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Dolphins have washed up dead. Endangered sea turtles have been found with oil stuck on their corneas. Lifeless brown pelicans, classified as endangered until recently, have been carried away in plastic bags. Beaches in Grand Isle, Louisiana, are spattered with gobs of sticky crude. And when the moon rises over the coast there, the oil-soaked ocean sparkles like cellophane under a spotlight.

(excerpt from this CNN story – )

On the Gulf of Mexico (CNN) — Ten miles off the coast of Louisiana, where the air tastes like gasoline and the ocean looks like brownie batter, Louisiana State University professor Ed Overton leans out of a fishing boat and dunks a small jar beneath the surface of the oil-covered water.

“God, what a mess,” he says under his breath, scooping up a canister of the oil that’s been spilled into the Gulf of Mexico.

Even though Overton has been studying oil spills for 30 years, he’s not sure what he’ll find in that sample. That’s because, just below the surface, the scope and impact of one of the biggest environmental disasters in the history of the U.S. remains a mystery

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/05/28/gulf.oil.environment.disaster/index.html?hpt=C2

(From CNN)

With lots of pictures.

And this one –

Overton dipped a jar into a sea that looks like it's covered in chocolate pudding. As one oceanographer put it, a Chernobyl-sized catastrophe could be brewing under the sea. In the Gulf of Mexico off Louisiana Coast - from CNN - May 28, 2010

Overton dipped a jar into a sea that looks like it's covered in chocolate pudding. As one oceanographer put it, a Chernobyl-sized catastrophe could be brewing under the sea. In the Gulf of Mexico off Louisiana Coast - from CNN - May 28, 2010

Dolphins have washed up dead. Endangered sea turtles have been found with oil stuck on their corneas. Lifeless brown pelicans, classified as endangered until recently, have been carried away in plastic bags. Beaches in Grand Isle, Louisiana, are spattered with gobs of sticky crude. And when the moon rises over the coast there, the oil-soaked ocean sparkles like cellophane under a spotlight.

(from)

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/05/28/gulf.oil.environment.disaster/index.html?hpt=C2

***

NOAA Assists With Multi-Agency Effort to Decontaminate Ships Passing through Oil Spill
Track the spill

updated May 20, 2010

Track the spill

See the projected path of the oil spill’s movements and satellite imagery.

****

The total area of the Gulf is about 600,000 square miles.(3)

The United States and Mexico form the Gulf’s mainland shore, which extends more than 4,000 miles from the Florida Keys to Cabo Catoche, at the northwestern tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico.
(7)

  • The greatest distance across the Gulf is approximately 1,000 miles going east to west. (3)
    • The shortest distance across the Gulf is about 500 miles between the Mississippi Delta and the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula. (3)

    Louisiana contains 41% of the nation’s coastal wetlands.
    (3)

  • Each year 40 to 60 square miles of Louisiana’s wetlands disappear due to natural and human induced impacts.
    (3)
  • Estimates by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers say that by 2040 an area larger than Rhode Island will have disappeared from Louisiana’s coastal margin. (3)
  • At a depth of more than 12,000 feet, Sigsbee Deep is the deepest part of the gulf. It is more than 300 miles long and is sometimes called the “Grand Canyon under the sea.” Its closest point to the Texas coast is 200 miles southeast of Brownsville. (7)

    http://www.gulfmex.org/facts.htm

    ***

    The Associated Press: Expert: Surface area of Gulf oil spill has

    May 1, 2010 The surface area of a catastrophic Gulf of Mexico oil spill quickly The Coast Guard estimates now that at least 1.6 million gallons of oil have but by Friday’s end it was in the range of 3850 square miles,
    http://www.google.com/…/ALeqM5gIXWYBTpLtSayJtg41LKXpxSxVPAD9FE5OIO3

    ***

    Massive oil spill to shut down 74000 square kms of Gulf Coast

    May 19, 2010 Massive oil spill to shut down 74000 square kms of Gulf Coast is nearly tripling the size of an area in the Gulf of Mexico that’s closed
    http://www.mb.com.ph/…/massive-oil-spill-shut-down-74000-square-kms-gulfcoast-fishing-zone

    ***

    NOAA Expects Busy Atlantic Hurricane Season
    An “active to extremely active” hurricane season is expected for the Atlantic Basin this year according to the seasonal outlook issued today by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center – a division of the National Weather Service.

