00934-74-7
X
X
0.0188
79.6918
mg/mi
46,166,188
1
X
104
1-ethyl-3-methylbenzene
00620-14-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
322.9508
mg/mi
0.039999999
122.5999985
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,131
,
1X
X
105
1-ethyl-4-methylbenzene
00622-96-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
239.2279
mg/mi
0.059999999
55.36999893
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,13
1
1X
X
106
1-ethylcyclopentene
02146-38-5
X
24
107
1-heptene
00592-76-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
33.5814
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,36,45,95,166
1
X
108
1-hexene
00592-41-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
34.1951
mg/mi
0.02
3.789999962
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,102,131,180
,
1X
X
109
1-hexyne
00693-02-7
X
24
110
1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene
04313-57-9
X
24
111
1-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-benzene
00527-84-4
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
11.9275
mg/mi
0.029999999
33.97999954
mg/hp-hr
9,45,46,48,102,166,180,184,188,193
1
X
X
112
1-methyl-2-propylbenzene
01074-17-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
24.9539
mg/mi
0.189999998
1.070000052
mg/hp-hr
9,22,24,31,45,46,102,166,184,188
1
X
X
113
1-methyl-3-(1-methylethyl)-benzene
00535-77-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
29.4000
mg/mi
0.02
27.62999916
mg/hp-hr
9,24,45,46,48,166,180,184,188,193
1
X
X
114
1-methyl-3-propylbenzene
01074-43-7
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
64.9621
mg/mi
0.159999996
0.159999996
mg/hp-hr
5,9,22,24,29,45,46,48,102,131,188
1
X
115
1-methyl-4-(1-methylethyl)-benzene
00099-87-6
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
13.3459
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
5,9,22,45,46,166,180,188,193
1
X
116
1-methyl-4-isobutylbenzene
05161-04-6
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
5.3213
mg/mi
1,20,21,22,31,45
117
1-methyl-4-propylbenzene
01074-55-1
X
X
X
X
0.0000
23.4000
mg/mi
0.150000006
0.49000001
mg/hp-hr
9,45,48,102,180
1
X
118
1-methylcyclohexene
00591-49-1
X
22,24
119
1-methylcyclopentene
00693-89-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
157.0216
mg/mi
6.099999905
8.75
mg/hp-hr
5,9,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,95,166,180,184,189,193
1
X
X
120
1-methylnaphthalene
00090-12-0
X
X
X
0.0044
18.6411
mg/mi
0.00017
131.8000031
mg/hp-hr
9,24,35,36,53,62,87,98,99,100,166,173,177,183
1
X
121
1-nitronaphthalene
00086-57-7
X
X
0.0003
0.0415
mg/mi
0.00032
0.00066
mg/hp-hr
9,95,166,183
1
X
122
1-nitropyrene
05522-43-0
X
X
X
0.0000
0.0025
mg/mi
2E-06
0.0033
mg/hp-hr
9,23,92,95,102,166,173,175,183,191
1
X
X
123
1-nonene
00124-11-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
108.4299
mg/mi
0.01
19.43000031
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,36,45,46,48,102,131,180,184,18
1
X
X
124
1-octene
00111-66-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
29.6784
mg/mi
0.670000017
0.579999983
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,36,45,46,48,131,180,184,188,193
1
X
X
125
1-pentene
00109-67-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
90.9571
mg/mi
0.07
9.409999847
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,95,101,10
1
X
X
126
1-pentyne
00627-19-0
X
24
127
1-undecene
00821-95-4
X
X
22,24
128
2,2,3-trimethylbutane
00464-06-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
15.9729
mg/mi
0.01
7.599999905
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,48,102,131,180,184,188,189,193
1
X
X
EPA420-B-06-002 2 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
2
4
1
3
3
1
4
1
x
129
2,2,3-trimethylpentane
00564-02-3
X
X
X
0.1314
0.1639
mg/mi
0.039999999
0.829999983
mg/hp-hr
31,102,184,189
1
X
X
130
2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane
01070-87-7
X
X
X
31,131
1
X
131
2,2,4-trimethyl-4-pentene
00107-39-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
19.0529
mg/mi
2.5
3.880000114
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,48,180,184,188
1
X
X
132
2,2,4-trimethylheptane
14720-74-2
X
0.0000
18.5880
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
133
2,2,4-trimethylhexane
16747-26-5
X
X
X
0.0189
37.6301
mg/mi
24,31,46,188
1
X
134
2,2,4-trimethylpentane
00540-84-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2025.9141
mg/mi
0.01
245.9900055
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,10
1
X
X
135
2,2,5-trimethylheptane
02091-95-6
X
0.0227
47.4738
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
136
2,2,5-trimethylhexane
03522-94-9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
250.3090
mg/mi
0.029999999
24.22999954
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,95,101,102,138,147,1
6
1X
X
137
2,2-dimethylbutane
00075-83-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
876.9746
mg/mi
0.170000002
11.31000042
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,102,131,1
1
X
X
138
2,2-dimethylhexane
00590-73-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
78.1000
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,188,193
1
X
139
2,2-dimethyloctane
15869-87-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
68.1829
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,48,180,188,193
1
X
140
2,2-dimethylpentane
00590-35-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
44.9000
mg/mi
0.07
17.55999947
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,48,102,131,180,184,189,193
1
X
X
141
2,2-dimethylpropane
00463-82-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
27.6685
mg/mi
0.02
0.039999999
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,131,184,188,189,193
1
X
X
142
2,3,3-trimethyl-1-butene
00594-56-9
X
X
X
X
24,31
143
2,3,3-trimethylpentane
00560-21-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
176.9000
mg/mi
0.01
57.65000153
mg/hp-hr
5,9,22,24,31,45,46,48,102,180,184,189
1
X
X
144
2,3,4,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran
60851-34-5
X
9
145
2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran
57117-31-4
X
9
146
2,3,4-trimethylpentane
00565-75-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
802.7360
mg/mi
0.01
1.419999957
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,53,62,95,101,102,131,
1
X
X
147
2,3,5,6-tetramethylphenol
00527-35-5
X
0.7000
46.0000
mg/mi
42
X
148
2,3,5-trimethylhexane
01069-53-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
40.7693
mg/mi
3.640000105
3.730000019
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,184,188,189,193
1
X
X
149
2,3,5-trimethylnaphthalene
02245-38-7
X
0.0002
108.2200012
mg/hp-hr
9,173,183
1
X
150
2,3,5-trimethylphenol
00697-82-5
X
3.9000
20.0000
mg/mi
42
151
2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
01746-01-6
X
X
X
0.0000
0.0000
mg/mi
4,9,13,16,17,23,27
152
2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran
51207-31-9
X
9
153
2,3-butadione
00431-03-8
X
X
X
0.0249
1.1185
mg/mi
35,53,62,193
1
X
154
2,3-dimethyl-1-butene
00563-78-0
X
X
X
0.0000
82.9369
mg/mi
5,31,46,131,188
1
X
155
2,3-dimethyl-2-pentene
10574-37-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
3.4340
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,95,166,188
1
X
156
2,3-dimethylbutane
00079-29-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
761.4819
mg/mi
0.02
60.16999817
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,1
1
X
X
157
2,3-dimethylheptane
03074-71-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
14.3480
mg/mi
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,131,188
1
X
158
2,3-dimethylhexane
00584-94-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
176.2000
mg/mi
0.01
0.959999979
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,131
,
1X
X
159
2,3-dimethyloctane
07146-60-3
X
X
X
0.0000
22.0364
mg/mi
5,24,46,147,188
1
X
160
2,3-dimethylpentane
00565-59-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
976.6037
mg/mi
0.01
0.389999986
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,1
1
X
X
161
2,3-dimethylphenol
00526-75-0
X
0.0100
46.0000
mg/mi
42
X
162
2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentene
00107-40-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
5.0079
mg/mi
1,5,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,188,189
1
X
163
2,4,4-trimethylhexane
16747-30-1
X
X
0.0000
17.8084
mg/mi
2.809999943
2.210000038
mg/hp-hr
31,46,184,188
1
X
X
164
2,4,5-trimethylheptane
20278-84-6
X
X
24
165
2,4,6-trimethylhexane
X
X
31
166
2,4,6-trimethylphenol
00527-60-6
X
0.0100
46.0000
mg/mi
42
X
167
2,4-dimethyl-1-pentene
02213-32-3
X
0.0000
4.0607
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
168
2,4-dimethyl-2-pentene
00625-65-0
X
0.0000
45.8811
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
169
2,4-dimethylheptane
02213-23-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
26.8086
mg/mi
2.5
3.720000029
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,131,184,188,189,193
1
X
X
170
2,4-dimethylhexane
00589-43-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
226.4912
mg/mi
0.02
48.43999863
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,101,102,131,
1
X
X
171
2,4-dimethyloctane
04032-94-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
50.6000
mg/mi
0.25
2.329999924
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,102,147,180,184,188
1
X
X
172
2,4-dimethylpentane
00108-08-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
486.6820
mg/mi
0.02
0.170000002
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,1
1
X
X
173
2,5-dimethyl-1,5-hexadiene
00627-58-7
X
X
5,131
1
X
174
2,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde
05779-94-2
X
X
2.5476
21.7480
mg/mi
20,21,53,62
1
X
175
2,5-dimethylheptane
02216-30-0
X
X
X
X
X
0.0122
2.1200
mg/mi
0.090000004
9.079999924
mg/hp-hr
24,31,102,131,184,189,193
1
X
X
176
2,5-dimethylhexane
00592-13-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
131.6040
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,53,62,101,138,147,188
1
X
177
2,5-dimethyloctane
15869-89-3
X
0.0000
26.2515
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
178
2,6- & 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene
00581-42-0
X
X
0.0003
7.9688
mg/mi
0.054000001
0.720000029
mg/hp-hr
9,87,166,177,183
1
X
179
2,6-dimethylheptane
01072-05-5
X
X
X
0.0104
50.8604
mg/mi
0.02
4.150000095
mg/hp-hr
31,46,102,184,188,189
1
X
X
180
2,6-dimethylnaphthalene
00581-42-0
X
X
0.00032
140.9499969
mg/hp-hr
24,35,98,99,100,173
