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COUNTRY    NOTICE TITLE    PROJECT    PROJECT NAME    PUBLICATION DATE    DUE DATE
HAITI    TRAVAUX DE CONSTRUCTION DE ROUTE    HA0093    Basic Infraestructure Rehabilitation Fund    07-Dec-2009    26-Jan-2010
HAITI    TRAVAUX DE CONSTRUCTION DE ROUTE    HA0093    Basic Infraestructure Rehabilitation Fund    07-Dec-2009    26-Jan-2010
HAITI    ETUDES ET CONSTRUCTION DES PONTS    HA1019    Road program    07-Dec-2009    28-Jan-2010
HAITI    ÉCLAIRAGE ROUTIER, SIGNALISATION, MARQUAGE (LOT B)    HA0093    Basic Infraestructure Rehabilitation Fund    23-Dec-2009    01-Feb-2010
HAITI    REMISE EN ÉTAT ÉLÉMENTS ÉLECTROMÉCANIQUES ET TRANSFORMATIO    HA1032    Edh investment plan – peligre hidro    04-Dec-2009    09-Mar-2010

http://www5.iadb.org/idbppi/aspx/ppProcurement.aspx

***

My Note –

This information is from one source where a river of funds have been streaming into Haiti for various projects – but how many times does the same need for clean water systems have to be originally funded in order to be fulfilled? There have been enough clean potable water projects and water systems projects funded in Haiti to have covered solving the problem and building the systems to serve 9 million people many times over.

How many studies need to be done at $150,000 – $300,000 each to determine that people who have no money are poor, that poverty produces slums and an impoverished standard of living, rampant crime, homelessness and an overwhelming desperation just to survive? Let’s see – an analysis could be done right now and cut out the siphoning of the funds to do it – People are hungry. Yes. People are impoverished. Yes. People need better tools of education. Yes. People are suffering diminished opportunities to support themselves, to pay their own way and to thrive. Yes. Analysis -Yes, there are real problems – Solve them. Apply the solutions that are available and use the countless studies that have already been made to actually accomplish something.

How much study needs to be done to determine that vocational training would be of help? And, to have studied that and restudied that while producing no solutions whatsoever which resulted in better education and opportunities for the adult population of Haiti is unconscionable.

As evidenced by the pictures on the news that we have all seen, before the earthquake Haiti stood in financial ruin and poverty, not because of the hurricanes and not because money hasn’t been flooding into the country from a multitude of sources – because it has. It is almost as if there is a hidden net that sits above the population of Haiti which siphons off every dollar and asset that goes there, no matter how large its funding and no matter how diligent the stewards of that money.

These funds have been used to study the problems while paying hundreds of thousands to the firms around the world who acted as consultants. These funds have been used to do poor and shoddy work on the infrastructure while the difference is being pocketed somewhere along the way. These funds have been used to provide microenterprise money at the ratio of 1/1000th of what would have been needed for the inventive capitalist talents to succeed in a microenterprise or small business. And, these funds have been used to neglect the people of Haiti while feeding on the trough of funds using them as an excuse to be available. Why is that?

None of the numbers add up – whether it is to see the overall shipping of goods from Haiti economic development funding manufacturing or anything else being exported for a return which was intended to provide a better quality of life and stronger infrastructure for Haiti. If the volunteers going there for NGOs and charities are paying their own way for the most part and not being paid, if the substance of what is being made available directly to the population of Haiti and its infrastructure is only a drop of what is being sent, and if the infrastructure obviously exists in an impoverished form even today and prior to the earthquake with huge portions of the population living in 80% unemployment and on less than $2.00 a day when they are employed, then something is grossly wrong.

There were over 10,000 NGOs in Haiti before the earthquake, each with substantial flows of money coming to them. There were economic development funds from a variety of income streams coming from several  agency sources in the United States and through a multitude of international and United Nations funding sources. There have been numerous Haitians in America and around the world feeding money back to their families and communities in Haiti. And, there have been tourist and tourism dollars flowing in consistently which should have resulted in a better standard of living for the Haitian people.

Now, there are tremendous amounts of new money from donations to relief and rebuilding and economic development funds for the recovery of Haiti after the earthquake’s devastation. Who have been the stewards of the money that previously hit the net held above the nation of Haiti and was siphoned off, diverted or used to feed the academics and consultants around the world by using studies upon studies upon studies of the same problems without ever fixing them or solving anything?

Who will be the stewards now of a new way of life for Haiti as a member of the international community with a strong foundation of economic prosperity and opportunity? Will they pay to study it again? Or will it be as simple as using existing knowledge, applying results from studies already done and intelligently applying some common sense to solve the problems with workable solutions that can go forward for the people of Haiti to prosper?

Does anybody even know how to do it that way?

– cricketdiane

Oh yeah, and one

***

Partnerships

To increase the impact of its technical cooperation as well as to promote major issues related to industrial development, UNIDO has joined forces with other organizations and counterparts from the international community, as well as with actors from the private sector, including non-governmental organizations, and the Academia.

1) PARTNERSHIPS FOR POVERTY REDUCTION THROUGH PRODUCTIVE ACTIVITIES

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP):
UNDP and UNIDO further strengthened their cooperation through an inter-agency agreement that combines the core competencies and specialized expertise of UNIDO with the broad country-level representation and delivery capacity of UNDP. The operational focus of the agreement lies on two components: expanding UNIDO field coverage in a cost-effective manner through the establishment of UNIDO Desks in UNDP Country Offices, and developing joint activities in private sector development. As a result, UNIDO Desks have been set up in 16 countries, and UNDP and UNIDO have developed a number of joint programmes aimed at strengthening private sector enterprises and institutions in support of national development goals.

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
The partnership between FAO and UNIDO focuses on the need to meet mounting global challenges related to agri-business and agro-industry development, bio-energy, economic recovery in post-crisis countries and the organization of global forums. The joint FAO-UNIDO activities have had a distinct qualitative impact: a number of technical manuals, including toolkits, have been prepared on agro-industrial development, and comprehensive technical assessments have been undertaken to gauge the challenges faced by countries in need of assistance.

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD):
IFAD and UNIDO cooperate in the areas of value chain development and market linkages. agro-industry and agro-processing, and food production and bio-energy in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Under a recent initiative, IFAD and UNIDO have agreed to intensify their strategic partnership and increase the developmental impact of their complementary assistance. Government support and funding has been secured for three major programmes carried out under this partnership in Nigeria, Sierra Leone and India.

International Labour Organization (ILO):
The collaboration between ILO and UNIDO focuses on issues concerning youth and women, two particularly vulnerable groups in developing countries. As such, ILO and UNIDO are key players in the multi-stakeholder programme for productive and decent work for youth in the Mano River Union countries (Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone), which are telling examples of the dangerous link between high youth unemployment and insecurity. Likewise, in Eritrea, Kenya, Malawi, United Republic of Tanzania and Zimbabwe, ILO and UNIDO have jointly formulated entrepreneurship development training programmes designed to strengthen capacities in private sector agencies and NGOs, and to support businesswomen and young entrepreneurs in the establishment of competitive micro- and small-scale agri-businesses.