    ***

    Waiting out the spill: Anger, frustration and uncertainty

    By the CNN Wire Staff

    May 30, 2010 — Updated 0726 GMT (1526 HKT)

    (CNN) — The parish president said his knees got weak. The congressman said it was like a punch to the stomach, but that his constituents are resilient.

    Those in charge of trying to stop the worst oil spill in American history said they were “disappointed.”

    But on Saturday, engineers and scientists decided the process they thought had the best chance of succeeding never would. They advised BP executives to pull the plug, so to speak, and try something else.

    “We have not been able to stop the flow,” a somber BP Chief Operating Officer Doug Suttles told reporters. ” … Repeated pumping, we don’t believe, will achieve success, so we will move on to the next option.”

    That next option? A modified version of a procedure that’s been tried twice before, a process everyone going in knows can only slow — but not stop — the gusher that’s pumping up to 19,000 barrels (798,000 gallons) of oil into the Gulf of Mexico every day.

    (etc.)

    http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/05/29/gulf.top.kill.failure.reax/?hpt=Sbin

    ***

    BP compares humans lives to the cost benefit analysis using the three little pigs for comparison (in 2002 memo) and decides that it is cheaper and more cost efficient to put lives in danger and simply pay claims when they are killed by a company caused disaster –

    http://cnn.com/video/?/video/bestoftv/2010/05/26/nr.int.coon.bp.little.piggies.cnn

    ***

    Deepwater Horizon Incident, Gulf of Mexico

    Deepwater Horizon 24Hr Trajectory Map Icon 2010-05-29-2100
    24 Hour Trajectory Map: Jump down to Current Trajectory Maps on this page for full-sized versions.

    As the nation’s leading scientific resource for oil spills, NOAA has been on the scene of the BP oil spill from the start, providing coordinated scientific weather and biological response services to federal, state and local organizations. More

    Updated daily
    Situation: May 29, 2010

    Response:
    After three days of trying to kill the well with drilling fluids and debris, BP has conceded that the effort has not been successful in stemming the flow of oil from the ruptured riser.  In an early evening press conference, BP said it was unclear why the “top kill” failed, but said it was time to move to other options.

    Assessment:
    NOAA’s Damage Assessment Remediation and Restoration Program is conducting a Natural Resource Damage Assessment. The focus currently is to assemble existing data on resources and their habitats and collect baseline (pre-spill impact) data.  Data on oiled resources and habitats are also being collected.

    Deepwater Horizon 24Hr Offshore Trajectory Map Icon 2010-05-29-1900
    Offshore Surface Oil Trajectory Map: Jump down to Current Trajectory Maps on this page for full-sized versions.

    NOAA by the Numbers in the Gulf Region May 29, 2010

    NOAA aircraft deployed:

    N46RF Twin Otter (DHC-6), Current station: Mobile, Ala., Began flying marine mammal surveys as of 28 Apr.  Its mission changed on May 5 to multispectral scanning to study oil density and thickness.

    • N56RF Twin Otter (DHC-6), is out of routine maintenance today and departing for a new project on the west coast. This aircraft had been flying marine mammal and Fisheries enforcement missions.
    • N68RF King Air (BE-350ER), Current Station: New Orleans, La., Mission: Coastal photography and mapping, First Flight: 5 May. Is expected out of maintenance and conducting a bore site calibration.
    • N42RF Orion (WP-3D), Current Station: Tampa, Fla., Mission: Loop Current study; First Flight: 8 May, flew May 21. Aircraft flew mission on Friday, May 28 – media onboard.

    NOAA and contract research vessels:

    • Gordon Gunter
      • Reporters and photographers from New York Times, CNN, Associated Press, and the Times-Picayune visited the ship while underway yesterday.
      • Preliminary data results from the acoustic survey are beginning to circulate
    • Thomas Jefferson
      • Alongside in New Orleans conducting repairs
      • Media briefing conducted dockside on Friday
      • Staging for upcoming acoustic and water sampling
    • NOAA Ships Pisces and Oregon II are alongside in a repair status.