1
X
181
2,6-dimethyloctane
02051-30-1
X
0.0000
32.1216
mg/mi
24,46,188
1
X
182
2-(1-methylethyl)-phenol
00088-69-7
X
0.0100
46.0000
mg/mi
42
X
183
2-butanone
00078-93-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
21.6013
mg/mi
0.050000001
1.440000057
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,24,31,42,45,46,48,53,62,92,102,147,155,
1
X
X
184
2-butanone & 2-methylpropanal mi
78-93-3; 78-84-2
X
X
13
262
mg/hp-hr
7,170,190
1
X
185
2-butenal
04170-30-3
X
X
0.0000
13.2414
mg/mi
46,188,190
1
X
X
186
2-butyne
00503-17-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
33.5000
mg/mi
1.059999943
1.059999943
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,102,131,188,193
1
X
187
2-ethoxy-2-methylpropane
00637-92-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
98.6320
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,53,131,147
1
X
188
2-ethyl-1,3-dimethylbenzene
02870-04-4
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
14.4266
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
8,9,22,24,29,45,46,131,180,188,193
1
X
189
2-ethyl-1,4-dimethylbenzene
01758-88-9
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
40.4460
mg/mi
0.219999999
0.219999999
mg/hp-hr
8,9,22,24,45,46,48,102,131,166,180,188,193
1
X
190
2-hexene
00592-43-8
X
X
24
191
2-methoxy-2-methylpropane
01634-04-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2069.0410
mg/mi
2.170000076
7.559999943
mg/hp-hr
1,4,5,9,12,13,14,18,20,21,22,23,24,29,30,31,32,33,37,4
1
1X
X
192
2-methyl-1,3-butadiene
00078-79-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
275.1026
mg/mi
0.029999999
30.23999977
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,95,102,131,138,147,1
6
1X
X
193
2-methyl-1-butene
00563-46-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
211.2182
mg/mi
0.029999999
28.06999969
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,102,131,138
,
1X
X
194
2-methyl-1-hexene
06094-02-6
X
X
X
1.159999967
2.279999971
mg/hp-hr
31,131,184
1
X
X
195
2-methyl-1-nitronaphthalene
00881-03-8
X
9
196
2-methyl-1-pentene
00763-29-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
52.2099
mg/mi
0.02
4.110000134
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,53,95,102,131,166,180,1
8
1X
X
EPA420-B-06-002 3 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
1
44
1
2
197
2-methyl-1-propene
00115-11-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
3024.3494
mg/mi
0.200000003
453.1600037
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,43,45,46,47,48,53,62,102,13
1
X
X
198
2-methyl-2-butene
00513-35-9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
291.9271
mg/mi
0.029999999
45.06999969
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,36,45,46,48,53,95,102,131,147
,
1X
X
199
2-methyl-2-ethylheptane
X
X
31
200
2-methyl-2-hexene
02738-19-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
54.4751
mg/mi
3.220000029
5.199999809
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,48,131,184,188
1
X
X
201
2-methyl-2-pentene
00625-27-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
71.0536
mg/mi
4.949999809
7.170000076
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,166,180,184,1
8
1X
X
202
2-methyl-2-propenal
00078-85-3
X
X
X
X
0.0000
38.5633
mg/mi
9,45,46,53,62,166,188,193
1
X
203
2-methyl-3-ethylpentane
00609-26-7
X
X
X
22,31
204
2-methyl-3-pentanone
00565-69-5
X
X
8
205
2-methyl-4-ethylhexane
03074-75-7
X
X
X
31,131
1
X
206
2-methylbutane
00078-78-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
6220.4587
mg/mi
0.02
178.6000061
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,38,40,45,46,47,48,53,62,9
5
1X
X
207
2-methyldecane
06975-98-0
X
X
5,24
208
2-methylheptane
00592-27-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
182.4516
mg/mi
0.180000007
0.180000007
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,62,95,102,131,1
1
X
209
2-methylhexane
00591-76-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
479.4750
mg/mi
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,53,62,95,101,138,1
1
X
210
2-methylindane
00824-63-5
X
X
X
0.0153
29.5122
mg/mi
46,95,166,188
1
X
211
2-methylnaphthalene
00091-57-6
X
X
X
X
0.0031
31.0686
mg/mi
0.00029
192.8699951
mg/hp-hr
9,24,35,36,53,62,87,92,98,99,100,166,173,177,183,187
,
1X
X
212
2-methylnonane
00871-83-0
X
0.0226
68.3083
mg/mi
46,188,193
1
X
213
2-methyloctane
03221-61-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
141.7847
mg/mi
0.289999992
24.29999924
mg/hp-hr
5,9,22,24,31,45,48,102,131,180,184,188,189
1
X
X
214
2-methylpentane
00107-83-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2618.9709
mg/mi
0.02
338.6499939
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,
1
1X
X
215
2-methylpropanal
00078-84-2
X
X
X
X
0.0700
7.8000
mg/mi
0.018999999
25
mg/hp-hr
5,24,31,42,48,102,180,184,191
1
X
X
216
2-nitrobiphenyl
00086-00-0
X
X
0.0002
0.0149
mg/mi
9,95,166
1
X
217
2-nitrofluorene
00607-57-8
X
X
0.0000
0.0002
mg/mi
1E-06
0.000478
mg/hp-hr
9,95,102,191
1
X
X
218
2-nitronaphthalene
00581-89-5
X
X
0.0004
0.0123
mg/mi
0.00069
0.00151
mg/hp-hr
9,95,166,183
1
X
219
2-oxopropanal
00078-98-8
X
X
X
0.0311
6.2137
mg/mi
24,35,36,53,62
1
X
220
2-propenal
00107-02-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
46.9000
mg/mi
0.100000001
449
mg/hp-hr
1,4,5,7,9,10,11,12,13,16,17,18,20,21,24,31,35,36,42,45
,
1X
X
221
2-propenylbenzene
00300-57-2
X
X
8
222
2-propylphenol
00644-35-9
X
1.2000
15.0000
mg/mi
42
223
3,3,5-trimethyl-1-hexene
04316-65-8
X
5
224
3,3-dimethyl-1-butene
00558-37-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
15.4488
mg/mi
0.029999999
2.599999905
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,102,131,180,184,188,189
1
X
X
225
3,3-dimethylheptane
04032-86-4
X
X
0.0800
1.5500
mg/mi
31,193
1
X
226
3,3-dimethylhexane
00563-16-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
42.2762
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,48,101,131,188
1
X
227
3,3-dimethyloctane
04110-44-5
X
0.0000
25.0359
mg/mi
46,188,193
1
X
228
3,3-dimethylpentane
00562-49-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
28.7439
mg/mi
0.029999999
6.460000038
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,102,184,188,189,193
1
X
X
229
3,4-dimethyl-1-pentene
07385-78-6
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
13.6454
mg/mi
0.899999976
1.379999995
mg/hp-hr
9,45,46,48,184,188
1
X
X
230
3,4-dimethylhexane
00583-48-2
X
X
X
0.0000
30.2116
mg/mi
4.789999962
7.760000229
mg/hp-hr
31,46,131,184,188,189,193
1
X
X
231
3,4-dimethyloctane
15869-92-8
X
X
24
232
3,5-dimethylheptane
00926-82-9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
75.4626
mg/mi
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,188,193
1
X
233
3,5-dimethylphenol
00108-68-9
X
0.0100
46.0000
mg/mi
42
234
3-butenylbenzene
00768-56-9
X
5,24
235
3-ethyl-1,4-hexadiene
2080-89-9
X
20,21
236
3-ethyl-2-pentene
00816-79-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
11.4211
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,188
1
X
237
3-ethylhexane
00619-99-8
X
X
X
0.1110
127.3811
mg/mi
0.059999999
0.239999995
mg/hp-hr
8,31,53,62,102,184,189,193
1
X
X
238
3-ethylpentane
00617-78-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
98.2980
mg/mi
0.029999999
2.839999914
mg/hp-hr
9,24,45,46,102,184,188,189
1
X
X
239
3-heptene
00592-78-9
X
X
24
240
3-methyl-1,3-pentadiene
04549-74-0
X
5
241
3-methyl-1-butene
00563-45-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
54.5960
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,53,62,131,188,193
1
X
242
3-methyl-1-hexene
03404-61-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
8.2340
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,131,188
1
X
243
3-methyl-1-pentene
00760-20-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
36.8873
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,131,180,188
1
X
244
3-methyl-2-pentene
00922-61-2
X
X
X
0.0421
1.5041
mg/mi
22,95,166
1
X
245
3-methylbenzaldehyde
00620-23-5
X
X
X
0.0000
20.9245
mg/mi
29,46,166,188,190
1
X
X
246
3-methylbutanal
00590-86-3
X
X
X
X
X
0.1553
13.7199
mg/mi
0.090000004
1.49000001
mg/hp-hr
24,53,102,184,190,193
1
X
X
247
3-methylcyclopentene
01120-62-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
42.6402
mg/mi
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,188
1
X
248
3-methylene-heptane
01632-16-2
X
X
5,131
1
X
249
3-methylheptane
00589-81-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
248.7027
mg/mi
0.620000005
34.70000076
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,95,147,166,184,18
8
1X
X
250
3-methylhexane
00589-34-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
474.6073
mg/mi
0.039999999
43.54000092
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,13
1
X
X
251
3-methylnonane
05911-04-6
X
22
252
3-methyloctane
02216-33-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
95.3337
mg/mi
0.230000004
12.39999962
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,95,102,131,166,184,1
8
1X
X
253
3-methylpentane
00096-14-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1385.6064
mg/mi
0.029999999
67.19999695
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,24,29,31,34,35,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,10
1
X
X
254
3-nitrofluoranthene
00892-21-7
X
X
1E-06
0.00013
mg/hp-hr
9,166,175,191
1
X
X
255
4,4-dimethylheptane
01068-19-5
X
X
X
0.99000001
1.409999967
mg/hp-hr
31,131,184
1
X
X
256
4-ethyl-1,2-dimethylbenzene
00934-80-5
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
64.5750
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
8,9,22,24,29,45,46,48,166,180,188,193
1
X
257
4-ethyl-3-heptene
33933-74-3
X
20,21
258
4-methyl-1-pentene
00691-37-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
32.8000
mg/mi
0.01
4.130000114
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,102,131,180,184,188
1
X
X
259
4-methyl-2-pentanone
00108-10-1
X
X
X
0.4500
4.2400
mg/mi
8,190,193
1
X
260
4-methylbenzaldehyde
00104-87-0
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
8.8356
mg/mi
1,20,21,24,45,147,190
1
X
X
261
4-methylheptane
00589-53-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
74.6211
mg/mi
1.110000014
26.52000046
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,24,29,31,45,46,48,95,166,184,188,189
1
X
X
262
4-methylindane
00824-22-6
X
0.0000
10.8495
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
263
4-methyloctane
02216-34-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
117.0375
mg/mi
1,5,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,147,188
