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NVEWS: National Volcano Early Warning System

map of world showing icons for U.S. volcanoes by threat level

U.S. Volcanoes and NVEWS Targets: red – 35 highest
priority volcanoes, orange – 22 high-priority volcanoes,
small green – the other U.S. volcanoes.

The National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) is a proposed national-scale plan to ensure that volcanoes are monitored at levels commensurate to their threats. The plan was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) and its affiliated partners in the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) (http://www.cusvo.org).

Roughly half of the Nation’s 169 young volcanoes are dangerous because of the manner in which they erupt and the communities within their reach. Currently, many of these volcanoes have insufficient monitoring systems (for example, seismometers and continuous GPS [Global Positioning System]), and others have outdated equipment. The NVEWS plan ensures that the most hazardous volcanoes would be properly monitored well in advance of the onset of activity, making it possible for scientists to improve the timeliness and accuracy of hazard forecasts and for citizens to take proper and timely action to reduce risk.

In addition, the NVEWS plan seeks to improve a number of capabilities of the US volcanology community through the following elements: 1) Increased partnerships with local governments and emergency responders, 2) grants to universities and other groups for cooperative research to advance volcano science, monitoring technologies, and mitigation strategies, 3) added staffing and automation to improve 24/7 monitoring of volcanoes, and 4) computer systems to distribute data to scientists, responding agencies, and the public, and to unify the systems currently used to monitor US volcanoes.

More information can be found in the documents listed below.

(from)

http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/publications/2009/nvews.php

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Top Priority Volcanoes for Improved Monitoring Networks

The overall result of the 2005 NVEWS assessment was the identification of 57 priority volcanoes undermonitored for the threats posed and thus targets for improved monitoring networks. Priority targets in this table may have changed since the 2005 assessment as incremental monitoring improvements have been made.

Region Highest Priority High Priority
Alaska Akutan, Amak, Amukta, Augustine, Bogoslof, Cleveland, Fourpeaked, Kasatochi, Kiska, Makushin, Recheshnoi, Redoubt, Seguam, Vsevidof, Yantarni, Yunaska Black Peak, Chiginagak, Churchill, Dana, Douglas, Dutton, Edgecumbe, Hayes, Kaguyak, Kupreanof, Spurr, Wrangell
Washington Glacier Peak, Mount Baker, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens Mount Adams
Oregon Crater Lake, Mount Hood, Newberry, Three Sisters
California Lassen Volcanic Center, Mount Shasta Clear Lake, Mono-Inyo Craters, Mono Lake Volcanic Field, Medicine Lake
Wyoming Yellowstone
Hawaii Kilauea, Mauna Loa Hualalai
Commonwealth of N. Mariana Islands Agrigan, Alamagan, Anatahan, Asuncion, Farallon de Pajaros, Guguan, Pagan Sarigan

NVEWS Documents and Other Supporting Information

(found on this page also)

http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/publications/2009/nvews.php

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Selected Map Products of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program

Topical Maps of U.S. Volcanoes

This Dynamic Planet

This Dynamic Planet map shows many of the features that have shaped–and continue to change–our dynamic planet including plate boundaries, earthquakes, volcanoes, and impact craters. The map is designed to show the most prominent features when viewed from a distance, and more detailed features upon closer inspection. The back of the map zooms in further, highlighting examples of fundamental features, while providing text, timelines, references, and other resources to enhance understanding of this dynamic planet. Both the front and back of this map illustrate the enormous recent growth in our knowledge of planet Earth. Yet, much remains unknown, particularly about the processes operating below the ever-shifting plates and the detailed geological history during all but the most recent stage of Earth’s development.

Alaska

Volcanoes of Alaska

Alaska Volcano Observatory, 1998, Volcanoes of Alaska: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys, Information Circular 38 (1 sheet, 1:4,000,000)

A poster-style map of historically active volcanoes and other volcanic centers in Alaska, including photographs of selected volcanoes. The map poster also includes descriptions and illustrations of the tectonic setting of Alaska, recent notable eruptions, volcano hazards, and a glossary. This map is ideal for classroom use.

