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The off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon burns in the Gulf of Mexico April 21, 2010. A huge oil slick remained offshore and largely stationary today, May 4, 2010, in a development that should help cleanup efforts. Jon T. Fritz | MCT - (photo 15 of 42)

The off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon burns in the Gulf of Mexico April 21, 2010. A huge oil slick remained offshore and largely stationary today, May 4, 2010, in a development that should help cleanup efforts. Jon T. Fritz | MCT - (photo 15 of 42)

(from – )

http://www.sacbee.com/2010/05/04/2726703/oil-spill-cleanup-and-containment.html?mi_rss=Photo%20Galleries

***

Dispersants are chemical agents (surfactants, solvents, and other compounds) that reduce interfacial tension between oil and water in order to enhance the natural process of dispersion by generating larger numbers of small droplets of oil that are entrained into the water column by wave energy.

The small dispersed oil droplets tend not to merge into larger droplets that quickly float back to the water surface and reform into surface slicks. Instead, the small droplets stay suspended in the water column, spreading in three dimensions instead of two and being distributed by turbulent diffusion.

( . . . )

In many instances where a dispersed plume may come into contact with sensitive water-column or benthic organisms or populations, the current understanding of key processes and mechanisms is inadequate to confidently support a decision to apply dispersants.

While laboratory experiments over the last decade or so have shed some light on how, when, and where dispersants can be effective, the use of non-standardized laboratory or mesocosm testing and monitoring techniques, lack of sufficiently coordinated effort, and misinterpretation of available information, have limited development of consensus about dispersant efficacy in some settings (e.g., freshwater, estuarine, coastal, and high-latitude environments).

The lack of standardized procedures, when coupled with an insufficient number of well-designed tank or field-scale tests, has limited the value of this research for decisionmaking.

In addition, there has been insufficient research into the fate of both chemically and naturally dispersed oil to evaluate concerns about its long-term im-

http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11283&page=10#

The National Academies Home

500 Fifth St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20001

Oil Spill Dispersants: Efficacy and Effects (2005)
Ocean Studies Board (OSB)

My Note –

uses information available in 2004 essentially despite its 2005 pub date

***

A dead Portuguese Man-O-War floats on a blob of oil in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La., Tuesday, May 4, 2010. Cleanup and containment of a massive oil slick resumed Tuesday as winds eased in the Gulf of Mexico and people along beaches and bayous waited to find out just how badly it might damage the delicate coast.

Eric Gay | AP Photo

A dead Portuguese Man-O-War floats on a blob of oil in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La., Tuesday, May 4, 2010. Cleanup and containment of a massive oil slick resumed Tuesday as winds eased in the Gulf of Mexico and people along beaches and bayous waited to find out just how badly it might damage the delicate coast.

A dead Portuguese Man-O-War floats on a blob of oil in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La., Tuesday, May 4, 2010. Cleanup and containment of a massive oil slick resumed Tuesday as winds eased in the Gulf of Mexico and people along beaches and bayous waited to find out just how badly it might damage the delicate coast. Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/05/04/2726703/oil-spill-cleanup-and-containment.html?mi_rss=Photo%20Galleries#ixzz0nYSyD1zz Eric Gay | AP Photo (photo 16 of 42)

***

Gulf attorneys general seek federal cooperation in getting Gulf oil spill information
By The Times-Picayune
May 06, 2010, 11:51AM

The attorneys general for Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Texas have sent a letter to President Barack Obama  and U.S. Attorney Eric Holder seeking “assistance in establishing a state-federal working group” on the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

(etc.)

The Gulf Coast attorneys general earlier sent letters to BP and the other companies involved in the oil rig explosion that caused the spill, seeking “complete documentation that only BP and other companies may currently have” about the accident and the response.

“As the attorneys constitutionally empowered to protect the citizens and economies of our states and to represent the departments and agencies of our states, we must make every effort to ensure that our states and our citizens receive full restitution, damages, and costs from any and all parties responsible for this spill,” the letter says.

“We recognize that BP has stated publicly that it will live up to its obligation to pay all claims arising from this environmental and economic disaster. We hope that BP will. But we would be remiss in our responsibilities if we did not consider the possibility that enforcement or litigation efforts may be required in the future.”

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/gulf_attorneys_general_seek_fe.html

***

HOW LONG WILL IT LAST?

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano warns that the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is a long-term event. Napolitano said Thursday during a visit to Biloxi that she doesn’t think the spill will be over soon. She says she hopes the device being deployed to cap the spewing well is successful, but officials are still planning for the worst.
Oil Rig ExplosionThe Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns and collapses into the Gulf of Mexico on April 22.