1
X
264
4-nitrobiphenyl
00092-93-3
X
X
0.0000
0.0023
mg/mi
9,95,166
1
X
EPA420-B-06-002 4 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
19
5
5
3
8
265
4-nitropyrene
57835-92-4
X
9
266
5-methylindane
00874-35-1
X
0.0230
16.5031
mg/mi
46,188
1
X
267
5-nitroacenaphthene
00602-87-9
X
9
268
6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene
63041-90-7
X
X
X
0.0000
0.0004
mg/mi
7E-07
0.00042
mg/hp-hr
9,95,102,175,183,191
1
X
X
269
6-nitrochrysene
07496-02-8
X
X
X
0.0000
0.0003
mg/mi
8E-07
0.00021
mg/hp-hr
9,95,102,166,175,191
1
X
X
270
7-nitrobenz(a)anthracene
20268-51-3
X
X
0.0000
0.0004
mg/mi
6E-07
6E-05
mg/hp-hr
9,95,102
1
X
271
9-nitroanthracene
00602-60-8
X
X
X
0.0000
0.0025
mg/mi
2E-06
0.0044
mg/hp-hr
9,95,166,173,175,183,191
1
X
X
294
ethyl indane
X
24
295
ethyl napthalene
27138-19-8
X
X
0.100000001
1.600000024
mg/hp-hr
24,102
1
X
296
ethyl styrene
28106-30-1
X
20,21
357
indeno(1,2,3-cd)fluoranthene
00193-43-1
X
9
358
acenaphthene
00083-32-9
X
X
X
X
0.0001
2.2146
mg/mi
2.6139E-05
0.560000002
mg/hp-hr
9,15,25,35,53,62,87,92,95,98,99,100,166,177,187,191
1
X
X
359
acenaphthylene
00208-96-8
X
X
X
X
0.0002
3.6870
mg/mi
1.21283E-05
31.80999947
mg/hp-hr
9,15,25,35,53,62,87,92,95,98,99,100,166,173,177,180,
1
X
X
360
acetaldehyde
00075-07-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
604.8023
mg/mi
0.039999999
822
mg/hp-hr
1,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,16,17,19,20,21,23,24,26,2
1
X
X
361
acetone
00067-64-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
260.5937
mg/mi
0.100000001
271
mg/hp-hr
1,5,7,8,9,20,21,24,31,35,36,42,45,46,48,53,62,102,147,
1
1X
X
362
acetylene
00074-86-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
7229.9774
mg/mi
0.07
2857.01001
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,35,36,38,40,45,46,47,48,5
3
1X
X
363
aluminum
07429-90-5
X
X
0.0011
3.0105
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,87,166,193
1
X
364
ammonium chloride
12125-02-9
X
X
9,24
365
anthracene
00120-12-7
X
X
X
X
X
0.0001
4.3700
mg/mi
4.54828E-05
9.670000076
mg/hp-hr
9,15,24,25,35,36,53,62,87,92,95,98,99,100,166,173,17
1
X
X
366
antimony
07440-36-0
X
X
0.0001
0.1302
mg/mi
2,9,24,166
1
X
367
arsenic
07440-38-2
X
X
X
0.0008
0.0342
mg/mi
4,9,10,13,16,24,166
1
X
368
barium
07440-39-3
X
X
0.0000
2.5872
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,166
1
X
369
benzaldehyde
00100-52-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
98.7980
mg/mi
0.050000001
1138
mg/hp-hr
1,5,7,8,9,20,21,24,29,31,36,42,45,46,48,53,62,95,102,1
4
1X
X
370
benzaldehyde & unknown
00100-52-7; X
X
35
371
benzene
00071-43-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2389.7565
mg/mi
0.100000001
14421
mg/hp-hr
1,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,16,17,19,20,21,22,23,24,2
1
X
X
372
benzene & cyclohexane
00100-52-7; 110-82-7
X
X
44.2800
165.2400
mg/mi
34
X
373
benzo(a)anthracene
00056-55-3
X
X
X
X
X
0.0001
14.7200
mg/mi
5E-06
0.016419999
mg/hp-hr
9,15,24,25,35,36,53,62,87,92,95,98,99,100,102,166,17
1
X
X
374
benzo(a)phenanthrene
00218-01-9
X
X
X
X
X
0.0001
10.7600
mg/mi
2E-06
0.017200001
mg/hp-hr
15,24,25,35,36,87,92,95,98,99,100,102,115,166,173,17
5
1X
X
375
benzo(a)pyrene
00050-32-8
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
14.8200
mg/mi
2E-06
0.02059
mg/hp-hr
9,15,16,23,24,25,35,36,53,87,92,95,98,99,100,102,115,
1
1X
X
376
benzo(b)chrysene
00214-17-5
X
X
0.0006
0.5200
mg/mi
0.00015
0.0004
mg/hp-hr
9,87,183,193
1
X
377
benzo(b)fluoranthene
00205-99-2
X
X
X
X
0.0000
25.2000
mg/mi
2E-06
0.0053
mg/hp-hr
15,25,53,92,98,99,100,102,173,175,180,187,191,193
1
X
X
378
benzo(b)quinoline
00260-94-6
X
24
379
benzo(c)chrysene
00194-69-4
X
0.00014
0.00029
mg/hp-hr
9,183
1
X
380
benzo(c)phenanthrene
00195-19-7
X
X
X
0.0000
0.3019
mg/mi
0.00154
0.00303
mg/hp-hr
9,24,95,166,183
1
X
381
benzo(e)pyrene
00192-97-2
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
17.8900
mg/mi
6E-05
0.018990001
mg/hp-hr
9,23,24,35,36,53,87,92,98,99,100,166,173,175,177,180
,
1X
X
382
benzo(ghi)fluoranthene
00203-12-3
X
X
0.0000
17.1300
mg/mi
0.01694
0.024839999
mg/hp-hr
9,53,62,183,193
1
X
383
benzo(ghi)perylene
00191-24-2
X
X
X
X
X
0.0006
47.5800
mg/mi
2E-06
0.060740001
mg/hp-hr
9,15,24,25,35,87,92,95,98,99,100,102,115,166,173,175
,
1X
X
384
benzo(k)fluoranthene
00207-08-9
X
X
X
X
0.0000
5.3700
mg/mi
2E-06
0.0109
mg/hp-hr
15,25,53,92,98,99,100,102,173,175,180,187,191,193
1
X
X
385
benzofluoranthene
56832-73-6
X
X
X
9,23,24,35
386
beryllium
07440-41-7
X
10,16
387
boron
07440-42-8
X
X
24
388
bromine
07726-95-6
X
X
0.0002
0.3050
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,87,166
1
X
389
butanal
00123-72-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
11.0008
mg/mi
1,8,9,20,21,24,45,46,62,147,166,188
1
X
390
butanal & crotonaldehyde
00123-72-8; 4170-30-3
X
36
391
butane
00106-97-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1920.7675
mg/mi
0.02
29.54000092
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,38,40,45,46,47,48,53,62,9
5
1X
X
392
butenes
X
X
22.6800
134.6400
mg/mi
34
X
393
butylbenzene
00104-51-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
156.3805
mg/mi
1,8,20,21,22,24,31,45,95,131,147,166
1
X
394
butylcyclohexane
01678-93-9
X
X
X
24
395
cadmium
07440-43-9
X
X
0.0090
1.1301
mg/mi
9,10,16,166
1
X
396
calcium
07440-70-2
X
X
0.0030
6.8568
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,53,87,115,166,177,193
1
X
399
chloride
16887-00-6
X
X
0.0090
30.3163
mg/mi
9,115,166,193
1
X
400
chlorine
07782-50-5
X
X
0.0000
1.2180
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,53,87,166,177
1
X
401
chlorobenzene
00108-90-7
X
X
24,190
1
X
402
chromium
07440-47-3
X
X
X
X
0.0003
0.2260
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
2,4,9,10,12,13,16,17,24,42,87,166,187,193
1
X
X
403
chrysene & triphenylene
218-01-9; 217-59-4
X
X
0.0001
0.0324
mg/mi
0.01038
0.01736
mg/hp-hr
9,53,62,183
1
X
404
cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane
02207-01-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
26.8857
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,48,180,188
1
X
405
cis-1,2-dimethylcyclopentane
01192-18-3
X
X
31
406
cis-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane
00638-04-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
104.0803
mg/mi
0.001
0.001
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,31,45,46,184,188
1
X
X
407
cis-1,3-dimethylcyclopentane
02532-58-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
201.6427
mg/mi
4.860000134
7.340000153
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,95,131,166,180,184,188,1
1
X
X
408
cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane
00624-29-3
X
X
X
5,22,24,31
409
cis-1-ethyl-2-methylcyclopentane
00930-89-2
X
X
1.279999971
1.789999962
mg/hp-hr
31,184
1
X
410
cis-1-ethyl-3-methylcyclopentane
02613-66-3
X
X
X
0.0000
1.2765
mg/mi
0.090000004
4.150000095
mg/hp-hr
31,46,102,184
1
X
X
411
cobalt
07440-48-4
X
X
0.0000
0.0134
mg/mi
2,9,166
1
X
412
copper
07440-50-8
X
X
X
0.0002
0.2270
mg/mi
2,9,17,24,87,166,177,193
1
X
413
coronene
00191-07-1
X
X
X
X
0.0001
0.1418
mg/mi
0.00493
0.00949
mg/hp-hr
9,23,36,53,87,95,115,166,177,183
1
X
414
cresol
01319-77-3
X
X
X
0.0000
3.9000
mg/mi
42,92
1
X
415
crotonaldehyde
4170-30-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
70.8363
mg/mi
0.100000001
238
mg/hp-hr
1,5,7,9,20,21,24,31,42,45,48,53,62,102,147,166,170,18
0
1X
X
416
cycloheptane
00291-64-5
X
20,21
EPA420-B-06-002 5 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
1
8
6
417
cyclohexane
00110-82-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
300.0255
mg/mi
0.300000012
3.859999895
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,138,166,
1
X
X
418
cyclohexanone
00108-94-1
X
X
8
419
cyclohexene
00110-83-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
64.0357
mg/mi
0.039999999
1.830000043
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,95,102,166,184,188,193
1
X
X
420
cyclopenta(cd)pyrene
27208-37-3
X
X
0.0000
0.0345
mg/mi
0.02125
0.026149999
mg/hp-hr
9,53,62,183
1
X
421
cyclopenta(dd)pyrene
X
35
422
cyclopentane
00287-92-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
108.0294
mg/mi
0.170000002
2.980000019
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,53,62,95,101,102,131,138
,
1X
X
423
cyclopentene
00142-29-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
58.8207
mg/mi
0.01
5.670000076
mg/hp-hr
1,5,9,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,102,131,147,16
6
1X
X
424
decane
00124-18-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
68.3838
mg/mi
0.330000013
1.429999948
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,95,102,166,1
1
X
X
425
di-isopropylbenzene
25321-09-9
X
X
X
24
426
dibenz(a,h)anthracene
00053-70-3
X
X
X
X
0.0001
0.0134
mg/mi
2E-06
0.0057
mg/hp-hr
15,25,35,92,98,102,173,175,180,187,191
1
X
X
427
dibenz(a,h+a,c)anthracene
00053-70-3; 215-58-7
X
X
X
0.0001
1.7300
mg/mi
0.00087
0.00154
mg/hp-hr
9,87,95,166,183,193
1
X
428
dibenz(a,j)anthracene
00224-41-9
X
X
0.00055
0.00093
mg/hp-hr
9,175,183
1
X
X
429
dibenzo(a,e)pyrene
00192-65-4
X
0.00061
0.00113
mg/hp-hr
9,183
1
X
430
dibenzo(a,h)pyrene
00189-64-0
X
0.00075
0.00133
mg/hp-hr
9,183
1
X
431
dibenzo(a,i)pyrene
00189-55-9
X
0.00027
0.00091
mg/hp-hr
9,183
1
X
432
dibenzo(a,l)pyrene
00191-30-0
X
X
0.00125
0.00284
mg/hp-hr
9,175,183
1
X
X
433
dibenzothiophene
00132-65-0
X
X
X
0.0002
0.0490
mg/mi
24,35,53,62,193
1
X
434
dichloromethane
00075-09-2
X
X
X
0.0000
1.4000
mg/mi
17,42,190
1
X
X
436
diesel particulate matter
X
X
X
10.0000
22540.0000
mg/mi
8
500
mg/hp-hr
14,23,33,87,92,98,99,100,155,166,180,183,187
1
X
X
437
diethylbenzene
25340-17-4
X
X
X
X
0.0651
26.8604
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
24,95,102,166
1
X
438
dimethylbutene
X
X
24
439
dimethylcyclobutanone
X
24
440
dimethylcyclohexane
27195-67-1
X
X
24
441
dimethylcyclopentane
28729-52-4
X
X
24
442
dimethylcyclopentene
X
24
443
dimethyldecane
X
24
444
dimethylethylcyclohexane
X
24
445
dimethylheptane
30498-66-9
X
24
446
dimethylhexadiene
X
X
24
447
dimethylhexane
28777-67-5
X
X
24
448
dimethylhexene
78820-82-3
X
X
24
449
dimethylindane
53563-67-0
X
X
0.0372
37.0897
mg/mi
24,166
1
X
450
dimethylindene
X
24
451
dimethylnaphthalene
28804-88-8
X
X
X
0.0013
6.6800
mg/mi
0.5
5.300000191
mg/hp-hr
24,35,36,95,102,180
1
X
452
dimethylnaphthyridine
X
24
453
dimethyloctane
X
X
X
0.0139
9.8210
mg/mi
24,166
1
X
454
dimethylpentane
38815-29-1
X
X
24
455
dimethylpentene
69852-93-3