    (from)
    http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/topic_subtopic_entry.php?RECORD_KEY%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=entry_id,subtopic_id,topic_id&entry_id%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=809&subtopic_id%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=2&topic_id%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=1

    ***

    This is an image from satellite – on May 24, 2010

    from NOAA - NASA - United States Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil leak - May 24, 2010 (a week ago)

    from NOAA - NASA - United States Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil leak - May 24, 2010 (a week ago)

    (from)

    http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Current/OILgulfmexico144_MOL.jpg

    NOAA – NASA – satellite image from May 24, 2010

    ***

    Gulf of Mexico oil spill - May 11, 2010 (NASA)

    Gulf of Mexico oil spill - May 11, 2010 (NASA)

    This satellite photo is from May 11, 2010 when the spill was still somewhat cohesive – so my question is –

    Why didn’t they on this day or any of the days before this – use those Navy hard booms or even the shitty, flimsy booms to simply surround the whole thing in the place where it was sitting if they are so damn bloody brilliant?

    They had pictures of it – they had boats – why didn’t they just surround the spill with the booms instead of using all the manpower to exclusively put them into areas that didn’t protect the shores and marshes anyway?

    At any point, including this one on May 11 – they could’ve sequestered the spill with the booms with less trouble than what they did that didn’t work – why didn’t they do that?

    – cricketdiane, 05-30-10

    ***

    Oil Slick in the Gulf of Mexico - May 18 - 2010 (NOAA - NASA)

    Oil Slick in the Gulf of Mexico - May 18 - 2010 (NOAA - NASA)

    I don’t know where I originally found this – but the colors were heightened in contrast by me – to see it better. I think some of the brighter areas that are slightly less than the white of the spill may be oil slicks – and some are cloud cover. This was from the satellite photos May 18, 2010 or before.

    – cricketdiane

    ***

    ***

    BP compares humans lives to the cost benefit analysis using the three little pigs for comparison (in 2002 memo) and decides that it is cheaper and more cost efficient to put lives in danger and simply pay claims when they are killed by a company caused disaster –

    http://cnn.com/video/?/video/bestoftv/2010/05/26/nr.int.coon.bp.little.piggies.cnn

    ***

    The Gulf measures approximately 1,600 kilometers from east to west, 900 kilometers from north to south, and has a surface area of 1.5 million square kilometers. The marine shoreline from Cape Sable, Florida to the tip of the Yucatan peninsula extends ~5,700 kilometers, with another 380 kilometers of shore on the northwest tip of Cuba. If bays and other inland waters are included, the total shoreline increases to over 27,000 kilometers in the U.S. alone.

    The Gulf measures approximately 1,600 kilometers from east to west, 900 kilometers from north to south, and has a surface area of 1.5 million square kilometers. - 2010 - Planet Earth Source: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/

    The Gulf measures approximately 1,600 kilometers from east to west, 900 kilometers from north to south, and has a surface area of 1.5 million square kilometers. - 2010 - Planet Earth Source: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/

    (from)

    http://www.gulfbase.org/facts.php

    DEPTH

    Gulf of Mexico
    Depth gradient throughout the Gulf of Mexico.
    Image modified from ESRI Data & Maps (2000).

    The Gulf of Mexico basin resembles a large pit with a broad shallow rim. Approximately 38% of the Gulf is comprised by shallow and intertidal areas (< 20 m deep). The area of the continental shelf (< 180 m) and continental slope (180 – 3,000 m) represent 22% and 20% respectively, and abyssal areas deeper than 3,000 m comprise the final 20% (Gore, 1992). The Sigsbee Deep, located in the southwestern quadrant, is the deepest region of the Gulf of Mexico. Its exact maximum depth is controversial, and reports by different authors state maximum depths ranging from 3,750 m to 4,384 m. Mean (average) water depth of the Gulf is ~1,615 m (Turner, 1999) and the basin contains a volume of 2,434,000 cubic kilometers of water (6.43 * 1017 or 643 quadrillion gallons).

    http://www.gulfbase.org/facts.php

    General Facts about the Gulf of Mexico

    From: Gore, 1992; Darnell and Defenbaugh, 1990; unless otherwise noted.



    ORIGINS AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY
    From: Gore, 1992; Donnelly, 1975; Martin, 1975; Uchupi, 1975 After Salvador, 1991

    The Gulf of Mexico basin is a relatively simple, roughly circular structural basin approximately 1,500 km in diameter, filled in its deeper part with 10 to 15 km of sedimentary rocks that range in age from Late Triassic to Holocene (approximately 230 m.y. to present). Little is known about the geologic history of the Gulf of Mexico Basin before Late Triassic time. Most of the basin was rimmed during the Early Cretaceous by carbonate platforms, and its western flank was involved during the latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary in a compressive deformation episode, the Laramide Orogeny, which created the Sierra Madre Oriental of eastern Mexico.
    GEOLOGY

    Today, the Gulf of Mexico is a small oceanic basin surrounded by continental land masses. Due to their physical structure, the Gulf and the Caribbean Sea are sometimes combined and referred to as the ‘American Mediterranean’. Uchupi (1975) divides the Gulf into two distinct geographical provinces (Terrigenous and Carbonate) while Antoine (1972) recognizes seven. The scheme proposed by Antoine is presented here, with additional information derived from other sources.

