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Earthquake Relief and Recovery Efforts in Chile –

U.N.Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon arrived Friday in Chile, which endured two more strong aftershocks while working to recover from a devastating earthquake and tsunami. COMPLETE COVERAGE | FULL STORY

From – CNN

http://www.cnn.com/

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http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/03/05/indonesia.earthquake/index.html?hpt=T2

Strong earthquake strikes off Sumatra coast

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(CNN) — A strong earthquake with magnitude 6.5 struck Friday night in the ocean southwest of Sumatra in Indonesia, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The quake, which occurred shortly after 11 p.m., was centered about 100 miles (165 kilometers) west of Bengkulu in Sumatra, and 215 miles (345 kilometers) south of Padang, Sumatra, the USGS said.

MAP 6.5 2010/03/05 16:06:58 -4.032 100.806 22.0 SOUTHWEST OF SUMATRA, INDONESIA

(listing found on USGS site – links to maps and details)

– also in Taiwan on Thursday –

MAP 6.2 2010/03/04 00:18:52 22.903 120.826 21.0 TAIWAN

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My Note –

What I notice is that there are aftershocks in Chile that are in the same range of magnitude as the recent earthquake in Taiwan and off the Sumatran coast. There were two on Friday that were over a magnitude of 6 in Chile. One of the news reports on cable news today said there have been over 150 aftershocks since the original 8.8 magnitude quake.

– cricketdiane

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Aftershocks in Chile (over 6 magnitude – there are lots of others still occurring) –

MAP 6.6 2010/03/05 11:47:10 -36.513 -73.116 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 6.0 2010/03/05 09:19:38 -36.535 -73.253 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 6.3 2010/03/04 22:39:26 -22.330 -68.340 105.1 ANTOFAGASTA, CHILE
MAP 6.0 2010/03/04 01:59:51 -33.167 -72.099 35.2 OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 6.0 2010/03/03 17:44:25 -36.452 -73.069 19.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE

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Elsewhere yesterday –

MAP 6.5 2010/03/04 14:02:28 -13.598 167.164 176.0 VANUATU

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(Above listings from USGS – )

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_big.php

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More from the CNN website –

Fact Check: Eastern U.S. earthquake risk

Latest Earthquakes in the USA – Last 7 days

USA earthquakes with M1+ located by USGS and Contributing Agencies.

USA Recent Earthquake Map
10-degree map centered at lon=-95 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-100  lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-105  lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-110  lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-115  lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-120 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-125 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-70 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-75 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-80 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-85 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-90 lat=27 10-degree map centered at lon=-95 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-100  lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-105  lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-110  lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-115  lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-120 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-125 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-70 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-75 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-80 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-85 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-90 lat=32 10-degree map centered at lon=-95 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-100  lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-105  lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-110  lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-115  lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-120 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-125 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-70 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-75 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-80 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-85 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-90 lat=37 10-degree map centered at lon=-95 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-100  lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-105  lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-110  lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-115  lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-120 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-125 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-70 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-75 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-80 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-85 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-90 lat=42 10-degree map centered at lon=-95 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-100 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-105 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-110 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-115 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-120 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-125 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-70 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-75 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-80 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-85 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-90 lat=47 10-degree map centered at lon=-130  lat=55 10-degree map centered at lon=-140  lat=55 10-degree map centered at lon=-150  lat=55 10-degree map centered at lon=-160  lat=55 10-degree map centered at lon=-170 lat=55 10-degree map centered at lon=-180 lat=55 10-degree map centered at lon=-130  lat=60 10-degree map centered at lon=-140  lat=60 10-degree map centered at lon=-150  lat=60 10-degree map centered at lon=-160  lat=60 10-degree map centered at lon=-170 lat=60 10-degree map centered at lon=-180 lat=60 10-degree map centered at lon=-130  lat=65 10-degree map centered at lon=-140  lat=65 10-degree map centered at lon=-150  lat=65 10-degree map centered at lon=-160  lat=65 10-degree map centered at lon=-170 lat=65 10-degree map centered at lon=-180 lat=65 10-degree map centered at lon=-130  lat=70 10-degree map centered at lon=-140  lat=70 10-degree map centered at lon=-150  lat=70 10-degree map centered at lon=-160  lat=70 10-degree map centered at lon=-170 lat=70 10-degree map centered at lon=-180 lat=70 10-degree map centered at lon=-157  lat=20 10-degree map centered at lon=-66 lat=18 Advanced  National Seismic System Homepage Local Timezone Times

(from – )

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsus/

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Coordination of Humanitarian Response

Coordination is not one type of action or actions involving one set of actors.  Coordination for OCHA means various types of actions involving different set of actors, providing different types of support, using many different tools and mechanisms.