456
dodecane
00112-40-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1015.1014
mg/mi
0.419999987
3.299999952
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,13
1
1X
457
elemental carbon
07440-44-0
X
X
X
9,24
458
ethane
00074-84-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
708.8000
mg/mi
0.039999999
164.6864929
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,28,29,31,35,36,45,46,47,48,53,95,1
0
1X
X
459
ethanedial
00107-22-2
X
X
X
0.1056
238.7893
mg/mi
24,35,36,53,62,166
1
X
460
ethenylmethylbenzene
25013-15-4

461
ethyl alcohol
00064-17-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
670.2491
mg/mi
1,8,20,21,22,23,24,30,31,37,39,41,43,45,46,50,131,188
1
X
462
ethylbenzene
00100-41-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
432.6778
mg/mi
0.01
177.3200073
mg/hp-hr
1,4,5,8,9,10,11,12,13,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,35,36,45,46
,
1X
X
463
ethylcyclohexane
01678-91-7

464
ethylcyclopentane
01640-89-7
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
91.6469
mg/mi
1,20,21,22,24,31,45,46,131,188
1
X
465
ethyldicycloheptane

466
ethyldimethylbenzene
X
24

467
ethyldimethylpentane
86571-39-3

468
ethylene
00074-85-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2424.2302
mg/mi
7.880000114
1135.119995
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,35,36,38,40,43,45,46,47,4
8
1X
X
469
ethylheptane

470
ethylhexane

471
ethylindane

472
ethylmethylbenzene
25550-14-5

473
ethylmethylcyclohexane

474
ethylmethylcyclopentane

475
ethylmethylhexane

476
ethylmethyloctane

477
ethylpentene

478
fluoranthene
00206-44-0
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
42.8800
mg/mi
0.000402462
1.220000029
mg/hp-hr
9,15,23,24,25,35,36,53,62,87,92,95,98,99,100,166,173,
1
1X
X
479
fluorene
00086-73-7

480
formaldehyde
00050-00-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1623.9200
mg/mi
0.140000001
3507
mg/hp-hr
1,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,16,17,19,20,21,23,24,25,2
1
X
X
481
gallium
07440-55-3

484
gold
07440-57-5

485
heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
37871-00-4

486
heptachlorodibenzofuran
38998-75-3

487
heptacosane
00593-49-7
X
X
0.0004
32.1684
mg/mi
24,53,62,166
1
X
EPA420-B-06-002 6 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

