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I have a dumb question – what right does BP have to tell scientists that they can’t have access to make measurements of the oil flow from the subsea floor of the Gulf of Mexico – they don’t own it – we do

And there have been a number of scientists, engineers, oceanographers that have asked to make those measurements close to the area where the crude oil is spewing out – and they have been denied access. I want to know what gives BP the right to do that. They do not own that 14 square feet – in fact, they don’t have any rights to any of it – all of these areas are owned by the American people and in our treasury of national resources – BP does not have the rights to deny access to any part of the operation.

So, why are they getting away with it?

– cricketdiane

I was just watching the coverage on AC360 and thought of it. I had read some things the other day that had come from oceanographers and other scientists that were being denied access and I forgot to say something about it. But, in the event of a national, and possibly an international ecological emergency that will affect generations of human activities and a wealth of national resources for many generations, BP lost its rights to the protections it may have afforded itself in its lease terms. They have no right to deny access – there is no ownership to BP of our oceans, our sea floor, our national waters, our state waters offshore or anything else they may be thinking.

Somebody needs to explain it to them in terms they can understand. This is not the Exxon Valdez disaster. This is massive, pervasive and has already spread exponentially more crude oil and toxic chemicals into the Gulf of Mexico, into the currents at all levels, and altered the coastal areas as well as the marine eco-systems permanently.

The other thing I wanted to say right quick is that BP’s choices about clean-up and how to deal with the disaster have permanently destroyed not only marine eco-systems (forever) but have also destroyed the air quality that we’ll have to all live with durn near as long as forever on top of it all. They have destroyed entire communities, livelihoods and coastal industries and the whole thing threatens the health of people throughout the area as well. Enough is enough.

When BP “borrowed” use of these subsea environments to do a little oil drilling, we did not sell them the spot they are drilling. They neither own the space, the sea, the sea floor where they are doing it, not the marine environment around it and not the air above it. And, they don’t own the oil they are taking out of it either – which now is being lost into the Gulf Stream and looping currents of the Gulf of Mexico, into the air and being burned off in a great pipe over the Gulf as a natural gas plume and being burned off in controlled burns as petroleum crude in the controlled burns they are using instead of sticking a bunch of hair in it and getting it up. That actually has been known to work and retrieves the oil for recovery. But, no – they didn’t want to do it that way.

– cricketdiane, 05-17-10

***

Where did BP get the idea that they own the Gulf of Mexico?

Mr. President – did you know that BP owns the Gulf of Mexico – or is it simply what their attorneys have led them to believe? I want to know which of our Congressmen sold our nation’s waters and every right to say what does or does not happen there – to the petroleum companies who have leased some places to drill there. I want to know who sold the Gulf of Mexico to them, who sold rights to our private lands in our national forests, who sold the rights to change the markers of the Alaskan national nature preserves and who sold the rights to mine them in open pit mines and by oil drilling crud producing curdling crude based industrial crap zones and who sold them Alaska as their private harvesting zone for petroleum and gold and minerals and whatever else they wanted?

I want to know who would have done that? Is it not clear yet – that we could’ve done something else?

Maybe this is something you should see –

(after I change computers – it’ll take a minute)

– cd9

***

White House to Create Oil Spill Commission White House to Create Oil Spill Commission

Federal Official Overseeing Offshore Drilling Announces Departure; Sen. Boxer Calls for Criminal Probe

Agency’s offshore drilling chief to retire

Senators want independent BP probe

(just had to add these two right quick first)

***

This – (and immediately after it – you’ve gotta see this – pass through the wikipedia stuff and see it right after that – )

***

Sunbeam (car company)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the motorcycle marque, see Sunbeam (motorcycle).

Sunbeam badge.

Sunbeam was a marque registered by John Marston Co. Ltd of Wolverhampton, England, in 1888. The company first made bicycles, then motorcycles and cars from the late 19th century until about 1936, and applied the marque to all three forms of transportation. The company also manufactured 647 aircraft during the Second World War. A Sunbeam was the first British car to win a Grand Prix race, and set a number of land speed records. The company went into receivership in 1935 and was purchased by the Rootes Group, which continued to use the Sunbeam marque.

Contents

[hide]

Early history

John Marston was apprenticed to the Jeddo Works of Wolverhampton as a japanner (metal lacquerer). In 1859, at the age of 23, he bought two tinplate manufacturers and set up on his own as John Marston Co. Ltd. Marston was an avid cyclist, and in 1877 set up the Sunbeamland Cycle Factory, producing bikes known as Sunbeams. Between 1899 and 1901 the company also produced a number of experimental cars, but none were offered to the market.

The first production car named as a Sunbeam was introduced in 1901, after a partnership with Maxwell Maberly-Smith. The Sunbeam-Mabley design was an odd one, with seats on either side of a belt-drive powered by a single-cylinder engine of less than 3 hp (2.2 kW). The design was a limited success, with 420 sold at £130 when production ended in 1904. At that point the company started production of a Thomas Pullinger designed car based on the Berliet mechanicals. They introduced a new model, based on a Peugeot motor they bought for study, in 1906 and sold about 10 a week.

In 1905, the Sunbeam Motorcar Company Ltd was formed separate from the rest of the John Marston business, which retained the Sunbeam motorcycles and bicycles.

The Breton car designer, Louis Coatalen, joined the company from Humber in 1909, and became chief designer. He soon reorganised production such that almost all parts were built by the company, as opposed to relying on outside suppliers. He quickly introduced his first design, the Sunbeam 14/20, their first to use a shaft-driven rear axle, upgrading it in 1911 with a slightly larger engine as the 16/20.

Sunbeam made a small number of Veterans, and by 1912 were making conventional, high quality cars. Direct competitors to Rolls Royce, a Sunbeam was considered to be a car for those who thought an RR a little ostentatious.

Louis Coatalen in the Nautilus at Brooklands in 1910

Coatalen was particularly fond of racing as a way to drive excellence within the company, noting that “Racing improves the breed”. After designing the 14/20, he started the design of advanced high-power engines, combining overhead valves with a pressurised oil lubrication system. In 1910 he built his first dedicated land-speed-record car, the Sunbeam Nautilus, powered by a 4.2-litre version of this engine design. The Nautilus implemented a number of early streamlining features, known as “wind cutting” at the time, but the custom engine suffered various problems and the design was eventually abandoned. The next year he introduced the Sunbeam Toodles II, featuring an improved valve system that turned it into a success. Coatalen won 22 prizes in Toodles II at Brooklands in 1911, and also achieved a flying mile of 86.16 mph (138.66 km/h) to take the 16hp Short Record. Sunbeam cars powered by more conventional (for the time) side-valve engines featured prominently in the 1911 Coupé de l’Auto race, and improved versions won first, second and third the next year. Sunbeams continued to race over the next few years, but the company had moved on to other interests.

Coatalen also designed a number of passenger cars, notably the Sunbeam 12/16. By 1911 Sunbeam were building about 650 cars a year, at that time making them a major manufacturer.

First World War

Starting in 1912 they had also branched out into aircraft engines, introducing a series of engines that were not particularly successful commercially. Coatalen seemed to be convinced that the proper solution to any engine requirement was a design for those exact specifications, instead of producing a single engine and letting the aircraft designers build their aircraft around it. Their most numerous designs were the troublesome V8 Sunbeam Arab, which was ordered in quantity in 1917 but suffered from continual vibration and reliability problems and only saw limited service, and the more successful V12 Sunbeam Cossack. Meanwhile Coatalen continued to experiment with ever-more odd designs such as the star-layout Sunbeam Malay, which never got beyond a prototype, the air-cooled Sunbeam Spartan and the diesel-powered Sunbeam Pathan. The company was fairly successful with the introduction of newer manufacturing techniques, however, and was one of the first to build aluminium single-block engines, a design that would not become common until the 1930s.

During the Second World War, the company built motorcycles, trucks, and ambulances. The company also participated in the Society of British Aircraft Constructors pool, who shared aircraft designs with any companies that could build them. Acting in this role, they produced 15 Short Bombers[1] powered by their own Sunbeam Gurkha engines, 20 Short Type 827s[1], 50 Short 310s[1], and others including Avro 504 trainers; they even designed their own Sunbeam Bomber, which lost to a somewhat simpler Sopwith design. Sunbeam had produced 647 aircraft of various types by the time the lines shut down in early 1919.

Post-war

Sunbeam 14/40 Tourer 1926

On August 13, 1920, Sunbeam merged with the French company Automobiles Darracq S.A.. Alexandre Darracq built his first car in 1896, and his cars were so successful that Alfa Romeo and Opel both started out in the car industry by building Darracqs under licence. In 1919 Darracq bought the London-based firm of Clement-Talbot to become Talbot-Darracq in order to import Talbots into England. Adding Sunbeam created “Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq”, or “STD Motors”.

In addition to quality limousine, saloon and touring cars, Coatalen was pleased to build racing cars for Henry Segrave—who won the French and Spanish GPs in 1923/4. He also built a Brooklands racer for K L Guinness—based on a V12 27 litre 350 hp (260 kW) Sunbeam Manitou engine, originally designed to power the R34 airship. This famous car (Sunbeam 350HP) established a new Land Speed Record at Brooklands and in Malcolm Campbell’s hands at Pendine Sands where it achieved 150.766 mph (242.634 km/h) in 1925 after renaming it the Blue Bird and painting it blue. The same year Coatalen’s new 3 litre Super Sports came 2nd at Le Mans—beating Bentley—this was the first production twin cam car in the world. In 1926 Segrave captured the LSR in a new 4 litre V12 Sunbeam racer originally named Ladybird and later renamed Tiger. Coatalen decided to re-enter the LSR field himself, building the truly gigantic Sunbeam 1000HP powered by two 450 hp (340 kW) Matabele engines. On 29 March 1927 the car captured the speed record at 203.792 mph (327.971 km/h). The car is now at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu, UK.

Sunbeam’s great age was really the 1920s under Coatalen’s leadership with very well engineered, high quality, reliable cars — and a great reputation on the track.

A later land speed record attempt, the 1930 Silver Bullet, failed to achieve either records, or the hoped-for advances in aero engines. It is now almost forgotten. Sunbeam did not really survive the depression and in 1935 went into receivership and was sold to Lord Rootes. The last true Sunbeam was made in 1935. The new entry model “Dawn” was a typical mid 1930’s design with independent front suspension whereas other models, the 18.2HP and Speed 20 were based on Vintage designs and qualify as PVT under VSCC rules.

Coatalen’s obsession with improvement meant that there were numerous small changes in models from year to year. This means that although all his designs are basically similar, very few parts are interchangeable!

In the Vintage period, typically two models dominated production volumes at each period:

  • 1920–24 16hp, 16/40, 24hp, 24/60 & 24/70 all based on pre war designs.
  • 1922–23 14hp The first highly successful post war 4 cylinder.
  • 1924 12/30 & 16/50 only produced in small numbers.
  • 1924–26 14/40 and big brother 20/60 developed from 14hp with 2 more cylinders added.
  • 1926–30 3 litre Super Sports, highly successful and much coveted, the first production twin OHC car in the world.
  • 1926–30 16hp (16.9) & 20hp (20.9). Two new designs with six cylinder integral cast iron block and crankcase. Both were reliable capable cars produced over many years, the 20hp (20.9) with a 3 litre engine producing 70 BHP is noted for its performance and is well respected as a practical and reliable touring car. It has many shared components with the 3 litre Super Sports (brakes, suspension, steering, axles, gearbox, transmission).
  • 1926–32 20/60 developed into 25hp with bore increased from 75 to 80 mm. A few 8 cylinder cars produced in this period, 30hp & 35hp.
  • 1930–32 16hp bore increased from 67 to 70 mm, (16.9 to 18.2hp).
  • 1931–33 New model 20hp introduced with 80 mm bore and 7 main bearings rated at 23.8hp. Very smooth and powerful engine.
  • 1933 18.2hp engine installed in Speed 20 chassis and renamed ‘Twenty’.
  • 1933–34 20.9hp engine resurrected and installed in new cruciform braced chassis for the Speed 20. Highly desirable model especially the 1934 body style.
  • 1933–35 Twenty-Five introduced with modified 1931–33 23.8 hp engine.
  • 1934 Twenty given the 20.9 engine in place of the 18.2.
  • 1934–35 Dawn introduced. 12.8 hp (9.5 kW) engine and IFS. Nice little car but not a great success.
  • 1935 Speed 20 renamed Sports 21 with redesigned body style.
  • 1935 Sports 21 given a high compression version of Twenty-Five engine.

