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Chile Earthquake early this morning –

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/index.php

Population Exposure
Population per ~1 sq. km. from LandScan
Population Exposure Map
Selected Cities Exposed

MMI City Pop.
VIII Arauco 25k
VIII Lota 50k
VIII Concepcion 215k
VIII Constitucion 38k
VIII Canete 20k
VII Melipilla 63k
VII Talca 197k
VII Rancagua 213k
VII Temuco 238k
VII Santiago 4,837k
VI Valparaiso 282k
Shaking Intensity
Shake Map

PAGER – M 8.8 – OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE

Alert Version: 6Saturday, February 27th, 2010 at 06:34:14 UTCLocation: 35.8° S, 72.7° WDepth: 35kmEvent Id: US2010TFANCreated: 9 hours, 10 minutes after earthquake.


Overall, the population in this region resides in structures that are vulnerable to earthquake shaking, though some resistant structures exist. On May 22, 1960 (UTC), a magnitude 9.5 earthquake 273 km South of this one struck Valdivia, Chile, with estimated population exposures of 230,000 at intensity VIII and 216,000 at intensity IX , resulting in a reported 3263 deaths from the earthquake and tsunami. Recent earthquakes in this area have caused tsunamis, landslides, and liquefaction that may have contributed to losses.

(from pager – population exposure to this earthquake – ANSS)

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/2010tfan/index.html

**

MMI City Population
VIII Arauco 25k
VIII Lota 50k
VIII Constitucion 38k
VIII Concepcion 215k
VIII Canete 20k
VII Melipilla 63k
VII Angol 45k
VII Bulnes 13k
VII Cabrero 18k
VII Talca 197k
VII Santa Cruz 33k
VII Lebu 22k
VII El Monte 23k
VII Chillan 150k
VII Parral 27k
VII Talcahuano 253k
VII San Carlos 32k
VII Los Angeles 125k
VII Curanilahue 31k
VII Lampa 29k
VII Tome 47k
VII Coronel 93k
VII Penco 46k
VII Longavi 6k
VII Chiguayante 83k
VII Linares 70k
VII San Antonio 86k
VII Coihueco 7k
VII Teno 7k
VII San Clemente 14k
VII Molina 29k
VII Paine 33k
VII Curico 102k
VII Cauquenes 31k
VII La Laja 17k
VII Yumbel 11k
VII Victoria 25k
VII Nacimiento 21k
VII San Bernardo 250k
VII Chimbarongo 17k
VII Nueva Imperial 19k
VII Rancagua 213k
VII Rengo 38k
VII Llaillay 17k
VII San Javier 22k
VII Graneros 23k
VII Villa Alemana 97k
VII Quilpue 130k
VII Traiguen 14k
VII Limache 36k
VII Talagante 52k
VII Penaflor 66k
VII Temuco 238k
VII Collipulli 16k
VII San Vicente 23k
VII vina causino 510k
VII Vilcun 9k
VII Quillota 68k
VII Buin 55k
VII Pitrufquen 14k
VII Freire 8k
VII Mulchen 22k
VII Carahue 12k
VII Hacienda La Calera 49k
VII Vina del Mar 295k
VII Santiago 4,837k
VII Lautaro 22k
VI Machali 28k
VI Los Andes 57k
VI San Felipe 59k
VI La Ligua 25k
VI Loncoche 16k
VI Panguipulli 16k
VI Las Animas 30k
VI Villarrica 32k
VI Valparaiso 282k
V Valdivia 133k
V Las Gaviotas 2k
V Mendoza 877k
IV San Martin 83k
IV Cutral-Co 47k
IV San Rafael 109k
III Neuquen 242k

PAGER results are generally available on the Internet within 30 minutes of the earthquake’s occurrence. However, information on the extent of shaking will be uncertain in the minutes and hours following and earthquake and typically improves as additional sensor data and reported intensities are acquired and incorporated into models of the earthquake’s source. Users of PAGER estimates should account for uncertainty and always seek the most current PAGER release for any earthquake.