    1) Gulf of Mexico Basin
    This portion of the Gulf of Mexico contains the Sigsbee Deep and can be further divided into the continental rise, the Sigsbee Abyssal Plain, and the Mississippi Cone. Located between the Sigsbee escarpment and the Sigsbee Abyssal Plain, the continental rise is composed of sediments transported to the area from the north. The Sigsbee Abyssal Plain is a deep, flat portion of the Gulf bottom located northwest of Campeche Bank. In this relatively uniform area of the Gulf bottom, the Sigsbee Knolls and other small diapiric (salt) domes represent the only major topographical features. The Mississippi Cone is composed of soft sediment and extends southeast from the Mississippi Trough, eventually merging with other sediments of the central basin. The cone is bordered by the DeSoto Canyon to the east and the Mississippi Trough to the west, and has been described in detail by Ewing et al. (1958).

    2) Northeast Gulf of Mexico
    Extending from just east of the Mississippi Delta near Biloxi to the eastern side of Apalachee Bay, this region of the Gulf bottom is characterized by soft sediments. To the west of the DeSoto Canyon, terrigenous (land-derived) sediments are thick and fill the remnants of the Gulf basin. In the eastern portion of the region, Mississippi-derived sediments cover the western edge of the Florida Carbonate Platform and a transition towards carbonate sediments begins. The Florida Escarpment separates the Florida Platform from the Gulf Basin and also forms the southeastern side of the DeSoto Canyon. In a region characterized by sediment deposition, the presence of the DeSoto Canyon is poorly understood. Some theories suggest that the canyon is the result of erosion caused by oceanic currents, possibly the Loop Current (Nowlin, 1971).

    3) South Florida Continental Shelf and Slope
    A submerged portion of the larger emergent Florida Peninsula, this region of the Gulf of Mexico extends along the coast from Apalachee Bay to the Straits of Florida and includes the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas. A generalized progression towards carbonate sediments occurs from north to south ending in the thick carbonate sediments of the Florida Basin. Evidence suggests that this basin was at one time enclosed by a barrier reef system (Ewing et al., 1966; Sheridan et al., 1966; Oglesby et al., 1965; Antoine and Ewing, 1963). In the Straits of Florida the Jordan Knoll appears to be composed of remnants from this ancient reef system. Evidence suggests that this reef may have once extended across the straits, adjoining the Florida reefs with those of northern Cuba.

    4) Campeche Bank
    Campeche Bank is an extensive carbonate bank located to the north of the Yucatan Peninsula (Ordonez, 1936). The bank extends from the Yucatan Straits in the east to the Tabasco-Campeche Basin in the west and includes Arrecife Alacran. The region shows many similarities to the south Florida platform and some evidence suggests that the two ancient reef systems may have been continuous (Antoine and Ewing, 1963; Uchupi and Emery, 1968). Continental drift and erosional processes are both theorized to have played a role in the separation of the two geologically similar carbonate platforms.

    5) Bay of Campeche
    The Bay of Campeche is an isthmian embayment extending from the western edge of Campeche Bank to the offshore regions just east of Veracruz (~96 degrees W). The Sierra Madre Oriental forms the south-southwestern border, and the associated coastal plain is similar to the Texas-Louisiana coast in the northern Gulf. The bottom topography is characterized by long ridges parallel to the exterior of the basin. Salt domes are prevalent in the region, and the upward migration of salt is theorized to be a cause of the complex bottom profiles (Worzel et al., 1968). Similar to the northern Gulf, large quantities of oil are produced here, and thick terrigenous sediments predominate.

    6) Eastern Mexico Continental Shelf and Slope
    Located between Veracruz to the south and the Rio Grande to the north, this geological province spans the entire eastern shore of Mexico. The Gulf bottom of the region is characterized by sediment-covered folds that parallel the shore. Apparently created by sediment-covered evaporites, evidence suggests that the folds have impeded sediment transport from the Mexican coast to the Gulf Basin (Bryant et al., 1968). As sediment cover increases from south to north, so does the relative complexity of the bottom structure.