The most successful, judged by volumes, was the 16hp (16.9) followed by 20hp (20.9) made from 1926-30. Whilst the 16 was solid and very reliable, it was a little underpowered at 2.1 litres, the 20.9 made a big jump to 3 litres and 70 bhp (52 kW; 71 PS) with similar body weight and vacuum servo brakes and was capable of 70 mph (110 km/h).

Sunbeam built their own bodies but also supplied to the coachbuilder trade; many limousines were built on Sunbeam chassis. The sales catalogue illustrates the standard body designs.

Rootes Group

Sunbeam-Talbot Saloon 1947

Sunbeam-Talbot 90 4-Door Saloon 1948

Sunbeam Alpine series 4 roadster

STD Motors went into receivership in 1935. By this point only Talbots was still a success, and in 1935 that portion was purchased by the Rootes Group. William Lyons of “SS Cars,” who was looking for a name change, given the rising Nazi connotations, tried to buy Sunbeam but they were also purchased by Rootes. After World War II SS Cars changed their name to Jaguar. Car production at the Wolverhampton factory was terminated.

Rootes was an early proponent of badge engineering, building a single mass-produced chassis and equipping it with different body panels and interiors to fit different markets. They ended production of existing models at all the new companies, replacing them with designs from Hillman and Humber that were more amenable to mass production.

In 1938 Rootes created a new marque called Sunbeam-Talbot which combined the quality Talbot coachwork and the current Hillman and Humber chassis and was assembled at the Talbot factory in London. The initial two models were the Sunbeam-Talbot 10 and the 3-litre followed by the Sunbeam-Talbot 2 litre and 4 litre models based on the earlier models only with different engines and longer wheelbases. Production of these models continued after the war until 1948.

In the summer of 1948, the Sunbeam-Talbot 80 and Sunbeam-Talbot 90 were introduced, with a totally new streamlined design with flowing front fenders (wings). The 80 used the Hillman Minx based engine with ohv and the 90 utilised a modified version of the Humber Hawk with ohv. The car bodies were manufactured by another Rootes Group company, British Light Steel Pressings of Acton, however the convertible drophead coupé shells were completed by Thrupp & Maberly coachbuilders in Cricklewood. The underpowered 80 was discontinued in 1950. The 90 was renamed the 90 Mark II and then the 90 Mark IIA and eventually in 1954 the Sunbeam Mark III, finally dropping the Talbot name. With the model name changes, the headlights were raised on the front fenders and an independent coil front suspension and the engine displacement went from 1944 cc to 2267 cc with a high compression head and developing 80 bhp (60 kW; 81 PS).

There was one more model of the Sunbeam-Talbot that appeared in 1953 in the form of an Alpine, a two seater sports roadster which was initially developed by a Sunbeam-Talbot dealer George Hartwell in Bournemouth as a one-off rally car that had its beginnings as a 1952 drophead coupé. It was named supposedly by Norman Garrad, (works Competition Department) who was heavily involved in the Sunbeam-Talbot successes in the Alpine Rally in the early 1950s using the Saloon model. The Alpine Mark I and Mark III (a Mark II was never made) were hand built like the Drophead Coupé at Thrupp & Maberly coachbuilders from 1953 to 1955 when production ceased after close to 3000 were produced. It has been estimated that perhaps only 200 remain in existence today. The Talbot name was dropped in 1954 for the Sunbeam Alpine sports car, making Sunbeam the sports-performance marque. In 1955 a Sunbeam saloon won the Monte Carlo Rally. Production ceased in 1956 and replaced by the sporty Sunbeam Rapier.

In 1959 a totally new Alpine was introduced, and the 1955 Rapier (essentially a badge-engineered Hillman Minx) was upgraded. After several successful series of the Alpine were released, director of US West-Coast operations, Ian Garrad, became interested in the success of the AC Cobra, which mounted a small-block V-8 engine in the small AC Ace frame to create one of the most successful sports cars of all time. Garrad became convinced the Alpine frame could also be adapted the same way, and contracted Carroll Shelby to prototype such a fit with a Ford engine. The result was the Sunbeam Tiger, released in 1964, which went on to be a huge success.

Chrysler era

But by this point Rootes was in financial trouble. Talks with Leyland Motors went nowhere, so in 1964 30 percent of the company (along with 50 percent of the non-voting shares) was purchased by Chrysler, which was attempting to enter the European market. Ironically, Chrysler had purchased Simca the year earlier, who had earlier purchased Automobiles Talbot, originally the British brand that had been merged into STD Motors many years earlier.

Chrysler’s experience with the Rootes empire appears to have been an unhappy one. Models were abandoned over the next few years while they tried to build a single brand from the best models of each of the company’s components, but for management “best” typically meant “cheapest to produce” which was at odds with the former higher-quality Rootes philosophy. Brand loyalty started to erode, and was greatly damaged when they decided to drop former marques and start calling everything a Chrysler. The Tiger was dropped in 1967 after an abortive attempt to fit it with a Chrysler engine, and the Hillman Imp–derived Stiletto disappeared in 1972.

The last Sunbeam produced was the “Rootes Arrow” series Alpine/Rapier fastback (1967–76), after which Chrysler, who had purchased Rootes, disbanded the marque. The Hillman (by now Chrysler) Hunter on which they were based soldiered on until 1978. A Hillman Avenger-derived hatchback, the Chrysler Sunbeam, maintained the name as a model rather than a marque from 1978 to the early 1980s, with the very last models sold as Talbot Sunbeams. The remains of Chrysler Europe were purchased by Peugeot and Renault in 1978, and the name has not been used since.

Products

Sunbeam car at the Black Country Living Museum

Early fire engine on display at the Black Country Living Museum, preserved by the Marston Wolverhampton Heritage Trust

Sunbeam cars

Pre WWI

  • 1901–04 Sunbeam Mabley
  • 1903–10 Sunbeam 12hp
  • 1905–11 Sunbeam 16/20 and 25/30
  • 1908 Sunbeam 20
  • 1908–09 Sunbeam 35
  • 1909 Sunbeam 16
  • 1909–15 Sunbeam 14/20, 16/20, and 20
  • 1910–11 Sunbeam 12/16
  • 1911–15 Sunbeam 18/22, 25/30 and 30
  • 1912–15 Sunbeam 12/16 and 16
  • 1912–14 Sunbeam 16/20

Inter-war years

1935 Sunbeam Model 25 Saloon

  • 1919–21 Sunbeam 16/40
  • 1919–24 Sunbeam 24, 24/60 and 24/70
  • 1922–23 Sunbeam 14 and 14/40
  • 1923–26 Sunbeam 20/60
  • 1924–33 Sunbeam 16 (16.9 and 18.4)
  • 1925–30 Sunbeam 3 litre Super Sports (Twin Cam)
  • 1926–32 Sunbeam Long 25
  • 1927–30 Sunbeam 20 (20.9)
  • 1930–33 Sunbeam 20 (23.8)
  • 1933–35 Sunbeam Speed Twenty
  • 1934–35 Sunbeam Twenty
  • 1934–35 Sunbeam Twenty-Five
  • 1934–35 Sunbeam Dawn

Rootes Group Cars

  • 1936–37 Sunbeam 30
  • 1938–48 Sunbeam-Talbot Ten
  • 1939–48 Sunbeam-Talbot Two Litre
  • 1938–40 Sunbeam-Talbot Three Litre
  • 1939–40 Sunbeam-Talbot Four Litre

Post WWII

Double Decker buses

  • Pathan 1930-1938
  • DF2 1936-1948

Double Decker trolleybus

  • MS2 1934-1948
  • MS3 1934-1948
  • MF1 1934-1949
  • MF2 1935-1952
  • W4 1943-1967
  • F4/F4A 1948-1965

Export only

Sunbeam-Coatalen engines

Support

The Sunbeam, Talbot Darracq Register has membership with about 250 Sunbeams, there are probably another 200+ outside the register. A comprehensive forum contains archive copies of all STD Register journals published since 1950 and Newsletters since 2003. It also provided access to experts who o answer technical questions and help those doing their own maintenance and restoration.

A printed maintenance manual is available along with digital copies of period owner’s manuals, spare parts lists, sales catalogues, road tests and engineering drawings.

The register funds cooperative production of limited batches of critical spares from time to time, specialist restorers occasionally manufacture parts on their own initiative. This means that most parts needed in general running are available. The excellent materials used mean that re-manufacture or repair is generally possible on failed components. Enthusiasts today build cars from bare chassis, gathering parts from wherever they can, with some success.

The register runs local monthly meeting across the UK and a limited number of events each year.

Sunbeams are ideal cars for formal occasions – some owners allow their cars to be used for weddings.

References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c Barnes & James, p.541
Bibliography

(from)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunbeam_%28car_company%29

***

AUTOMOTIVE

2025 Sunbeam Tiger electric car concept

By Paul Evans

16:52 April 16, 2009

2025 Sunbeam Tiger Electric Car Concept

2025 Sunbeam Tiger Electric Car Concept

Image Gallery (9 images)

The 1925 Sunbeam Tiger was a supercharged V12 four-liter racing car, driven by Sir Henry Segrave at 145 mph (233 km/h) and was the smallest-engined car ever to hold the world land speed record. The Sunbeam Tiger electric sports car concept has been designed to “virtually” commemorate the 100th anniversary (1925-2025) of the Tiger’s land speed record win. The Tiger concept car is powered by a Siemens 3 phase AC motor powering the rear wheels with a 26 kilowatt/hour lithium-titanate battery pack and has a curb weight of 600kg (1323lb).

The Sunbeam Tiger Concept is based on a tubular space frame chassis made from recycled aluminum, with other environmentally friendly materials used for many components, including vegetable oil resin body panels, soy foam seats covered in biofabric, natural fiber brake pads, eco-paint and cornstarch tires. The roll bars are built directly into the seat frame and the seat frame is built into the chassis for improved safety.

The car has an estimated performance of 0-60 mph in 2.3 seconds, an electronically limited top speed of 160mph and a driving range of about 800 miles between charges. The car’s designer, Ryan Skelley, admits that he made a mistake when calculating the distance available on one charge but the saving grace is that this is a concept for 2025 and with the current progression of battery technology, he’s sure that range will be achievable.

Paul Evans

2025 Sunbeam Tiger Electric Car Concept

Image Gallery (9 images)

***
Next – I’m going over to Mitsubishi Electric group and there is a wind turbine design for generating electricity that you’ve gotta see
– cd9
***

http://global.mitsubishielectric.com/company/ir/overview/strategy/index.html

Implementing Balanced Corporate Management

Management Policy

“Changes for the Better,” our corporate statement, encapsulates all that we stand for and aspire to—a brighter future for society, industry and everyday life through innovation.

Supporting this commitment to innovation and sustainable operations is a solid management structure backed by balanced management initiatives that stem from three key viewpoints: Growth; Profitability and Efficiency; and Soundness.

At the same time, we actively promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives based on our Corporate Mission and Seven Guiding Principles. A key priority is ethical and legal compliance through strengthening internal controls to ensure J-SOX compliance, and other educational measures implemented across the entire consolidated group of Mitsubishi Electric companies. In addition, we work diligently to protect the environment. Among a host of initiatives, we strive to reduce the level of CO2 emissions and foster a recycling-based society as part of our Environmental Vision 2021 program.