2) PARTNERSHIPS FOR TRADE CAPACITY-BUILDING

World Trade Organization (WTO):
WTO and UNIDO are truly complementary: while the core mandate of WTO is to foster the opening-up of trade in a manner that supports the developmental priorities of developing countries, the mandate of UNIDO is to support developing countries as they build up the industrial and productive capacities they need to exploit the benefits to be derived from more open trade. Thus, WTO and UNIDO focus their joint activities on trade capacity-building and on developing technical cooperation programmes towards developing manufacturing and export capacities in selected industrial sectors. UNIDO is a key contributor to the “Aid for Trade” initiative: the Organization has identified multi-agency supply-side development projects in eight pilot countries (Benin, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Lesotho, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal and Yemen) that will draw on the initial analyses contained in the EIF diagnostic trade integration studies. UNIDO also actively contributes to the WTO-led Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF) on Sanitary and Phyto-Sanitary (SPS) issues, which is an inter-agency coordination mechanism that analyzes trade-related challenges.

United Nations System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB) inter-agency cluster on trade and productive capacity:
UNIDO works alongside the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Trade Centre (ITC), WTO, UNDP and the five UN regional commissions as part of the CEB inter-agency cluster on trade and productive capacity. The cluster’s primary aim is to mainstream trade into poverty reduction, ensuring the inclusion of trade and productive capacity in poverty reduction strategy papers and United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs). The cluster also provides assistance in the development of policies designed to improve the trade performance and productive capacities of developing countries.

European Commission (EC):
The European Commission and UNIDO are cooperating on the implementation of the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), which are WTO-compatible trade and development arrangements between the European Union and six African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) regions, namely: Central Africa, East and Southern Africa, Southern Africa, West Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific. At the request of the ACP EPA regional groupings, UNIDO is formulating programmes for the upgrading and modernization of the industrial sector with the objectives of strengthening the productive and trade capacities and export competitiveness of SMEs, enhancing the quality infrastructure; and upgrading technical support institutions providing services for industrial sectors with a high potential for generating exports and employment.

International Organization for Standardization (ISO):
UNIDO’s cooperation with ISO is centred on support in the formulation of industrial standards, and on their dissemination through training and capacity-building activities. In the field of trade capacity-building, UNIDO provided input to the development of the ISO 26000 standard on Social Responsibility to Small and Medium Enterprises, and through its Corporate Social Responsibility Programme will play a substantial role in preparing smaller enterprises operating in developing countries for its implementation.

3) PARTNERSHIPS FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
The flagship of the partnership between UNEP and UNIDO is the National Cleaner Production Centres (NCPC) Programme, which aims at achieving cost-effective reduction of environmental pollutants, improving efficiency of resource use and, to the extent possible, enhancing industrial productivity through cleaner production and the application of environmentally sound technologies. Today, the programme operates in 37 countries.

Global Environment Facility (GEF):
UNIDO is an implementing partner of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for projects related to ozone depletion, persistent organic pollutants and climate change. As a GEF implementation agency, UNIDO plays a key role in managing GEF projects on the ground by assisting eligible governments and NGOs in the development, implementation, and management of GEF projects.

Multilateral Fund (for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol):
Since UNIDO first assumed its role as implementing agency of the MLF of the Montreal Protocol in 1992, the Organization has assisted 85 developing countries and economies in transition to comply with their obligations. In all, UNIDO has implemented more than 600 projects and executed more than 500 non-investment activities. For the year 2008, UNIDO again achieved the top ranking for having the best performance of all implementing agencies according to the annual performance evaluation conducted by the Multilateral Fund (MLF) Secretariat.

UN Energy:
Energy is a major cross-cutting challenge affecting all aspects of development, as well as climate change, economic growth and global security. To ensure cooperation and coherence among UN agencies with substantial energy portfolios, it was decided to create a coordination mechanism, UN-Energy. In 2007, the CEB nominated the Director-General of UNIDO to serve as chairman of this group, which draws its membership from twenty UN system organizations. In support of this, UNIDO has set about bolstering the work of UN-Energy to ensure a prompt and coherent system-wide response to the energy challenge in an increasingly compex and ever-changing global environment.

http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=1000350

***

Haiti: WB Approves US$24.5 Million in Grants for Economic Governance, Road Rehabilitation

Available in: Français
Press Release No:2010/180/LAC

Contacts:

In Washington: Alejandro Cedeño (202) 473-3477

acedeno@worldbank.org

Patricia da Camara (202) 473-4019

pdacamara@worldbank.org

WASHINGTON, December 8, 2009 – The World Bank Board of Directors today approved two grants for a total of US$24.5 million to support Haiti’s economic governance reform agenda and rehabilitation of key roads and bridges.

“The new funds will allow us to create fiscal space for priority poverty reduction programs while addressing urgent recovery and reconstruction needs,” said Haitian Finance Minister Ronald Baudin.

The first US$12.5 million grant approved today, for the Third Economic Governance Reform Operation (EGRO III), seeks to improve the effectiveness, transparency and accountability of public sector institutions by consolidating economic governance reforms and strengthening core institutions.

In particular, the operation aims to contribute to:

 Reducing inefficiencies in the electricity sector through improvements in the management of Electricité d’Haïti (EDH), the public electricity utility.

 Improving public financial management, to raise and use public resources in a more efficient and transparent way, prioritizing actions related to poverty reduction and growth.

 Strengthening the legal framework for public procurement, to contribute to more transparent and cost-effective public expenditure.

The grant will provide further support to Government reforms initiated under two previous operations, EGRO I (June 2006) and EGRO II (May 2008), as well as through the Enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative (completion point – June 2009). These supported reforms in governance, the civil service, public finance management, and public procurement.

“These grants bolster the Government’s program and are aimed at combining longer-term institution building with the delivery of quick, visible results to the population,” said Yvonne Tsikata, World Bank Director for the Caribbean.

The second grant approved today provides US$12 million of additional financing for the Transport and Territorial Development Project. This will replenish the project for road and bridge reconstruction undertaken following the hurricanes and tropical storms that struck Haiti in 2007 (Noel) and 2008 (Fay, Gustav, Hanna, Ike), as well as cover additional costs related to the road rehabilitation works included in the original project approved by the Board in April 2006.

Among the post-storm reconstruction works financed by the project are a number of spot interventions, road repairs and road protection against erosion on the Departmental Road No. 41 (RD41) between the towns of Jacmel and Marigot, as well as on the National Road No. 7 (RN7) near the city of Les Cayes and on the National Road No. 2 (RN2) between Saint-Louis du Sud and Aquin. Road maintenance and protection works have proved to significantly increase the resilience of road and bridge infrastructure to natural disasters such as the ones that struck Haiti in 2007 and 2008.

Another important project objective is to rehabilitate the National Road No. 3 (RN3) between Carrefour Barrière Battant and Carrefour la Mort (8.5 km). The other sections of RN3 (Barrière Battant – Saint Raphael – Hinche) will be rehabilitated with financing from the European Union and the French development agency (Agence Française de Développement, AFD). This will convert RN3 into a major transport corridor, an alternative to the country’s main highway, RN1, which links Haiti’s two largest cities, Port-au-Prince and Cap Haitian. The expected increase in traffic justifies an upgrade of standards, and subsequently more costly rehabilitation works than originally planned. Close coordination between the Haitian Government and the three donors will help ensure that these major road improvement works on RN3 bring the most benefits to the Haitian population.

The two grants approved today come from the International Development Association (IDA), the part of the World Bank that helps the world’s poorest countries by providing interest-free credits and grants for programs that boost economic growth, reduce inequalities and improve people’s living conditions. Since January 2005, IDA has provided a total of US$308 million in assistance for Haiti. In addition, trust funds administered by the World Bank have given more than US$55 million since 2003.