488
heptadecane
00629-78-7
X
X
X
0.0027
28.5244
mg/mi
0.300000012
0.300000012
mg/hp-hr
24,36,53,62,102,166,180,193
1
X
489
heptadienal
05910-85-9

490
heptane
00142-82-5

491
heptene
25339-56-4

492
hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
34465-46-8

493
hexachlorodibenzofuran
55684-94-1
X
494
hexacosane
00630-01-3

495
hexadecane
00544-76-3

496
hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane
00541-05-9

497
hexanal
00066-25-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
548.0000
mg/mi
0
80
mg/hp-hr
1,5,7,8,9,20,21,24,31,36,45,46,53,62,102,155,166,170,
1
X
X
498
hexane
00110-54-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1062.5487
mg/mi
0.01
29.37000084
mg/hp-hr
1,4,5,8,9,10,11,12,13,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,53
,
1X
X
499
hexene
25264-93-1

500
hexenes
X
X
5.4000
55.0800
mg/mi
34
X
501
hexobarbital
00056-29-1

502
indane
00496-11-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
52.3171
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,95,131,166,180,188
,
1X
503
indene
00095-13-6

504
indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene
00193-39-5

505
indium
07440-74-6

506
iron
07439-89-6

507
isobutane
00075-28-5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1506.5652
mg/mi
0.02
7.869999886
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,34,38,40,45,46,47,48,53,95,101,
1
1X
X
508
isomers of C9H16

509
isomers of butene

510
isomers of butylbenzene

511
isomers of decane

512
isomers of dodecane

513
isomers of heptane

514
isomers of hexane

515
isomers of nonane

516
isomers of octane

517
isomers of pentadecane

518
isomers of pentane

519
isomers of pentene

520
isomers of propylbenzene

521
isomers of tetradecane

522
isomers of undecane

523
lanthanum
07439-91-0
X
0.0101
10.7670
mg/mi
9,166
1
X
524
lead
07439-92-1
X
X
X
X
0.0001
1.5960
mg/mi
0.140000001
1.309999943
mg/hp-hr
2,4,9,10,13,16,24,87,115,166,177,191,193
1
X
X
525
m- & p-xylene
1330-20-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1068.7584
mg/mi
0.07
417.4299927
mg/hp-hr
1,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,35,36,43,45,48,53,62,95,101,
1
X
X
526
m-ethylphenol
00620-17-7
X
0.0100
46.0000
mg/mi
42
X
527
m-xylene
00108-38-3
X
X
X
X
0.0007
821.0334
mg/mi
5,8,24,38,40,46,131,188
1
X
528
magnesium
07439-95-4

529
manganese
07439-96-5

530
mercury
07439-97-6

531
methane
00074-82-8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
10540.2002
mg/mi
0.119999997
3524.291016
mg/hp-hr
1,3,5,8,9,20,21,22,23,24,28,29,30,31,34,35,36,38,40,45
,
1X
X
532
methyl alcohol
00067-56-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
851.9251
mg/mi
1,8,22,23,24,29,31,37,39,41,45,46,48,92,131,188
1
X
533
methyl bromide
00074-83-9

534
methylbenzaldehyde
01334-78-7
X
X
X
0.100000001
169.1999969
mg/hp-hr
8,9,24,180,191
1
X
X
535
methylbenzaldehyde & C10H14
01334-78-7;X

536
methylbutadiene

537
methylbutene

538
methylcyclohexane
00108-87-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
479.1982
mg/mi
0.02
14.10999966
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,10
1
X
X
539
methylcyclohexene

540
methylcyclooctane
01502-38-1

541
methylcyclopentadiene

542
methylcyclopentane
00096-37-7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
823.1962
mg/mi
0.07
1.309999943
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,45,46,48,53,62,95,101,102,1
1
X
X
544
methyldecane

545
methyldihydronaphthalene

546
methylheptane
50985-84-7

547
methylheptyne

548
methylhexadiene

549
methylhexanal

550
methylhexane
25495-88-9

551
methylhexene

552
methylindane
27133-93-3

553
methylindene
29036-25-7

554
methylnaphthalene
01321-94-4

555
methylnonane
63335-87-5

556
methyloctane
61193-19-9

EPA420-B-06-002 7 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

557
methylpentane
43133-95-5

558
methylpentene
37275-41-5

559
methylphenanthrene & methylanthr
28652-81-5; 26914-18-1

560
molybdenum
07439-98-7

561
n-butylbenzene & p-diethylbenzene
104-51-8;105-05-5

562
n-nitrosodibutylamine
00924-16-3

563
n-nitrosodiethylamine
00055-18-5

564
n-nitrosodimethylamine
00062-75-9

565
n-nitrosodipropylamine
00621-64-7

566
n-nitrosomorpholine
00059-89-2

567
n-nitrosopiperidine
00100-75-4

568
n-nitrosopyrrolidine
00930-55-2

569
naphthalene
00091-20-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
299.1262
mg/mi
0.001
86.90000153
mg/hp-hr
1,8,9,15,20,21,22,23,24,25,29,31,35,36,45,46,53,62,87,
9
1X
X
570
nickel
07440-02-0

571
nitrates
14797-55-8

574
nitrous oxide
10024-97-2
X
10.0000
239.0000
mg/mi
43
X
575
nonacosane
00630-03-5
X
X
0.0017
0.0590
mg/mi
24,53,62
1
X
576
nonane
00111-84-2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
70.7734
mg/mi
0.090000004
14.64999962
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,62,95,102,13
1
X
X
579
o-,m-,p-xylene
01330-20-7
X
X
X
X
X
0.8000
63.0000
mg/mi
0.400000006
0.699999988
mg/hp-hr
4,10,11,12,13,18,24,42,102
1
X
580
o-xylene
00095-47-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
429.7202
mg/mi
0.01
197.0800018
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,38,40,43,45,46,48,53,6
2
1X
X
582
octachlorodibenzodioxin
03268-87-9

583
octachlorodibenzofuran
39001-02-0

584
octacosane
00630-02-4

585
octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane
00556-67-2

586
octane
00111-65-9
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
138.2492
mg/mi
0.209999993
17.62999916
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,45,46,48,53,62,95,102,
1
1X
X
587
octatriene
30702-87-5

588
octyne
32073-03-3

594
p-methylphenylacetylene
00766-97-2

595
p-xylene
00106-42-3

palladium
07440-05-3

598
pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

36088-22-9

599
pentachlorodibenzofuran
30402-15-4

600
pentacosane
00629-99-2

601
pentadecane
00629-62-9

602
pentadiene
41050-31-1

603
pentanal
00110-62-3

604
pentane
00109-66-0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
1647.3680
mg/mi
0.029999999
49.75999832
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,34,35,38,40,45,46,47,48,53,6
2
1X
X
605
pentanone
00930-24-5

606
pentene
25377-72-4

607
pentenes

608
pentenyne
91144-32-0

609
pentylbenzene
00538-68-1

610
perylene
00198-55-0

611
phenanthrene
00085-01-8
X
X
X
X
X
0.0002
19.1400
mg/mi
3.15752E-05
76.43000031
mg/hp-hr
9,15,24,25,35,36,53,62,87,92,95,98,99,100,166,173,17
1
X
X
612
phenol
00108-95-2
X
X
X
0.1500
42.5155
mg/mi
mg/hp-hr
24,36,92,166,180,190
1
X
X
613
phosphorus
07723-14-0
X
X
X
0.0000
3.4188
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,53,87,92,166,177
1
X
614
platinum
07440-06-4
X
42,115
1
X
617
potassium
07440-09-7
X
X
0.0003
0.8486
mg/mi
2,9,24,42,87,166,193
1
X
618
propanal
00123-38-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
104.6758
mg/mi
0.100000001
209
mg/hp-hr
1,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,20,21,24,31,35,36,42,45,46,48,
1
X
X
619
propane
00074-98-6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
3365.8000
mg/mi
0.02
323.5700073
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,35,36,45,46,47,48,53,95,101,10
1
X
X
620
propene
00115-07-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2483.4958
mg/mi
1.169999957
475.3599854
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,38,40,45,46,47,48,53,6
2
1X
X
621
propylbenzene
00103-65-1

622
propylcyclohexane
01678-92-8

624
propyne
00074-99-7

625
pyrene
00129-00-0

626
rubidium
07440-17-7

627
salicylylaldehyde
00090-02-8

628
sec-amylbenzene
29316-05-0

629
selenium
07782-49-2

630
silicon
07440-21-3

631
silver
07440-22-4

632
sodium
07440-23-5

633
strontium
07440-24-6

634
styrene
00100-42-5

635
sulfates
14808-79-8

636
sulfur
07704-34-9

637
tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
41903-57-5

638
tetrachlorodibenzofuran
30402-14-3

EPA420-B-06-002 8 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

639
tetracosane
00646-31-1

640
tetradecane
00629-59-4

641
tetramethylbenzene

25619-60-7

642
tetramethylcyclobutene

643
thallium
07440-28-0

644
tin
07440-31-5

645
titanium
07440-32-6

X
646
toluene

00108-88-3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2994.8283
mg/mi
0.050000001
675.9899902
mg/hp-hr
1,4,5,8,9,10,11,12,13,18,20,21,22,24,29,31,35,36,38,40
,
1X
X
647
toluene & 2,3-dimethylhexane
108-88-3; 584-94-1