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/pager/events/us/2010tfan/index.html

**

Update time = Sat Feb 27 17:55:05 UTC 2010

MAG UTC DATE-TIME
y/m/d h:m:s
LAT
deg
LON
deg
DEPTH
km
Region
MAP 5.6 2010/02/27 17:24:34 -36.256 -72.927 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.0 2010/02/27 17:22:26 -38.043 -73.629 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.5 2010/02/27 17:11:49 -33.953 -71.796 35.0 LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 16:50:20 -34.162 -72.010 35.0 LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP 5.5 2010/02/27 16:37:34 -37.509 -73.605 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 16:32:21 -34.986 -72.356 35.0 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE
MAP 5.5 2010/02/27 16:27:58 -37.820 -73.404 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.5 2010/02/27 16:21:14 -38.266 -73.434 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 6.3 2010/02/27 15:45:41 -24.588 -65.432 38.2 SALTA, ARGENTINA
MAP 5.1 2010/02/27 15:23:06 -34.528 -74.987 35.0 OFF COAST OF LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP 2.7 2010/02/27 15:16:06 64.609 -149.293 1.3 CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 15:09:08 -33.890 -71.268 35.0 REGION METROPOLITANA, CHILE
MAP 3.2 2010/02/27 15:01:35 36.066 -117.884 1.9 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP 5.0 2010/02/27 14:40:53 -31.321 -74.548 35.0 OFF THE COAST OF COQUIMBO, CHILE
MAP 4.9 2010/02/27 14:29:10 -35.028 -71.714 35.0 MAULE, CHILE
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 14:23:28 -34.505 -72.596 35.0 OFFSHORE LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP 5.0 2010/02/27 14:20:00 -37.274 -73.062 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.0 2010/02/27 14:06:47 -37.288 -72.835 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 3.1 2010/02/27 13:56:38 36.065 -117.885 2.3 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 13:54:04 -33.269 -71.834 35.0 OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 5.0 2010/02/27 13:12:52 -35.014 -71.660 35.0 MAULE, CHILE
MAP 5.1 2010/02/27 13:07:42 -38.436 -73.254 35.0 ARAUCANIA, CHILE
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 12:19:51 25.979 128.434 9.9 RYUKYU ISLANDS, JAPAN
MAP 5.5 2010/02/27 12:03:27 -34.399 -73.825 35.0 OFF COAST OF LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP 5.4 2010/02/27 11:45:03 -36.318 -73.216 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.3 2010/02/27 11:27:00 -38.103 -73.587 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.4 2010/02/27 10:54:24 -36.828 -73.336 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.9 2010/02/27 10:38:36 -38.019 -73.575 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.9 2010/02/27 10:30:35 -33.559 -72.636 35.0 OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 5.6 2010/02/27 10:10:15 -33.701 -72.184 35.0 OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 5.8 2010/02/27 09:59:21 -37.991 -73.467 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 3.8 2010/02/27 09:40:02 61.871 -150.942 55.1 SOUTHERN ALASKA
MAP 5.1 2010/02/27 09:21:26 -36.609 -73.218 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.6 2010/02/27 09:00:18 -33.425 -71.625 35.0 VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 5.3 2010/02/27 08:53:57 -34.447 -73.397 35.0 OFF COAST OF LIBERTADOR O’HIGGINS, CHILE
MAP 5.0 2010/02/27 08:53:27 -35.073 -71.760 35.0 MAULE, CHILE
MAP 5.6 2010/02/27 08:48:05 -38.584 -75.257 35.0 OFF THE COAST OF ARAUCANIA, CHILE
MAP 2.7 2010/02/27 08:31:52 33.993 -117.187 9.0 GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA, CALIFORNIA
MAP 5.7 2010/02/27 08:31:05 -34.820 -72.443 35.0 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE
MAP 2.7 2010/02/27 08:28:00 33.999 -117.189 9.0 GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA, CALIFORNIA
MAP 6.1 2010/02/27 08:25:30 -34.750 -72.394 35.0 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE
MAP 5.5 2010/02/27 08:19:24 -33.479 -71.574 35.0 VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 5.6 2010/02/27 08:13:16 -33.062 -71.702 35.0 OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 3.6 2010/02/27 08:08:50 62.755 -148.809 0.1 CENTRAL ALASKA
MAP 6.9 2010/02/27 08:01:24 -37.654 -75.199 39.0 OFF THE COAST OF BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.4 2010/02/27 07:59:56 -36.050 -73.562 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.2 2010/02/27 07:56:37 -36.933 -73.240 35.0 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.4 2010/02/27 07:51:06 -36.399 -72.498 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 3.4 2010/02/27 07:47:34 33.489 -116.822 15.6 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP 5.4 2010/02/27 07:46:50 -36.795 -72.924 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 6.0 2010/02/27 07:37:18 -36.837 -72.541 35.0 BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 5.6 2010/02/27 07:33:31 -38.007 -73.484 35.7 OFFSHORE BIO-BIO, CHILE
MAP 3.4 2010/02/27 07:21:54 36.072 -117.885 2.9 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP 5.4 2010/02/27 07:19:49 -35.811 -72.945 35.0 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE
MAP 6.0 2010/02/27 07:12:29 -33.807 -71.913 35.0 OFFSHORE VALPARAISO, CHILE
MAP 3.8 2010/02/27 07:10:43 36.360 -117.943 7.8 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP 2.9 2010/02/27 07:04:24 40.138 -121.317 8.6 NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
MAP 4.1 2010/02/27 06:56:03 36.060 -117.886 2.1 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MAP 6.2 2010/02/27 06:52:35 -34.735 -72.638 35.0 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE
MAP 8.8 2010/02/27 06:34:15 -35.846 -72.719 35.0 OFFSHORE MAULE, CHILE