For more information on these projects, please visit:

Third Economic Governance Reform Operation (EGRO III)

http://web.worldbank.org/external/projects/main?pagePK=64283627&piPK=73230&theSitePK=40941&menuPK=228424&Projectid=P117944

Transport and Territorial Development Project – Additional Financing

http://web.worldbank.org/external/projects/main?pagePK=64283627&piPK=73230&theSitePK=40941&menuPK=228424&Projectid=P114059

For more information on the World Bank’s work in Haiti, please visit:

http://www.worldbank.org/ht

Related News
World Bank Statement on Haiti Debt
World Bank to Provide an Additional $100 Million to Haiti, Following Earthquake
World Bank Expresses Strong Support for Haiti Following Earthquake

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/NEWS/0,,contentMDK:22412192~menuPK:34463~pagePK:34370~piPK:34424~theSitePK:4607,00.html

***

Support mechanisms of the Regional Programme for LAC: 2006-2009

The Technical Assistance Knowledge Bank

This UNIDO-sponsored initiative was approved as a support tool based on contributions from countries through the sharing of expertise and experience to foster horizontal cooperation.With this tool, UNIDO aims at facilitating the provision of technical assistance in the LAC region by matching countries’ supply and demands and proposing the technical-financial support required.

* More

Observatory on Renewable Energies in Latin America and the Caribbean

The Renewable Energy Observatory intends to be a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary mechanism unifying and promoting renewable energy technologies and projects inside and outside the LAC region.The Observatory aims to alleviate poverty and enhance economic development by increasing investments in renewable energies and promoting its use.

* More

Consultative Groups

To assess the evolution of the Regional Programme, consultative groups have been set up to provide substantive input by offering revision of project’s implementation and to facilitate interaction with national stakeholders. This mechanism is also in charge of defining new areas for technical cooperation with UNIDO based on country needs. Consultative groups are already active in Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, being constituted by high authorities from several Ministries of the countries.

*

Establishment of a virtual community

with viodeoconferencing capability on the themes of advanced technologies and competitiveness and updating of UNIDO’s activities in the region.

http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=6833

***
December 2009 – IDB Portfolio in Haiti

The IDB’s portfolio as Haiti’s largest multilateral donor consists of programs for a total of more than $700 million. In 2009, program disbursements will reach $130 million, well over double the 2005 and 2006 levels. Disbursements are expected to continue to increase in the years to come.

The IDB also granted this year $511 million in debt relief, clearing the way for the Government to undertake vital public investments.

In an effort to help Haiti recover from the multiple 2008 shocks and restore the path to sustained economic growth, in 2009 the Bank provided unparalleled financial and technical assistance:

* In the first quarter of the year, the Board of Governors increased grants for Haiti to a total of $250 million for 2009/2010, almost tripling the amount established originally in the IDB’s Country Strategy document. The additional grants would be used to finance reconstruction works and investment projects in key areas such as social infrastructure, urban drainage and sanitation, access to potable water in urban areas, and nutrition.

* The IDB approved six major operations in 2009 for a total of $122 million from the Grant Facility, including $25 million in budget support already disbursed. These major high priority operations, aligned with the Government Program for reconstruction and reactivation of the economy, included:

* Watersheds Management and Natural Disaster Risk Prevention and Mitigation. A $30 million IDB grant will help limit flooding and erosion in watersheds. Planned public anti-flooding works in three critical watersheds will cover 6 percent of Haitian territory, bringing benefits 360,000 people of the Grande Rivière du Nord, Ravine du Sud and Cavaillon watersheds. . The works seek to limit torrential flows and protect infrastructure and property exposed to flooding or landslides. The project will also offer direct support for sustainable agriculture in the watersheds.

* Road Rehabilitation. A $25 million grant to continue improving the road network and road maintenance in the southern departments of Nippes, Grand Anse and Sud, where many areas still face transportation problems. The new grant, third in a series of four annual donations of $25 million each for road rehabilitation in Haiti, will help improve transportation conditions and safety, contributing to economic development in a region with considerable productive and tourism potential.

* Fiscal Reform and Budget Support. A $25 million grant will back Haitian Government’s efforts to boost revenues and increase efficiency of public spending and debt management. The policy-based grant will support priority public expenditures and fiscal reforms to increase tax and customs revenues, improve the efficiency of public spending and strengthen the management of public debt. The assistance will also contribute to Haiti’s efforts to reinforce its Public Works Ministry’s capacity to plan, develop and maintain the national road network as well as to the government’s efforts to increase the efficiency of the EDH power utility.

* School Reconstruction. A $20.5 million grant to help rebuild and equip schools destroyed or damaged by hurricanes or in dire need of repairs. The bulk of the IDB grant will be used to replace, repair or improve the buildings of at least 50 public schools, including the construction of sufficient classrooms, offices, dining rooms, kitchens and bathroom facilities. Resources will also be used to equip the schools with new furniture, clean water systems and solar lamp posts. The project will be carried by Haiti’s FAES economic and social assistance fund. Over the years FAES had built or repaired more than 330 schools using IDB financing. None of these schools suffered significant damage during last year’s hurricanes.

* Water and Sanitation. A $19 million operation complements an existing operation for Drinking Water and Sanitation Sector Reform, especially with respect to investments in sanitation and in water services coverage for six periurban areas (Saint-Marc, Port-De Paix, Les Cayes, Jacmel, Ouanaminthe and Cap-Haitien). The operation will address urgent needs in the sanitation sector and continue supporting the Government of Haiti’s efforts to develop the water sector. As it is expected that new projects will be coming on stream, it is critical that the institutions involved in the sector be strengthened. The project will include support to DINEPA and to the future decentralized OREPAS.

* Nutrition and Social Safety Net. A $2.5 million in IDB grants and an additional $3 million from the Food Price Crisis Fund managed by the Bank will support a national micronutrient delivery program to boost child and maternal health and to strengthen the Ministry of Health’s Nutrition Division. The program will help improve infant and child health and nutrition and social safety nets to fight extreme poverty in Haiti. Under the program, the distribution of vitamin A supplements will more than double over a four-year period from the current 31 percent to 70 percent of children under five years of age. Additionally, the program is expected to cut in half the incidence of infants affected by intestinal parasites.

Technical Cooperation

* In 2009 the IDB maximized the use of technical cooperation to support the operational program. More than $3 million from IDB resources and different trust funds managed by the Bank brought the total size of the active technical cooperation portfolio to around $16 million.

Private Sector

* MIF and IIC. IDB Group support to the private sector continued through the Multilateral Investment Fund, focusing on the productive sector and promoting entrepreneurship. MIF approvals for 2009 reached $4.9 million. Also the IDB’s Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) became an active player in Haiti through the approval of an $18 million loan to Distributeurs Nationaux, S.A. (Dinasa), a Haitian-owned company that is a leading marketer and distributor of fuel, as well as a $300,000 loan to Carifresh, a major supplier of quality agricultural products for export and domestic markets.

* HaitInvest will address and leverage foreign investment opportunities in key economic sectors. A front desk, or “one stop services center,” will be incorporated as part of the existing Center for Facilitation of Investments at the Ministry of Commerce and Industry. It will facilitate foreign investments by enhancing links between foreign investors and local partners; by easing access to public and private services for new businesses; ensuring linkages with existing business development programs from other agencies, such as the United Nations, USAID and the European Union; and increasing access to the internal markets associated with new businesses.