To ensure that we continue to meet the expectations of shareholders, we have undertaken reforms that are guiding our ongoing evolution into a network of highly competitive, electric-electronic businesses while leveraging synergies to further enhance corporate value.

http://global.mitsubishielectric.com/company/ir/overview/strategy/index.html

***

My Note –

That’s what your corporate strategy starts to look like when you give a damn.

And, when you care about how that strategy and corporate choices fit into a greater scheme of things. And as much as I know it is a philosophy that never is perfect but rather that we all grow towards all the time and do our best, the teams and corporations which have this type of philosophy and corporate culture produce differently and differently in the long run than those who act the way BP or even General Motors has acted about things.

And, – I might add the corporations that hold cultures as General Motors did and BP still does at their executive levels – which is the anti-thesis of what a healthy person would do or that a healthy corporate culture can be – it eventually undermines the corporation and its profits. Its always just a matter of time to their ultimate demise and how much damage gets done by them before they get there.

– cricketdiane
***
Look at some these nifty things when you get a chance –
They are amazing.

ADVANCE Magazine An online quarterly publication and rich source of information on our latest technological innovations, products and R&D.

Patent Licensing Mitsubishi Electric welcomes licensing inquiries concerning its patents held all over the world.

Research & Development Mitsubishi Electric’s research policy and advanced research centers that keep us at the forefront of cutting edge technology.(from choosing a tab on the lefthand sidebar that says – Research and Development on the first page on Investor’s Relations)

http://global.mitsubishielectric.com/company/rd/index.html

***

My Note –

I said “we” but it isn’t because I work for them or with them. It is because it is a common, shared principle that I choose to incorporate in the things I do as well. And, I agree with it not only in principle, but in practice.

– cricketdiane

***

from wikipedia –

Mitsubishi Electric Corporation (三菱電機株式会社, Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki-gaisha?) (TYO: 6503) is a Japanese company based in the Tokyo Building in Tokyo, manufactures electric and architectural equipment, as well as a major worldwide producer of photovoltaic panels[3]. The Corporation was established on 15 January 1921.

It is one of the Mitsubishi Group core companies. In the United States, products are manufactured and sold by Mitsubishi Electric & Electronics USA, Inc., headquartered in Cypress, California.

(and – although the best one is usually in Japanese)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Electric

***

They just had a commercial for the new Sharp television with four colors – I finally got to see it the other day and I would buy fifteen of them if I could. That is absolutely amazing and I love Sharp products anyway because they are just the best whether it is a microwave or television or whatever it is. I wish our American products were like that again.

– cricketdiane

***

But, back to what I wanted to show you –

(just go play with it sometime when you get the chance. Petroleum is not the only option – nor was it ever the only option, there was a little Sunbeam electric car made in the 1960s that went by the wayside and some of the 4-litre sunbeam designs – that were very early in the process – they made some incredible fuel efficiency choices that could’ve been brought forward. And also at this point before going head to head with the muscle cars – there were options being created to gain more from the petroleum that it was using.

from wikipedia – and I think the Sunbeam electric may be from a different manufacturer – I’m double checking that right now. The Sunbeam banner from the wikipedia entry made strides in the use of petroleum efficiently for the purpose of power derived from the process, intending to create racing platforms that could win against much more powerful engine configurations. And they did a good job – a really good set of work that could’ve been brought forward but somebody chose not to do that. (In Chrysler probably.)

– cricketdiane, my note

(from the wikipedia entry – )

“With the model name changes, the headlights were raised on the front fenders and an independent coil front suspension and the engine displacement went from 1944 cc to 2267 cc with a high compression head and developing 80 bhp (60 kW; 81 PS).”

“There was one more model of the Sunbeam-Talbot that appeared in 1953 in the form of an Alpine, a two seater sports roadster which was initially developed by a Sunbeam-Talbot dealer George Hartwell in Bournemouth as a one-off rally car that had its beginnings as a 1952 drophead coupé. It was named supposedly by Norman Garrad, (works Competition Department) who was heavily involved in the Sunbeam-Talbot successes in the Alpine Rally in the early 1950s using the Saloon model. The Alpine Mark I and Mark III (a Mark II was never made) were hand built like the Drophead Coupé at Thrupp & Maberly coachbuilders from 1953 to 1955 when production ceased after close to 3000 were produced. It has been estimated that perhaps only 200 remain in existence today. The Talbot name was dropped in 1954 for the Sunbeam Alpine sports car, making Sunbeam the sports-performance marque. In 1955 a Sunbeam saloon won the Monte Carlo Rally. Production ceased in 1956 and replaced by the sporty Sunbeam Rapier.”

(see above in the post)

***

2025 Sunbeam Tiger electric car concept | Hybrid Auto Review

May 4, 2010 The 1925 Sunbeam Tiger was a supercharged V12 four-liter racing car, driven by Sir Henry Segrave at 145 mph (233 km/h) and was the
http://www.hybridautoreview.net/2025-sunbeam-tiger-electriccar-concept.html

***

http://www.mitsubishielectric.co.jp/

Mitsubishi – Japan

***

And, would somebody please explain to me why we don’t have the Tesla Motor Car Electric in full-scale production at this point where we could all buy one for around $30,000 instead of it being back ordered at $150,000 each or whatever it is this week?

There’s just no excuse for a fine design like that not being available to all of us and commonly enough available in a mass production capability that would make it affordable. The business community has known there was a problem and in fact, a multitude of problems associated with the petroleum-based system for every single thing – especially transportation. Why the hell haven’t they done something else if they are so bright and well-educated and smart as business geniuses? It doesn’t take a rocket scientist, a Harvard Ph.D. or Masters degree to figure out that as of 1960 – there was evidence of the tremendous problems being caused by gasoline and petroleum products in general, both the shipping of, the mining of, the drilling for, the pollution from, the dangers associated with and generally – the dismal returns in energy efficiency of.

It is disgusting to think this is 2010 and they are still saying it would be 30 more years before they could possibly be expected to get anything changed over to anything besides petroleum.

Unbelievable.

– cricketdiane

Oh yeah – and then they blame us as consumers and customers for it being that way – even while denying access to us for any other thing of any other variety that might be in competition with the ways they want it done that are solely based on petroleum. (or coal – or natural gas or the most inefficient ways to use those substances, etc.)

***

http://www.mitsubishielectric.co.jp/

Mitsubishi – Japan

I’ll just put one thing –

  • 展示会情報出展予定の展示会のご案内、
    過去の展示会サイト

and then go to the English version.

***

And you might want to see this some time –

Planning a Sunbeam Alpine conversion. – DIY Electric Car Forums

10 posts – 6 authors – Last post: Jun 6, 2008

Planning a Sunbeam Alpine conversion. All EV Conversions and Builds.
http://www.diyelectriccar.com › … › All EV Conversions and Builds

***

Nifty, huh?

my note

***

(from Mitsubishi – USA website – )

Solar Energy

Photovoltaic Modules

http://www.mitsubishielectric-usa.com/

***

My Note –

I thought I better double check the entry I posted from the Japanese Mitsubishi site, just in case – through a Google translation – so here it ix –

展示会情報出展予定の展示会のご案内、
過去の展示会サイト

Exhibition Information Exhibition Exhibition planning,
Past fairs

Ooh – I just found out that Google translation tools – speaks out the words – now I can learn how to pronounce the Japanese words in the title and learn them as I go from reading them. How nifty. I love that – what great news to include in my day. I can read some things in other languages much better than I can say them. This is so good.

– cricketdiane

***

Durn – didn’t work the other way around to read the Japanese to me from the English translation out loud – the little speaker thing wasn’t there when I put them in the other direction. Oh well. It’s still nifty. I’ll work with it some more later and go watch the news in Japan to get better at it for now.

***

More from the Mitsubishi site – (American version)

Well, fine – I don’t like their American version – its harder to use than the Japanese site. The tabs on the left hand side are click them and the screen square to the right shows a product group with absolutely no real information without running through to a bunch of other pages. Forget it – I’m going to try the one square about midway down the page on the lefthand side and see where that goes – I’ll put it here.

Then, I’m giving up on doing it this way and going to go do it where it makes better sense.

Mitsubishi Electric
Interactive Product Guide

Interactive Product Guide

Who built this thing?

Okay that was nifty for what a cute little webpage window can do and not tell a damn thing worth seeing. But, okay – maybe it works for trade shows.

I’m going back to a search for the sunbeam electric and that wind turning lateral blade system with the magnets on the bottom of each blade that moves inside a magnetic cowling to create electricity – sorry about the sidetrip through corporate jungle undergrowth. I do have to say that I don’t like it when the Japanese companies use Americans to interface with Americans in how they present their products and the capabilities of their companies. It just isn’t right. The American pr and marketing firms and people who work in that just don’t approach it the same way as it was originally presented and it sucks.

Its my opinion – take it or leave it.

That happens a lot with many different countries and their consumer products to us but honestly – most of the time the simple change of languages would be enough and suit just fine. The other just makes a mess of what is otherwise an elegant presentation of their corporation and its products just as is made in their native language and cultural influence. Americans don’t seem to interface in that way very well – somehow we undermine the process when it is done for places and things from other places in the world – though probably unintentionally.

– cricketdiane

***

From a google search using the search terms –

sunbeam electric car
and I see a suggestion at the bottom of the page for

sunbeam motor cars

which might be worth trying. I know people remember the little Sunbeam car from the 60s – I don’t think it was made for very long and it was fully electric.

I’ll find it in a minute.

Added On May 14, 2010

Actor Kevin Costner was in New Orleans on Thursday with a machine that extracts oil from water. WDSU reports.

Added On May 17, 2010

The oil spill debate heats up on Capitol Hill as BP’s president says the company will learn from the terrible event.

Added On May 17, 2010

CNN’s Brian Todd looks at the latest developments in the effort to stop the oil leak in the Gulf.

Added On May 17, 2010

CNN’s Chad Myers explains how the oil from the Gulf of Mexico could possibly make its way all the way to Europe.

Added On May 17, 2010

A look back at the top stories for May 17, 2010.

Added On May 14, 2010

Incident Commander Thad Allen says majority of Gulf Coast oil is still offshore.

Presidential commission will investigate oil spill

By the CNN Wire StaffMay 17, 2010 8:18 p.m. EDT

http://us.cnn.com/2010/US/05/17/gulf.oil.spill/index.html

Some of the oil has washed ashore on the Louisiana coast, and tar balls related to the spill have turned up as far east as Dauphin Island, Alabama.

Some estimates put the amount of oil gushing from the well far higher than the 5,000-barrel-per-day estimate made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration a few days after the spill began. Samples taken by scientists offshore have raised concerns that large plumes of oil are settling below the surface.

Samantha Joye, a professor of marine sciences at the University of Georgia, told CNN’s “American Morning” that the size of the suspected plumes is hard to determine.

“Nothing like it has really ever been seen in the deep water of the Gulf of Mexico before,” she said. “It’s not only a large feature, but it’s a very complex feature. There’s a lot of vertical structure to it.”

But federal officials said the results have not been fully analyzed. Charlie Henry, a scientific adviser from NOAA, said descriptions of “layers of oil” beneath the Gulf were “totally untrue.”

“They were able to detect what we think is hydrocarbons in the water column. It was stated as oil, but it wasn’t like oil you could see,” Henry told reporters Monday afternoon.

(etc.)

http://us.cnn.com/2010/US/05/17/gulf.oil.spill/index.html

***

My Note –

Note that there are only dozens of scientists and engineers that have judged the flow of oil out of the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon spill to have been closer to or even beyond the 70,000 barrels a day range, (not anywhere close to the 5,000 BP is insisting upon) – but that you, I , your kids, your neighbors and anyone else can see in the photographs of the Gulf that there are huge plumes of oil beneath the surface visible in almost every single photograph that has come from the Gulf since this started happening.

And, I mean not only on the surface as a rainbow colored slick, and in huge surging surface streaks of heavy thick orange brown crude oil, but also beneath the surface of the ocean in the aerial photographs that have come from the area. It is visible to anybody – and there are independent science groups, scientists and engineers in the area that have measured it and taken readings and observations who have measured the underwater plumes of oil at over 300 feet thick running for twenty miles or more by several miles wide.

