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Photo of bridge devastated by earthquake

Credit: J.K. Nakata, U.S. Geological Survey

More than 75 million Americans in 39 states live in towns and cities at risk for earthquake devastation.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) created the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) to give researchers the tools to learn how earthquakes and tsunami impact the buildings, bridges, utility systems and other critical components of today’s society.

NEES is a network of 15 large-scale, experimental sites that feature such advanced tools as shake tables, centrifuges that simulate earthquake effects, unique laboratories, a

tsunami wave basin and field-testing equipment. All are linked to a centralized data pool and earthquake simulation software, bridged together by the high-speed Internet2. The new NEESgrid system, a communications web that uses collaborative tools and tele-presence technologies, allows off-site researchers to interact in real time with any of the networked sites.

With these tools, engineers and students from all parts of the country can collaborate on multi-site experiments using simulators that generate earthquake effects strong enough to bring down full-sized buildings.

From that knowledge will come a new set of rules from which engineers can design structures and materials that will better withstand earthquake forces.

NEES Operations

NEES will operate from Oct. 1, 2004, through Sept. 30, 2014. The nonprofit NEES Consortium, Inc. (NEESinc) will operate and coordinate the network’s activities. NEESinc provides open access to the 15 sites by allocating research time at the facilities while leading training, education and outreach activities and establishing ties with U.S. and international partners.

The Consortium of Universities for Research in Earthquake Engineering (CUREE), under an NSF development award, led the project to establish NEESinc. Partners in the consortium’s development included the Civil Engineering Research Foundation–the research arm of the American Society of Civil Engineers–the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, faculty members from academic institutions across the United States and practicing engineers.

An executive director and a board of directors guide the public-benefit NEESinc. Those involved in the organization’s planning, leadership and management broadly represent the earthquake engineering community and provide expertise in areas such as organizational planning, earthquake engineering research, information technology, simulation and assessment.

NEESgrid

A pioneering cyberinfrastructure known as NEESgrid connects earthquake engineering researchers throughout the United States and the world. Integrating real-life and computational simulations, NEESgrid software brings together various components to share knowledge and enables researchers to breach traditional disciplinary and geographical barriers to design innovative, safer civil infrastructure.

Photo of bridge devastated by earthquake.

Credit: FEMA News Photo

NEESgrid software represents the culmination of several years of effort to develop a national, virtual “collaboratory” for earthquake engineering. With NEESgrid, geographically distributed teams efficiently plan, perform and publish earthquake engineering research, ultimately producing increasingly complex, comprehensive and accurate design and performance models of at-risk civil infrastructure.

The core features include tele-presence services that allow users to remotely observe and control an experiment; streaming data services that transfer data to remote users; and preliminary data and metadata management services that will ultimately allow data storage and retrieval from the NEESgrid repository. Users access this collaborative environment through a Web-based, customizable user interface that integrates a suite of tools for experiment planning, execution, analysis and publication.

OpenSees, a software framework for computational simulation of structural and geotechnical systems, provides the computational simulation capabilities in NEESgrid. FedeasLab serves as a toolbox for nonlinear structural analysis for Matlab software. The NEESgrid Simulation Portal allows users to remotely access OpenSees.

NEESgrid is the product of close collaboration among a broad spectrum of civil engineering departments, computational science centers, national laboratories and private-sector partners, led by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and the University of Illinois Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Development partners included Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Michigan, the University of Southern California, Stanford University, Washington University at St. Louis, the University of California at Berkeley, Mississippi State University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Creare, Inc.

NEESit

The NEES Cyberinfrastructure Center (NEESit), led by the San Diego Supercomputer Center in partnership with Oregon State University, the University of Michigan, the University of California at Berkeley, and Creare, Inc., will oversee NEES operations and maintenance.

Three core objectives for NEESit are:

  • develop a distance-independent environment for collaboration that fosters large-scale, integrated, earthquake engineering studies required to address many of the complex problems of earthquake engineering
  • build an end-to-end data environment that captures, manages and preserves the vast amounts of experimental data and associated metadata, and ensures that the information is readily accessible to NEES’s research, education and practitioner communities
  • ensure that earthquake engineering researchers have easy access to high-end computational resources and visualization and simulation capabilities

For more information on NEESgrid, see http://it.nees.org. For general NEES information, see http://www.nees.org.

George E. Brown, Jr.

The NEES project was named in memory of the late George E. Brown, Jr., former chairman of the House Science Committee and a champion of engineering and science in Congress for more than 30 years. Representative Brown authored the legislation creating the interagency National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program in 1977, which in turn, led to the creation of the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation.