THE RIG’S OWNER

The owner of the rig that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico said Thursday its contract with BP should protect it from lawsuits by fishermen, hotel owners and other businesses damaged by the massive oil spill. Transocean Ltd. CEO Steven Newman said the company won’t be held liable for “any expense or claim related to pollution” from the well.

WILDLIFE

Louisiana’s secretary of wildlife and fisheries has arranged to credential out-of-state veterinary specialists to help rescue oiled birds and animals. The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says veterinarians from Delaware, California and Alaska have already volunteered. It says the state Board of Veterinary Medicine agreed to grant emergency waivers for veterinarians who have treated oiled animals such as birds, dolphins, whales and sea turtles.
SUGGESTION LINE

Government officials are being inundated with homespun remedies to prevent the nightmare scenario of oil washing up all over the Gulf Coast. More than 3,500 suggestions have come in by phone and e-mail. Ideas range from the goofy — putting a cork in the blown-out well — to the possible.

One business plans to demonstrate a product that shoots a carbon dioxide solution from guns to freeze parts of the slick, which could then be scooped up and refined.

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/some_gulf_oil_spill_events_fro.html

(lots more good information here)

***

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-05/05/c_13279032.htm

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2010-05/05/c_13279032_2.htm

Many offshore oil rigs in the Gulf appear to be operating normally while the refineries in the region, which account for 40 percent of the nation’s refining capacity, continue to make and ship gasoline, they say.

The oil market has so far shrugged off the spill, even as the government scrambles to contain it.

Tom Kloza, an oil analyst, said the spill is a huge environmental and political story, but “definitely should not be an economic story with the price of oil in the next few months.”

The Gulf region accounts for roughly 30 percent of the U.S. domestic oil production. But the oil travels to shore via undersea pipelines and won’t be affected by a spill, said Ken Medlock, an energy research fellow at Rice University.

(and)

In Washington, U.S. authorities are weighing the pros and cons of a new BP method to break up the spill with dispersant chemicals injected underwater in addition to the traditional method of using dispersants on the surface.

In fact, BP has already attempted to inject the chemicals near the source of the leak deep underwater.

Oil has been gushing out of the seabed since at least April 22, when the Deepwater Horizon rig sank two days after an explosion and fire.

Charlie Henry, an official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Tuesday that the government is evaluating the pros and cons of the new method, trying to determine what method makes the biggest mitigation to the pollution threat.

“This is a unique idea to insert dispersants near the seafloor. But there are a lot of unknowns associated with this,” he said.

Henry said the dispersants being used in the Gulf show “fairly low toxicity.” However, toxicologists and environmental scientists said while the dispersants are unlikely to cause immediate harm to people, they can have a big impact on marine organisms that are directly exposed.
A flotilla of nearly 200 boats tackled a massive oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday, taking advantage of calm weather to intensify the fight to reduce the spill and limit its impact on the U.S. shoreline. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo)

(and)

But U.S. lawmakers appeared to be unimpressed and unsatisfied when leaving the meeting with BP executives. They later told U.S. press that the company is “attempting to solve a problem which they have never had to solve before at this depth. What we heard was worst-case scenario, with no good solutions.”

(and)

NO GOOD SOLUTIONS YET

The original estimate was that the leak, caused by an explosion of a BP oil rig in the Gulf on April 20, was gushing oil at a rate of 5,000 barrels a day. But if things go badly, BP executives told U.S. lawmakers in a closed-door meeting here in Washington Tuesday, the figure could grow to 60,000 barrels a day, or 2.5 million gallons.

WASHINGTON, May 4 (Xinhua) — British Petroleum (BP) executives admitted on Tuesday that good solutions are still being sought to tackle the Gulf of Mexico oil spill while U.S. officials are weighing a new method to clean up the mess with dispersant chemicals injected underwater.

(My Note – today is May 10, 2010)

***

Photo  22 / 36  An aerial view of the crude oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead, May 6, 2010. Credit: REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Handout

Photo 22 / 36 An aerial view of the oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead, May 6, 2010. Credit: REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Handout

(from – )

http://www.reuters.com/article/slideshow?articleId=USTRE6430AR20100509#a=22

***

Photo  25 / 36

A U.S. Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico, while searching for survivors in this April 21, 2010 handout photo, released to Reuters on May 7, 2010.
Credit: REUTERS/Petty Officer 2nd Class Scott Lloyd-US Coast Guard/Handout

http://www.reuters.com/article/slideshow?articleId=USTRE6430AR20100509#a=25

US_Gulf_of_Mexico_offshore_gas

US_Gulf_of_Mexico_offshore_gas

***

Gov. Bobby Jindal and Plaquemines officials float plan to rebuild barrier islands to stop encroaching oil
By Chris Kirkham, The Times-Picayune
May 08, 2010, 3:54PM

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser, left, and Gov. Bobby Jindal were photographed Wednesday in Venice, where they visited a boat used in distribution of booms to contain the Gulf of Mexico oil leak.