656
trans-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane
06876-23-9

657
trans-1,2-dimethylcyclopentane
00822-50-4

658
trans-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane
02207-03-6

659
trans-1,3-dimethylcyclopentane
01759-58-6

660
trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane
02207-04-7

661
trans-1-ethyl-3-methylcyclopentane
02613-65-2

662
trans-1-ethyl-4-methylcyclohexane
06236-88-0

663
trans-1-methyl-2-ethylcyclopentane
00930-90-5

664
trichloromethane
00067-66-3

665
tricosane
00638-67-5

666
tridecane
00629-50-5

667
trimethylbenzene
25551-13-7

668
trimethylcyclohexane
30498-63-6

669
trimethylcyclopentane
30498-64-7

670
trimethyldecane
98060-54-9

671
trimethylheptane
X
24
672
trimethylhexene

673
trimethylindane

674
trimethyloctane
98060-52-7

675
trimethylpentadiene

676
trimethylpentane
29222-48-8

677
trimethylpentene
61665-19-8

678
undecane
01120-21-4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0.0000
2074.8801
mg/mi
0.02
1.5
mg/hp-hr
1,5,8,9,20,21,22,24,31,35,36,45,46,48,95,102,131,166,
1
X
X
697
uranium
07440-61-1

698
vanadium
07440-62-2

700
yttrium
07440-65-5

701
zinc
07440-66-6

702
zirconium
07440-67-7

703
diesel VOC
X
X
X
90.0000
59090.0000
mg/mi
26
1573.452637
mg/hp-hr
,87,92,98,99,100,155,166,180,183,187
1
X
X
704
(E)-4-octene
14850-23-8

705
17a(H),21b(H)-29-norhopane

706
17a(h),21ß(h)-hopane
13849-96-21

707
17a(H)-22,29,30-trisnorhopane
53584-59-1

708
1-methylphenanthrene
832-69-9

709
2,6,10-trimethyltridecane
3891-99-4

710
20R&S-5a(H),14b(H),17b(H)-sitostane

711
20R&S-5a(H),14b(H),17b(H)-ergostane

712
20R-13b(H),17a(H)-diacholestane

713
20R,5a(H),14b(H),17b(H)-cholesta
69483-47-2

714
c27-20r5a(h),14a(h),17a(h)-cholest
481-21-0

715
20S-13b(H),17a(H)-diacholestane

716
c27-20s5a(h),14ß(h),17ß(h)-cholestane

717
22,29,30-trisnorneohopane

718
22r&s,17a(h),21b(H)-30-bishomohopane

719
22r&s,17a(H),21b(H)-30-homohopane

720
furfural
98-01-1

721
2-methylanthracene
613-12-7

722
2-methylphenanthrene
2531-84-2

723
3-methylphenanthrene
832-71-3

724
8b,13a-dimethyl-14b-n-butylpodocarpane

725
8b,13a-dimethyl-14b-[3′-methylbutyl]podocarpane

726
anthraquinone
84-65-1

727
9-methylphenanthrene
883-20-5

728
acephenanthrylene
201-06-9

729
benzo(j)fluoranthene
205-82-3

730
2,3-benzofuran
271-89-6

731
benzoic acid
65-85-0

732
isobutyraldehyde & butyraldehyde
78-84-2 & 123-72-8

733
c2-fluorene

EPA420-B-06-002 9 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
734
c2-naphthalene

735
c3-naphthalene

736
c4-naphthalene

737
methylfluorene
26914-17-0

738
decanal
112-31-2

739
decanoic acid
334-48-5

740
decylcyclohexane
1795-16-0

741
dibenzofuran
132-64-9

742
dibenzothiazole

743
dodecanal
112-54-9

744
dodecylcyclohexane
1795-17-1

745
icosanoic acid
506-30-9

746
icosylcyclohexane

747
farnesane
3891-98-3

748
9-Fluorenone
486-25-9

749
henicosylcyclohexane

750
heptadecanoic acid
506-12-7

751
heptadecylcyclohexane
19781-73-8

752
heptanal
111-71-7

753
hexadecylcyclohexane
6812-38-0
X
X
0.0009
40.6200
mg/mi
53,62,166,193
1
X
754
indanone
83-33-0

755
indeno(1,2,3-cd)fluoranthene
00193-43-1

756
m/p-tolualdehyde
620-23-5 & 104-87-0

757
methylbenzoic acid
12167-74-7

758
docosane
629-97-0

759
icosane
112-95-8

760
henicosane
629-94-7

761
nonadecane
629-92-5

762
octadecane
593-45-3
X
X
0.0012
110.9582
mg/mi
0.200000003
0.5
mg/hp-hr
53,62,102,166,180,193
1
X
763
nonadecanedioic acid
6250-70-0

764
nonadecanoic acid
646-30-0

765
nonadecylcyclohexane
22349-03-7

766
nonanal
124-19-6

767
nonanoic acid
112-05-0

768
nonylcyclohexane
2883-02-5

769
norfarnesane
6864-53-5

770
norpristane
3892-00-0

771
octadecanedioic acid
871-70-5

772
octadecanoic acid
57-11-4

773
octadecylcyclohexane
4445-06-1

774
octanal
124-13-0

775
octanoic acid (caprylic acid)
124-07-2

776
o-tolualdehyde

529-20-4

777
pentadecylcyclohexane
6006-95-7

778
phytane
638-36-8

779
pristane
1921-70-6

780
methyl tert-amyl ether
994-05-8

781
tetradecylcyclohexane
1795-18-2

782
tridecanal
10486-19-8

783
tridecylcyclohexane
6006-33-3

784
undecanal
112-44-7

785
undecanoic acid
112-37-8

786
undecylcyclohexane
54105-66-7

787
xanthone
90-47-1

788
ammonium
14798-03-9

789
18a(h)-22,29,30-trisnorneohopane

790
acetophenone
98-86-2

791
lauric acid
143-07-7

792
heptylcyclohexane
5617-41-4

793
hexylcyclohexane
4292-75-5

794
azelaic acid
123-99-9

795
octanedioic acid
505-48-6

796
octylcyclohexane
1795-15-9

797
pentylcyclohexane
38792-89-1

798
Myristic Acid
544-63-8

799
tridecanoic acid
638-53-9

800
1,1′-biphenyl, 3-methyl-
643-93-6

801
1,1′-biphenyl, 4-methyl
644-08-6

EPA420-B-06-002 10 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006


802
1,2,8-trimethylnaphthalene
3876-97-9

803
1,3+1,6+1,7dimethylnaphthalene
75-41-7; 575-43-9; 575-37

804
1,4+1,5+2,3-dimethylnaphthalene
71-58-4; 571-61-9; 581-40

805
1,7-dimethylphenanthrene
483-87-4

806
1,8-dimethylnaphthalene
569-41-5

807
1-ethyl-2-methylnaphthalene

17057-93-1

808
1-methyl-7-isopropylphenanthrene
483-65-8

809
1-methylfluorene
1730-37-6

810
2-methylbiphenyl
643-58-3

811
3,6-dimethylphenanthrene
1576-67-6

812
7-methylbenz[a]anthracene
2541-69-7

813
7-methylbenzo(a)pyrene

63041-77-07

814
9-methylanthracene
779-02-2

815
benzo(b+j+k)fluoranthene
05-99-2; 205-82-3; 207-08

816
benzonaphthothiophene
61523-34-0

817
bishomohopane-1

818
bishomohopane-2

819
cholestane-1

X
820
cholestane-2

821
cholestane-3

822
diasterane-1

823
diasterane-2

824
dimethylphenanthrene
29062-98-4

825
ergostane
25318-39-2

826
homohopane-1

827
homohopane-2

828
hopane-1

829
hopane-2

830
hopane-3

831
methyl ethyl naphthalene
29253-36-9

832
methylbiphenyl
28652-72-4

833
methylphenanthrene
28652-81-5

834
methylpyrene
2381-21-7

835
norhopane-1

836
norhopane-2

837
sitostane

838
trimethylnaphthalene
28652-77-9

839
trisnorhopane-1

840
trisnorhopane-2

841
bis[2-ethylhexyl]phthalate
117-81-7

842
cyanide compounds

843
di-n-butylphthalate

84-74-2

844
dioxins and furans

845
1-ethylnaphthalene+2-ethylnaphthal
e1127-76-0 & 939-27-5

846
methylpyrene/methylfluoranthene
2381-21-7; 30997-39-8

847
3-nitrofluorene
5397-37-5

848
5+6-methylchrysene
3697-24-3 & 1705-85-7

849
3-nitro-1,1′-Biphenyl
2113-58-8

850
1,5-dinitronaphthalene
605-71-0

851
4-nitrophenanthrene
82064-15-1

852
1,3-dinitronaphthalene
606-37-1

853
1,8-dinitronaphthalene
602-38-0

854
9-nitrophenanthrene
954-46-1

855
3-nitrophenanthrene
17024-19-0

856
tert-butylbenzene + 1,2,4-trimethylb
98-06-6 & 95-63-3

857
1-butene + isobutene
106-98-9 & 115-11-7
X
X
X
1.0933
132.5400
mg/mi
95,166,193
1
X
858
1-methylindane
767-58-8
X
X
0.0803
42.2308
mg/mi
95,166
1
X
859
alpha-pinene
80-56-8