(From -)

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_all.php

**

Tsunami Warning in Hawaii: Register on Safe and Well

February 27, 2010

A Tsunami warning is in effect for Hawaii. Expected landfall is about 11am local time (4pm ET).

You can follow the Hawaii Red Cross chapter on Twitter: http://twitter.com/hawaiiredcross

Registering with the Safe and Well Web site is an easy way to notify loved ones of your well-being during a tsunami evacuation (US only)

  • If you have time before you evacuate, call someone and ask them to register you and your family.
  • Registration can be done with the Safe and Well feature of redcross.org or by calling 866-438-4636.
  • Friends and family can then search for your message on Safe and Well by using your phone number or complete address.

Chile Earthquake
For inquiries about friends and family in Chile, please try to keep calling them, monitor their social networking profiles or contact other family members who live nearby.

Telephone, internet and other communication lines are often disrupted in times of disaster.

People trying to locate U.S. citizens living or traveling in Chile should contact the U.S. Department of State, Office of Overseas Citizens Services, at 1-888-407-4747 or 202-647-5225.

Leave a Comment » | Chile Earthquake (2010), Disaster Alerts | Permalink
Posted by amrecro


Chile Earthquake: Update #2

February 27, 2010

For inquiries about relatives living and who have citizenship in Chile, please try to keep calling, monitor their social networking profiles or contact other family members who live nearby. Telephone, Internet and other communication lines are often disrupted in times of disaster. People trying to locate U.S. citizens living or traveling in Chile should contact the U.S. Department of State, Office of Overseas Citizens Services, at 1-888-407-4747 or 202-647-5225.

Leave a Comment » | Chile Earthquake (2010) | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Permalink
Posted by amrecro


Earthquake in Chile

February 27, 2010

Update 11:15am
The American Red Cross has pledged an initial $50,000 from the International Response Fund to assist communities impacted by today’s earthquake in Chile. We are prepared to take further action as local responders assess the situation.

******

We are waking up to news of a massive earthquake in Chile.

We are working with the International Federation of Red Cross / Red Crescent to determine if and how the American Red Cross is responding.

To ask for or provide information about US citizens in Chile, contact the US State Dept at 1-888-407-4747.

The Chilean Red Cross is on Twitter. @CruzRojainforma. You can translate here: http://bit.ly/9duK6a.

Leave a Comment » | Chile Earthquake (2010) | Tagged: , , , | Permalink
Posted by amrecro

http://newsroom.redcross.org/
**

Earth scientists began recording earthquakes about 1880, but it was not until the 1940’s that instruments were installed in buildings to measure their response to earthquakes. The number of instruments installed in strucures increased in the 1950’s and 1960’s. The first abundant data on the response of structures came from the devastating 1971 San Fernando, California, earthquake, which yielded several dozen records. These records were primitive by today’s standards. The first records from instruments sophisticated enough to measure twisting of a building were obtained during the 1979 Imperial Valley, California, earthquake.

Today there are instruments installed in hospitals, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures throughout the earthquake-prone areas of the United States, including Illinois, South Carolina, New York, Tennessee, Idaho, California, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii. Both the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) and the USGS operate instruments in California. The USGS also operates instruments in the other seismically active regions of the nation.

http://quake.usgs.gov/prepare/factsheets/SaferStructures/

***

US Earthquakes (Click on image for a full size version – 128K)
Earthquakes are a widespread hazard in the United States. Colors show magnitudes of historical earthquakes: red, 7 or greater; orange, 5.5 to 7; yellow, 4.5 to 5.5. The U.S. Geological Survey operates instruments in many structures in the seismically active areas shown. These instruments measure how structures respond to earthquake shaking.