And, then there are the blobs and globules mixed with dispersant toxic chemicals that are loosely floating on the surface in a photo I posted with dolphin seen underneath it – in photos of zippy bags with the ocean water in them and in every photo that has been taken under the water anywhere – even miles and miles away from the central spill zone.

BP is a real piece of work and so are the people like the one in the story above who said that the underwater plumes are not really there and that we are not seeing what we are seeing and it couldn’t possibly be what it looks like it is despite 70,000 barrels of oil or more pouring into the Gulf of Mexico for 29 days now non-stop.

And they’ve got a straw in the barrel of the pipe catching 1000 gallons of methane which they’re burning off in a tower to pollute the air and some crude oil – however little bit that is. What they are thinking is beyond me.

– cricketdiane

But, we never even had to do it this way.

***

I was looking for the two video clips that show how the engineers and scientists independent of BP have calculated the flow from basic principles used by all disciplines of engineering and science to get a very close approximation of volume. – Maybe I’ll find it later.

Here’s this part –

Scientists: Large oil plumes detected in Gulf may pose new threat

By the CNN Wire StaffMay 17, 2010 4:59 p.m. EDT

http://us.cnn.com/2010/US/05/17/oil.spill.plumes/index.html

The spill has become so serious that on Monday, eight U.S. senators called for an independent federal investigation of whether oil giant BP violated civil or criminal laws in connection with the oil spill.

The plumes could mean that even more oil has gushed into the Gulf from an undersea well than previously thought, and the contaminants under the surface could pose additional environmental hazards.

“Nothing like it has really ever been seen in the deep water of the Gulf of Mexico before,” Samantha Joye, a professor of marine sciences at the University of Georgia, told CNN’s “American Morning.” “It’s not only a large feature, but it’s a very complex feature. There’s a lot of vertical structure to it.”

At least one of the plumes is thought to be enormous. Vernon Asper, a professor of marine science at the University of Southern Mississippi, told National Public Radio in a story that aired Monday that the largest is “probably 15 or 20 miles long and maybe 4 or 5 miles wide.”

Asper and a group of researchers spent about two weeks aboard a vessel in the Gulf to study the oil.

( . . . )

http://us.cnn.com/2010/US/05/17/oil.spill.plumes/index.html

Interactive Animation Map of the Crude Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico over the course of days –

http://us.cnn.com/2010/US/04/29/interactive.spill.tracker/index.html

***

This is the link to the video that has the calculations being explained by Professor Wereley of Purdue University – although those calculations are typically known by anyone involved in petroleum engineering without a doubt, my note. (from CNN – May 14, 2010)

http://cnn.com/video/?/video/bestoftv/2010/05/13/ac.oil.spill.cnn

from their blogpost that includes the video of this –

Gulf oil spill A U.S. congressman said he will launch a formal inquiry Friday into how much oil is gushing into the Gulf of Mexico after learning of independent estimates that are significantly higher than the amount BP officials have provided. BP officials have said 5,000 barrels per day of crude, or 210,000 gallons, have been leaking for the past three weeks. But after analyzing videos of the spill, a researcher at Purdue University has predicted that about 70,000 barrels of oil per day are gushing into the Gulf.

on this page –

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/category/latest-news/gulf-coast-oil-spill/

(AND)

NEW ORLEANS, May 17, 2010

Oil Spill Hovers Over Gulf of Mexico Reefs

Sensitive Ecosystem in Danger and Could be Headed for the Florida Keys

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/05/17/tech/main6491241.shtml

(AP)

The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has already spewed plumes over ecologically sensitive reefs, part of a stalled marine sanctuary proposal that would have restrict drilling in a large swath of the northern part of the vital waterway.

Marine scientists fear that two powerful Gulf currents will carry the oil to other reefs. The eastward flowing loop current could spread it about 450 miles to the Florida Keys, while the Louisiana coastal current could move the oil as far west as central Texas.

(etc.)

“At first we had a lot of concern about surface animals like turtles, whales and dolphins,” said Paul Montagna, a marine biologist at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi who studies Gulf reefs. “Now we’re concerned about everything.”

Special Section: Disaster in the Gulf
Oil Spill by the Numbers
Gulf Oil Spill Containment Efforts

On Sunday, researchers said computer models show oil has already entered the loop current that could carry the toxic goo toward the Keys, the third-longest barrier reef in the world.

The oil is now over the western edge of a roughly 61-mile expanse of reef south of Louisiana known as the Pinnacles, about 25 miles north of where the Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20, killing 11 people and starting the spill that grows by the hour.

The Pinnacles is one of nine coral banks and hard-bottom areas stretching from Texas to Florida that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tried in 2008 to get designated a marine sanctuary called Islands in the Stream.

This sanctuary would have restricted fishing and oil drilling around the identified reef “islands.” But the plan was put on hold after vehement objections from Republican lawmakers, fishermen and the oil industry.

Scientists have found undersea plumes of oil at the spill as much as 10 miles long, which are an unprecedented danger to the deep sea environment, said Samantha Joye, a professor of marine sciences at the University of Georgia.

These plumes are being eaten by microbes thousands of feet deep, which removes oxygen from the water.

“Deepwater coral are abundant on the sea floor in this part of the Gulf, and they need oxygen,” said Joye, who was involved in the plume discovery. “Without it, they can’t survive.”

(etc.)

NOAA, which manages marine sanctuaries, is also responsible for estimating financial costs of the spill on the sea environment and fisheries. The Pinnacles is a significant habitat for sea life vital to commercial fisheries such as red snapper, crab and shrimp.

The creation of a sanctuary across hundreds of miles of the Gulf would not have blocked oil and gas exploration where the Deepwater Horizon exploded, said Montagna. However, he said it could have resulted in stricter environmental regulation for reefs closest to the spill site, and likely less drilling.

“So you can imagine these animals that make a living on rocks, filtering food out of the water, and the dispersants come along and sink the oil; it’s a big concern,” Montagna said.

The area also is breeding ground for sperm whales and bluefin tuna, species not doing well, he said.

Studies published in a 2005 National Academy of Sciences report show that oil mixed with dispersants damaged certain corals’ reproduction and deformed their larvae. The study concluded the federal government needed to study more before using massive amounts of dispersants.

Reefs are made up of living creatures that excrete a hard calcium carbonate exoskeleton.

Depending on the oil exposure, they can be smothered by the pollutants or become more susceptible to bleaching, which hinders reproduction and growth. While the warm temperatures of Florida could speed the recovery of damaged reefs there, some problems could be seen for a decade or more. In the deeper reefs in colder water closer to the spill, the damage could last even longer.

As the spill increases, the oil oozes toward other reefs that stretch from the blowout site eastward to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

The Keys exist in relatively shallow water, so the potential exposure to the oil is higher than for deeper reefs, though BP PLC officials say the oil would be more diffused after having broken down during its travel over hundreds of miles.

The depth of the gushing leaks and the use of more than 560,000 gallons of chemicals to disperse the oil, including unprecedented injections deep in the sea, have helped keep the crude beneath the sea surface.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

The depth of the gushing leaks and the use of more than 560,000 gallons of chemicals to disperse the oil, including unprecedented injections deep in the sea, have added layers of oil beneath the water as well as on the surface for thousands of square miles. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

This week, researchers from USF and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection are heading to the loop current to get a “chemical fingerprint” of any oil they find to confirm it is from the leaking well.

“We don’t expect the loop current to carry oil onto beaches,” William Hogarth, dean of the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science, said. “But we do have a great concern for the Keys.”

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/05/17/tech/main6491241.shtml

***

Going back to the Sunbeam car –

The History of Electric Vehicles
The Middle Years of Electric Cars (1930 – 1990)
1975 Electric Vehicle - Postal

http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aacarselectric1a.htm

***

In the early 1960s, the Boyertown Auto Body Works jointly formed the Battronic Truck Company with Smith Delivery Vehicles, Ltd., of England and the Exide Division of the Electric Battery Company. The first Battronic electric truck was delivered to the Potomac Edison Company in 1964. This truck was capable of speeds of 25 mph, a range of 62 miles and a payload of 2,500 pounds.

Battronic worked with General Electric from 1973 to 1983 to produce 175 utility vans for use in the utility industry and to demonstrate the capabilities of battery-powered vehicles. Battronic also developed and produced about 20 passenger buses in the mid 1970s.

The other company was Elcar Corporation, which produced the “Elcar”. The Elcar had a top speed of 45 mph, a range of 60 miles and cost between $4,000 and $4,500.

Elcar - electric carsIn 1975, the United States Postal Service (see top image) purchased 350 electric delivery jeeps from the American Motor Company to be used in a test program. These jeeps had a top speed of 50 mph and a range of 40 miles at a speed of 40 mph. Heating and defrosting were accomplished with a gas heater and the recharge time was 10 hours.

Next page > Electric Cars The Current Years (1990 to Present)

Photos and partial information provided by the U. S. Department of Energy

****

The “Big Three” automobile manufacturers, and the U.S. Department of Energy, as well as a number of vehicle conversion companies are actively involved in electric vehicle development through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Electric conversions of familiar gasoline powered vehicles, as well as electric vehicles designed from the ground up, are now available that reach super highway speeds with ranges of 50 to 150 miles between recharging.

The History of Electric Vehicles
Recent Years (1990 to 1998)
U.S. Electricar S-10 Electric Pickup Truck Electric Vehicles

Some examples of these vehicles are the Chevrolet S-10 pickup truck (top image), converted by U.S. Electricar and no longer available. It was powered by dual alternating current motors and lead acid batteries. It had a range of about 60 miles and could be recharged in less than 7 hours.

(from)

http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aacarselectric2a.htm

***

This wind turbine charges a 12 V battery to run 12 V appliances.

5 kilowatt vertical axis wind turbine

(from)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power

***

The world’s tallest vertical-axis wind turbine, in Cap-Chat, Quebec.
(from)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertical_axis_wind_turbine

The School showing wind turbines on the roof
Arizona State University
(from – )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASU_School_of_Sustainability

***

My Note –

I haven’t found the one that is in my notes somewhere – that has a circular cowling which is magnetic and then as the fan blades rotate in the wind, each blade has magnets on the end and make electricity – and I still haven’t found the little 1960s Sunbeam electrick. I also thought that International had some electric vehicles including trucks during the 60s and 70s that seemed to go by the wayside, too.

And, would somebody tell me why it is that in this day and age – I can’t buy about fifteen solar panels for $5.00 or even for $50.00 – why is that? We could have been using that for everything in every home or business – but no. How hard could it be to have mass production for these electric vehicles and solar panels and flexible solar cells that I have been reading about for years and have been invented upmteen years ago?

– cricketdiane

***

But, that’s not all –

eBay find of the day: 1960 Henney Kilowatt electric car — Autoblog

Feb 25, 2008 Unfortunately, the machine was held back by the same problems that electric car companies face today: price, speed and range.
green.autoblog.com/…/ebay-find-of-the-day-1960-henney-kilowatt-electriccar/

eBay find of the day: 1960 Henney Kilowatt electric car

by Jeremy Korzeniewski (RSS feed) on Feb 25th 2008 at 9:40AM


Click on the image above for more pictures

Originally billed as “The Ultimate Achievement of Advanced Electrical Engineering and Compact Automotive Design,” you could call the Henney Kilowatt a true forefather of today’s hybrid and electric cars. The whole story of how this car came to be is available here at the Wiki, but the short version is that the Eureka Williams Company (think vacuum cleaners), Henney Coachworks and National Union Electric Company (original makers of Exide batteries) all got together with tooling bought from Renault to create a fully electric sedan to compete with gasoline-powered cars of the same era (the 1950s). Unfortunately, the machine was held back by the same problems that electric car companies face today: price, speed and range. At first, the 36 volt power system was woefully inadequate, but for 1960, a new 72 volt system allowed the car to reach 60 miles per hour for about 60 miles. Still, this was too little, too late for the Kilowatt and less than 50 were ever sold.