    7) Northern Gulf of Mexico
    The northern Gulf of Mexico extends from Alabama to the U.S.-Mexico border. North to south, the province extends from 200 miles inland of the present day shoreline to the Sigsbee escarpment. Sediments in the region are generally thick with the greatest sediment load provided by the Mississippi River. Widespread salt deposits are present throughout the region (Murray, 1961; Halbouty, 1967) and these structures act to create subsurface and emergent topographic features on the continental slope such as the Flower Garden Banks off the Texas/Louisiana coast, and the pinnacles region offshore of the Mississippi/Alabama coast.
    CIRCULATION AND CURRENTS

    Water enters the Gulf through the Yucatan Strait, circulates as the Loop Current, and exits through the Florida Strait eventually forming the Gulf Stream. Portions of the Loop Current often break away forming eddies or ‘gyres’ which affect regional current patterns. Smaller wind driven and tidal currents are created in nearshore environments.

    Drainage into the Gulf of Mexico is extensive and includes 20 major river systems (>150 rivers) covering over 3.8 million square kilometers of the continental United States (Moody, 1967). Annual freshwater inflow to the Gulf is approximately 10.6×1011 m3 per year (280 trillion gallons). 85% of this flow comes from the United States, with 64% originating from the Mississippi River alone. Additional freshwater inputs originate in Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, and Cuba.

    http://www.gulfbase.org/facts.php

    (from)

    GulfBase is a project of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi.
    To give proper credit to the original authors, please cite information taken from GulfBase by the original source as displayed.
    Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi To cite GulfBase, use: M. Nipper, J.A. Sánchez Chávez, and J.W. Tunnell, Jr., Editors. 2010. GulfBase: Resource Database for Gulf of Mexico Research. World Wide Web electronic publication. http://www.gulfbase.org, 30 May 2010.

    ***

    And this from the people who decided to take all other parts of the economies of every Gulf Coast state and decimate them to give the full authority and rights to the Gulf of Mexico to the petroleum oil industry including BP –

    Minerals Management Service (MMS), 2002. Summary of offshore petroleum operations in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. Located at: http://www.gomr.mms.gov/homepg/whoismms/aboutmms.html

    ***

    Operational Significant Event Imagery – (NOAA)

    Links

    »OSEI Home

    »OSEI Image of the Day

    »New Imager

    (from)

    http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Current/

    ***

    Latest oil spill developments

    By the CNN Wire Staff//
    // -1) {document.write(‘May 30, 2010 — Updated 1209 GMT (2009 HKT)’);} else {document.write(‘May 30, 2010 8:09 a.m. EDT’);}
    // ]]>May 30, 2010 — Updated 1209 GMT (2009 HKT)

    // (CNN) — Here are the latest developments involving the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico:

    NEW:

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the United States Coast Guard will transport recovered oiled birds, including brown pelicans and a northern gannet, from the Ft. Jackson Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Ft. Jackson, Louisiana to Egmont Key National Wildlife Refuge at the mouth of Tampa Bay, Florida, where they will be released into the wild on Sunday.

    A team of oil spill experts were on standby in the United Arab Emirates, ready to help in the Gulf of Mexico cleanup efforts if called to do so, said Craig Buckingham of the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company.

    (etc.)

    Health problems

    At least two more oil spill cleanup workers have been hospitalized after feeling ill on the job, according to local shrimpers who are assisting in the recovery effort along the Gulf Coast. The workers complained of nausea, headaches and dizziness after low-flying planes applied chemical dispersants within one mile of operating cleanup vessels.

    Some people involved in cleaning up the oil spill “clearly” have become sick, but the reasons are not yet clear, Suttles said earlier Saturday.

    Seven oil spill recovery workers who were hospitalized in New Orleans, Louisiana, after complaining of feeling ill were properly trained and had protective gear on, according to the federal on-scene coordinator for the oil spill response effort.

    Landry said workers were treated for several symptoms, including headaches, nausea, vomiting and shortness of breath. Safety officials from the Coast Guard, BP and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration have responded.

    (etc.)

    http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/05/30/gulf.oil.spill.developments/index.html

    ***

    MERIS True Color Image for May 27, 2010 (Image data courtesy of ESA)

    MERIS True Color Image for May 27, 2010 (Image data courtesy of ESA)

    (from)

    May 27, 2010

    NOAA Coast Watch

    http://coastwatch.noaa.gov/

    ***

    NOAA AVHRR SST image from May 20, 2010.  Sea surface temperature imagery - shows loop current - NASA - NOAA

    NOAA AVHRR SST image from May 20, 2010. Sea surface temperature imagery - shows loop current - NASA - NOAA - May 20, 2010

    http://coastwatch.noaa.gov/cwn/cw_featuredimage.html

    NOAA AVHRR SST image from May 20, 2010.