Humanitarian coordination is based on the belief that a coherent approach to emergency response will maximize its benefits and minimize its potential pitfalls.

Through approved structures and policies set out by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee, OCHA carries out its coordination role by:

  • Developing common strategies– Humanitarian assistance is most effective when the actors involved are able to define common priorities, share goals, agree on tactics and jointly monitor progress.  OCHA works with its partners both within and outside the UN system to develop a strategy known as the Common Humanitarian Action Plan (CHAP), and to establish a clear division of responsibility for addressing humanitarian needs.
  • Assessing situations and needs – Ongoing analysis of the political, social, economic and military environment and the periodic assessment of humanitarian needs are critical to understanding the causes, dynamics and impact of any crisis. As emergencies evolve and needs change, relief agencies and other actors come and go, focusing on their respective areas and particular programmes.  Throughout a crisis, it is OCHA’s job to: 1) identify overall humanitarian needs; 2) develop a realistic plan of action for meeting these needs that avoids duplication; and  3) monitor progress, adjust programmes if necessary and analyze their impact.
  • Mobilizing resources – A consolidated and cost-effective approach to fundraising improves access to funding and ensures a more efficient allocation of resources.  As part of its mandate, OCHA leads the Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP) for resource mobilization.
  • Addressing common problems – During a crisis, problems arise that affect many agencies and NGOs, but do not fall squarely within any particular agency’s mandate.  OCHA addresses problems common to humanitarian actors, such as negotiating with warring parties to gain access to civilians in need or working with UN security officials to support preparedness and response measures in changing security situations.
  • Administering coordination mechanisms and tools – OCHA serves as the secretariat for critical inter-agency coordination mechanisms such as the IASC; rapid-response tools, such as the United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) system, the International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG) and the On-Site Operations Coordination Centre (OSOCC). OCHA also ensures the most efficient use of military and civil defense assets in humanitarian operations by facilitating the relationship between the humanitarian and military components of a relief operation.

More on OCHA Coordination ToolsUNDAC –  OSOCC –  INSARAG – Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination –  Logistics Support

(from – )

http://ochaonline.un.org/OOLmockup09/AboutUs/Coordination/tabid/5872/language/en-US/Default.aspx

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UN relief chief warns of new Haiti disaster as rainy season looms‎ – 8 hours ago

Photograph: Esteban Felix/AP John Holmes, the British diplomat who heads the UN’s disaster relief programme, has called for a huge increase in the provision

The Guardian

Disaster Relief

Information sources for Disaster Relief from the United Nations and other international organizations, compiled by UNjobs Association of Geneva.
unjobs.org/topics/…aid…relief/disasterrelief/disasterrelief

OCHA Disaster Response Tools and Services

The Emergency Relief Coordinator (ERC), through the Coordination and Response Division (CRD) of the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, is responsible for coordinating the international response to a natural disaster. Response coordination for technological and environmental emergencies, and mobilization of emergency response tools, are undertaken by the respective sections of the OCHA Emergency Services Branch (ESB). The available tools and mechanisms are described below:

Emergency Relief – Rapid Deployment Mechanisms

Early Warning and Contingency Planning Before a natural disaster event, or when such an event is deemed imminent, OCHA can deploy staff from the Early Warning Unit (EWU) in New York or the OCHA Regional Office, to assist in contingency and preparedness planning in support of humanitarian coordination activities. http://www.humanitarianinfo.org/iasc/content/default.asp UN Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) we are using bestfree hosting Teams can be deployed to assist either the Government or the UN Resident Coordinator (RC) in emergency assessment and field coordination during the initial relief phase of a disaster. http://www.gdacs.org/ International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG) Is a global network of more than 80 countries and disaster response organizations, operating under the United Nations umbrella. http://ochaonline.un.org/?TabId=1436 Military, Civil Protection and Civil Defence Assets (MCDA) MCDA can be mobilized from countries and multinational organizations. UN Civil-Military Coordination (UN-CMCoord) Officers can also be deployed to support the RC/HC in the coordination of MCDA and the civil-military interface. http://ochaonline.un.org/cmcs The Environmental Emergencies Section Unit (EES) ESS is jointly managed by OCHA and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and serves as the integrated United Nations emergency response mechanism to activate and provide international assistance for countries facing environmental emergencies. http://ochaonline.un.org/ochaunep

International Humanitarian Partnership (IHP)