For years, state government officials, scientists and coastal residents have made numerous pleas to the federal government for money to restore Louisiana’s barrier islands.

( . . . )

Rough drafts of the plan show filling in gaps within the Chandeleur Islands, east of the Mississippi River and Breton Sound, and building up barrier islands to protect the Barataria Basin west of the river.

( . . . )
Although the dredging could cost hundreds of millions of dollars, Nungesser said he believes it would be a good investment by BP to avoid the damage to sensitive coastal marshes and wildlife.

Ambitious dredging projects such as this one would normally require months, if not years, of environmental and regulatory review.

Jindal and Nungesser said they are working with the Army Corps of Engineers to see whether those hurdles can be cleared expeditiously.

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/gov_bobby_jindal_and_plaquemin.html

***

Workers along the Mississippi River try to contain the hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel oil from a barge and ship collision on Wednesday, July 2008. The river is now closed to the Gulf of Mexico. (Eliot Kamenitz / The Times-Picayune)

Workers along the Mississippi River try to contain the hundreds of thousands of gallons of fuel oil from a barge and ship collision on Wednesday, July 2008. The river is now closed to the Gulf of Mexico. (Eliot Kamenitz / The Times-Picayune) - The massive oil spill that remains a major threat to the area's fragile delta ecosystem now stretches from New Orleans to the mouth of the Mississippi River -- a distance of 100 miles, Coast Guard officials said early Thursday.The barge -- which was carrying 400,000 gallons of thick, tar-like No. 6 fuel oil -- was split in half, sending its contents into the river.

The catastrophic spill occurred early Wednesday after an outbound 600-foot Liberian-flagged tanker named The Tintomara collided with a barge being pulled by a tugboat near the Harvey Locks. The barge — which was carrying 400,000 gallons of thick, tar-like No. 6 fuel oil — was split in half, sending its contents into the river.

The massive oil spill that remains a major threat to the area’s fragile delta ecosystem now stretches from New Orleans to the mouth of the Mississippi River — a distance of 100 miles, Coast Guard officials said early Thursday.

The Coast Guard has closed the river from mile marker 97 in New Orleans to Southwest Pass –where the river empties into the Gulf of Mexico.

(etc.)

Meanwhile, river traffic continues to pile up, Young said.

There are 25 deep-draft vessels stalled north of the Harvey Locks; 35 south of Southwest Pass; 21 at the Algiers Lock; and nine at the Industrial Canal, Young said. The Coast Guard was able to alleviate some of the logjam Wednesday by opening the Harvey Locks (mile marker 99) once the slick moved downriver.

“As the spill runs south, more traffic will be able to slowly move on,” because it will be possible for the Coast Guard to open more locks and move traffic along, Young said. The river could be closed for days or weeks as workers try to remove the oil from the river.

The port loses about $100,000 in revenue each day the river is closed. That does not include the losses to terminal operators, stevedores, tug boat operators and other private businesses.

( , , , )

Salvage of the barge, which has spilled practically all of its contents into the water, is scheduled for today, said Petty Officer Thomas Blue.

The oil is too thick to evaporate from the river’s surface and could sink. Authorities are hoping to remove the oil before that happens.

(etc.)

http://www.nola.com/news/index.ssf/2008/07/coast_guard_closes_almost_20_m.html

***

Oil blobs and oil sheen are seen in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La., Tuesday, May 4, 2010. Cleanup and containment of a massive oil slick resumed Tuesday as winds eased in the Gulf of Mexico and people along beaches and bayous waited to find out just how badly it might damage the delicate coast. Eric Gay | AP

Oil blobs and oil sheen are seen in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La., Tuesday, May 4, 2010. Cleanup and containment of a massive oil slick resumed Tuesday as winds eased in the Gulf of Mexico and people along beaches and bayous waited to find out just how badly it might damage the delicate coast. Eric Gay | AP

(from)

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/05/04/2726703/oil-spill-cleanup-and-containment.html?mi_rss=Photo%20Galleries#ixzz0nYdpInbd