    Sea surface temperature imagery like the image above are useful in identifying oceanographic features. In this image, the loop current is prominent and may be ‘pinching’ itself off which usually results in an eddie that progresses westward and persists over several months. Through repeated observations and when used with other types of satellite data products, images such as these assist in the monitoring and prediction of the possible extent of the oil spill that began April 20, 2010. For more information on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, please visit the website of NOAA’s Emergency Response (http://deepwaterhorizon.noaa.gov).

    Imagery and data products for the Gulf of Mexico are available from NOAA CoastWatch Central and the Gulf of Mexico/Caribbean Nodes.

    ***

    From CNN update today about the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill –

    Economy

    The commercial and recreational fishing closure is now 60,683 square miles, which is about 25 percent of the Gulf of Mexico exclusive economic zone, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The closure went into effect at 6 p.m. ET Friday.

    Images from the massive BP oil spill have prompted tourists to go to other destinations this Memorial Day weekend.

    Hotels in Florida, Alabama and Mississippi are using everything from “beach cams” and money-back guarantees to constant updates on their websites to get the word out that their beaches are clean and open for business.

    In Louisiana, hotels catering to sport fishermen are seeing a falloff in bookings, but that’s been offset by the masses of recovery workers, BP employees and journalists who have poured into the area.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/05/30/gulf.oil.spill.developments/index.html

    ***

    The Gulf of Mexico – A Resource at Risk | Kid’s Stuff | Educator

    The Gulf of Mexico covers more than 617600 square miles (1.6 million square kilometers) Many of the shellfish-producing areas along the Gulf Coast are
    http://www.epa.gov/reg4gmpo/edresources/resource.html
    ***

    South Mississippi Profile – Gulf Coast

    The Gulf Coast encompasses a 1795-square-mile area, more than 40 miles of beaches, about 360000 people, 11 incorporated cities, a few hundred years of
    http://www.newcomersandvisitorsguide.com/coastprofile.html

    ***

    This from May 18, 2010

    States that 46,000 Square Miles has been banned from fishing – it has now been extended to 25% of the Gulf of Mexico –

    Fishing Now Banned In 46000 Square Miles Of Gulf – New Orleans

    NEW ORLEANS Federal officials say they’re expanding the area of the Gulf of Mexico where Gulf Oil Spill Air Quality Gulf Coast. Oil Spill Air Quality
    http://www.wkrg.com/gulfsquaregulf/…/May-18-2010_3-20-pm/

    ***

    Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Covers 100 Square Miles After Drilling

    Apr 23, 2010 has spread over an area of 100 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico and AP – Intent on showing firm command of a deepening Gulf Coast
    industry-news.org/…/gulf-of-mexico-oil-spill-covers-100-square-miles-after-drilling-rig-blast/

    My Note –

    So, again my question is – why didn’t they surround the 100 square miles of the oil slick – never had to put any dispersants on it although they did that undersea at the place of the leak from day one according to BP and never had to let it get out of hand.

    They had the boats – they had that much boom and they could’ve taken it out to the spill, sequestered the spill in place and then sucked it up on their 15 vessels with their 4,000 gallon capacity each and kept it right there while capping the damn thing in the first four – seven days after the leak started.

    But, no – they are using the brightest, most expert, plans that they generated at BP and at BP’s insistence both when the Exxon Valdez spill happened through Alyeska and here at this disaster through their Marine Spill Response Corporation they put together and own together with the other oil companies.

    Yep – they didn’t even start to try and sequester and contain that oil spill where it was in the first place with their booms and skimmers and larger hard booms that are available which are larger, higher and sturdier with a deeper skirt on them to prevent oil from going beneath them.