(Lots of pictures of different parts of this car from every angle are found at the bottom of the text – you oughta see it when you can. Amazing.

(from )

http://green.autoblog.com/2008/02/25/ebay-find-of-the-day-1960-henney-kilowatt-electric-car/

***

Methods of generating electricity

There are seven fundamental methods of directly transforming other forms of energy into electrical energy:

Static electricity was the first form discovered and investigated, and the electrostatic generator is still used even in modern devices such as the Van de Graaff generator and MHD generators. Electrons are mechanically separated and transported to increase their electric potential.

Almost all commercial electrical generation is done using electromagnetic induction, in which mechanical energy forces an electrical generator to rotate. There are many different methods of developing the mechanical energy, including heat engines, hydro, wind and tidal power.

The direct conversion of nuclear energy to electricity by beta decay is used only on a small scale. In a full-size nuclear power plant, the heat of a nuclear reaction is used to run a heat engine. This drives a generator, which converts mechanical energy into electricity by magnetic induction.

Most electric generation is driven by heat engines. The combustion of fossil fuels supplies most of the heat to these engines, with a significant fraction from nuclear fission and some from renewable sources. The modern steam turbine invented by Sir Charles Parsons in 1884 – today generates about 80 percent of the electric power in the world using a variety of heat sources.

Turbines

Large dams such as Three Gorges Dam in China can provide large amounts of hydroelectric power; it will have a 22.5 GW capability.

A combined cycle natural gas power plant near Orem, Utah.

All turbines are driven by a fluid acting as an intermediate energy carrier. Many of the heat engines just mentioned are turbines. Other types of turbines can be driven by wind or falling water.

Sources include:

  • Steam – Water is boiled by:
    • Nuclear fission,
    • The burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, or petroleum). In hot gas (gas turbine), turbines are driven directly by gases produced by the combustion of natural gas or oil. Combined cycle gas turbine plants are driven by both steam and natural gas. They generate power by burning natural gas in a gas turbine and use residual heat to generate additional electricity from steam. These plants offer efficiencies of up to 60%.
    • Renewables. The steam generated by:
      • Biomass
      • The sun as the heat source: solar parabolic troughs and solar power towers concentrate sunlight to heat a heat transfer fluid, which is then used to produce steam.
      • Geothermal power. Either steam under pressure emerges from the ground and drives a turbine or hot water evaporates a low boiling liquid to create vapour to drive a turbine.
  • Other renewable sources:
    • Water (hydroelectric) – Turbine blades are acted upon by flowing water, produced by hydroelectric dams or tidal forces.
    • Wind – Most wind turbines generate electricity from naturally occurring wind. Solar updraft towers use wind that is artificially produced inside the chimney by heating it with sunlight, and are more properly seen as forms of solar thermal energy.

Reciprocating engines

Small electricity generators are often powered by reciprocating engines burning diesel, biogas or natural gas. Diesel engines are often used for back up generation, usually at low voltages. However most large power grids also use Diesel generators, originally provided as emergency back up for a specific facility such as a hospital, to feed power into the grid during certain circumstances. Biogas is often combusted where it is produced, such as a landfill or wastewater treatment plant, with a reciprocating engine or a microturbine, which is a small gas turbine.

A coal-fired power plant in Laughlin, Nevada U.S.A. Owners of this plant ceased operations after declining to invest in pollution control equipment to comply with pollution regulations.[6]

Photovoltaic panels

Unlike the solar heat concentrators mentioned above, photovoltaic panels convert sunlight directly to electricity. Although sunlight is free and abundant, solar electricity is still usually more expensive to produce than large-scale mechanically generated power due to the cost of the panels. Low-efficiency silicon solar cells have been decreasing in cost and multijunction cells with close to 30% conversion efficiency are now commercially available. Over 40% efficiency has been demonstrated in experimental systems.[7] Until recently, photovoltaics were most commonly used in remote sites where there is no access to a commercial power grid, or as a supplemental electricity source for individual homes and businesses. Recent advances in manufacturing efficiency and photovoltaic technology, combined with subsidies driven by environmental concerns, have dramatically accelerated the deployment of solar panels. Installed capacity is growing by 40% per year led by increases in Germany, Japan, California and New Jersey.

Other generation methods

Wind-powered turbines usually provide electrical generation in conjunction with other methods of producing power.

Various other technologies have been studied and developed for power generation. Solid-state generation (without moving parts) is of particular interest in portable applications. This area is largely dominated by thermoelectric (TE) devices, though thermionic (TI) and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have been developed as well. Typically, TE devices are used at lower temperatures than TI and TPV systems. Piezoelectric devices are used for power generation from mechanical strain, particularly in power harvesting. Betavoltaics are another type of solid-state power generator which produces electricity from radioactive decay. Fluid-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation has been studied as a method for extracting electrical power from nuclear reactors and also from more conventional fuel combustion systems. Osmotic power finally is another possibility at places where salt and sweet water merges (e.g. deltas, …)

Electrochemical electricity generation is also important in portable and mobile applications. Currently, most electrochemical power comes from closed electrochemical cells (“batteries“) [8], which are arguably utilized more as storage systems than generation systems, but open electrochemical systems, known as fuel cells, have been undergoing a great deal of research and development in the last few years. Fuel cells can be used to extract power either from natural fuels or from synthesized fuels (mainly electrolytic hydrogen) and so can be viewed as either generation systems or storage systems depending on their use.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_generation

***

China’s 1.2 MW wind turbine

http://www.techmonitor.net/techmon/07mar_apr/nce/nce_wind.htm

A project to develop the key technologies for making wind turbines at the megawatt level, contracted to Xinjiang Jinfeng Science & Technology Co. under the framework of the National 863 Programme during the 10th Five-Year period, has rolled out the technologies needed for designing and manufacturing direct drive permanent magnet synchro-generator of 1.2 MW.
The effort has produced two prototype generators. The first generator has worked over 8,000 hours on a combined basis, and passed the performance test made by Windtest. The second has clocked some 600 hours, with a localization approaching 74 per cent. The project team has completed the design of dynamic structure for the wind turbine, worked out strategies for simulation analysis and control, designed and developed key components and parts for vane, permanent magnet generator, and wheels, rolled out the needed converter and control systems, and mastered the technologies for both assemble and testing.

Website: www.most.gov.cn

***

My Note –

I saw the recent one of these the other day – at least part of it. Its hard to catch when they are playing it. In one segment they showed a piezoelectric gizmo that is seated into the pavement of freeways, highways and surface streets which generates electricity every time a vehicle passes over it. If they put that out on Interstate 75, near where I live, we probably wouldn’t need any other power source for awhile as many cars and heavy diesel trucks are using that road every minute of every single day – and throughout most of every night, as well. (even on Sundays).

– cricketdiane

**

http://www.bloomberg.com/innovators/

Technologies that address the energy crisis present some of the biggest economic opportunities of this century.
Watch
*&*
***
Very nifty. When can we do that everywhere in America?
– cd
***
Here is the Sunbeam America site – and on the right top side of the banner they are offering some of their current electric runabout cars now –

http://www.sunbeamamerica.com/

***

American readers might remember the Sunbeam Tiger, one of the last products to be made before the Chrysler takeover and the car driven by Maxwell Smart. Simca made small family sedans to compete with Renault, Citroen and Peugeot.

http://www.allpar.com/model/eurocc.html

The Peugeot Museum in Poissy has a complete range of everything that was built or studied in Poissy, including a Dodge Omni that was sent to perform the first tests with the Peugeot diesel engine. The museum can be visited every Saturday at CAAPY, 45 Rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud, 78 Poissy.

http://www.allpar.com/model/eurocc.html

Sunbeam Tiger: the car of Agent 86

Sunbeam Tiger: the car of Agent 86

Sunbeam Tiger: the car of Agent 86 - first car to do 150 mph

(from)

http://www.allpar.com/cars/adopted/sunbeam/tiger.html

Photo: Sunbeam Tiger at the Bay State Antique Automobile Club’s July 10, 2005 show (by Sfoskett)

The Sunbeam Tiger, the car driven by agent Maxwell Smart in the latest Get Smart movie, came out of the Rootes Group, which was later purchased by Chrysler Corporation.

Sunbeam started in 1899, merging with Darracq in 1920; the original Sunbeam Tiger was built by this merged company in 1925. It was originally named Ladybird, perhaps an odd name for a V12 four-liter racing car. The Sunbeam Tiger, a one-off vehicle, was the first car to exceed 150 mph and had the smallest engine of any car ever to hold the World Land Speed Record.

The combined company went bankrupt in 1934, and the remains were purchased by Rootes Group, which closed the factory, dropped the existing Sunbeam designs, and called the cars Talbot-Sunbeams for a while before placing Sunbeam at the top of the Rootes luxury order, modifying existing cars to take the Sunbeam name.

Postwar Sunbeams were raced in road rallys; one model in particular, the 90, was exceptionally successful. A new two-seat roadster called the Sunbeam Alpine, based on the 90, was made from just 1953 to 1955, but it too was very successful in racing, as was the new-for-1955 Sunbeam Rapier (whose four door version was the Hillman Minx and Singer Gazelle).

The next Alpine was a two-door convertible based on the 1959 Hillman Husky, using Rapier running gear. Carroll Shelby-prepared Alpines were entered in Le Mans in from 1961 to 1963, though in two of the three years neither Alpine made it to the finish line.

The Sunbeam Alpine was powered by 1.5 liter four-cylinder engines connected to four-speed manual transmissions with an optional electric overdrive, using front disc brakes with rear drums.

( . . . )

The Sunbeam Tiger was relatively inexpensive for its performance; still, fewer than 7,000 were made over its four model years. It was billed as the world’s fastest production car for under $3,500 (steep but not excessive for 1965). The Sunbeam Alpine, in contrast, was just $2,400. By 1967, it was billed as the world’s fastest car under $3,700 (the price having moved up) and was sold in the United States by Chrysler dealers, sold as the “Rootes Sunbeam.” 1965 sunbeam tiger - used by Maxwell SmartIn racing, the Sunbeam Tiger started running at high speeds, running with Jaguars rather than MGs, and setting an AHRA national record with a quarter mile of 12.95 seconds in 1965; and winning the 1964 Geneva Rally, the 1965 Scottish Rally, the 1965 International Police Rally, and (within its class) the 1965 Monte Carlo rally, where it placed around fourth or fifth outright. The Shelby-prepped V8s failed the cars when commpeting in LeMans, just as the Shelby Alpines failed; but a Shelby prepared car in the U.S. won an SCCA Class B race in the U.S.

A Sunbeam won the index of thermal efficiency, the second highest award at LeMans outside the outright winner. (Thanks, David at PR Strategy Consulting).

The first 3,763 Tigers were the Mark I, with the next 2,706 being Mark IA, the primary differences being the doors (round vs square corners), convertible top covers (metal vs vinyl), fresh air ventilation (added in the IA), and door seams (lead filled vs unfilled); finally, there were a small number of Mark II items, which had a slightly larger V8, and a revised grille, with chrome side trim removed.

(etc.)

http://www.allpar.com/cars/adopted/sunbeam/tiger.html

Their note –

In the late 1990s, another company purchased the rights to the Sunbeam name and posted a Web site to sell their new Sunbeam Tigers and other vehicles. Mike Sealey investigated and wrote:

The SUV I cannot place, except for headlights coming from the Opel Frontera. It might be a Polish Tarpan/Daewoo or perhaps a vehicle from India.

The Tiger sports car is the Swedish JC Indigo 3000, built around 1997-98. Production totalled less than 40, a great car that deserved to have achieved more. They are even using JC’s own photos.

My Note –

But that was before the recent conversion to an electric option which is more in the line of the original founders vision for sunbeam.

And, I still don’t see what was wrong with this –

The Sunbeam Alpine was powered by 1.5 liter four-cylinder engines connected to four-speed manual transmissions with an optional electric overdrive, using front disc brakes with rear drums.