***

Idling his 28-foot charter boat in the lee of Louisiana’s pristine Chandeleur Islands, Bob Kenney looked over the gunwales to see dozens of dead baby jellyfish floating along the hull. Off in the distance, the collections of thick, reddish-brown goo looked for all the world like little islands — except that they were moving.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/05/05/paranoia-anxiety-grow-gulf-coast-oil-spill/

The Environmental Protection Agency stepped up air quality monitoring on the Gulf Coast after people in New Orleans and elsewhere reported a strong odor of petroleum. A throng standing on the beach in Gulfport, Miss., Saturday were convinced they could smell the slick — until someone pointed out a big diesel truck idling just 50 feet away.

When the truck left, so did the smell.

Officials couldn’t confirm reports that some of it reached the delicate Chandeleur Islands off the coast of Louisiana on Tuesday. The Associated Press reported oil had come ashore at the mouth of the Mississippi last week.

The Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20, killing 11 workers and sending hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil a day gushing into the Gulf. While a rainbow sheen of oil has reached land in parts of Louisiana, the gooey rafts of coagulated crude have yet to come ashore in most places.

The Marine Spill Response Corp. had five, 210-foot vessels designed for oil skimming operating offshore Tuesday. Three more were at sea preparing to lower their equipment so they could suck up oil as well.

That certainly describes the current spill and the perennially beleaguered communities along the Gulf Coast.

Fishermen have complained bitterly about the federal decision to close a large swathe of the Gulf to commercial and sport fishing, saying it was an overreaction. Some even vowed to keep catching fish until someone arrested them.

But U.S. Sen. David Vitter said it was necessary to reassure the American public that the seafood on restaurant menus and store shelves is safe.

“We don’t want hysteria to take over and hysteria to hurt the industry even more than the oil is,” said Vitter, R-La.

Daryl Carpenter, president of the Louisiana Charter Boat Association, is struggling to get people to understand that three-quarters of the Gulf is still clean and open to fishing.

In Gulf Shores, Ala., the real estate firm Brett/Robinson Vacations, sent a note to those renting vacation properties that they would not be penalized for any spill-related cancellations, but urged them not to jump the gun.

“There are many questions and many `what ifs’ regarding this event,” the message read. “Because changes come about hourly and 30 days is a long way away, we are asking you to wait before canceling your vacation, especially those of you who are scheduled to arrive more than 30 days from today.”

The missive concluded with the words: “Thank you for staying with us and enjoying our beautiful Beaches.”

050410_gulfshark_doomsday_604x341.jpg

May 4: A dead shark is seen laying in the surf as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path.

“We don’t want hysteria to take over and hysteria to hurt the industry even more than the oil is,” said Vitter, R-La.

***

A dead bird is seen on the beach as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 4 in Ship Island, Mississippi. It is unknown if the bird died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. Joe Raedle | Getty Images

A dead bird is seen on the beach as concern continues that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico may harm animals in its path on May 4 in Ship Island, Mississippi. It is unknown if the bird died due to the oil spill. Oil is still leaking out of the Deepwater Horizon wellhead at a estimated rate of 1,000-5,000 barrels a day. Joe Raedle | Getty Images - Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/05/04/2726703/oil-spill-cleanup-and-containment.html?mi_rss=Photo%20Galleries#ixzz0nYhqc27J

(from)

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/05/04/2726703/oil-spill-cleanup-and-containment.html?mi_rss=Photo%20Galleries#ixzz0nYhqc27J

***

References

Ocean Studies Board and Marine Board (2003). Oil in The Sea III: Inputs, Fates, and Effects. Washington DC: The National Academies Press.

Revised on: 3 August, 2009

http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/oceanography-book/oilspills.htm

Current evidence implies that oiled and hot-water washed sites initially suffered more severe declines in population abundance than oiled and not-washed sites.
From NOAA.

4. Any cleanup that changes the physical makeup of the area delays recovery. In particular, Large scale excavation of gravel beaches, which delays recovery for many years.
5. Oil that penetrates deeply into sand or sediments can stay fresh for years and be released slowly back into the water. Cleanup is difficult because it disrupts the physical state of the area. Recovery is delayed many years.
6. Using water to flush away oil may remove fine sediment needed by organisms.

For more information, read the conclusions of the impact of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. David S. Page at Bowdoin College, Department of Chemistry, and Edward S. Gilfillan at Bowdoin College, Environmental Studies Program, have also summarized to effects after 10 years. Results of studies of major British oil spills at sea by the British Marine Life Study Society. By 2001 a survey by Auke Bay Laboratory found only 20 acres of beach contained oil residues, all buried below the surface of the beach (Alaska Fisheries Science Center: The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill: How Much Oil Remains?).