Designing and building large structures is always a challenge, and that challenge is compounded when they are built in earthquake-prone areas. More than 60 deaths and about $ 6 billion in property damage resulted from the Loma Prieta earthquake. As earth scientists learn more about ground motion during earthquakes and structural engineers use this information to design stronger buildings, such loss of life and property can be reduced.

To design structures that can withstand earthquakes, engineers must understand the stresses caused by shaking. To this end, scientists and engineers place instruments in structures and nearby on the ground to measure how the structures respond during an earthquake to the motion of the ground beneath. Every time a strong earthquake occurs, the new information gathered enables engineers to refine and improve structural designs and building codes. In 1984 the magnitude 6.2 Morgan Hill, California, earthquake shook the West Valley College campus, 20 miles away. Instruments in the college gymnasium showed that its roof was so flexible that in a stronger or closer earthquake the building might be severely damaged, threatening the safety of occupants. At that time, these flexible roof designs were permitted by the Uniform Building Code (a set of standards used in many states). Many industrial facilities nationwide were built with such roofs.

West Valley College (Click on image for a full size version – 82K)
Seismic records (upper right) obtained during the 1984 Morgan Hill, California, earthquake led to an improvement in the Uniform Building Code (a set of standards used in many states). The center of the gym roof shook sideways three to four times as much as the edges. The Code has since been revised to reduce the flexibility of such large-span roof systems and thereby improve their seismic resistance.

Building codes provide the first line of defense against future earthquake damage and help to ensure public safety. Records of building response to earthquakes, especially those from structures that failed or were damaged, have led to many revisions and improvements in building codes. In 1991, as a direct result of what was learned about the West Valley College gymnasium roof, the Uniform Building Code was revised. It now recommends that such roofs be made less flexible and therefore better able to withstand large nearby earthquakes.

Earth scientists began recording earthquakes about 1880, but it was not until the 1940’s that instruments were installed in buildings to measure their response to earthquakes. The number of instruments installed in strucures increased in the 1950’s and 1960’s. The first abundant data on the response of structures came from the devastating 1971 San Fernando, California, earthquake, which yielded several dozen records. These records were primitive by today’s standards. The first records from instruments sophisticated enough to measure twisting of a building were obtained during the 1979 Imperial Valley, California, earthquake.

Today there are instruments installed in hospitals, bridges, dams, aqueducts, and other structures throughout the earthquake-prone areas of the United States, including Illinois, South Carolina, New York, Tennessee, Idaho, California, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii. Both the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) and the USGS operate instruments in California. The USGS also operates instruments in the other seismically active regions of the nation.

Dam Viaduct Freeway
Hospital (Click on images for full size versions – 192K, 238K, 98K, 114K)
USGS scientists have installed instruments in a variety of structures across the United States to monitor their behavior during earthquakes. Examples shown include a dam, a bridge supporting a large aqueduct, a highway overpass, and a Veterans hospital.

The majority of deaths and injuries from earthquakes are caused by the damage or collapse of buildings and other structures. These losses can be reduced through documenting and understanding how structures respond to earthquakes. Gaining such knowledge requires a long-term commitment because large devastating earthquakes occur at irregular and often long intervals. Recording instruments must be in place and waiting, ready to capture the response to the next temblor whenever it occurs. The new information acquired by these instruments can then be used to better design earthquake-resistant structures. In this way, earth scientists and engineers help reduce loss of life and property in future earthquakes.

Mehmet Celebi, Robert A. Page, and Linda Seekins

COOPERATING AGENCIES, COMPANIES, AND INSTITUTIONS
California Department of Transportation
California Division of Mines and Geology
City of Los Angeles
General Services Administration
Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
Oregon Department of Highways
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Department of Energy
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Washington Department of Highways
Washington Department of Natural Resources
Private building owners

For more information contact:
Earthquake Information Hotline (415) 329-4085
U.S. Geological Survey, MS 977
345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025
USGS Menlo Park Earthquakes Home Page

U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet-167-95 1995

http://quake.usgs.gov/prepare/factsheets/SaferStructures/
***
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