* Business Plan Competition. This contest for Caribbean tourism projects involving low-income communities in their value chains will be organized by the IDB’s Opportunities for the Majority Initiative. It is open to companies based in the Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. Plans must include low-income communities as suppliers of goods or services, so that both companies and local residents benefit from the development of tourism ventures. (link to press release)

* Other IDB private sector efforts included technical cooperation to explore the economic feasibility of a new industrial park in the north of the country, and for the design of the value chain strategy for fruits and biodiesel.

Co-financing

* Following up on the Donors Conference held at IDB headquarters in April 2009, co-financing resources were actively pursued in the sectors led by the IDB. Bank co-financing agreements include: €12 million from Germany for energy and social protection, €1.5 million from the European Union for rural supply chains, US$15 million from OFID for electricity, and US$30 million from Spain for water and sanitation, and US$3.5 million from the Global Environmental Facility for watershed management. The IDB already administers or facilitates the co-financing of over $120 million from Canada, the European Union, OFID and the Caribbean Development Bank.

Looking ahead, IDB support to Haiti will continue to focus on priority areas that have been identified with country authorities: transportation and infrastructure, productive activities and private sector development, basic services, prevention and mitigation of natural disaster risk and environmental sustainability, and economic governance.

The IDB also reaffirmed its commitment to strengthen collaboration among donors and other cooperation partners.

For more information: IDB and Haiti

http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:YZPfeMvszagJ:idbdocs.iadb.org/wsdocs/getdocument.aspx%3Fdocnum%3D35025547+economic+development+grants+Haiti+government&cd=6&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

This is the html version of the file http://idbdocs.iadb.org/wsdocs/getdocument.aspx?docnum=35025547.
Google automatically generates html versions of documents as we crawl the web.

***

The IDB, established in 1959 to support the process of economic and social development in Latin America and the Caribbean, is the main source of multilateral financing in the region. The IDB Group provides solutions to development challenges by partnering with governments, companies and civil society organizations, thus reaching its clients ranging from central governments to city authorities and businesses.

The IDB lends money and provides grants. With a triple-A rating, the Bank borrows in international markets at competitive rates. Hence, it can structure loans at competitive conditions for its clients in its 26 borrowing member countries.

In addition, it also offers research, advice and technical assistance to support key areas like education, poverty reduction and agriculture. The Bank is also active on cross-border issues like trade, infrastructure and energy.

To ensure the Bank’s accountability, transparency and effectiveness in its activities, the IDB has the Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE), the Office of Institutional Integrity (OII), and the Independent Investigation Mechanism (IIM) in place to ensure sufficient oversight for its projects.

http://www.iadb.org/aboutus/

***

1.
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Industrial Development Board
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privileged partner for Haiti. He outlined several areas in which he saw UNIDO playing a role in … programming mission to Haiti, with emphasis on indus- …
http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/28006_idb29_11e.pdf
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HAITI – Country Information
UNIDO does not currently maintain an Office in HAITI. Please contact UNIDO Headquarters directly. unido.org. About  UNIDO in Brief  Mission  Structure …
http://www.unido.org/data/geodoc.cfm?cc=HAI – Cached
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HAITI / Port-au-Prince
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Haiti is one of the principal countries of origin of immigrants to the United States, and since last year, remittances from Haitians …
http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Services/LDC_SSC/…/Haiti.pdf
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UNITED NATIONS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION
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Nov 30, 2005 … The Prime Minister of the Republic of Haiti, H.E. Mr. Gérard Latortue, made a statement. The Prime Minister of the United Republic of …
http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/46230_journal_2.pdf
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Earthquake in Haiti
All UNIDO staff are profoundly shocked and saddened by the catastrophe that hit Haiti and caused countless deaths, unimaginable human suffering, and misery. …
http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=1000791 – Cached
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UNIDO Databases
Title: (R) HAITI. RAPPORT SUR LES ECONOMIES D’ENERGIE. … Abstract: Final report on assistance to energy saving in factories in Haiti, with special …
http://www.unido.org/data//data/ida/016xxx/016375.cfm – Cached
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HAITI the Republic of Haiti UNIDO Contacts Projects implemented in …
Projects implemented in HAITI  Contributions to UNIDO Regular Budget  UN Rate of Exchange … UNIDO does not currently maintain an Office in HAITI. …
http://www.unido.org/data1/geodoc.cfm?cc=HAI – Cached
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GENERAL CONFERENCE
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Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan,. Lebanon, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Malawi,. Malaysia, Mali, Mauritius, Mongolia, …
http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/PMO/…/GC.8_4_add.1e.pdf
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COUNTRY ECO_GROUP ECO_VAL GEO_GROUP GEO_VAL PERIOD WORLD_VAL Haiti …
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Haiti, Developing Countries .0185, Low Income .2049, 2005 .0047 … Haiti, Developing Countries .0253, Least developed countries, 1.7695, 2000 .0053 …
http://www.unido.org/Data1/Country/Stats/DataToExcel.cfm?t…P_Table…
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Policies for Promoting Industrial Energy Efficiency in Developing …
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Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Martinique, Mexico,. Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts …
http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/media/…/ind_energy_efficiencyEbookv2.pdf
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[PDF]
Growth, Industry and Trade of the Least Developed Countries*
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by G Robyn – Related articles – All 7 versions
Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Lesotho, Liberia,. Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, …
https://unido.org/…/Aspects_of_marginalization_growth_industry_and_trade_of_LDCs.pdf
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[PDF]
Ap̈ndices
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UNIDOÛS SUPPORT PROGRAMME IN HAITI Ó SEED MONEY. HONDURAS. Ongoing. FM/HON/08/003 …… HAITI, IRAQ, LIBERIA, SIERRA LEONE AND TIMORJLESTE). US/GLO/01/048 …
https://unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/News/…/Spanish_Appendices.pdf
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***

Basic Facts

President:
Luis Alberto Moreno
Membership:
48 countries represented by the Board of Executive Directors
Approved lending and grants over the past 12 months:
$10 billion
Employees:
About 2,000
Offices:
Headquarters in Washington, DC, with country offices in 26 borrowing countries, plus a regional office in Tokyo and another one in Paris.
Clients:
Central governments, provinces, municipalities, private firms and non-governmental organizations.
Download:
PDF version of Basic Facts 2009 (We’re here)