    – cricketdiane

    ***

    Since the beginning of the industrial revolution the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from human activities has resulted in atmospheric CO2 concentrations that have increased from approximately 280 to 385 parts per million (ppm). The atmospheric concentration of CO2 is now higher than experienced on Earth for at least the last 800,000 years and probably over 20 million years, Coral Reefs

    Since the beginning of the industrial revolution the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from human activities has resulted in atmospheric CO2 concentrations that have increased from approximately 280 to 385 parts per million (ppm). The atmospheric concentration of CO2 is now higher than experienced on Earth for at least the last 800,000 years and probably over 20 million years, Coral Reefs

    Since the beginning of the industrial revolution the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from human activities has resulted in atmospheric CO2 concentrations that have increased from approximately 280 to 385 parts per million (ppm). The atmospheric concentration of CO2 is now higher than experienced on Earth for at least the last 800,000 years and probably over 20 million years, and is expected to continue to rise at an increasing rate, leading to significant temperature increases in the atmosphere and oceans in the coming decades.

    The oceans have absorbed approximately 525 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or about one third of the anthropogenic carbon emissions released. This absorption has benefited humankind by significantly reducing the greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere and minimizing some of the impacts of global warming.

    However, the ocean’s uptake of carbon dioxide is having negative impacts on the chemistry and biology of the oceans. Hydrographic surveys and modeling studies have revealed that the chemical changes in seawater resulting from the absorption of carbon dioxide are lowering seawater pH. The pH of ocean surface waters has already decreased by about 0.1 units from an average of about 8.21 to 8.10 since the beginning of the industrial revolution.

    Estimates of future atmospheric and oceanic carbon dioxide concentrations, based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) CO2 emission scenarios and coupled ocean-atmosphere models, suggest that by the middle of this century atmospheric carbon dioxide levels could reach more than 500 ppm, and near the end of the century they could be over 800 ppm. This would result in an additional surface water pH decrease of approximately 0.3 pH units by 2100.

    When CO2 reacts with seawater, the reduction in seawater pH also reduces the availability of carbonate ions, which play an important role in shell formation for a number of marine organisms such as corals, marine plankton, and shellfish. This phenomenon, which is commonly called “ocean acidification,” could have profound impacts on some of the most fundamental biological and geochemical processes of the sea in coming decades. Some of the smaller calcifying organisms are important food sources for higher marine organisms.

    Declining coral reefs due to increases in temperature and decreases in carbonate ion would have negative impacts on tourism and fisheries. Abundance of commercially important shellfish species may also decline and negative impacts on finfish may occur. This rapidly emerging scientific issue and possible ecological impacts have raised serious concerns across the scientific and fisheries resource management communities.

    http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/co2/OA/background.html

    ***

    1. Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone” Is Size of New Jersey

      May 25, 2005 Streaming into the Gulf of Mexico along the Louisiana coast, the rivers drain about 40 percent of all U.S. land area and account for nearly
      news.nationalgeographic.com/…/0525_050525_deadzone.html – 

    Florida Gulf of Mexico

    The total area of the Gulf of Mexico is approximately 615000 square miles. Coastal cities along the Gulf of Mexico include Tampa, St. Petersburg, Pensacola

    ,
    floridagulfofmexico.com/
    1. Why The Gulf of Mexico?

      At 615000 square miles the Gulf of Mexico is the ninth largest body of water in the While these estuaries make up only 24% of all USA estuaries by area,
      http://www.harteresearchinstitute.org/index.php?option=com&#8230;

    NOAA extends fishing closed area to portion of loop current as

    May 18, 2010 The closed area now represents 45728 square miles, which is slightly We stand shoulder-to-shoulder with Gulf coast fishermen and their
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100518180608.htm

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    (from)