By Josh Chamot

http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nees/about.jsp

http://www.nees.org

(found here in this list below from the National Science Foundation – apparently some of our money is doing some good things)

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Special Reports

Page: Previous | Next (Showing: 1-30 of 37)
Science Nation Science Nation
An online magazine examining the breakthroughs and the possibilities for new discoveries about our planet, our universe and ourselves. Each week, Science Nation takes a dynamic, entertaining look at the research–and the researchers– that will change our lives.   Updated
Date Updated: March 1, 2010
Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge
Visuals can communicate research results and scientific phenomena in ways that words cannot. That’s why NSF cosponsors this international contest to recognize outstanding achievements in this area.
Date Updated: February 18, 2010
Ecology of Infectious Diseases Ecology of Infectious Diseases
West Nile virus. Hantavirus. Lyme disease. Infectious diseases are spreading in animals and humans. Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible?
Date Updated: January 13, 2010
Predicting Seasonal Weather Predicting Seasonal Weather
Large-scale weather patterns play a large role in controlling seasonal weather. Knowing the conditions of these atmospheric oscillations in advance would greatly improve long-range weather predictions.
Date Updated: January 11, 2010
Image of two stock cars racing The Science of Speed
You can’t win NASCAR races without getting the science right. NSF has partnered with NASCAR in the production of the “Science of Speed”, a fast-paced 12-part video series that explains the scientific principles that are so essential to the NASCAR experience.
Date Updated: December 17, 2009
Science of the Olympic Winter Games Science of the Olympic Winter Games
NBC Learn has teamed up with the National Science Foundation to produce Science of the Olympic Winter Games, a 16-part video series that explores the science behind individual Olympic events.
Date Updated: December 14, 2009
Reconstruction of Tawa hallae. Tawa hallae: Dinosaur Ancient History
When paleontologists unearthed the ancient dinosaur Tawa hallae, they knew it was different–and remarkably well preserved. What they did not know is that the animal has an intriguing lineage, one that answers questions about the earliest evolution of dinosaurs.
Date Updated: December 10, 2009
Climate Change Climate Change
Our planet’s climate affects–and is affected by–the sky, land, ice, sea, life, and people found on it. To understand the entire story of climate change we must study all of the natural and human systems that contribute to and interact with Earth’s climate system.
Date Updated: December 7, 2009
Image of sun shining on leaves. To What Degree: What Science Is Telling Us About Climate Change
What is science telling us about climate change? Leading climate change experts discuss one of the most complex scientific puzzles ever to confront humankind.
Date Updated: December 7, 2009
Portrait of Charles Darwin Evolution of Evolution: 150 Years of Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species”
On Nov. 24, 1859, Charles Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species” intrigued scientists, appalled religionists and fascinated the public. Now, 150 years later, “Origin” still causes ripples. This report–updated on the original publication’s anniversary–gives a surprising glimpse inside the science and society that fueled his rise to science stardom.
Date Updated: November 24, 2009
Dead Zones Dead Zones
The Earth currently has more than 400 “dead zones”–marine expanses covering hundreds, or even thousands, of square miles that periodically become virtually lifeless. Explore the surprising causes of Oregon’s dead zones, and the pioneering methods used to research them.
Date Updated: November 3, 2009
Nobel Prizes--The NSF Connection Nobel Prizes–The NSF Connection
When a scientist who has received federal funding is awarded the Nobel prize, the public can share both the pride and the research benefits. Some 187 laureates have been supported by the public through NSF.
Date Updated: October 14, 2009
Thumbnail child holding a pencil Math: What’s the Problem?
International assessments show U.S. math students outperformed by those in many other countries. Research supported by NSF illuminates the role of teaching, curriculum and technology in math education, and demonstrates the importance of math education to all citizens.
Date Updated: January 26, 2009
Jellyfish images Jellyfish Gone Wild: Environmental Change and Jellyfish Swarms
Massive jellyfish blooms have recently overrun some world-class fisheries and tourist destinations–even transforming large swaths of them into veritable jellytoriums. This report–guaranteed to make your skin crawl–explains the basics of jellyfish biology and summarizes what we know about the causes and future of jellyfish blooms. NAGC Winner