860
beta-pinene
127-91-3

861
isopropyltoluene
25155-15-1

862
limonene
138-86-3

863
propyltoluene
28729-54-6

864
(E)-1,3-hexadiene
20237-34-7

865
1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane
811-97-2

866
trichloroethene
79-01-6

867
methylisopropylbenzene
25155-15-1

868
c4-benzene or c2-benzene

869
hexadecadienoic acid methyl ester

EPA420-B-06-002 11 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

870
heptenoic acid, methyl ester

871
ethyl dimethyl benzene

872
trimethyl pentadecane

873
benzene, 1,1′(1-methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)bis-

874
methyl propyl benzene
1074-17-5

875
tetrahydro dimethyl naphthalene

876
trimethyl dodecane

877
1,1′-ethylidenebis-benzene
612-00-0

878
octadecenoic acid methyl ester

879
tetramethyl hexadecane

880
hexadecanoic acid
57-10-3

881
tetramethyl butane
594-82-1

882
dimethylbenzaldehyde

883
3-ethyl-cis-2-pentene
816-79-5

884
ethyl hexanol
104-76-7

885
methyl tridecane

886
nonene
27215-95-8

887
dimethyl undecane
79004-83-4

888
phenyl ethanone

889
dimethyl dodecane

890
hexyl cyclohexane
4292-75-5

891
cerium
7440-45-1

892
fluoride
16984-48-8

893
phosphates
14265-44-2

894
sulfates or phosphates

895
anthracene/phenanthrene
120-12-7; 85-01-8

896
pyrene/fluoranthene
129-00-0; 206-44-0

897
1,4-pentadiene
591-93-5

898
1,2-dimethylcyclohexane

583-57-3

899
2,2-dimethylheptane
1071-26-7

900
2,3-dimethyl-1-hexene
16746-86-4

901
2-ethyl-1-butene
760-21-4

902
2-methyl-1-phenyl-1-propene
768-49-0

903
2-methylundecane
31807-55-3

904
3,3,4,4-tetramethylhexane
5171-84-6

905
3-ethylheptane
15869-80-4

906
(Z)-1,3-pentadiene
1574-41-0

907
(Z)-2,5-dimethyl-3-hexene
10557-44-5

908
(Z)-2-methyl-3-hexene
15840-60-5

909
cis-decalin
493-01-6

910
1,cis-2,trans-3-trimethylcyclopentane

911
tetralin
119-64-2

912
(E)-2,3-dimethyl-3-hexene

913
(E)-decalin
493-02-7

914
tert-butyl alcohol
75-65-0

915
3,3-dimethyl-1-pentene
3404-73-7

916
trans-3,4-dimethyl-2-pentene + 1-he
p4914-92-5; 592-76-7

917
4-methyloctane + 2-octyne
2216-34-4; 2809-67-8

918
1,4 + 1,2-dimethylcyclopentane
X; 2452-99-5

919
toluene + 2,3,3-trimethylpentane
108-88-3; 560-21-4
X
X
1.3700
98.7700
mg/mi
131,193
1
X
920
1-methyl-3-isopropylbenzene + 1-m
e535-77-3; 99-87-6

921
2,2,4-trimethylhexane + 1,1-ethyl m
e16747-26-5; X

922
2,2,5-trimethylhexane+t-1,3-ethylm
3522-94-9; X

923
2,2-dimethylhexane + 2,4,4-trimeth
590-73-8; 107-40-4

924
2,3,5-trimethylhexane + cis-1,2-di
1069-53-0; 2207-01-4

925
2,4-dimethylpentane + 2,3-dimethyl
108-08-7; 563-79-1

926
2,5-dimethylhexane + 2,2,3-trimeth
592-13-2; 564-02-3

927
2-methyl-3-ethylpentane + 2,5-dime
t609-26-7; 3404-78-2

928
2-methylhexane + cyclohexene + 2,
91-76-4; 110-83-8; 565-59

929
3,3-dimethylpentane +cyclohexane
562-49-2; 110-82-7

930
3-ethylhexene + t-1,4-dimethylcycl
X; 2207-04-7

931
3-ethylpentane + t-1,2-dimethylcycl
617-78-7; X

932
3-methylpentane + cis-1,3-dimethyl
96-14-0; 638-04-0

933
4-methylheptane + 3-methyl-3-ethyl
9-53-7; 1067-08-9; 4316-6

934
cis-1,2-dimethylcyclopentane + met
1192-18-3; 108-87-2

935
cis-1,3-ethylmethylcyclopentane +
2613-66-3; X

936
cylcoheptane + 3-ethylhexene-1 + t-
886-65-7; X; X

937
ethylcyclohexane + n-propylcyclop
1678-91-7; 2040-96-2

EPA420-B-06-002 12 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

938
n-octane + cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohe
1-65-9; 624-29-3; 2207-03