    http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/co2/sitemap.html

    About Ocean Acidification – CO2- Climate Change – Ocean Chemistry Changes

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    The following images link to further information on ocean acidification:
    Ocean Acidification Mooring: As one of the oldest oceanic time series sites, Ocean Station Papa (50°N, 145°W) is a critical site in the global network of OceanSITES time series reference sites. Through support from the US NSF and NOAA and in collaboration with the Canadian DFO Line P Program, a surface mooring was deployed in June 2007 at Ocean Station Papa to monitor ocean-atmosphere interactions, carbon uptake, and ocean acidification.
    How is ocean acidity changing? How will ecosystems be affected? What research is being done? For the answers to these questions and more, click the image to the left to go to the Ocean Acidification Network, an information network for the internal scientific community.
    Second Symposium on The Ocean in a High-CO2 World 6 – 9 October 2008 Musée Océanographique, Monaco. The purpose of the meeting is to provide an interdisciplinary forum to assess what is known about ocean acidification and to identify priorities for future research. For more information on this symposium, click the image to the left.
    The Future Oceans – Warming Up, Rising High, Turning Sour Latest research findings show that failure to check mankind’s emissions of carbon dioxide will have severe consequences for the world’s oceans. The marine environment is doubly affected: continuing warming and ongoing acidification both pose threats. In combination with over-fishing, these two threats are further jeopardizing already weakened fish stocks. Sea-level rise is exposing coastal regions to mounting flood and hurricane risks. Click the image to the left for the full report.
    The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Group seeks to to establish the evolving role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle in the face of environmental change through studies of marine biogeochemical cycles and associated ecosystems. Click on the image at left to read more.
    Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs and Other Marine Calcifiers July 5, 2006: Worldwide emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning are dramatically altering ocean chemistry and threatening marine organisms, including corals, that secrete skeletal structures and support oceanic biodiversity. The report (accessed via the picture at left) released today summarizes the known effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on these organisms, known as marine calcifiers, and recommends future research for determining the extent of the impacts. Click the image to the left for the full report. (9,677 KB PDF)
    Carbon Dioxide and Our Ocean Legacy April 7, 2006: Global climate change is increasing ocean temperatures and raising sea levels. New scientific research shows that our oceans are beginning to face yet another threat due to global climate change – their basic chemistry is changing because of the uptake of carbon dioxide released by human activities. Click the image to the left for the full report. (100KB PDF)
    The Dangers of Ocean Acidity:
    Listen to RealAudio Listen to MP3
    April 6, 2006: Are humans changing the chemistry of the world’s oceans by burning fossil fuels? Is carbon dioxide a threat to coral reefs and marine ecosystems? The problem starts with fuels like coal and gas that release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The excess carbon dioxide contributes to global warming. But carbon dioxide is not just making things hotter. It’s also changing the chemistry of the world’s oceans. Is the ‘acidification’ of seawater a threat to the future of coral reefs and other living organisms?
    NOAA / NSF Cruise reveals impacts of ocean acidification on chemistry, biology of North Pacific Ocean April 5, 2006: Data collected from ocean sampling in the Pacific Ocean from the southern to northern hemispheres confirms that the oceans are becoming more acidic. A recently completed field study from Tahiti to Alaska collecting data about the effects of ocean acidification on the water chemistry and marine organisms found evidence that verifies earlier computer model projections. These findings are consistent with data from previous field studies conducted in other oceans. Click the image to the left for the full story.
    Results from Workshop on the Impacts of Increasing Atmospheric CO2 on Coral Reefs and Other Marine Calcifiers. Calcification rates of several major groups of marine calcifying organisms, from both neritic and pelagic environments, will very likely decrease in response to changes in ocean carbonate chemistry. Although benthic and planktonic calcifiers of both neritic and pelagic communities display a similar response to increased CO2 forcing, important differences exist between the two that will dictate different approaches toward assessing the larger potential effects of reduced calcification on ecosystem structure and function, how the effects could cascade to other ecosystems, and ultimately, the changes in the ocean carbon cycle. Click on the image to the left for results from the April 2005 Workshop in Florida.

    Additional Ocean acidification sites:

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    POES Composite (Daily Sea Surface Temperatures) - NOAA - May 29, 2010

    POES Composite (Daily Sea Surface Temperatures) - NOAA - May 29, 2010

    (from)

    http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/DATA/RT/SST/ATL/20.jpg

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    My Note –

    A little while ago on CNN before State of the Union, I think it was – there was an interview with a person – scientist / biologist / animal rescuer or something that said Alabama beaches are now getting oil on them and that tourists who came found crude oil on their feet after going into the water – which doesn’t come off very easily and it stinks. So – its there too.

    And, I thought of something – which is one of the places where we really messed up as a nation. When European cars were getting 40 mpg – we were supposed to do our typical cowboy thing and make our cars get – not only 40 mpg too – but outdo them and get 60 mpg and then 80 mpg.

    And, I hear Bill Bennett (on CNN right now) saying that Bush shouldn’t be blamed for this – that’s in the past. He needs to go swimming in the Gulf of Mexico or take a bath in some crude oil bathwater, too. Then – we’ll talk.

    – cricketdiane

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    Oh yeah – and next time they have an oil spill – put the boom around the spill immediately – and on the coast to protect it – then get the damn thing sucked up with something like the skimmers or the tankers with a hose like they did in the Middle East in 1993 – and don’t dick around with it for days because you think it makes you look bad. That would be a good start.

    And, let’s make gasoline and diesel fuel obsolete right now. That would be even better.

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