This map costs $3.00 and it can be ordered from:

Mailing address
Alaska Division of Geology and Geophysical Surveys
794 University Avenue, Suite 200
Fairbanks, AK 99709-3645
Telephone in the U.S.
voice (907) 451-5020
fax (907) 451-5050
Email: dggspubs@dnr.state.ak.us

Hawai`i

Geologic map of the island of Hawaii

Wolfe, Edward W., and Morris, Jean (eds.), 1996, Geologic map of the island of Hawaii: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-2524-A (3 sheets 1:100,000; booklet 18 p.)

Wolfe, Edward W., and Morris, Jean (eds.), 1996, Sample data for the geologic map of the island of Hawaii: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-2524-B (3 sheets 1:100,000; booklet 15 p.)

This is the first map of the entire Island of Hawai`i to show in detail the age and distribution of both prehistoric and historic lavas. The map is a compilation of geologic mapping from 1975 through 1988 by approximately 20 geologists, with subsequent updates for Kilauea lavas emplaced through April 20, 1995, in a continuing eruption. Its chronologic detail reflects the application of isotopic-dating techniques that were unavailable when its predecessor was made in 1946.

Lava flow hazards on the island of Hawai`i

Wright, Thomas L., Chun, Jon Y.F., Esposo, Joan, Heliker, Christina, Hodge, Jon, Lockwood, John P., and Vogt, Susan M., 1992, Map showing lava-flow hazard zones, Island of Hawaii: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-2193.This map shows lava-flow hazard zones for the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Kohala). The hazard zones are based chiefly on the location of eruptive vents, areas covered by past lava flows as revealed by geologic mapping and historic observations, and topography. The maps shows nine lava-flow hazard zones and the boundaries between the zones are approximate because the degree of hazard from one zone to the next is generally gradual rather than abrupt, and the change can occur over the distance of a mile or more. This map updates an earlier hazard assessment published in 1974 and revised in 1987.

California

Long Valley vicinity, California

Bailey, Roy A., 1989, Geologic map of the Long Valley Caldera, Mono-Inyo Craters Volcanic Chain, and vicinity, Eastern California: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1933 (2 sheets 1:62:500; booklet 11 p.)

Long Valley caldera is currently the most restless volcano in the conterminous United States. The rugged landscape of the Long Valley region owes its beauty and appeal to the striking geologic features created largely by the growth of the imposing Sierra Nevada mountains to the west and volcanic eruptions. This geologic map shows the youngest faults and volcanic landforms and rock deposits that were formed in this area during the past 3.6 million years as well as the much older rocks that underlies the area (dating back to about 240 million years). The map identifies eruptive products created by the caldera-forming and subsequent eruptions as well as from the Mono-Inyo Crates volcanic chain that cuts through the caldera. The accompanying booklet provides an overall geologic and glacial history of the area.

Washington

Hydrologic Hazards at Mount Rainier, Washington

Scott, Kevin M., and Vallance, James W., 1995, Debris flow, debris avalanche, and flood hazards at and downstream from Mount Rainier, Washington: U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Atlas 729 (2 sheets, booklet 9 p.)

Mount Rainier volcano has produced many large debris flows and debris avalanches (also called lahars and landslides) during the past 10,000 years, and many traveled more than 100 kilometers to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound Lowland. Two maps are included in the atlas. One map illustrates the types, probabilities, and risks of the most dangerous types of debris avalanches and debris flows. Based on 3 characteristic types of events of a known size and estimated frequency, the map shows potential future inundation areas for all rivers draining Mount Rainier. A second map shows examples of smaller debris avalanches and debris flows that occurred in the 20th century. The booklet describes the three characteristic type of events that were used to estimate future inundation areas and factors affecting the risk analysis.


http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/publications/maps.php

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This Dynamic Planet

World Map of Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Impact Craters, and Plate Tectonics

Ordering Instructions

The two-sided map can be ordered from the USGS Store. On the Map Locator page, enter “This Dynamic Planet” into the Product Name box. A single handling fee is applied to all domestic orders. For international shipping, see the USGS frequently asked questions page. Discounts are available for some groups. For more information call 1-888-ASK-USGS.

The map is also for sale from:
U.S. Geological Survey
Information Services
Box 25286, Federal Center
Denver, CO 80225

New product number 206335.

Linked Websites

Please visit the Smithsonian Institution This Dynamic Planet website. This site provides interactive mapping functions (including zoom), contains additional information not shown on the printed paper map, and includes downloadable PDF files of all map components and HTML pages.