Date Updated: September 16, 2008
Photo of battered trunk, whip and hat Archaeology From Reel to Real
No one expects the “reel” world of Indiana Jones to resemble the real world of science, but NSF-supported archaeologists really do discover “lost cities,” try to figure how “lost civilizations” disappeared and learn about Ancient Egypt from its graves and their skeletons. NAGC Winner
Date Updated: May 21, 2008
NSF and the Birth of the Internet NSF and the Birth of the Internet
The Internet is now a part of modern life, but how was it created? Learn how the technology behind the Internet was created and how NSFNET, a network created to help university researchers in the 1980s, grew to become the Internet we know today. NAGC Winner
Date Updated: April 29, 2008
Illustration showing montage of extreme microbes X-treme Microbes
They’re called ‘extremophiles’ because they’re able to live in shocking extremes of cold, heat, pressure, acidity and more. Research on these strange organisms is redefining the limits of life on Earth and, perhaps, on other worlds. NAGC Winner
Date Updated: April 29, 2008
Photo of William Golden William T. Golden Appreciation
Although he never worked as a scientist and didn’t receive his master’s degree in biology until age 70, William T. Golden was one of the most influential figures in post-World War II American science.
Date Updated: November 15, 2007
U.S. South Pole Station U.S. South Pole Station
In the most forbidding environment on Earth, NSF has created a uniquely designed high-tech haven to support research and to house the scientists and others who keep the effort going year-round. NAGC Winner
Date Updated: March 15, 2007
Language and Linguistics Language and Linguistics
Common to all humans, language is nonetheless complex. How do languages develop and change? What happens when one is lost? What about sign languages? Linguists explore these questions and more.
Date Updated: March 13, 2007
a view of the famous crack in the Liberty Bell The Liberty Bell: Protecting an American Icon
When the Liberty Bell took a journey to its new home, 21st century sensor technology helped ensure a safe move for this symbol of American history, preserving the bell and its legendary crack.
Date Updated: February 8, 2007
Robotics Robotics
Robots have long captured the human imagination, yet despite many advances, robots have yet to reach the potential so often envisioned in science fiction.
Date Updated: October 25, 2006
The Secret Lives of Wild Animals The Secret Lives of Wild Animals
Modern technologies like global tracking systems and ultraminiaturized sensors now provide researchers with intimate glimpses of rarely seen behaviors of wild animals. NAGC Winner
Date Updated: September 25, 2006
Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation
More than 75 million Americans live in areas at risk for earthquake or tsunami devastation. This network links researchers working to design structures and materials that better withstand the forces of nature.
Date Updated: August 14, 2006
Disasters Disasters–A Series
Whether caused by nature or by humans, disasters are a costly threat. Scientists are working to anticipate and minimize their worst effects.
Date Updated: August 7, 2006
Cyberinfrastructure Cyberinfrastructure
Cyberinfrastructure is poised to revolutionize many science and engineering disciplines. Individual researchers will have the power of the world’s highest-performance digital resources at their disposal.
Date Updated: June 28, 2006
Aviation Opens Antarctica Aviation Opens Antarctica
Adm. Richard Byrd’s historic flight to the South Pole in 1929 helped open the Frozen Continent. The history of aviation and the history of Antarctic science and exploration are inextricably entwined.
Date Updated: June 5, 2006
Seafloor Science Seafloor Science
On the seafloor–where no sunlight reaches and pressure is extreme–tectonic plates slowly shift, chimneys spew hot liquid “smoke,” and exotic life forms thrive. Join the VISIONS ’05 expedition to see more.
Date Updated: March 20, 2006
Surveys: Tracking Opinion Surveys: Tracking Opinion
Human behavior is one of the most important yet ill-understood areas of scientific inquiry. Surveys are the scientific instruments that help us understand ourselves and our society.
Date Updated: March 17, 2006
After the Tsunami After the Tsunami
Within days of the massive tsunami in the Indian Ocean in late 2004, teams of researchers rushed to survey the disaster, hoping to learn how such loss of lives, property and ecosystems could be prevented.
Date Updated: October 7, 2005
Arctic Climate Research Arctic Climate Research
The complex factors that influence climate change demand a multifaceted approach–from ships at sea to snowmobiles in Alaska–to study the process.
Date Updated: October 7, 2005