The International Humanitarian Partnership (IHP) was created in 1995 as an informal cooperation the Department for International Development (DFID), the Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA), and the Swedish Rescue Service (SRSA). The objective of the cooperation was to provide logistical support to UN agencies especially in sudden onset disasters. http://ochaonline.un.org/Coordination/FieldCoordinationSupportSection/IHP/tabid/1450/Default.aspx

full movies


FUNDING and RESOURCE MECHANISMS

Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) This US$ 500 million fund was established in 2006 to support rapid response assistance and to address critical humanitarian needs in underfunded emergencies. http://cerf.un.org The Consolidated Appeal Process (CAP) An annual appeal document, the main purpose of the CAP is to provide a framework for joint strategic planning and prioritization, and to mobilize resources in a specific country or region. http://ochaonline.un.org/humanitarianappeal/ Inter-Agency Emergency Appeals Emergency assistance can be provided in formulating appeals, either in the form of Flash Appeals or Donor Alerts, issued before or in the early stages of a crisis, or when an ongoing crisis deteriorates considerably. http://www.humanitarianappeal.net Financial Tracking System (FTS) The FTS is a global, web-based searchable database which records all humanitarian requirements and reported international aid (including that for NGOs, Red Cross/Red Crescent, bi-lateral aid, in-kind aid and private donations). http://ocha.unog.ch/fts/

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT – TOOLS and SERVICES

ReliefWeb

ReliefWeb is the world’s leading on-line gateway to information (documents and maps) on humanitarian emergencies and disasters. An independent vehicle of information updated 24 hours per day. http://www.reliefweb.int

Humanitarian Information Centre (HIC)

OCHA can deploy staff at short notice to establish a HIC in the field to provide information management (IM) services. This includes the collation, analysis and dissemination of information, and the provision of IM services to partners. http://www.humanitarianinfo.org

Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN)

IRIN can provide humanitarian coverage in the form of news reports within 3-6 hours of emergencies developing across the region, through either IRIN Information Officers or via a large network of in-country stringers. http://www.irinnews.org

The Virtual Operations Coordination Centre (VOSOCC)

VOSOCC is a web-based platform for coordination and real-time information exchange in disasters. The VOSOCC is used to mobilize UNDAC teams, facilitates the management of training programmes and provides a discussion forum for over 4000 participants from over 100 countries and organizations. http://ocha.unog.ch/virtualosocc

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The Global Alert and Coordination System (GDACS)

GDACS provides near real-time alerts about natural disasters around the world and provides tools to facilitate response coordination. GDACS is a web-based programme that combines existing disaster information management systems with the aim of alerting the international community to major sudden-onset disasters. http://www.gdacs.org

The Central Register of Disaster Management

Central Register is an operational tool to support the United Nations system and the international community in their efforts to ensure expeditious delivery of required humanitarian emergency assistance. http://www.reliefweb.int/cr/

OCHA On-Line

OCHA On-Line is OCHA’s official website, providing information specific to OCHA and its work. http://ochaonline.un.org


(this page includes some incredible guidelines sort of information also)

http://ochaonline.un.org/Resources/DisasterResponseTools/tabid/4510/language/en-US/Default.aspx


Globe and Mail
UN Contributes $10M For Chile Earthquake Relief‎ – 8 hours ago

Ban praised Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, who was criticized in the days following the quake, one of the strongest on record, for not acting quickly

Wall Street Journal

(search result entries above are from google search, my favorite)

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Disaster & Emergency Management

Background Information & Resources on Chile

Chile Earthquake 2010: Facts, Engineering, News & Maps

Chileans remained dazed after an 8.8-magnitude earthquake struck the South American nation on February 27, 2010 at 03:34 local time (06:34:14 UTC), leaving homes destroyed and scores dead.¹ A strong aftershock struck on Sunday, a day after the initial tremor left hundreds of people dead and a long swath of the country in smoky rubble. The death toll was expected to rise, particularly around Concepción, Chile’s second-largest metropolitan area, which is roughly 70 miles from the quake’s center. While this earthquake was far stronger than the 7.0-magnitude one that ravaged Haiti six weeks ago, the damage and death toll in Chile are likely to be far less extensive, in part because of strict building codes put in place after devastating earthquakes. ²

Coastal Chile has a history of very large earthquakes: since 1973, there have been 13 events of magnitude 7.0 or greater. The February 27 shock originated about 230 km north of the source region of the magnitude 9.5 earthquake of May, 1960 – the largest earthquake worldwide in at least the last 200 years.³

Contents

( incredible amount of information on this page including links to news articles around the world about the earthquake and recovery efforts in Chile)

From – MCEER – Earthquake Engineering to Extreme Events

http://mceer.buffalo.edu/infoservice/disasters/Chile-Earthquake-2010.asp

(amazing resource about earthquakes and earthquake resistant engineering as well as structural engineering for extreme events.)

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