See the yearly photographs of Means Rock to understand the difficulty of determining if an area has returned to normal.

Sometimes the clean up is worse than the spill. The NOAA has been monitoring Prince William Sound, the location of the spill, and they have amassed information on Results, Lessons Learned, and Implications.

1. Set aside areas that have not been cleaned to compare with cleaned areas to assess usefulness of cleaning.
2. High-pressure, hot-water cleaning causes short-term and long-term damage.
3. Stating that cleanup does “more harm than good” while to some extent true, is a bit of an oversimplification. Still, we have learned that:
1. The use of detergents, which are toxic to marine life, to disperse the oil.
2. The use of steam and hot water to clean rocks, which kills all organisms on the rocks.

***

The main threat posed to living resources by the persistent residues of spilled oils and water-in-oil emulsions (“mousse”) is one of physical smothering. The animals and plants most at risk are those that could come into contact with a contaminated sea surface. Marine mammals and reptiles; birds that feed by diving or form flocks on the sea; marine life on shorelines; and animals and plants in mariculture facilities.

The most toxic components in oil tend to be those lost rapidly through evaporation when oil is spilt. Because of this, lethal concentrations of toxic components leading to large scale mortalities of marine life are relatively rare, localized and short-lived.

Sub-lethal effects that impair the ability of individual marine organisms to reproduce, grow, feed or perform other functions can be caused by prolonged exposure to a concentration of oil or oil components far lower than will cause death. Sedentary animals in shallow waters such as oysters, mussels and clams that routinely filter large volumes of seawater to extract food are especially likely to accumulate oil components.

Whilst these components may not cause any immediate harm, their presence may render such animals unpalatable if they are consumed by man, due to the presence of an oily taste or smell. This is a temporary problem since the components causing the taint are lost (depurated) when normal conditions are restored.
From Effects of Marine Oil Spills

http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/oceanography-book/oilspills.htm

***

Near Port Fourchon, southwest of New Orleans, workers for contractor Wild Well Control were busy welding and painting a massive containment device. BP spokesman John Curry said it would be deployed on the seabed by Thursday.

(from foxnews article linked above in this post)

My Note –

So, that is who built the containment dome that didn’t work – wonder what was paid to them and to the engineering firm that designed it?)

– cricketdiane

***


The Itox 1 exploratory well in the Bay of Camphece blew out on 3 June 1979 causing a major oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. By the time the well was brought under control in 1980, an estimated 140 million gallons of oil had spilled into the bay. The IXTOC I is currently number 2 on the list of largest oil spills of all-time.

From Incident News.
http://www.incidentnews.gov/entry/517477

The IXTOC I exploratory well blew out on June 3, 1979 in the Bay of Campeche off Ciudad  del Carmen, Mexico. By the time the well was brought under control in 1980, an estimated  140 million gallons of oil had spilled into the bay. The IXTOC I is currently #2 on the  all-time list of largest oil spills of all-time

The IXTOC I exploratory well blew out on June 3, 1979 in the Bay of Campeche off Ciudad del Carmen, Mexico. By the time the well was brought under control in 1980, an estimated 140 million gallons of oil had spilled into the bay. The IXTOC I is currently #2 on the all-time list of largest oil spills of all-time - from NOAA Incident News website

(from – )

http://www.incidentnews.gov/entry/517477

***

Incident Map – United States (only)

This map shows the locations of oil spills and other incidents for which NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) provided scientific support for the response. It also shows the locations of other major spills, but it does not show the location of every significant oil spill.

**

1980 – (3 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

(etc.)

Tarballs 98
Bodega Bay, CA    1998-Jan-21

1998 – (117 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

1999 – (84 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2000 – (81 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2001 – (63 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2002 – (13 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2003 – (9 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2004 – (12 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2005 – (9 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2006 – (6 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2007 – (13 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2008 – (18 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2009 – (41 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

2010 – (20 incidents mapped — zoom out to see more incidents.)

(its only May now – that is in 5 months of this year)

http://www.incidentnews.gov/map

It also shows the locations of other major spills, but it does not show the location of every significant oil spill.

***

Jon Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, and Rowan Gould, acting director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, were sent to the Gulf to help lead efforts to protect coastal communities. Gould is a veteran of cleanup efforts following the 1989 Exxon Valdez accident, the worst U.S. oil spill ever.