Sunbeam started in 1899, merging with Darracq in 1920; the original Sunbeam Tiger was built by this merged company in 1925. It was originally named Ladybird, perhaps an odd name for a V12 four-liter racing car. The Sunbeam Tiger, a one-off vehicle, was the first car to exceed 150 mph and had the smallest engine of any car ever to hold the World Land Speed Record.

The Sunbeam Tiger was relatively inexpensive for its performance; still, fewer than 7,000 were made over its four model years. It was billed as the world’s fastest production car for under $3,500 (steep but not excessive for 1965).

That works – what was wrong with that? And it didn’t guzzle oil or petrol or anything and it worked. What was wrong with that design?

– cricketdiane, 05-17/18 – 10

***

Wolverhampton’s Architectural Heritage

Places of Work

Motor Industry

From the end of the 19th century to the mid 1960’s Wolverhampton was the home of a thriving motor vehicle manufacturing industry. Motor vehicle manufacturers such as Sunbeam, AJS, Guy Motors and Star Engineering, together with engine manufacturers such as Meadows and Villiers were all located in Wolverhampton.

Sunbeam

Sunbeam vehicles originated with the company J Marston Ltd located in Paul Street, Wolverhampton. The company originally manufactured japanned tinware products, moving into bicycle production in 1887 at the works known as Sunbeamland.

Sunbeamland 1920's (L6/SUN/E/2)

Sunbeamland 1920’s (L6/SUN/E/2)

In the late 1890’s the company began to make motorcars and opened a new works in Blakenhall next door to the Villiers Cycle Components Co., factory, a company that was owned by John Marston.

The company continued to manufacture bicycles (and from 1913 motorcycles) at the works until the mid 1930’s when it moved into the production of parts for aircraft, something it had been doing on a much smaller scale since before World War I.

CE Marshall Ltd Paul Street 1994 (L6/MAR/E/1)

Former Sunbeamland, 1994 (L6/MAR/E/1)

J Marston Ltd left the site in the 1960’s and moved to a site in Wobaston Road, Fordhouses.

Sunbeam Motor Car Works

The Sunbeam motorcar was first made at the works of J Marston Ltd in Pool Street in 1898. However when it was decided to increase production the cycle works was considered too small. The company decided to move to Blakenhall and premises in Cross Street were found. Following the move of motorcar production to Blakenhall a new company, the Sunbeam Motor Car Co Ltd, was formed. This company expanded over the years and built a new factory in Villiers Street where the company manufactured motorcars, electric trolley buses, aeroplane and airship engines and grand prix racing cars.

Click on the image to enlarge
Click on the image to enlarge

Sunbeam Motor Car Co Ltd c. 1930 (L6/SUN/E/1)

Main Entrance Sunbeam Motor Car Co Upper Villiers Street, 1915 (WTON/6272)

Main Entrance, Sunbeam Motor Car Co, Upper Villiers Street, 1915 (WTON/6272)

In the mid 1930’s the company was bought by the Rootes Group and production of motorcars was moved to Coventry. The site was then occupied by Fischer Bearings Ltd, a manufacturer of mechanical bearings.

Sunbeam Motor Car Co Ltd Offices 1979 (L6/SUN/E/5)

Sunbeam Motor Car Co Ltd Offices 1979 (L6/SUN/E/5)

Villiers Engineering Co Ltd

Norton Villiers Works Marston Road 1961 (C2/MARS/7/1)

Norton Villiers Works, Marston Road 1961 (C2/MARS/7/1)

The Villiers Cycle Components Co was founded in 1898 by John Marston to manufacture cycle pedals for Sunbeam cycles. The company was so successful that soon it was producing more pedals than was needed, so it was decided to offer the surplus to other bicycle manufacturers.

(L6/VIL/E/1)An interesting architectural feature of the Villiers

(L6/VIL/E/1)An interesting architectural feature of the Villiers
works were the iron gates.

The impressive iron gates and the stone surround were originally the gates to the Convent Lodge at Tong Castle, Shropshire. The gates were removed and rebuilt as the main entrance to the Villiers works in Marston Road.

The product range expanded and in 1911 the company produced its first petrol engine. In 1912 the Villiers Engineering Co Ltd was formed and remained was in existence until the 1970’s.

Star Engineering Ltd

The first petrol driven motorcar made in Wolverhampton was produced by Star Cycle Co in 1897. The company very quickly went into production of motorcars and in 1909 the name was changed to the Star Engineering Co.
So successful was the company that by 1919 Star was one of the six largest motorcar manufacturers in Britain. The company operated from a number of small factories located in Dudley Road, Frederick Street, Nelson Street, Stewart Street, Ablow Street and Dobb Street.

It was at the Frederick Street site that the Star’s foundry was located, manufacturing metal castings for the vehicles made by the company. The entrance to the large two-storey building was through a pedimented doorway.

Moxley Foundry 1994 (formerly Star Motor Works) (L6/MOX)

Moxley Foundry 1994 (formerly Star Motor Works) (L6/MOX)

Moxley Foundry 1994 (formerly Star Motor Works) (L6/MOX)

In 1928 the company moved to Bushbury, and in the same year was taken over by Guy Motors Ltd. Motor manufacture continued until 1932 when the company finally went into liquidation.

The building is now occupied by the Moxley Foundry Co Ltd.

Guy Motors

Guy Motors Ltd started in 1914. The company soon acquired premises in Park Lane, Fallings Park, a newly developing suburb of Wolverhampton. The company prospered and was able to build a brand new factory on the Fallings Park site. It was during the 1930’s that the company adopted the slogan “Feathers in our Cap” and later the Native American head mascot.

Main Entrance Guy Motors Ltd Park Lane 1928 (WTON/9520)

Main Entrance, Guy Motors Ltd, Park Lane 1928 (WTON/9520)

Click on the image to enlarge
Click on the image to enlarge

Aerial View of Guy Motors Ltd, Park Lane 1952 (L6/GUY/E/1)

The company was bought by Jaguar Cars Ltd in 1961 who were themselves to come under the control of the British Motor Corporation in 1966.

Vehicle production ceased in 1975, and subsequently only sub-assemblies and components were produced at the factory. Final production ended in 1978.

Guy Motors Factory Park Lane c. 1980 (L6/GUY/E/1)

Guy Motors Factory Park Lane c. 1980 (L6/GUY/E/1)

Within a few years most of the Fallings Park works had been demolished, and what was left was turned into an industrial estate.

(from)

http://www.wolverhamptonarchives.dial.pipex.com/local_heritage_work_4.htm

***

One of many power plants at The Geysers, a geothermal power field in northern California, with a total output of over 750 MW.

Geothermal power plants can operate 24 hours per day, providing base-load capacity, and the world potential capacity for geothermal power generation is estimated at 85 GW over the next 30 years. However, geothermal power is accessible only in limited areas of the world, including the United States, Central America, Indonesia, East Africa and the Philippines. The costs of geothermal energy have dropped substantially from the systems built in the 1970s.[6] Geothermal heat generation can be competitive in many countries producing geothermal power, or in other regions where the resource is of a lower temperature. Enhanced geothermal system (EGS) technology does not require natural convective hydrothermal resources, so it can be used in areas that were previously unsuitable for geothermal power, if the resource is very large. EGS is currently under research at the U.S. Department of Energy.

Biomass briquettes are increasingly being used in the developing world as an alternative to charcoal. The technique involves the conversion of almost any plant matter into compressed briquettes that typically have about 70% the calorific value of charcoal. There are relatively few examples of large scale briquette production. One exception is in North Kivu, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, where forest clearance for charcoal production is considered to be the biggest threat to Mountain Gorilla habitat. The staff of Virunga National Park have successfully trained and equipped over 3500 people to produce biomass briquettes, thereby replacing charcoal produced illegally inside the national park, and creating significant employment for people living in extreme poverty in conflict affected areas. [9]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_energy

***

Solar thermal power stations have been successfully operating in California commercially since the late 1980s, including the largest solar power plant of any kind, the 350 MW Solar Energy Generating Systems. Nevada Solar One is another 64MW plant which has recently opened.[23] Other parabolic trough power plants being proposed are two 50MW plants in Spain, and a 100MW plant in Israel.[24]

The world’s first commercial [7] tidal stream generator — SeaGen — in Strangford Lough. The strong wake shows the power in the tidal current.

In 2007, the world’s first turbine to create commercial amounts of energy using tidal power was installed in the narrows of Strangford Lough in Ireland. The 1.2 MW underwater tidal electricity generator takes advantage of the fast tidal flow in the lough which can be up to 4m/s. Although the generator is powerful enough to power up to a thousand homes, the turbine has a minimal environmental impact, as it is almost entirely submerged, and the rotors turn slowly enough that they pose no danger to wildlife.[35][36]

Solar power panels that use nanotechnology, which can create circuits out of individual silicon molecules, may cost half as much as traditional photovoltaic cells, according to executives and investors involved in developing the products. Nanosolar has secured more than $100 million from investors to build a factory for nanotechnology thin-film solar panels. The company’s plant has a planned production capacity of 430 megawatts peak power of solar cells per year. Commercial production started and first panels have been shipped[37] to customers in late 2007.[38]

(It is now 2010 – where are they available to me at some price I can afford?)

my note

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_energy

***

Patent application title: ELECTRIC VEHICLE WITH REGENERATION

Inventors: Brad Donahue
Agents: LARSON AND LARSON
Assignees:
Origin: LARGO, FL US
IPC8 Class: AH02K718FI
USPC Class: 290 1 A

Abstract:

An electric powered vehicle has a rechargeable power source coupled to at least one electric motor through a controller. The motor(s) are coupled to a drive train for converting the rotational movement of the motor(s) into linear motion of the vehicle. At least one generator is coupled to the motor(s) for generating a first electric potential for recharging the power source. On the front surface of the vehicle is an air passage that channels air movement to a fan when moving in a forward motion. The fan rotates in response to the air movement and is coupled to a fan generator that turns in response, generating a second electric potential for recharging the power source. The tips of the fan blades are equipped with magnetic material and a series of electro-magnets are configured in proximity of the blades so they can be sequentially energized in absence of air movement to rotate the fan and generating the second electric potential in absence of air movement. The motor(s) and generators will function as a braking system to slow the vehicle when needed and generate electric potentials for charging the power source.

Claims:

1. A system for powering a vehicle, the system comprising:a vehicle adapted to transport at least one person;a rechargeable power source disposed within the vehicle;at least one electric motor configured to rotate upon receipt of power from the rechargeable power source, the at least one electric motor coupled to a drive system of the vehicle to move the vehicle in a generally forward or backward motion;for each one of the at least one electric motor, a generator coupled to the one of the at least one electric motor so the generator turns when the one of the at least one electric motor turns, thereby generating a first electric potential for recharging the rechargeable power source;an air passage on a front surface of the vehicle for capturing air movement as the vehicle moves in a generally forward motion;a fan configured to accept the air movement, the fan having a plurality of fan blades adapted to convert the air movement into rotational force while the vehicle moves in the generally forward motion, a magnetic material affixed thereon a tip of each of said plurality of fan blades;a fan generator coupled to the fan so turning of the fan causes the fan generator to turn, the fan generator producing a second electric potential for recharging the rechargeable power source; anda plurality of electro magnets, each of said plurality of electro magnets configured to attract the magnetic material in sequence, thereby turning the fan in an absence of the air movement.

2. The system for powering a vehicle of claim 1, wherein the rechargeable power source is a rechargeable battery.

3. The system for powering a vehicle of claim 1, wherein the vehicle is selected from the group consisting of an automobile, an airplane, a truck, a bus, a recreational vehicle and a boat.

4. The system for powering a vehicle of claim 1, wherein the drive system comprises two wheels connected to an axle.

5. The system for powering a vehicle of claim 4, whereas the at least one motor is coupled to the drive system through a transmission and when the vehicle is in motion and power from the rechargeable power source is not applied to the at least one electric motor, the first electric potential for recharging the rechargeable power source is produced by the at least one generator and a third electric potential for recharging the rechargeable power source is produced by the at least one electric motor.