(from)

http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/

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Special Reports

Page: Previous |Next (Showing: 31-37 of 37)
Arctic Climate Research Arctic Climate Research
The complex factors that influence climate change demand a multifaceted approach–from ships at sea to snowmobiles in Alaska–to study the process.
Date Updated: October 7, 2005
Digging Dinosaurs Digging Dinosaurs
Spotting fossil remains is only the first step in accurately recreating a creature that has been dead for many millions of years.
Date Updated: October 7, 2005
Life Science Frontiers Life Science Frontiers
Biological organisms mesh with the surrounding environment to form vibrant, thriving communities. Scientists from diverse backgrounds are examining this complicated weave of life.
Date Updated: October 7, 2005
World Year of Physics 2005 World Year of Physics 2005
Just a century ago, an unknown patent clerk named Albert Einstein gave us a whole new way to think about light, matter, energy, space and time. Learn what he did in 1905–and all that came of it.
Date Updated: August 3, 2005
The Sensor Revolution The Sensor Revolution
In the 1980s, it was the PC revolution; in the 1990s, the Internet revolution. And now, it’s the Sensor revolution–introducing the world’s first electronic nervous system.
Date Updated: July 21, 2005
Teacher Institutes Teacher Institutes
By putting teachers back into an intense learning and leadership environment, the National Science Foundation seeks to improve the mathematics and science education of the nation’s youth.
Date Updated: July 20, 2005
The Chemistry of Water The Chemistry of Water
Water is very familiar, but it is hardly ordinary. Scientists still have much to learn about this remarkable and versatile substance.
Date Updated: June 10, 2005

(from)

http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/?&page=2

**

Photo of bridge devastated by earthquake

Credit: J.K. Nakata, U.S. Geological Survey

More than 75 million Americans in 39 states live in towns and cities at risk for earthquake devastation.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) created the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) to give researchers the tools to learn how earthquakes and tsunami impact the buildings, bridges, utility systems and other critical components of today’s society.

NEES is a network of 15 large-scale, experimental sites that feature such advanced tools as shake tables, centrifuges that simulate earthquake effects, unique laboratories, a

tsunami wave basin and field-testing equipment. All are linked to a centralized data pool and earthquake simulation software, bridged together by the high-speed Internet2. The new NEESgrid system, a communications web that uses collaborative tools and tele-presence technologies, allows off-site researchers to interact in real time with any of the networked sites.

With these tools, engineers and students from all parts of the country can collaborate on multi-site experiments using simulators that generate earthquake effects strong enough to bring down full-sized buildings.

From that knowledge will come a new set of rules from which engineers can design structures and materials that will better withstand earthquake forces.

http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nees/about.jsp

http://www.nees.org

**

NEES Engineers Join Reconnaissance Team Traveling to Earthquake Devastated Haiti

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) / Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) team, with representatives from NEES, Applied Technology Council (ATC), Geo-engineering Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER), EERI and USGS, are traveling to earthquake devastated Haiti with support from the US Southern Command (SOUTHCOM).

The USGS/EERI team traveled to Haiti Monday, January 25 to help gather information on the effects of the recent Magnitude 7.0 earthquake that devastated the area around Port au Prince, Haiti on January 12. The EERI reconnaissance coordination is provided through support from the NSF funded Learning From Earthquakes Program. The USGS/EERI Team consists of Marc Eberhard, University of Washington (NEES, team leader, structural engineer), Steven Baldridge, Baldridge and Associates (ATC, structural engineer), Justin Marshall, Auburn University (EERI, structural engineer), Walter Mooney, (USGS, seismologist) and Glenn Rix, Georgia Tech, (GEER, geotechnical engineer)

Dr Ellen Rathje, from the University of Texas at Austin, and Co Chair of the GEER Steering Committee is coordinating the investigation of the earthquake’s geotechnical impacts. In any extreme event (earthquake, tsunami, landslide, flood, etc.), it is important to understand the in-situ reaction of the rock and soil. Site conditions cannot be replicated in a lab and observations of actual conditions are a way to improve our understandings of the extreme movement associated with an event like this earthquake.

The USGS/EERI Team will provide initial reconnaissance helping determine what needs to be done by subsequent teams.  While there, they will send information and data back to the earthquake engineering community and will provide assistance and information to civilian and military leadership.

Regular updates from Prof. Eberhard and Prof. Rathje can be found on the NEES Haiti Reconnaissance Blog.

image

Photo by Eduardo Fierro courtesy of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER).

January 25, 2010 in Education, Partnerships, Research, Training

https://www.nees.org/news/detail/nees_engineers_in_haiti/

**

ANDERSON COOPER 360 DEGREES

Chile Earthquake Aftermath; The Power of One Senator; Seaworld Safety Record Examined; Investigators Link Hamas Leader’s Death to Israel; Obama Gets Health Checkup; Osmond Tragedy: Marie’s Son Commits Suicide

Aired March 1, 2010 – 22:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
ANDERSON COOPER, CNN ANCHOR: Good evening, everyone.

Tonight: rescue relief work and riot control and a disaster that could have been so much worse. We’re talking, of course, about Chile. And we will have the latest from on the ground there.