“You’re talking about massive economic loss to our tourism, our beaches, our fisheries, very possibly disruption of our military testing and training which is in the Gulf of Mexico,” Florida Democratic Senator Bill Nelson told CNN.”

Crews labored all weekend to cordon off the entrance to Alabama’s Mobile Bay with a containment boom fence to try to safeguard America’s ninth-largest seaport.

Ships arriving at Southwest Pass, the deepwater entrance to the Mississippi River and New Orleans, will be inspected to determine if they need cleaning.

Seafood is a $2.4 billion industry in Louisiana, which produces more than 30 percent of the seafood originating in the continental United States.

In Bayou La Batre, Alabama, the Coast Guard and BP were contracting boat owners at an average rate of $3,000 per day to help with oil-skimming operations.

Louisiana officials closed more waters to fishing and shrimp and oyster harvesting as the slick edged westward.

Shrimp harvesting is now banned from Freshwater Bayou on the central coast to Louisiana’s border with Mississippi. Some oyster beds west of the Mississippi River also are shut.

Truckloads of sand were being delivered to Port Fourchon to fill large sandbags, which will be dropped by National Guard helicopters in five areas along the coast.

(etc.)

A state of emergency was declared on Sunday in Lafourche and Terrebonne Parishes in Louisiana, west of the Mississippi Delta, where training is under way to teach local fisherman how to deploy booms and assist with oil spill contractors.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6430AR20100510?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews

Hundreds of boats deployed protective booms and used dispersants to break up the oil again on Sunday, but rougher seas threatened to curtail the spill response. Crews have laid more than 189 miles of boom and spread 325,000 gallons (1.2 million liters) of chemical dispersant.

SANDBAGS

The spill’s major contact with the shoreline so far has been in the Chandeleur Islands off Louisiana, mostly a wildlife reserve. The next few days threatens wider contact.

(from article above – from Reuters – 05-10-10 ( Sunday was May 9, 2010)

***

My Note –

yeah – ya’ll sure know what you’re doing alright – and it is just like you said – “all safe and never will the oil industry have the kinds of disasters that those extreme ecological fanatics talk about – it is just hysteria about it because people have heard about a couple birds getting oil on them . . . ”

Yeah – right.

That isn’t even a good lie anymore.

– cricketdiane

***

Ship partially on fire with smaller boat spraying water

Mega Borg

The Mega Borg released 5.1 million gallons of oil as the result of a lightering accident and subsequent fire. The incident occurred 60 nautical miles south-southeast of Galveston, Texas on June 8, 1990.

For More Information

(from)

http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/gallery_gallery_photo.php?RECORD_KEY%28j_gallery_photos%29=joinphotogal_id,gallery_id,photo_id,topic_id&joinphotogal_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=85&gallery_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=3&photo_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=34&topic_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=1

***

Docked ship on fire with plumes of black smoke rising

Cibro Savannah

The Cibro Savannah exploded and caught fire while departing the pier at the CITGO facility in Linden, New Jersey, on March 6, 1990. About 127,000 gallons of oil remained unaccounted for after the incident: no one knows how much oil burned and how much spilled into the environment.
For More Information

(from)

http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/gallery_gallery_photo.php?RECORD_KEY%28j_gallery_photos%29=joinphotogal_id,gallery_id,photo_id,topic_id&joinphotogal_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=81&gallery_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=3&photo_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=30&topic_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=1

***

Sip on fire with plumes of black smoke

Burmah Agate

On November 1, 1979, the Burmah Agate collided with the freighter Mimosa southeast of Galveston Entrance in the Gulf of Mexico. An estimated 2.6 million gallons of oil was released into the environment; another 7.8 million gallons was consumed by the fire onboard. This spill is currently #55 on the all-time list of largest oil spills.

For More Information

(from – )

http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/gallery_gallery_photo.php?RECORD_KEY%28j_gallery_photos%29=joinphotogal_id,gallery_id,photo_id,topic_id&joinphotogal_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=80&gallery_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=3&photo_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=29&topic_id%28j_gallery_photos%29=1

***

Quantities of Oil Spilled – (in tonnes rather than barrels or gallons)