6. The system for powering a vehicle of claim 1, wherein the one of the at least one motor is coupled to the drive system through a differential.

7. The system for powering a vehicle of claim 1, wherein the drive system is at least one propeller blade.

Description:

PRIOR APPLICATIONS

[0001]This application is a divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/143,251, filed on Jun. 2, 2005.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002]1. Field of the Invention

[0003]This invention relates to the field of electric powered vehicles and more particularly to a system for powering electric vehicles with power generation for recharging a battery.

[0004]2. Description of the Prior Art

[0005]For a long while, it has been a challenge to efficiently transport people and goods. Early transportation utilized animals, wind power or human energy to leverage wheels, gears, sails, pedals and the like to move a vehicle containing people and/or cargo. Later, fossil fuels or natural resources were burned to create steam which could be used to power a vehicle such as burning wood or coal in a steam driven locomotive. The combustion engine was invented, using fossil fuel to directly push a piston, creating energy of motion to move a vehicle. For some rare cases, nuclear energy has been used to power a vehicle. In all, modern modes of powering a vehicle require fossil fuel that is becoming move expensive will at some date deplete.

[0006]On the other hand, electricity is now a viable power source for vehicles. Electricity can be created in many ways other than using fossil fuel. It can be generated by capturing wind energy in windmills or the energy of falling water in hydroelectric plants or the energy of the tides. It can also be generated directly from solar energy using solar cells. Alternately, it can be generated using nuclear energy which is believed to be in sufficient supply as to last longer than fossil fuels.

[0007]Unfortunately, by the nature of vehicles, it is difficult to efficiently power a moving device directly with this generated electricity unless a power delivery infrastructure is in place. In some examples such as electric trains, subways and busses, electricity has been used to power vehicles, but power must be continuously provided to these vehicles by overhead lines or a “third rail”–an infrastructure not easily duplicated on suburban streets, highways and rural roads.

[0008]An alternative would be to power the vehicle by an alternative source of electricity that can be transported with the vehicle, such as a battery. Battery powered vehicles have been used successfully in many applications, especially where speed and distance are not a requirement. For example, golf carts are usually powered by a battery. They only need go a few miles per hour and only travel the distance of 18 holes before they can be connected to a power source for recharging.

[0009]Various limitations in battery technology have limited their use as a primary source of energy in many vehicles such as cars, boats and planes. For one, the volumetric efficiency and mass efficiency of battery technology has matured slowly, requiring large, heavy battery systems to provide minimal range, acceleration and top speed. Another issue is the lack of availability of ubiquitous power sources and unfriendly recharge timing. There are no “recharge stations” analogous to “gas stations.” Even if there were, it usually takes much longer, perhaps hours, to recharge a battery, making it impractical to stop and recharge on the way to work. Improvements have been made to battery technology, motor technology and vehicle construction to make a battery driven vehicle feasible and useful. Furthermore, electric/combustion hybrid vehicles have been introduced to overcome some of the limitations stated above, but it will take time to develop an infrastructure and either make these vehicles meet the expectation of today’s consumers (e.g., drivers) or to transform expectations of today’s consumers to adapt to the vehicle’s capabilities.

[0010]What is needed is a system that will increase the range, acceleration and/or top-speed of an electric powered vehicle.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011]In one embodiment, a system for powering a vehicle is disclosed including a vehicle adapted to transport at least one person, a rechargeable power source within the vehicle and at least one electric motor rotating upon receipt of electricity from the rechargeable power source and coupled to a drive system to move the vehicle in a generally forward or backward motion. A generator is coupled to each of the electric motors for generating electricity to recharge the rechargeable power source. There is also an air passage on a front surface of the vehicle for capturing air movement as the vehicle moves forward and a fan with plurality of fan blades that turn in response to the air movement, converting the air movement into rotational force while the vehicle moves in a generally forward motion. The fan blades have a permanent magnet affixed on each tip and a fan generator is coupled to the fan so the fan generator turns in response to the fan turning, producing electricity to recharge the rechargeable power source. Further included is a plurality of electro magnets, each configured to attract the permanent magnet in sequence, turning the fan in the absence of air movement.

[0012]In another embodiment, a method of powering a vehicle is disclosed including providing at least one electric motor coupled to a drive system of a vehicle and a rechargeable power source for powering the electric motors through a controller control. Power from the electric motors is fed to a first set of generators, thereby generating a first electric potential. A fan is coupled to an air passage located in the front of the vehicle so air pressure resulting from a forward movement of the vehicle causes the fan to turn, feeding a rotational energy of the fan to a fan generator, thereby generating a second electric potential. The rechargeable power source is recharged from the first electric potential and the second electric potential.

[0013]In another embodiment, an apparatus for powering a vehicle is disclosed including a rechargeable power source connected to a motor to convert the rechargeable power into rotational power. A drive train is connected to the motor to convert the rotational power into linear motion. In addition, a generator is connected to the motor to generate a first electric potential. Also included is an air passage for capturing air from a front end of the vehicle and a fan device adapted to convert air movement from the air passage into rotational movement and a second generator connected to the fan device to generate a second electric potential. The first electric potential and the second electric potential are used to recharge the rechargeable power source.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0014]The invention can be best understood by those having ordinary skill in the art by reference to the following detailed description when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0015]FIG. 1 illustrates a top schematic view of a system of a first embodiment of the present invention.

[0016]FIG. 2 illustrates a side schematic view of the first embodiment of the present invention.

[0017]FIG. 3 illustrates a top schematic view of a second embodiment of the present invention.

[0018]FIG. 4 illustrates a side schematic view of the second embodiment of the present invention.

[0019]FIG. 5 illustrates a top schematic view of a third embodiment of the present invention.

[0020]FIG. 6 illustrates a side schematic view of the third embodiment of the present invention.

[0021]FIG. 7 illustrates a side schematic view of a fourth embodiment of the present invention.

[0022]FIG. 8 illustrates an expanded schematic view of the fourth embodiment of the present invention.

[0023]FIG. 9 illustrates a side schematic view of a fifth embodiment of the present invention.

[0024]FIG. 10 illustrates a top schematic view of a sixth embodiment of the present invention.

[0025]FIG. 11 illustrates a top schematic view of a seventh embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0026]Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Throughout the following detailed description, the same reference numerals refer to the same elements in all figures.

[0027]Referring to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, a top schematic view and a side schematic view of a system of a first embodiment of the present invention is described. A vehicle 10 has a rechargeable power source 12 that powers two motors 14 through a controller 26. The controller 26 is linked to a gas petal or other control mechanism and adjusts the speed of the vehicle 10 by controlling current flow to the motors 14. Each motor 14 has a dual pulley 16 for linking each motor 14 to both a drive pulley 18 and a generator pulley 24. In this embodiment a belt transfers rotational energy from each motor 14 to the drive pulley 18 and to the generator pulley 24, which, in turn, transfers rotational energy to the drive axle 19 and the generators 22, respectively. The axle is coupled to one or both drive wheels 20 and transfers rotational energy to the drive wheels 20 to cause the vehicle to move in a forward or backward linear direction. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are coupled to the drive train through a transmission 8 for providing slippage and various gear ratios. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are directly coupled to the transmission 8 or they are coupled through a gear or chain and sprockets.

[0028]As power is applied to the motors 14, the motor’s 14 armatures turn and a belt between the motor pulleys 16 and the generator pulleys 24 cause the generators 22 to turn, thereby creating electricity which is fed back to the rechargeable power source 12 where it is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. Additionally, when power is not applied to the motors 14 and the vehicle is in motion (e.g., the vehicle is coasting or slowing down), the drive wheels transfer rotational energy back to the motors 14, which then rotates, also causing the generators 22 to rotate. The rotation of the motors 14 and the generators 22 provide additional power which is fed back to the rechargeable power source 12 where it is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. In this, the motors 14 act as additional generators. Using the motors and generators of the vehicle to reduce the speed of the vehicle, hence braking the vehicle and reducing the vehicle’s kinetic energy is sometimes referred to as “regenerative braking.”

[0029]The rechargeable power source 12 is one commonly used in the industry such as lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries. In some embodiments, the batteries create a voltage potential from 12V to 360V. The power is first conditioned so that it can recharge the specific power source 12 by providing the proper charge voltage and current while monitoring the charge cycle so as to not overcharge the power source 12. It is known in the industry how to charge batteries

[0030]In some embodiments various motor 14 and generator 22 sizes are used. For example, a first motor 14 is larger than a second motor 14. Both motors 14 are used when accelerating and only the second motor 14 is used when maintaining a speed. In one embodiment, the first motor is 75 HP and the second motor is 25 HP. Likewise, various generator 22 sizes produce different voltage and current levels. In some embodiments, the motor pulley 16 is greater in diameter than the generator pulley 24 by a ratio so that the generator 22 turns faster than the motor 14. For example, if the diameter of the motor pulley 16 is 10 inches and the diameter of the generator pulley 24 is 2 inches, then the ratio is 10:2 or 5:1 and the generator 22 will rotate five times for every rotation of the motor 14. This will create a higher than average voltage potential.

[0031]Referring to FIG. 3 and FIG. 4, a top schematic view and a side schematic view of a system of a second embodiment of the present invention is described. A vehicle 9 has a rechargeable power source 12 that powers three motors 14/27 through a controller 26. The controller 26 is linked to a gas petal 32 or other control mechanism and adjusts the speed of the vehicle 9 by controlling current flow to the motors 14/27. Each of the first two motors 14 have a dual pulley 16 for linking each motor 14 to both a drive pulley 18 and a generator pulley 24. In this embodiment a belt transfers rotational energy from each motor 14 to the drive pulley 18 and to the generator pulley 24, which, in turn, transfers rotational energy to the drive axle 19 and the generators 22, respectively. The axle is coupled to one or both drive wheels 20 and transfers rotational energy to the drive wheels 20 to cause the vehicle to move in a forward or backward linear direction. In some embodiments, the motors are coupled to the drive train through a transmission 8 for providing slippage and various gear ratios. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are directly coupled to the transmission 8 or it is coupled through a gear or chain and sprockets. The rear motor 27 is directly coupled to a differential 28, which transfers rotational energy to the rear wheels 21, causing the vehicle to move in a generally forward or backward motion. The rear motor 27 has a pulley 29 that is coupled to a pulley 25 on a third generator 23 by a belt.

[0032]When power is applied to the motors 14, the motor’s 14 armatures turn, a belt between the motor pulleys 16 and the generator pulleys 24 cause the first two generators 22 to turn and a belt between the rear motor pulley 29 and the rear generator pulley 25 causes the rear generator 23 to turn, thereby creating electricity which is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. Additionally, when power is not applied to the motors 14 or to the motor 27 and the vehicle is in motion (e.g., the vehicle is coasting or slowing down), the drive wheels 20/21 transfer rotational energy back to the motors 14/27, which then rotates, also causing the generators 22/23 to rotate. The rotation of the motors 14/27 and the generators 22/23 provide additional power which is fed back to the rechargeable power source 12 where it is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12.

[0033]The rechargeable power source 12 is one commonly used in the industry such as lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries. The power is first conditioned so that it can recharge the specific power source 12 by providing the proper charge voltage and current while monitoring the charge cycle so as to not overcharge the power source 12. It is known in the industry how to charge batteries.

[0034]Also shown in this embodiment and referring to FIG. 3 and FIG. 4 is a forward mounted fan 40 that is connected to a fan generator 44 through a fan pulley 42 and a fan generator pulley 46 connected by a belt. As the vehicle travels in a forward direction, air travels in through air passages 50 and blows against the blades 48 of the fan 40, causing the fan to rotate. The rotational energy of the fan 40 is transferred through the fan pulley 42 to the fan generator pulley 46 by the fan belt, causing the fan generator 44 to turn, thereby generating electricity that is used with the electricity generated by the other generators to charge the rechargeable power source 12.