http://www.iadb.org/aboutus/BasicFacts.cfm
Inter-American Development Bank

***

custom.htm
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Page 1
V.05-82685 (E)
For reasons of economy, this document has been printed in a limited number. Delegates are kindly requested to bring
their copies of documents to meetings.
United Nations Industrial Development Organization
Distr.
GENERAL
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
30 March 2005
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH
Industrial Development Board
Thirtieth session
Vienna, 20-23 June 2005
Item 4 (a) of the provisional agenda
Programme and Budget Committee
Twenty-first session
Vienna, 10-12 May 2005
Item 3 of the provisional agenda
PERFORMANCE REPORT AND PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE
REPORT FOR THE BIENNIUM 2004-2005
Interim financial performance report for the biennium 2004-2005
Submitted by the Director-General
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
3
Chapter
I. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE 12-MONTH PERIOD OF THE
BIENNIUM 2004-2005 ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2004 ………………………………………………………
3
Statement I
Statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004………………………………………….
4
Statement II
Statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 …………………………………………………………………………………
5
Schedule 2.1
Status of assessed contributions to the regular budget as at 31 December 2004
6
Schedule 2.2
Status of advances to the Working Capital Fund as at 31 December 2004 ……..
12
Itemizes the utilization of financial resources during the period 1 January – 31 December 2004 in accordance
with Programme and Budget Committee conclusion 1987/19.
Page 2
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 2
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
Statement III
General Fund and Working Capital Fund: Statement of cash flow for the year
ended 31 December 2004………………………………………………………………………..
16
Statement IV
General Fund: Status of appropriations by major programme for 2004 as at
31 December 2004…………………………………………………………………………………
17
Schedule 4.1
General Fund: Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for
2004 as at 31 December 2004 ………………………………………………………………….
18
Schedule 4.1
Other Headquarters funds—Buildings Management Services:
(Supplementary) Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at
31 December 2004………………………………………………………………………………….
19
II. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ………………………………………………………………….
20
Preface: UNIDO MISSION STATEMENT …………………………………………………………………………
20
Annexes
I. Technical cooperation activities executed by UNIDO…………………………………………………………..
36
Table 1: Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004 in euros………………………………………….
36
Table 1: Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004 in US dollars ………………………………….
37
Table 2: Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 in euros…………………………………………………………………………………
38
Table 2: Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 in US dollars …………………………………………………………………………
39
Table 3: Summary of transactions on sub-accounts of the Industrial Development Fund for the
year 2004 as at 31 December 2004 ………………………………………………………………………
40
Table 4: Summary of technical cooperation activities financed by trust funds for the year 2004
as at 31 December 2004……………………………………………………………………………………..
42
Table 5: Summary of technical cooperation activities for 2004 financed under inter-
organization agreements …………………………………………………………………………………….
46
II. Operating funds—UNDP and UNDP trust funds………………………………………………………………….
47
III. Special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs): ……………………..
51
Statement of income and expenditure for the year ended 31 December 2004……………………………
51
Statement of assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004 …………………
51
Page 3
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 3
Introduction
1. In its conclusion 1987/19, paragraph (j), the Programme and Budget Committee requested the Director-General to
submit each year to the Industrial Development Board through the Committee a clear and detailed financial
performance report itemizing the utilization of financial resources.
2. The present financial report covers the period 1 January 2004 – 31 December 2004 and is based on the
appropriations contained in the programme and budgets 2004-2005, as adopted by the General Conference at its tenth
session (decision GC.10/Dec.17).
I. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE 12-MONTH PERIOD OF THE
BIENNIUM 2004-2005 ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2004
Certification of financial statements
Director-General’s responsibility
The Director-General of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization is responsible for the
preparation and integrity of the financial statements. These statements have been prepared in accordance with the
United Nations System Accounting Standards and article X of the Financial Regulations of UNIDO and include certain
amounts that are based on management’s best estimates and judgements. Financial information used elsewhere is
consistent with that in the financial statements. Management considers that the statements present fairly the financial
position of the Organization and of funds held in trust by it, the results of their operations and the changes in their
financial position.
To fulfil its responsibility, the Organization maintains systems of internal accounting controls, policies and
procedures to ensure the reliability of financial information and the safeguarding of assets. The internal control systems
and financial records are subject to reviews by the Office of the Comptroller General and the External Auditor during
their respective audits.
The following appended financial statements, comprising Statements I to IV, relevant schedules and supporting
notes, were properly prepared in accordance with the United Nations System Accounting Standards and article X of the
Financial Regulations of UNIDO.
[signed]
[signed]
Amita Misra
Carlos A. Magariños
Director, Financial Services Branch
Director-General
Page 4
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 4
Statement I
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURE AND CHANGES IN RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
General Fund and
Other Headquarters
Technical
Total
Total
Heading
Working Capital Fund
funds
cooperation
Eliminations
2004
2002
(Note or schedule No. 2) (Note or schedule No. 3) (Note or schedule No. 4) (Note No. 2 q)
INCOME
Assessed contributions
71,000.0
(a)
71,000.0
66,844.9
Voluntary contributions
260.9
111,200.0
111,460.9
87,547.3
OTHER INCOME
Revenue-producing activities
37.7
(b)
8,846.3
8,884.0
9,522.0
Funds under inter-organization arrangements
5,048.0
5,048.0
10,461.7
Jointly-financed activities
19,804.9
(2,897.2)
16,907.7
14,454.2
Income for services rendered
599.2
(203.9)
395.3
689.2
Interest income
660.5
(c)
267.9
682.2
(d)
1,610.6
1,921.6
Currency exchange adjustments
174.3
(d)
(415.7)
(c)
(1,157.1)
(e, f)
45.5
(1,353.0)
417.8
Miscellaneous income
328.0
(e)
21.0
(13.5)
(0.3)
335.2
784.0
TOTAL INCOME
72,461.4
29,123.6
115,759.6
(3,055.9)
214,288.7
192,642.7
EXPENDITURE
.
.
Salaries and common staff costs
41,471.9
13,980.0
26,581.1
2,755.2
84,788.2
90,256.3
Operating costs and contractual services
11,830.6
13,947.1
30,687.3
(1,880.9)
54,584.1
49,841.2
Acquisitions
14,278.5
749.3
15,027.8
16,825.4
Fellowships
4,049.9
427.1
4,477.0
4,003.5
RPTC and SRA activities
5,506.4
(f)
(5,106.6)
399.8
2,312.9
Programme support costs
41.0
8,545.9
8,586.9
9,227.2
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
58,808.9
27,968.1
84,142.7
(3,055.9)
167,863.8
172,466.5
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE
13,652.5
1,155.5
31,616.9
0.0
46,424.9
20,176.2
Prior biennium adjustments
(119.3)
(g)
(119.3)
9.1
Savings on cancellation of obligations from prior biennium
3,277.8
(h)
1,359.3
4,637.1
5,187.7
Provision for delays in the collection of contributions
(6,093.9)
(6,093.9)
(4,680.4)
NET EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER
EXPENDITURE
10,717.1
2,514.8
(d)
31,616.9
44,848.8
20,692.6
Transfers to reserves
410.9 (b, f)
103.2
(g)
514.1
2,431.4
Transfers from reserves
(0.4)
(0.4)
(34.1)
Credits to Member States
(2,941.1)
(p)
(2,941.1)
Transfers to and from other funds
0.0
(247.9)
Other adjustments to reserves and fund balances
(9,557.5)
(9,557.5)
(23,762.1)
Reserves and fund balances, beginning of biennium
13,623.3
12,174.6
99,814.1
125,612.0
135,147.4
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES, END OF BIENNIUM
21,809.8
14,689.4
121,976.7
0.0
158,475.9
134,227.3
Page 5
IDB.3
0/9
P
BC.21/9
Page 5
Statement II
STATEMENT OF ASSETS, LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
General Fund and
Other Headquarters
Technical
Total
Total
Heading
Working Capital Fund
funds
cooperation
Eliminations
2004
2002
(Note or schedule No. 2)
(Note or schedule No. 3) (Note or schedule No. 4)
(Note 2 q)
ASSETS
Cash and term deposits
24,981.6
16,684.4
173,757.8
(i)
215,423.8
194,676.4
Accounts receivable
Assessed contributions receivable from Member States
117,401.9
117,401.9
111,404.2
Voluntary contributions receivable
Other contributions receivable
93.7
154.7
248.4
6,133.7
Provision for delays in the collection of contributions
(110,666.8)
(110,666.8)
(106,756.7)
Interfund balances
458.1
1,691.2
2,149.3
5,571.4
Other
3,741.2
(i)
8,352.9
(e)
1,891.9
13,986.0
11,850.0
Other assets
614.5
0.6
4,199.3
4,814.4
5,413.0
TOTAL ASSETS
36,166.1
25,496.0
181,694.9
0.0
243,357.0
228,292.0
LIABILITIES
.
.
Payments or contributions received in advance
1,324.0
(j)
54.5
7,780.6
9,159.1
14,126.8
Borrowings payable within one year
737.0
(k)
737.0
958.0
Unliquidated obligations
5,116.7
8,109.0
26,002.4
39,228.1
38,945.2
Accounts payable—interfund
677.7
1,162.8
308.8
2,149.3
5,571.4
Accounts payable—other
6,500.9 (d, i, p)
1,480.3
(e)
25,626.4
(d, e)
33,607.6
32,547.3
Other funds and special accounts
Other liabilities
Borrowings payable after one year
1,916.0
TOTAL LIABILITIES
14,356.3
10,806.6
59,718.2
0.0
84,881.1
94,064.7
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
Operating reserves
4,828.9
(f)
405.3
(j)
5,234.2
5,355.8
Other reserves
10,340.2 (l, m, n)
1,921.3
12,261.5
10,213.8
Balances relating to projects funded by donors
117,364.5
117,364.5
104,087.3
Working Capital Fund
7,423.0
(o)
7,423.0
7,423.0
Surplus (deficit)
4,046.6
(p)
9,860.5
2,285.6
(h)
16,192.7
7,147.4
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
21,809.8
14,689.4
121,976.7
0.0
158,475.9
134,227.3
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
36,166.1
25,496.0
181,694.9
0.0
243,357.0
228,292.0
Page 6
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 6
Schedule 2.1
STATUS OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE REGULAR BUDGET (in euros)
as at 31 December 2004
Scale %
Contributions payable 1 January 2004
Credits and Collections in 2004
Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004
Prior biennium Current biennium
Prior biennium
Current biennium
Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Afghanistan
0.00100
90,146
710
18,934