See also the USGS booklet This Dynamic Earth: The Story of Plate Tectonics, which gives background information about the theory of plate tectonics and traces its development.

The USGS also has created a website for teachers: This Dynamic Planet: A Teaching Companion.

(from)

http://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/2800/

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This Dynamic Planet

World Map of Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Impact Craters, and Plate Tectonics

Third Edition (Published 2006)

By Tom Simkin,1 Robert I. Tilling,2 Peter R. Vogt3,1 Stephen H. Kirby,2 Paul Kimberly,1 and David B. Stewart2

Cartography and graphic design by Will R. Stettner,2 with contributions by Antonio Villaseñor,4 and edited by Katharine S. Schindler2

1Smithsonian Institution, 2U.S. Geological Survey, 3U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera, Spanish National Research Council

Introduction

Our Earth is a dynamic planet, as clearly illustrated on the main map by its topography, over 1,500 volcanoes, 44,000 earthquakes, and 170 impact craters. These features largely reflect the movements of Earth’s major tectonic plates and many smaller plates or fragments of plates (including microplates). Volcanic eruptions and earthquakes are awe-inspiring displays of the powerful forces of nature and can be extraordinarily destructive. On average, about 60 of Earth’s 550 historically active volcanoes are in eruption each year. In 2004 alone, over 160 earthquakes were magnitude 6.0 or above, some of which caused casualties and substantial damage.

This map shows many of the features that have shaped–and continue to change–our dynamic planet. Most new crust forms at ocean ridge crests, is carried slowly away by plate movement, and is ultimately recycled deep into the Earth–causing earthquakes and volcanism along the boundaries between moving tectonic plates. Oceans are continually opening (for example, Red Sea, Atlantic Ocean) or closing (for example, Mediterranean Sea). Because continental crust is thicker and less dense than thinner, younger oceanic crust, most does not sink deep enough to be recycled, and remains largely preserved on land. Consequently, most continental bedrock is far older than the oldest oceanic bedrock (see back of map).

The earthquakes and volcanoes that mark plate boundaries are clearly shown on this map, as are craters made by impacts of extraterrestrial objects that punctuate Earth’s history, some causing catastrophic ecological changes. Over geologic time, continuing plate movements, together with relentless erosion and redeposition of material, mask or obliterate traces of earlier plate-tectonic or impact processes, making the older chapters of Earth’s 4,500-million-year history increasingly difficult to read. The recent activity shown on this map provides only a present-day snapshot of Earth’s long history, helping to illustrate how its present surface came to be.

The map is designed to show the most prominent features when viewed from a distance, and more detailed features upon closer inspection. The back of the map zooms in further, highlighting examples of fundamental features, while providing text, timelines, references, and other resources to enhance understanding of this dynamic planet. Both the front and back of this map illustrate the enormous recent growth in our knowledge of planet Earth. Yet, much remains unknown, particularly about the processes operating below the ever-shifting plates and the detailed geological history during all but the most recent stage of Earth’s development.

PDF Files

In addition to the paper map, which is available for purchase, the USGS is providing PDF files of the map. These files are very large and should be downloaded and viewed in Adobe Reader.

Below: Thumbnail image of the front of the map, which measures 58 by 45 inches, and a figure representative of the materials on the reverse side of the map.

This  Dynamic Planet - Front side of map

PDF file of the Front Side of the map: high resolution [52 MB] | screen resolution [8 MB]

Sample  figure from reverse of map showing Hawaiian Islands

PDF file of the Reverse Side of the map: high resolution [108 MB] | screen resolution [7 MB]

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Mount St. Helens Now In High Definition

VolcanoCam Classic

View Full-Size (640×480):

VolcanoCam High-Definition

View Medium Size (640×480):

View Full-Size (1024×768):

Warning! This is a large image!!

Current Camera Status

VolcanoCam Update For Wednesday, 10 March 2010

  • Update @ 0731 Hours – Do not expect any views as the late winter storm continues today.

Camera Images Description

These are near real-time images of Mount St. Helens, taken from the Johnston Ridge Observatory (JRO) using our VolcanoCam Classic camera and the new VolcanoCamHD camera. The (JRO) and VolcanoCams are located at an elevation of approximately 4,200 feet, about five miles from the volcano. You are looking approximately south-southeast across the North Fork Toutle River Valley. The VolcanoCam images automatically update approximately every five minutes.