[0035]Referring to FIG. 5 and FIG. 6, a top schematic view and a side schematic view of a system of a second embodiment of the present invention is described. A vehicle 7 has a rechargeable power source 12 that powers three motors 14/27 through a controller 26. The controller 26 is linked to a gas petal or other control mechanism and adjusts the speed of the vehicle 7 by controlling current flow to the motors 14/27. Each of the first two motor 14 has a dual pulley 16 for linking each motor 14 to both a drive pulley 18 and a generator pulley 24. In this embodiment a belt transfers rotational energy from each motor 14 to the drive pulley 18 and to the generator pulley 24, which, in turn, transfers rotational energy to the drive axle 19 and the generators 22, respectively. The axle is coupled to one or both drive wheels 20 and transfers rotational energy to the drive wheels 20 to cause the vehicle to move in a forward or backward direction. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are coupled to the drive train through a transmission 8 for providing slippage and various gear ratios. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are directly coupled to the transmission 8 or it is coupled through a gear or chain and sprockets. The rear motor 27 is directly coupled to a differential 28, which transfers rotational energy to the rear wheels 21, causing the vehicle to move in a generally forward or backward motion. The ear motor 27 has a pulley 29 that is coupled to a pulley 25 on a rear generator 23 by a belt.

[0036]When power is applied to the motors 14, the motor’s 14 armatures turn, a belt between the motor pulleys 16 and the generator pulleys 24 cause the first two generators 22 to turn and a belt between the rear motor pulley 29 and the rear generator pulley 25 causes the rear generator 23 to turn, thereby creating electricity which is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. Additionally, when power is not applied to the motors 14/27 and the vehicle is in motion (e.g., the vehicle is coasting or slowing down), the drive wheels transfer rotational energy back to the motors 14/27, which then rotates, also causing the generators 22/23 to rotate. The rotation of the motors 14/27 and the generators 22/23 provide additional power which is fed back to the rechargeable power source 12 where it is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12.

[0037]The rechargeable power source 12 is one commonly used in the industry such as lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries. The power is first conditioned so that it can recharge the specific power source 12 by providing the proper charge voltage and current while monitoring the charge cycle so as to not overcharge the power source 12. It is known in the industry how to charge batteries.

[0038]Referring to FIG. 7 and FIG. 8, a side schematic view and an expanded view of a fourth embodiment of the present invention is shown. In this embodiment a forward mounted fan 40 is connected to a fan generator 44 as shown in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4. When the vehicle is stationary, no air travels in through an air passage 50 and the blades 48 of the fan 40 do not turn. In this embodiment, each fan blade 48 has a magnet material 62 affixed on an outer edge or tip and there is a plurality of electro-magnets 60 arranged in a sequential fashion so that when the vehicle is not moving, the electro-magnets 60 can be sequentially energized, much like an electric motor, causing the fan 40 to turn. The magnetic material is steel or iron or it is a permanent magnet made from iron or powdered iron. The magnetic material may be coated to reduce or prevent rust. Since the fan 40 is linked to the fan generator 44, the fan generator 44 will turn, thereby generating electricity that is used with the electricity generated by the other generators 22 to charge the rechargeable power source 12.

[0039]Referring to FIG. 9, a side schematic view of a fifth embodiment of the present invention is described. A truck 80 has a rechargeable power source 12 that powers three motors 14/27 through a controller 26. The controller 26 is linked to a gas petal or other control mechanism and adjusts the speed of the truck 80 by controlling current flow to the motors 14/27. Each of the first two motor 14 has a dual pulley 16 for linking each motor 14 to both a drive pulley 18 and a generator pulley 24. In this embodiment a belt transfers rotational energy from each motor to the drive pulley 18 and to the generator pulley 24, which, in turn, transfers rotational energy to the drive axle 19 and the generators 22, respectively. The axle is coupled to one or both drive wheels 20 and transfers rotational energy to the drive wheels 20 to cause the vehicle to move in a forward or backward direction. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are coupled to the drive train through a transmission 8 for providing slippage and various gear ratios. In some embodiments, the motors 14 are directly coupled to the transmission 8 or they are coupled through a gear or chain and sprockets. The third motor 27 is directly coupled to a differential 28, which transfers rotational energy to the rear wheels 21, causing the truck to move in a generally forward or backward motion. The third motor is coupled to a third generator 23.

[0040]When power is applied to the motors 14/27, the motor’s 14/27 armatures turn, a belt between the motor pulleys 16 and the generator pulleys 24 cause the first two generators 22 to turn and a belt between the rear motor pulley 29 and the rear generator pulley 25 causes the rear generator 23 to turn, thereby creating electricity which is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. Additionally, when power is not applied to the motors 14/27 and the vehicle is in motion (e.g., the vehicle is coasting or slowing down), the drive wheels 20/21 transfer rotational energy back to the motors 14/27, which then rotate, also causing the generators 22/23 to rotate. The rotation of the motors 14/27 and the generators 22/23 provide additional power which is fed back to the rechargeable power source 12 where it is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12.

[0041]The rechargeable power source 12 is one commonly used in the industry such as lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries. The power is first conditioned so that it can recharge the specific power source 12 by providing the proper charge voltage and current while monitoring the charge cycle so as to not overcharge the power source 12. It is known in the industry how to charge batteries.

[0042]Also shown in this embodiment is a forward mounted fan 40 that is connected to a fourth generator. As the vehicle travels in a forward direction, air travels in through an air passage 50 and blows against the blades 48 of the fan 40, causing the fan 40 to rotate. The rotational energy of the fan 40 is transferred to the fan generator 44, causing the fan generator to turn, thereby generating electricity that is used with the electricity generated by the other generators to charge the rechargeable power source 12.

[0043]Referring to FIG. 10, a top schematic view of a sixth embodiment of the present invention is described. An airplane 90 has a rechargeable power source 12 that powers three motors 14 through a controller. The controller is linked to a gas petal or other control mechanism and adjusts the speed of the airplane 90 by controlling current flow to the motors 14. Each of the motors 14 directly drive a propeller 92 for causing the airplane to go in a forward direction. Each of the motors 14 also have a pulley 16 for linking to a generator pulley 24. In this embodiment a belt transfers rotational energy from each motor pulley 16 to the generator pulley 24, which, in turn, transfers rotational energy to the generators 22. As the motor’s 14 armatures turn, a belt between the motor pulley 16 and the generator pulley 24 causes the three generators 22 to turn, thereby creating electricity which is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. The rechargeable power source 12 is one commonly used in the industry such as lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries. The power is first conditioned so that it can recharge the specific power source 12 by providing the proper charge voltage and current while monitoring the charge cycle so as to not overcharge the power source 12. It is known in the industry how to charge batteries.

[0044]Also shown in this embodiment is a forward mounted fan 40 that is connected to a fourth generator 44. As the airplane travels in a forward direction, air travels in through an air passage and blows against the blades of the fan 40, causing the fan to rotate. The rotational energy of the fan 40 is transferred to the fan generator 44, causing the fan generator to turn, thereby generating electricity that is used along with the electricity generated by the other three generators to charge the rechargeable power source 12.

[0045]Referring to FIG. 11, a top schematic view of a seventh embodiment of the present invention is described. A boat 100 has a rechargeable power source 12 that powers a motor 14 through a controller. The controller is linked to a gas petal or other control mechanism and adjusts the speed of the boat 100 by controlling current flow to the motor 14. The motor 14 directly drives a propeller 102 for causing the boat to go in a forward or backward direction. The motor 14 also has a motor pulley 16 for linking to a generator pulley 24. In this embodiment a belt transfers rotational energy from the motor pulley 16 to the generator pulley 24, which, in turn, transfers rotational energy to the generator 22. As the motor’s 14 armatures turns, a belt between the motor pulley 16 and the generator pulley 24 causes the generator 22 to turn, thereby creating electricity which is conditioned and used to recharge the power source 12. The rechargeable power source 12 is one commonly used in the industry such as lead-acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries. The power is first conditioned so that it can recharge the specific power source 12 by providing the proper charge voltage and current while monitoring the charge cycle so as to not overcharge the power source 12. It is known in the industry how to charge batteries.

[0046]Also shown in this embodiment is a forward mounted fan 40 that is connected to a fan generator 44. As the boat travels in a forward direction, air travels in through an air passage and blows against the blades of the fan 40, causing the fan 40 to rotate. The rotational energy of the fan 40 is transferred to the fan generator 44 through a fan pulley 42 and a fan generator pulley 46, causing the fan generator 44 to turn, thereby generating electricity that is used with the electricity generated by the other generator to charge the rechargeable power source 12.

[0047]Equivalent elements can be substituted for the ones set forth above such that they perform in substantially the same manner in substantially the same way for achieving substantially the same result. Although the disclosed embodiments show examples of up to three motors and up to four generators, there is no limitation within the present invention that limits the vehicle to any specific number of motors or generators as long as there is at least one motor and at least one generator. Furthermore, it is anticipated that in some embodiments, some motors will have associated generators and some motors will not include an associated generator. In some embodiments, the air vent and fan/fan generator will not be included.

[0048]It is believed that the system and method of the present invention and many of its attendant advantages will be understood by the foregoing description. It is also believed that it will be apparent that various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the components thereof without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention or without sacrificing all of its material advantages. The form herein before described being merely exemplary and explanatory embodiment thereof. It is the intention of the following claims to encompass and include such changes.

(from)

http://www.faqs.org/patents/app/20080296907

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Inventor, Engineer Ludvik J. Koci, 91

September 30, 1999|By G.J. Zemaitis. Special to the Tribune.

Ludvik J. Koci obtained his first patent in the mid-1930s and changed the way Americans lived.

The Chicago-born engineer was granted a patent for a thermostat that allowed him to invent numerous household appliances, including the Sunbeam Toastmaster.

A longtime Oak Brook resident, Mr. Koci died Monday in Lexington Health Care Center of Elmhurst. He was 91.

Mr. Koci was the son of Czech immigrants and the first in his family to attend college.

In a period of four years, he obtained electrical and chemical engineering degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and went to work for the Chicago Flexible Shaft Co. in Chicago. The firm later became the Sunbeam Corp., for which he worked for 37 years.

“The family has a large briefcase filled with his patents,” said his daughter Cynthia Veldman. “But he was most proud of the Toastmaster.”

The Toastmaster stood out for its innovative ability to automatically lower and raise bread once it was toasted.

Mr. Koci also held patents for the first electric iron, the first electric coffee percolator, the first electric frying pan, and electric shavers and blankets.

Mr. Koci taught advanced mathematics at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Though an innovative thinker and inventor, he lacked sales skills, his daughter said.

“For the longest time, in the 1960s, we had prototypes of an electric bicycle and electric car that he built. He just could not get anyone interested in manufacturing them,” she said.

One of his inventions, an electronic turn indicator, was dismissed by several automobile manufacturers, which thought the idea was no better than a driver signaling by extending an arm from a moving car, she said.

“My father also loved music, particularly polka. As a young man, he was known as the king of polka,” said his daughter.

His love of things Czech also extended to food and Pilsner beer, a style first brewed in the Eastern European country.

“He always said that was the beer that set the standard for the world,” said his daughter.

Mr. Koci is also survived by a son, Ludvik F.; another daughter, Camille Dorsey; two brothers, Henry and Erwin; 11 grandchildren; and eight great- grandchildren.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Thursday in Knollcrest Funeral Home, 1500 S. Meyers Rd., Lombard.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1999-09-30/news/9909300309_1_electric-patent-czech

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My Note –

This man is the reason we have two pieces of bread toasted on both sides from a little electric toaster sitting on the counter or the table anytime we want them.

“For the longest time, in the 1960s, we had prototypes of an electric bicycle and electric car that he built. He just could not get anyone interested in manufacturing them,” she said.

One of his inventions, an electronic turn indicator, was dismissed by several automobile manufacturers, which thought the idea was no better than a driver signaling by extending an arm from a moving car, she said.

Inventor, Engineer Ludvik J. Koci

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