71,212
710
71,922
Albania
0.00426

3,025

3,025



Algeria
0.09951

70,652

6,050

64,602
64,602
Angola
0.00284

2,016

2,016



Argentina
1.37752
4,638,854
978,039
20,215

4,618,639
978,039
5,596,678
Armenia
0.00284
912,755
2,016
2,080

910,675
2,016
912,691
Austria
1.34625

955,838

955,838



Azerbaijan
0.00569
1,021,570
4,040
10,213

1,011,357
4,040
1,015,397
Bahamas
0.01706

12,113

12,113



Bahrain
0.02559
506
18,169
506
664

17,505
17,505
Bangladesh
0.01000

7,100

639

6,461
6,461
Barbados
0.01279
688
9,081
538

150
9,081
9,231
Belarus
0.02701
275,188
19,177
143,574

131,614
19,177
150,791
Belgium
1.60498

1,139,535

1,139,535



Belize
0.00100
562
710
562
710



Benin
0.00284
2,620
2,016
2,603

17
2,016
2,033
Bhutan
0.00100

710

710



Bolivia
0.01137
14,666
8,073
1,180

13,486
8,073
21,559
Bosnia and Herzegovina
0.00569

4,040

4,040



Botswana
0.01422

10,096

10,096



Brazil
3.39761
16,554,949
2,412,303


16,554,949
2,412,303
18,967,252
Bulgaria
0.01848

13,121

13,121



Burkina Faso
0.00284

2,016

2,016



Burundi
0.00100
66,368
710
7

66,361
710
67,071
Cambodia
0.00284
4,010
2,016
25

3,985
2,016
6,001
Cameroon
0.01279

9,081

3,345

5,736
5,736
Cape Verde
0.00100
96,115
710
7

96,108
710
96,818
Central African Republic
0.00100
111,478
710
7

111,471
710
112,181
Chad
0.00100
84,776
710


84,776
710
85,486
Chile
0.30138
211,795
213,980
159,755

52,040
213,980
266,020
China
2.17788

1,546,295

1,474,600

71,695
71,695
Colombia
0.28574
205,274
202,875
78,184

127,090
202,875
329,965
Comoros
0.00100
121,682
710


121,682
710
122,392
Congo
0.00100
109,354
710
108,246

1,108
710
1,818
Costa Rica
0.02843
105,580
20,185
1,880

103,700
20,185
123,885
Côte d’Ivoire
0.01279

9,081

9,081



Croatia
0.05544

39,362

39,362



Page 7
IDB.3
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BC.21/9
Page 7
Scale %
Contributions payable 1 January 2004
Credits and Collections in 2004
Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004
Prior biennium Current biennium
Prior biennium
Current biennium
Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Cuba
0.04265
26,672
30,282
26,672


30,282
30,282
Cyprus
0.05402

38,354

38,354



Czech Republic
0.28858

204,892

204,892



Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
0.01279
4,279
9,081
926

3,353
9,081
12,434
Democratic Republic of the Congo
0.00569
121,858
4,040
30
121,828
4,040
125,868
Denmark
1.06477

755,987

755,987



Djibouti
0.00100
84,776
710


84,776
710
85,486
Dominica
0.00100
649
710
93

556
710
1,266
Dominican Republic
0.03270
350,535
23,217


350,535
23,217
373,752
Ecuador
0.03554

25,233

25,233



Egypt
0.11515
71,745
81,757
71,745
81,757



El Salvador
0.02559
158,458
18,169


158,458
18,169
176,627
Equatorial Guinea
0.00100
121,682
710


121,682
710
122,392
Eritrea
0.00100
639
710
86

553
710
1,263
Ethiopia
0.00569

4,040

4,040



Fiji
0.00569

4,040

560

3,480
3,480
Finland
0.74207

526,870

526,870



France
9.19202

6,526,334

6,526,334



Gabon
0.01990
38,458
14,129
70

38,388
14,129
52,517
Gambia
0.00100
74,084
710
7

74,077
710
74,787
Georgia
0.00711
1,599,047
5,048
102

1,598,945
5,048
1,603,993
Germany
13.88754

9,860,153

9,860,153



Ghana
0.00711
1,610
5,048
436

1,174
5,048
6,222
Greece
0.76624

544,030

544,030



Grenada
0.00100
76,959
710
10,496

66,463
710
67,173
Guatemala
0.03838
280
27,250
280
27,250



Guinea
0.00426

3,025

516

2,509
2,509
Guinea-Bissau
0.00100
116,788
710
7

116,781
710
117,491
Guyana
0.00100
1,800
710
1,800
208

502
502
Haiti
0.00284

2,016

2,016



Honduras
0.00711

5,048

5,048



Hungary
0.17059

121,119

121,119



India
0.48476

344,180

344,180



Indonesia
0.28432

201,867

201,867



Iran (Islamic Republic of)
0.38667
437,147
274,536
192,640

244,507
274,536
519,043
Iraq
0.19334
1,697,868
137,271


1,697,868
137,271
1,835,139
Ireland
0.41795

296,745

296,745



Israel
0.58996

418,872

418,872



Italy
7.20001

5,112,007

5,112,007



Jamaica
0.00569
11,530
4,040
11,530
4,040



Japan
22.00000

15,620,000

15,620,000



Page 8
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 8
Scale %
Contributions payable 1 January 2004
Credits and Collections in 2004
Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004
Prior biennium Current biennium
Prior biennium
Current biennium
Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Jordan
0.01137