(from)

http://www.fs.fed.us/gpnf/volcanocams/msh/

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VolcanoCams


Washington State VolcanoCams

  • Mount Baker [10/08]
    Seattle Space Needle 360 degree webcam, includes distant views of Mount Rainier and Mount Baker
  • Mount Rainier [10/08]
    View across University of Washington Red Square, Mount Rainier in background.
    — View courtesy University of Washington Computing and Communications. Images are updated every 5 minutes.
  • Mount Rainier [10/08]
    Air Quality camera, looking west down the Nisqually River valley, no view of Mount Rainier, also gives weather information — Link courtesy Mount Rainier National Park
  • Mount Rainier [10/08]
    Seattle Space Needle 360 degree webcam, includes distant views of Mount Rainier and Mount Baker
  • Mount St. Helens [10/08]
    “Live” view from Johnston Ridge Observatory, updated every 5 minutes.
    — Link courtesy U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. — VolcanoCam FAQ’s

Oregon VolcanoCams

  • Mount Hood [10/08]
    KATU Portland, Oregon, live cameras. Some occasionally show Mount Hood.
    — View courtesy KATU TV, Portland, Oregon
  • Mount Jefferson [10/08]
    Air Quality Camera located at Mount Hood, shows Mount Jefferson in the distance, also gives lots of weather information provided
    — View courtesy U.S. Forest Service

California VolcanoCams

Alaska VolcanoCams

Hawaii VolcanoCams

  • Haleakala Crater [10/08]
    — link courtesy AEOS Haleakala Atmospheric Characterization Project, Maui — (note: link good but no image when checked on November 2, 2006)
  • Mauna Kea Observatory [10/08]
    — View from the CFHT (Canada, France, Hawaii Telescope) dome showing the weather tower and the Gemini dome.
  • Pu’u O’o [10/08]
    — link courtesy Hawai’i Volcano Observatory

Other USA VolcanoCams

VolcanoCams Around the World

  • Canary Islands (Spain)
    • Gran Canaria [10/08]
      — link courtesy Instituto Astrofisica Canarias
    • El Teide [10/08]
      — link courtesy Instituto Astrofisica Canarias
  • Greece
    • Santorini [04/09]
      — the cameras are located in Imerovigli on the terraces of Hotel Heliotopos, link courtesy “www.santorini.net”
  • Italy
    • Etna [10/08]
      — link courtesy “albanetcom.com”
    • Etna [10/08]
      — check on volcano name under “Rete di telecamere” to pop up new menu choices, link courtesy Istituto Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia
    • Stromboli [10/08]
      — check on volcano name under “Rete di telecamere” to pop up new menu choices, link courtesy Istituto Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia
    • Vesuvius [10/08]
      — various views, not always Vesuvius, link courtesy Medivia, Tourism in Campania
    • Vesuvius [10/08]
      — two views available, link courtesy Vesuvioinrete
    • Vulcano [10/08]
      — check on volcano name under “Rete di telecamere” to pop up new menu choices, link courtesy Istituto Nazionale Geofisica Vulcanologia
  • Japan
    • Asama [10/08]
      — page in Japanese
    • Fuji [10/08]
      — nice view
    • Fuji [10/08]
      — 24Hours Mt. Fuji LIVE
    • Iwate [10/08]
      — link courtesy Iwate University, Department of Computer Science
    • Sakurajima [10/08]
      — as seen from Kagoshima
    • Unzen [10/08]
    • Usu [10/08]
      — “wakasaresort.com” website
  • Mexico
    • Colima [10/08]
      — link courtesy University of Colima
    • Popocatépetl [10/08]
      — click on “Imagen del volcan – Estacion Altzomoni” or “Imagen del volcan – Estacion Tlamacas”, view courtesy CENAPRED
  • New Zealand
    • Ngauruhoe [04/09]
      — click on volcano, link courtesy GeoNet
    • Ruapehu [04/09]
      — click on volcano, link courtesy GeoNet
    • Ruapehu [10/08]
      — Snowcam
    • Taranaki (Egmont) [04/09]
      — click on volcano, link courtesy GeoNet
    • White Island [04/09]
      — three webcams and one seismographs to choose from, link courtesy GeoNet
  • Nicaragua
    • Cerro Negro [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • Concepcion [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • Concepcion (another view) [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • Masaya [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • Momotombo [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • San Cristobal [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • Telica [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
    • All together [10/08]
      — link courtesy Dirección General de Geofísica
  • Russia
    • Bezymianny [10/08]
      — on Kamchatka, view from Kozyrevsk village, 45 kilometers west of the volcano, link courtesy IVGG and EMSD
    • Klyuchevskoy [10/08]
      — on Kamchatka, view from Klyuchi city, 30 kilometers north of the volcano, link courtesy IVGG and EMSD
    • Shiveluch [10/08]
      — on Kamchatka, view from Klyuchi city, 46 kilometers south of the volcano, link courtesy IVGG and EMSD
  • Turkey
    • Mount Ararat [10/08]
      — a quiet stratovolcano, link courtesy Arminco Telecommunications