We’re also going to show you exactly why it came through its quake better than Haiti, and also which American cities now face the greatest possibility of the big one — scary stuff, but better to know than to not know.

[etc.]

COOPER: Scary stuff. Here’s the latest: Heavy construction in Concepcion, which Chile’s second largest city, but police, military, and government services are all functioning.

There have been outbreaks of looting, but merchants have now struck a deal with authorities, giving away food and other necessities to those in need. American and U.N. aid is on the way. Secretary of State Clinton is due in Chile tomorrow.

More than 700 bodies have been recovered so far, the majority in the town of Maule — casualties, too, from the tsunami, and recriminations today, the Chilean defense minister blaming the navy for not issuing a warning.

But main focus right now tonight is the search for survivors.

Soledad O’Brien is on the ground in Concepcion and has our report.
[ . . . ]

COOPER: Well, that was Soledad O’Brien reporting.

We were trying to establish a connection, a live connection, with Soledad and also with our Karl Penhaul, who is also on the ground. We have been having trouble establishing that connection. As you can imagine, it’s difficult conditions. We will continue to try to do that.

But we want to show you why this wasn’t even worse. Seven hundred killed is not hundreds of thousands, as in Haiti. Obviously, 700 is too many. But these pictures tell part of the reason why that difference in the destruction — on the left, the kind of damage we saw all across Port-au-Prince, pancaked buildings — on the right, what happened to most of the structures in the town of Concepcion, terrible damage, but survivable damage.

So, we wanted to know exactly what makes the difference between life and death in an earthquake.

Joe Johns found out.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JOE JOHNS, CNN SENIOR CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): The quake in Haiti was a 7.0, killing more than 200,000 people. The quake in Chile registered 8.8, as much as 800 times stronger — the death toll, less than 1,000 so far. Why is that? Geography, for one thing. The Port-au-Prince quake was in shallow earth 15 miles from the city. The Chile quake was 30 miles off the coast, deep under water.

History is another factor. No one alive remembers the series of earthquakes that hit Haiti in the 1700s. But Chile’s experience is much more recent, more than 28 quakes in the 20th century, including the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in 1960, all of which has led Chile to put in and adhere to strict building codes.

Chile learned its lessons the hard way, making engineering the biggest factor of all that sets Chile and Haiti apart.

ROGER BILHAM, PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO: Despite the — the — the loss of life, this has to be regarded as a success story. The — you have got to remember that 500,000 buildings are damaged, probably half of those irreparably. But we’re looking at a kind of earthquake destruction that enables people to walk out of these damaged structures.

JOHNS: In precisely the same way that Chile’s building codes were a success, Haiti was a dismal and deadly failure. In Port-au- Prince, we surveyed the damage with structural engineer Kit Miyamoto, who specializes in earthquakes.

KIT MIYAMOTO, STRUCTURAL AND EARTHQUAKE ENGINEER: You see the column. You see top of column. You see some rebar kind of sticking out through it?

JOHNS (on camera): Yes.

GRIFFITH: Doesn’t have enough group, just does not have enough rebar. That’s why it just collapsed like that. It’s really brittle.

JOHNS (voice-over): Chile is one of the wealthiest and most transparent countries in South America. Haiti is the poorest and among the most corrupt in the Western Hemisphere. So, how does Haiti get the money and enforcement power to change the rules and build safe buildings?

MIYAMOTO: We know that this area is one of the highest-risk area in the whole world, a really dangerous area, and, still, the new construction do not have the use of the latest technology.

This is cost, we’re talking about $20 billion, right, and, also 200,000 death. You can prepare for probably thousands of the cost and no death.

JOHNS (on camera): Who messed it up so bad in Haiti?

MIYAMOTO: We did, engineers.

JOHNS: By not doing the right things?

(CROSSTALK) MIYAMOTO: I did not — I did not speak out loud enough. It’s our responsibility. I have no doubt in my mind that we need to take responsibility. This is my screw-up. This — this should not be happening again again. This should not be — this story needs to be told.

JOHNS (voice-over): After so many deaths, engineering a safer future is a heavy burden.

Joe Johns, CNN, Washington.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

COOPER: A quick reminder: The live chat is up and running right now at AC360.com. You can join that live chat.

We have established contact with Chile. And we’re going to go back there in a moment. Soledad O’Brien and Karl Penhaul are standing by live for us.

Also, we’re going to take a look at where the next big quake may hit, including two cities right here in America. A seismologist is with us for that.

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1003/01/acd.01.html

**

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