8,073

378

7,695
7,695
Kazakhstan
0.03980
495,863
28,258
122,173

373,690
28,258
401,948
Kenya
0.01137

8,073

8,073



Kuwait
0.20897

148,369

148,369



Kyrgyzstan
0.00100
375,752
710
30

375,722
710
376,432
Lao People’s Democratic Republic
0.00100

710

710



Lebanon
0.01706
20,479
12,113
20,479
12,113



Lesotho
0.00100

710

171

539
539
Liberia
0.00100
87,358
710


87,358
710
88,068
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
0.09525

67,628

25,844

41,784
41,784
Lithuania
0.02417
335,321
17,161
101,073

234,248
17,161
251,409
Luxembourg
0.11373
73,672
80,748
73,672
80,748



Madagascar
0.00426

3,025

2,471

554
554
Malawi
0.00284
38,194
2,016
26

38,168
2,016
40,184
Malaysia
0.33407

237,190

237,190



Maldives
0.00100
577
710
577
467

243
243
Mali
0.00284
19,136
2,016
18,678

458
2,016
2,474
Malta
0.02132

15,137

15,137



Mauritania
0.00100
113,982
710
7

113,975
710
114,685
Mauritius
0.01564

11,104

11,104



Mexico
1.54385
210,056
1,096,133
210,056
1,096,133



Monaco
0.00569

4,040

4,040



Mongolia
0.00100

710

171

539
539
Morocco
0.06255
100
44,411
100
44,411



Mozambique
0.00100

710

93

617
617
Myanmar
0.01000
6,577
7,100
522

6,055
7,100
13,155
Namibia
0.00995

7,065

7,065



Nepal
0.00569

4,040

311

3,729
3,729
Netherlands
2.47073

1,754,218

1,754,218



New Zealand
0.34260

243,246

243,246



Nicaragua
0.00100
134,643
710
7

134,636
710
135,346
Niger
0.00100
96,150
710
7

96,143
710
96,853
Nigeria
0.09667
89,011
68,636
2,654
86,357
68,636
154,993
Norway
0.91835

652,029

652,029



Oman
0.08672

61,571

61,571



Pakistan
0.08672

61,571

61,571



Panama
0.02559
2,193
18,169
833

1,360
18,169
19,529
Papua New Guinea
0.00853
5,241
6,056
479

4,762
6,056
10,818
Paraguay
0.02275
57,580
16,153
15,125

42,455
16,153
58,608
Peru
0.16775
296,101
119,103
344

295,757
119,103
414,860
Philippines
0.14216
32,009
100,934
32,009
37,103

63,831
63,831
Page 9
IDB.3
0/9
P
BC.21/9
Page 9
Scale %
Contributions payable 1 January 2004
Credits and Collections in 2004
Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004
Prior biennium Current biennium
Prior biennium
Current biennium
Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Poland
0.53736
41,061
381,526
41,061
381,526



Portugal
0.65678

466,314

466,314



Qatar
0.04833

34,314

2,183

32,131
32,131
Republic of Korea
2.63137

1,868,272

634,678

1,233,594
1,233,594
Republic of Moldova
0.00284
872,848
2,016
93

872,755
2,016
874,771
Romania
0.08245
50,631
58,540
50,631
58,540



Russian Federation
1.70591

1,211,196

1,211,196



Rwanda
0.00100
9,263
710
27

9,236
710
9,946
Saint Kitts and Nevis
0.00100

710

93

617
617
Saint Lucia
0.00284
1,914
2,016
1,914
2,016



Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
0.00100
110,948
710
7

110,941
710
111,651
Sao Tome and Principe
0.00100
121,682
710


121,682
710
122,392
Saudi Arabia
0.78756

559,168

559,168



Senegal
0.00711

5,048

5,048



Serbia and Montenegro
0.02843
18,049
20,185
18,017

32
20,185
20,217
Seychelles
0.00284
45,828
2,016
26

45,802
2,016
47,818
Sierra Leone
0.00100
82,375
710
16,788

65,587
710
66,297
Slovakia
0.06113

43,402

43,402



Slovenia
0.11515
331,781
81,757
184,206

147,575
81,757
229,332
Somalia
0.00100
134,656
710
7

134,649
710
135,359
South Africa
0.58001

411,807

411,807



Spain
3.58064

2,542,254

2,542,254



Sri Lanka
0.02275

16,153

16,153



Sudan
0.00853
4,615
6,056
4,615
6,056



Suriname
0.00284
41,522
2,016
26

41,496
2,016
43,512
Swaziland
0.00284

2,016

482

1,534
1,534
Sweden
1.45962

1,036,330

1,036,330



Switzerland
1.81111

1,285,888

1,285,888



Syrian Arab Republic
0.11373

80,748

80,748



Tajikistan
0.00100
277,104
710
651

276,453
710
277,163
Thailand
0.41795
75,331
296,745
75,331
296,745



TFYR of Macedonia
0.00853
6,021
6,056
6,021


6,056
6,056
Timor-Leste
0.00100

710

710



Togo
0.00100
72,475
710
15,186

57,289
710
57,999
Tonga
0.00100

710

710



Trinidad and Tobago
0.02275
14,457
16,153
14,457
16,153



Tunisia
0.04265
2,336
30,282
2,336
28,293

1,989
1,989
Turkey
0.62550

444,105

444,105



Turkmenistan
0.00426
155,308
3,025


155,308
3,025
158,333
Uganda
0.00711

5,048

4,690

358
358
Ukraine
0.07534
6,804,134
53,491
1,025,511

5,778,623
53,491
5,832,114
Page 10
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 10
Scale %
Contributions payable 1 January 2004
Credits and Collections in 2004
Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004
Prior biennium Current biennium
Prior biennium
Current biennium
Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
United Arab Emirates
0.28716

203,884

203,884



United Kingdom
7.86994

5,587,656

5,587,656



United Republic of Tanzania
0.00569

4,040

4,040



Uruguay
0.11373
192,516
80,748
31,366

161,150
80,748
241,898
Uzbekistan
0.01564
469,275
11,104
159

469,116
11,104
480,220
Vanuatu
0.00100
78,344
710
7

78,337
710
79,047
Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
0.29569
328,131
209,940
328,131


209,940
209,940
Viet Nam
0.02275

16,153

16,153



Yemen
0.00853
323
6,056
323
6,056



Zambia
0.00284
55,544
2,016
26

55,518
2,016
57,534
Zimbabwe
0.01137
7,226
8,073
7,226
8,046

27
27
Subtotal:
100
42,521,493
71,000,000
3,288,436
64,264,899
39,233,057
6,735,101
45,968,158
FORMER MEMBER STATES:
USA
69,228,235