(from USGS website on this page -)

http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Photo/volcano_cams.html

***

Volcano Webcam Links

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Galeras
Galeras Voclano
Huila
Huila Volcano
Popocatépetl
Popocatépetl  Volcano
Mount Baker
Halema’uma’u
Halema'uma'u  Volcano
Soufrière Hills
Soufriere Hills Volcano
Tungurahua
Tungurahua Volcano
Mt. Rainier
Mt. Rainier  Volcano
Old Faithful
Old Faithful
Telica
Cerro Negro
Concepcion
bezymianny, russia
klyuchevskoy, russia
sheveluch, russia
Washington VAAC Webcams

Cotopaxi – Ecuador

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Colima (Naranjal)
Colima (Nevado)

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Colima observatory
Galaras – Consaca
Galeras – Pasto
Photo de la soufrère de Guadeloupe
Halema`uma`u Panorama
Halema’uma’u
Halema’uma’u Wide-View
Halema’uma’u Zoom
Huila

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Mammoth Hot Springs

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Montagne Pelee
Mount Adams
Mount Baker
Mount Hood
Mount Jefferson
Mt St Helens
Mt St Helens HD cam
Mount St. Helens Webcam Loop
Nicaragua
Old Faithful

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Poas – Barva

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Popo (Altzomoni)
Popo (Tianguismanalco)
Popo (Tlamacas)
Pu`u `O`o(L)
Pu`u `O`o(M)
Pu`u `O`o(R)
Rainier
Rainier 2
Rainier 3
San Salvador

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Shasta

–>

Soufrière de Guadeloupe
Soufrière Hills
Tungurahua
Worldwide Webcams

Akutan
Asama
Augustine
AVO Webcams
Chaiten
Cleveland
Etna
Four Peaked
Llaima
Katmai
Klyuchevskoy volcano cams
Koryaksky webcam (KVERT)
Pavlof
Peulik
Redoubt – CI
Redoubt – DFR
Redoubt – Hut
Sakurajima
Sheveluch
Shishaldin
Spurr
Spurr – CKT
Veniaminof
Villarrica

Places to search for more Volcano Cameras

Cascade Volcano WebCams
l’ACTIV Volcano Cams
French | English
USGS linked Webcams
Volcanolivecams
Worldwide List of Web Cameras

(from)

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/VAAC/cams.html

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Un volcan, des volcans sur ACTIVOLCANS !

Un volcan ou des volcans du monde, retrouvez toutes ces informations sur ACTIVOLCANS, la base de données francophone sur les volcans du monde.
Découvrez les volcans du monde et suivez l’activité et l’actualité volcanique en direct. Retrouvez un volcan et ses éruptions volcaniques. Des infos en volcanologie, des photos et des webcams de volcans.
ACTIVOLCANS, le site de l’ACTIV ( Association pour la Connaissance et la transmission de l’Information en Volcanologie ).

http://www.activolcans.info/WEBCAM.php

Retrouvez l'actualité sur  la thématique volcans
Recherchez un volcan grâce  à son nom

***

Very, very nifty site  – with video cams of volcanoes from all over the world, maps, info, photos of caldera and volcanoes and easy to use – this site is in French, either use google translator tools or work with what is there – it is pretty self-explanatory whether you speak French or not. – cricketdiane

***

Volcano Webcams page from the above website, ACTIVOLCANS

http://www.activolcans.info/WEBCAM.php

***

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