Position
Ship name Year Location
Spill Size
(tonnes)
1
Atlantic Empress 1979 Off Tobago, West Indies
287,000
2
ABT Summer 1991 700 nautical miles off Angola
260,000
3
Castillo de Bellver 1983 Off Saldanha Bay, South Africa
252,000
4
Amoco Cadiz 1978 Off Brittany, France
223,000
5
Haven 1991 Genoa, Italy
144,000
6
Odyssey 1988 700 nautical miles off Nova Scotia, Canada
132,000
7
Torrey Canyon 1967 Scilly Isles, UK
119,000
8
Sea Star 1972 Gulf of Oman
115,000
9
Irenes Serenade 1980 Navarino Bay, Greece
100,000
10
Urquiola 1976 La Coruna, Spain
100,000
11
Hawaiian Patriot 1977 300 nautical miles off Honolulu
95,000
12
Independenta 1979 Bosphorus, Turkey
95,000
13
Jakob Maersk 1975 Oporto, Portugal
88,000
14
Braer 1993 Shetland Islands, UK
85,000
15
Khark 5 1989 120 nautical miles off Atlantic coast of Morocco
80,000
16
Aegean Sea 1992 La Coruna, Spain
74,000
17
Sea Empress 1996 Milford Haven, UK
72,000
18
Katina P 1992 Off Maputo, Mozambique
72,000
19
Nova
1985 Off Kharg Island, Gulf of Iran
70,000
20
Prestige* 2002 Off the Spanish coast
63,000*
35
Exxon Valdez 1989 Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA
37,000

Figure and table are from International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation compilation of historical data.

(from – )

http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/oceanography-book/oilspills.htm

(does not include spills after 2002 – It is now 2010, my note)

***

Oil Spills

Oil spills from oil tankers operating at sea world-wide account for only 7.7% of oil in the ocean, yet large spills attract far more attention than other much larger sources of oil pollution.

The International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Historical Data has information on all spills, large and small. They note that “The average number of large spills per year during the 1990s was about a third of that witnessed during the 1970s.”

International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Historical Data
http://www.itopf.com/stats.html

***

Spain’s ‘Coast of Death’ bears evidence of oil spill 8 years later
By Ivan Watson, CNN
May 9, 2010 6:01 p.m. EDT

But no one prepared these people for the man-made disaster that washed up on their shores nearly eight years ago, when the tanker ship Prestige broke open and sank, releasing millions of gallons of oil.

“It was the worst thing I have ever seen,” said Ramon Vilela, a Muxia resident who makes his living harvesting goose barnacles, a valuable local delicacy, off the region’s rocky beaches.

“We had a difficult time,” said Jose Soneira, a pensioner who lives by the harbor in Muxia. This town on Spain’s northwestern coast was considered ground zero during the disaster.

“We couldn’t come out here,” he said, pointing at the beach. “It was all full of black sludge. Black, black, black. Wherever you put your feet, you had to wear boots and protection.”

The Prestige first got into trouble in November 2002, when the Greek-owned ship operating under the flag of the Bahamas sprang a leak after being caught in a storm off Spain’s Galician coast. The Spanish government denied the Prestige refuge and ordered the foundering ship to be towed further out to sea.

Several days later, more than 100 miles off the Spanish coast, a roiling storm finally broke the stricken ship in two, sending its shattered hull to the bottom of the ocean and spilling much of its cargo of heavy fuel oil into the water.

Millions of gallons of oil began washing up. Locals called it la marea negra, or the black tide.

It was one of the worst oil spills in modern history.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, the pollution killed an estimated 250,000 sea birds. The oil spill also ground Galicia’s multimillion-dollar fishing industry to a halt.

Today, locals point to the rocky beach at Cuña. Despite nearly eight years of wind, surf and rain, thick black tar still clings to the rocks.

(etc.)

http://us.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/europe/05/09/spain.black.tide/index.html?hpt=C1

***

Next step to stop oil: Throw garbage at it
By the CNN Wire Staff
May 10, 2010 — Updated 0306 GMT (1106 HKT)

( . . . )

Officials are considering heating the dome or adding methanol to dissolve the hydrates, he said. If the hydrate problem is resolved, BP hopes to connect the dome to a drill ship and to begin sucking oil from the containment dome.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasters warned that the Mississippi Delta, Breton Sound, the Chandeleur Islands and areas directly north could see oil hit the coast by Tuesday, and significant winds could push oil west of the Mississippi River Delta by Monday. And scientists are analyzing tar balls found on a beach on Dauphin Island, Alabama, to determine whether they were caused by the oil spill, and Coast Guard spokesman Erik Swanson said.

“The next tactic is going to be something they call a junk shot,” Allen told CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday. “They’ll take a bunch of debris — shredded up tires, golf balls and things like that — and under very high pressure, shoot it into the preventer itself and see if they can clog it up and stop the leak.”