939
trans-hexene-2 + cis-3-hexene + cis
642-09-3; 7688-21-3; 625-

940
methylcyclopentane + trans-3-meth
96-37-7; 616-12-6

941
isobutylbenzene + n-decane
538-93-2; 124-18-5

942
1,3-pentadiene
504-60-9

943
(E)-2-heptenal
18829-55-5

944
1,3-dichlorobenzene
541-73-1

945
1,4,5-trimethylnaphthalene
2131-41-1

946
17a(h),18a(h),21ß(h)-25,28,30-trisnorhopane

947
17a(h),18a(h),21ß(h)-28,30-bisnorhopane

948
17a(h),21ß(h)-22,29,30-trisnorhopane

949
17a(h),21ß(h)-30-norhopane
53584-60-4

950
17ß(h),21a(h)-hopane
1176-44-9

951
17ß(h),21ß(h)-hopane
471-62-5

952
18a(h),21ß(h)-22,29,30-trisnorhopane

953
18a(h),21ß(h)-30-norneohopane

954
1-methylpyrene
2381-21-7
955
2,4,5-trimethylnaphthalene
17057-91-9

956
22r-17a(h),21ß(h)-30,31,32-trishomohopane

957
22r-17a(h),21ß(h)-30,31-bishomohopane

958
22r-17a(h),21ß(h)-30-homohopane
60305-22-8

959
22s-17a(h),21ß(h)-30,31,32-trisomohopane

960
22s-17a(h),21ß(h)-30,31-bishomohopane

961
22s-17a(h),21ß(h)-30-homohopane
60305-23-9

962
2-methylphenol
95-48-7

963
4-ethylguaiacol
2785-89-9

964
4-formyl guaiacol

965
4-methyl syringol
6638-05-7

966
4-methylguaiacol
93-51-6

967
4-methylpyrene
3353-12-6

968
4-n-propyltoluene + 1,4-diethylbenz
1074-55-1; 105-05-5

969
5-isopropyl-m-xylene
4706-89-2

970
9-anthraldehyde
642-31-9

971
abietic acid
514-10-3

972
acenaphthenequinone
82-86-0

973
acetovanillone
498-02-2

974
benz(a)anthracene-7,12-dione
2498-66-0

975
c27-20r-13a(h),17ß(h)-diasterane

976
c27-20r-13ß(h),17a(h)-diasterane

977
c27-20r5a(h),14ß(h)-cholestane

978
c27-20s-13a(h),17ß(h)-diasterane

979
c27-20s-13ß(h),17a(h)-diasterane

980
c27-20s5a(h),14a(h)-cholestane

981
c27-tetracyclic terpane

982
c28-20r5a(h),14a(h),17a(h)-ergostane

983
c28-20r5a(h),14ß(h),17ß(h)-ergostane

984
c28-20s-13ß(h),17a(h)-diasterane

985
c28-20s5a(h),14a(h),17a(h)-ergostane

986
c28-tetracyclic terpane

987
c29-20r-13a(h),17ß(h)-diasterane

988
c29-20r5a(h),14a(h),17a(h)-stigmastane

989
c29-20r5a(h),14ß(h),17ß(h)-stigmastane

990
c29-20s5a(h),14a(h),17a(h)-stigmastane

991
c29-20s5a(h),14ß(h),17ß(h)-stigmastane

992
cis-pinonic acid
473-72-3

993
dehydroabietic acid
1740-19-8

994
docosanoic acid
112-85-6

995
dodecene
25378-22-7

996
elaidic acid
112-79-8

997
eugenol
97-53-0

998
glutaric acid

110-94-1

999
guaiacol

90-05-1

1000
henicosanoic acid
2363-71-5

1001
heptadecane_pristane
629-78-7; 1921-70-6

1002
heptanedioic acid
111-16-0

1003
hexadecane_norpristane
544-76-3; 3892-00-0

1004
hexanedioic acid
124-04-9

1005
hexanoic acid
142-62-1

EPA420-B-06-002 13 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

1006
isoamylbenzene

2049-94-7

1007
isoeugenol
97-54-1

1008
isophthalic acid
121-91-5

1009
m- & p-cresol

108-39-4; 106-44-5

1010
methylpyridine + methylfluorene
1333-41-1; 26914-17-0

1011
methylsuccinic acid
498-21-5

1012
oleic acid
112-80-1

1013
pentadecanoic acid
1002-84-2

1014
pentamethylbenzene
700-12-9

1015
perinaphthenone
548-39-0

1016
phthalic acid
88-99-3

1017
picolinic acid
98-98-6

1018
p-methylstyrene
622-97-9

1019
sitosterol
83-46-5

1020
stearic acid
57-11-4

1021
succinic acid
110-15-6

1022
syringol
91-10-1

1023
tricosanoic acid
2433-96-7

1024
2,7-dinitrofluorene
5405-53-8

1025
1,6- & 1,8-dinitropyrene
42397-64-8; 42397-65-9

1026
3-methylcholanthrene
56-49-5

1027
7-nitrobenzo(a)anthracene
63041-91-8

1028
anthanthrene
191-26-4

1029
benzo(b)fluorene
243-17-4

1030
triphenylene
217-59-4

1031
ethylbiphenyl
40529-66-6

1032
1,3-isobenzofurandione
85-44-9

1033
2-butoxy ethanol
111-76-2

1034
butenyl dimethylbenzene
X

1035
methyl dodecane
90454-15-2

1036
icosene
3452-07-1

1037
hepenoic acid, ethyl ester

1038
hexadecanoic acid, ethyl ester
628-97-7

1039
hexadecene
26952-14-7

1040
tetrahydromethylnaphthalene
31291-71-1

1041
octadecene
27070-58-2

1042
tetramethyl pentadecane

1043
tetradecene
26952-13-6

1044
methyl ester undecenoic acid

1045
2,4-dinitrophenol
51-28-5

1046
2-hexanone
591-78-6

1047
2-nitrophenol
88-75-5

1048
4-nitrophenol
100-02-7

1049
benzyl alcohol
100-51-6

1050
butylbenzylphthalate
85-68-7

1051
carbon disulfide
75-15-0

1052
carbon tetrachloride
56-23-5

1053
methyl chloride
74-87-3

1054
cis-1,2-dichloroethene
156-59-2

1055
diethyl phthalate
84-66-2

1056
trichlorofluoromethane
75-69-4

1057
p-cresol
106-44-5

1058
pentachlorophenol
87-86-5

1059
tetrachloroethylene
127-18-4

ammonia
7664-41-7
X
X
0.1
292.3999939
mg/mi
0.100000001
4901
mg/hp-hr
191,193
1
X
X
1061
di-nitropyrene

1062
hydrogen sulfide
7783-06-4

1063
(2-methylpropyl)-cyclohexane
1678-98-4

1064
(E)-3-nonene
20063-92-7
X
0.05
0.430000007
mg/mi
193
1
X
1065
(Z)-2-nonene
6434-77-1
X
0.07
1.049999952
mg/mi
193
1
X
1066
(Z)-3-nonene
20237-46-1
X
0.18
0.589999974
mg/mi
193
1
X
1067
1,1,2-trimethylcyclohexane

7094-26-0
X
2.0899999
3.940000057
mg/mi
193
1
X
1068
1,1,4-trimethylcyclohexane
7094-27-1
X
0.05
0.829999983
mg/mi
193
1
X
1069
1,2,4-trimethylbenzene + 1,2,4-tribu
5-63-6;14800-16-9;872-05
X
0.18
25.39999962
mg/mi
193
1
X
1070
1,3-dimethyldibenzothiophene
31317-15-4
X
0.002
0.055
mg/mi
193
1
X
1071
1,8-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene

31317-42-7
X
0.003
0.119000003
mg/mi
193
1
X
1072
10-methyl-benzo(b)naphtho(2,1-d)thiophene
X
0.003
0.137999997
mg/mi
193
1
X
1073
2,2,4-trimethylpentane + 1-heptene
540-84-1;592-76-7
X
1.46
104.6299973
mg/mi
193
1
X
EPA420-B-06-002 14 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006

1074
2,3-dimethylhexane + 3-ethyl-2-met
h584-94-1;609-26-7

1075
2,4-dimethylhexane + 2,2,3-trimeth
589-43-5;564-2-3

1076
2,5-dimethylhexane + ethylcyclope
592-13-2;1640-89-7

1077
2,6-dimethylheptane + cis-1,2-dime
1072-5-5;2207-1-4

1078
2-methyl-benzo(b)naphtho(2,1-d)thiophene

1079
2-methyl-dibenzothiophene
20928-02-3

1080
2-methylfluorene
1430-97-3

1081

2-propyltoluene
1074-17-5

1082
3, 3-dimethylhexane + 1-cis-2-trans
563-16-6; X

1083
3,4-dimethylheptane + 4-methyloct
922-28-1 ;2216-34-4

1084
3-ethyloctane
5881-17-4

1085
3-ethylpentane + trans-1,3-dimethyl
617-78-7;1759-58-6

1086
3-methyloctane + 3,3-diethylpentan
6-33-3; 1067-20-5; 15869-

1087
3-propyltoluene
1074-43-7

1088
4,4 + 2,2-dimethylheptane
1068-19-5;1071-26-7

1089
4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene
1207-12-1

1090
4-methyl-1-pentene + 3-methyl-1-p
691-37-2; 760-20-3

4-methyl-2-pentene
4461-48-7

1092
4-methylheptane + 3-ethyl-3-methyl
89-53-7;1067-08-9;591-49

1093
4-propyltoluene + butyl-1,3-dimeth
1074-55-1;X;934-74-7

1094
5-methyl-benzo(b)naphtho(2,1-d)thiophene

1095
5-methyl-naphtho(2,1-b)thiophene

1096
6-methyl-benzo(b)naphtho(2,1-d)thiophene

1097
8-methyl-benzo(b)naphtho(1,2-d)thiophene

1098
8-methyl-benzo(b)naphtho(2,3-d)thiophene
24964-07-6

1099
8-methyl-naphtho(2,1-b)thiophene

1100
acetic acid
64-19-7

1101
benzo(a)fluorene

238-84-6

1102
butylcyclopentane
2040-95-1

1103
c21 aaa-sterane

1104
c21 abb-sterane

1105
c21 tricyclic terpane

1106
c22 abb-sterane

1107
c22 tricyclic terpane

1108
c23 ab-dimethyl-a-butylpodocarpane

1109
c24 ab-dimethyl-a-methylbutylpodocarpane

1110
c25 tricyclic terpane

1111
c26 tricyclic terpane

1112
c26 tricyclic triterpane 22r

1113
c26 tricyclic triterpane 22s

1114
c27 20r-baa-cholestane
481-20-9

1115
c27 20s-abb-cholestane

1116
c27 tetracyclic terpane 22r

1117
c27 tetracyclic terpane 22s

1118
c27 trisnorhopane tm

1119
c28 20r/s?-ba-diasterane

1120
c28 20r-aaa-methylcholestane

1121
c28 20r-abb-methylcholestane
71117-90-3

1122
c28 20r-ba-diasterane

1123
c28 20s-aaa-methylcholestane

1124
c28 20s-abb-methylcholestane

1125
c29 20r-aaa-ethylcholestane
62446-14-4

1126
c29 20r-abb-ethylcholestane
71117-92-5

1127
c29 20s-aaa-ethylcholestane

1128
c29 20s-abb (20r-baa)-ethylcholestane

1129
c29 20s-ba-diasterane

1130
c29 ab-25-norhopane

53584-60-4

1131
c29 ba-norhopane
3258-87-5

1132
c30 tricyclic terpane 22r

1133
c30 tricyclic terpane 22s

1134
cis- & trans-3-hexene
7642-09-3;13269-52-8

1135
cis,cis,cis-1,2,3-trimethylcyclopenta
n2613-69-6

1136
cis-cis-trans-1,2,4-trimethylcyclope
X;638-04-0

1137
ctc-123-trimethylcyclopentane

1138
ctc-124-trimethylcyclohexane

1139
ctt-124-trimethylcyclohexane

1140
formic acid
64-18-6

1141
isobutylcyclopentane
3788-32-7

EPA420-B-06-002 15 February 2006

The Master List of Compounds Emitted by Mobile Sources – 2006
1142
isopropylcyclopentane
3875-51-2

1143
m&p-xylene + 2,3-dimethylheptane
1330-20-7; 3074-71-3

1144
maleic acid
110-16-7

1145
malonic acid
141-82-2

1146
methyl vinyl ketone
78-94-4

1147
methylcyclohexane + cis-1,2-dimet
08-87-2;1192-18-3;4516-69

1148
naphtho(2,1-b)thiophene

1149
n-octane + trans-1,2-dimethylcyclo
111-65-9;6876-23-9

1150
n-propylcyclopentane + cis,cis,cis-1
,2040-96-2; X;1678-91-7

1151
n-undecane + 1,2-dimethyl-3-ethylb
e1120-21-4;933-98-2

1152
phenanthro(2,1-b)thiophene

1153
phenanthro(2,3-b)thiophene
1154
phenanthro(3,4-b)thiophene

1155
phenanthro(4,3-b)thiophene

1156
pinacolin
75-97-8

1157
propionic acid
79-09-4

1158
tert-butyl-2-methyl-benzene

1159
tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-benzene

1160
tert-butyl-4-ethyl-benzene

1161
trimethylacetaldehyde + 3-methyl-2
630-19-3;563-80-4

1162
hydrogen cyanide
74-90-8
X
X
0
90
mg/mi
197
1
X
EPA420-B-06-002 16 February 2006

(from)

http://www.epa.gov/oms/regs/toxics/420b06002.pdf

***

This one’s a real winner too – coming from the exhaust emissions –

# 1162

hydrogen cyanide

CAS Number – 74-90-8

Found in Gas Exhaust – yes

Found in Diesel Exhaust – yes

90 mg/mi

My Note –

This is very interesting also –

http://www.cas.org/ASSETS/01FFDF0F1F18466DACF7C9C5ADFF8DEA/chemlistlists.pdf

********