Oil company BP, the well’s owner, had attempted to lower a four-story containment vessel over the well to cap the larger of the well’s two leak points. But that plan was thwarted Saturday after ice-like hydrate crystals, formed when gas combined with water, blocked the top of the dome and made it buoyant.

BP said it has not abandoned the dome plan. But Doug Suttles, the company’s chief operating officer, told reporters that officials are considering the “junk shot” along with other possible solutions.

Suttles said Saturday that trying to stuff shut the blowout preventer had not yet been attempted because of possible challenges and risks. And Allen said the approach had worked in the past, but never so deep beneath the water’s surface.

“We’re working at 5,000 feet of depth, which has never been done before,” he said.

The dome was resting on the seabed Sunday while crews tried to find a way to deal with the crystals — a process that could take two days, Suttles told reporters Saturday.
Video: Heavily-oiled pelican rescued
Video: Ice-like crystals impede oil capture
Video: Tar balls appear on pristine island
Video: Oil slick nears Biloxi

*(from CNN – )

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/05/09/gulf.oil/index.html?hpt=T2

Federal investigators are still trying determining what caused the explosion that sank the Deepwater Horizon, owned by BP contractor Transocean Ltd. The explosion left 11 men presumed dead aboard the rig and caused the massive underwater gusher that the company and the federal government have been trying to cap since late April.

Suttles said Saturday that senior BP employees, including the company’s vice president for drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, were on board the rig at the time of the explosion discussing its positive safety performance.

“This rig had an outstanding record,” he said.

All six BP employees on board were among the 111 people who escaped from the burning rig, Suttles said.

***

Oil is seen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico in an aerial view of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill off the coast of Mobile, Alabama, in this handout photograph taken from a U.S. Coast Guard HC-144 Ocean Sentry aircraft on May 6, 2010 and obtained on May 9, 2010. Credit: REUTERS/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael B. Watkins/U.S. Navy/Handout

Oil is seen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico in an aerial view of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill off the coast of Mobile, Alabama, in this handout photograph taken from a U.S. Coast Guard HC-144 Ocean Sentry aircraft on May 6, 2010 and obtained on May 9, 2010. Credit: REUTERS/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael B. Watkins/U.S. Navy/Handout - (Photo 1 of 36 - Reuters Slife Show of Gulf Oil Spill)

(from)

http://www.reuters.com/article/slideshow?articleId=USTRE6430AR20100509#a=1

photograph taken from a U.S. Coast Guard HC-144 Ocean Sentry aircraft on May 6, 2010

(Today is May 10, at 6.01 pm ET – 2010 – my note)

***


A dead sea turtle lies on the beach in Pass Christian, Mississippi, U.S., May 2, 2010. President Barack Obama said on May 2 that the United States is dealing with a “massive” and ” potentially unprecedented” environmental disaster as a result of the expanding oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico caused by a sunken oil rig. British Petroleum (BP) announced on May 3 that it will pay “all necessary and appropriate clean-up costs” resulting from the blown-out oil well that has caused a massive slick that continues to swell in the Gulf of Mexico. (Photo Source: Fotomore.cn)

U.S. gulf oil spill brings severe pollution of ecosystem

16:08, May 04, 2010

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90001/90783/91321/6972723.html

(That is from China’s news about us – )

***


taking a walk in the rain to go to the grocery – will  do more later –

– cricketdiane

***

quick note –

Owner: Methane levels “normal” at time of Siberian mine blasts

19:58, May 10, 2010

Rescuers and miners talk at the administrative building of Raspadskaya mine in the Kemerovo region in Russia’s coal-rich Kuzbass region May 9, 2010. (Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
Owner of the Russian coal mine where double blasts killed 31 people over the weekend said methane content at the time of explosions was “normal,” local media reported on Monday.

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90001/90777/90853/6979613.html

Latest figures from the Russian Emergency Situations Ministry put the death toll of the explosions at 31, with some 60 people currently unaccounted for. Around 60 people were also injured.

Russian Emergency Situations Minister Sergei Shoigu, who flew to the site near the city of Mezhdurechensk in the Kemerovo region, said earlier on Monday that merely 48 hours may be left for saving 13 miners and rescuers, in two locations due to rising water levels, because of the damaged drainage system.

Goryachkin also said it was premature to talk about the possible causes of the blasts that occurred at the depth of 490 meters.

Founded in 1973, the Raspadskaya was one of Russia’s leading coking coal producers, with total coal reserves estimated at 782 million tons.

Source:Xinhua

***

will start new post -cd