21,887

69,206,348

69,206,348
Yugoslavia (former)
2,081,702



2,081,702

2,081,702
Sub total:
71,309,937

21,887

71,288,050

71,288,050
NEW MEMBER STATES:
Chad
9,809

7

9,802

9,802
Comoros
12,975

7

12,968

12,968
Djibouti
8,787

7

8,780

8,780
El Salvador
17,250



17,250

17,250
Equatorial Guinea
12,975

7

12,968

12,968
Liberia
18,620

7

18,613

18,613
Sao Tome and Principe
12,975

7

12,968

12,968
Timor-Leste
668

668




Turkmenistan
52,332



52,332

52,332
Subtotal:
146,391

710

145,681

145,681
TOTAL
113,977,821
71,000,000
3,311,033
64,264,899
110,666,788
6,735,101
117,401,889
1986
50,465
35
50,430
50,430
1987
53,410

53,410
53,410
1988
82,281
17
82,264
82,264
1989
109,948
1,094
108,854
108,854
1990
525,661
9,835
515,826
515,826
1991
763,259
9,856
753,403
753,403
1992
942,764
26,744
916,020
916,020
1993
1,140,298
48,632
1,091,666
1,091,666
1994
8,072,707
56,864
8,015,843
8,015,843
1995
37,918,785
1,040,500
36,878,285
36,878,285
1996
35,079,800
24,831
35,054,969
35,054,969
1997
5,047,707
95,669
4,952,038
4,952,038
Page 11
IDB.3
0/9
P
BC.21/9
Page 11
Scale %
Contributions payable 1 January 2004
Credits and Collections in 2004
Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004
Prior biennium Current biennium
Prior biennium
Current biennium
Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
1998
3,956,766
133,424
3,823,342
3,823,342
1999
4,628,093
235,359
4,392,734
4,392,734
2000
3,028,794
87,689
2,941,105
2,941,105
2001
3,172,139
100,188
3,071,951
3,071,951
2002
3,985,584
388,833
3,596,751
3,596,751
2003
5,419,360
1,051,463
4,367,897
4,367,897
TOTAL
113,977,821
71,000,000
3,311,033
64,264,899
110,666,788
6,735,101
117,401,889
Page 12
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 12
Schedule 2.2
STATUS OF ADVANCES TO THE WORKING CAPITAL FUND
as at 31 December 2004
Scale of assessment
Amount of
Collections
Adjustments Collections
Amount
M e m b e r S t a t e
(per cent)
advance
1986-2003
2004
2004 outstanding
Afghanistan
0.00100
74
308
(234)

Albania
0.00426
316
297
19

Algeria
0.09951
7,387
7,349
38

Angola
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Argentina
1.37752
102,254
120,847
(18,593)

Armenia
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Austria
1.34625
99,933
99,617
316

Azerbaijan
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Bahamas
0.01706
1,266
1,262
4

Bahrain
0.02559
1,900
1,930
(30)

Bangladesh
0.01000
742
742


Barbados
0.01279
949
965
(16)

Belarus
0.02701
2,005
2,005


Belgium
1.60498
119,139
118,769
20
350

Belize
0.00100
74
74


Benin
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Bhutan
0.00100
74
74


Bolivia
0.01137
844
817
27

Bosnia and Herzegovina
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Botswana
0.01422
1,056
1,039
17

Brazil
3.39761
252,206
170,093
3,064
79,049
Bulgaria
0.01848
1,372
1,336
36

Burkina Faso
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Burundi
0.00100
74
74


Cambodia
0.00284
211
150
61

Cameroon
0.01279
949
965
(16)

Cape Verde
0.00100
74
74


Central African Republic
0.00100
74
74


Chad
0.00100
74
74


Chile
0.30138
22,372
22,269
103

China
2.17788
161,665
161,080
585

Colombia
0.28574
21,211
21,156
55

Comoros
0.00100
74
74


Congo
0.00100
74
74


Costa Rica
0.02843
2,110
2,078
14
18

Côte d’Ivoire
0.01279
949
965
(16)

Croatia
0.05544
4,115
4,083
32

Cuba
0.04265
3,166
3,192
(26)

Cyprus
0.05402
4,010
4,010


Czech Republic
0.28858
21,421
21,376
45

Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
0.01279
949
965
(16)

Democratic Republic of the Congo
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Denmark
1.06477
79,039
78,759
280

Djibouti
0.00100
74
74


Dominica
0.00100
74
74


Dominican Republic
0.03270
2,427
318
7
2,102
Page 13
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 13
Scale of assessment
Amount of
Collections
Adjustments Collections
Amount
M e m b e r S t a t e
(per cent)
advance
1986-2003
2004
2004 outstanding
Ecuador
0.03554
2,638
2,598
40

Egypt
0.11515
8,548
8,536
12

El Salvador
0.02559
1,900
146
7
1,747
Equatorial Guinea
0.00100
74
74


Eritrea
0.00100
74
74


Ethiopia
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Fiji
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Finland
0.74207
55,084
54,930
154

France
9.19202
682,327
680,024
2,303

Gabon
0.01990
1,477
1,485
(8)

Gambia
0.00100
74
74


Georgia
0.00711
528
520
8

Germany
13.88754
1,030,877
1,027,422
3,455

Ghana
0.00711
528
520
8

Greece
0.76624
56,878
56,712
166

Grenada
0.00100
74
74


Guatemala
0.03838
2,849
2,821
28

Guinea
0.00426
316
297
19

Guinea-Bissau
0.00100
74
74


Guyana
0.00100
74
74


Haiti
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Honduras
0.00711
528
520
8

Hungary
0.17059
12,663
12,619
44

India
0.48476
35,984
35,853
131

Indonesia
0.28432
21,105
21,007
98

Iran (Islamic Republic of)
0.38667
28,703
28,579
124

Iraq
0.19334
14,352
3,630
140
10,582
Ireland
0.41795
31,025
30,954
71

Israel
0.58996
43,793
43,647
146

Italy
7.20001
534,459
532,567
1,892

Jamaica
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Japan
22.00000
1,633,067
1,633,067


Jordan
0.01137
844
817
27

Kazakhstan
0.03980
2,954
2,969
(15)

Kenya
0.01137
844
817
27

Kuwait
0.20897
15,512
15,440
72

Kyrgyzstan
0.00100
74
74


Lao People’s Democratic Republic
0.00100
74
74


Lebanon
0.01706
1,266
1,262
4

Lesotho
0.00100
74
74


Liberia
0.00100
74
74


Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
0.09525
7,070
7,052
18

Lithuania
0.02417
1,794
1,782
12

Luxembourg
0.11373
8,442
8,388
54

Madagascar
0.00426
316
297
19

Malawi
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Malaysia
0.33407
24,798
24,719
79

Maldives
0.00100
74
74


Mali
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Page 14
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 14
Scale of assessment
Amount of
Collections
Adjustments Collections
Amount
M e m b e r S t a t e
(per cent)
advance
1986-2003
2004
2004 outstanding
Malta
0.02132
1,583
1,559
24

Mauritania
0.00100
74
74


Mauritius
0.01564
1,161
1,188
(27)

Mexico
1.54385
114,600
114,240
360

Monaco
0.00569
422
297
125

Mongolia
0.00100
74
74


Morocco
0.06255
4,643
4,602
41

Mozambique
0.00100
74
74


Myanmar
0.01000
742
742


Namibia
0.00995
739
742
(3)

Nepal
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Netherlands
2.47073
183,404
182,755
649

New Zealand
0.34260
25,431
25,313
118

Nicaragua
0.00100
74
74


Niger
0.00100
74
74


Nigeria
0.09667
7,176
7,126
50

Norway
0.91835
68,170
67,921
249

Oman
0.08672
6,437
6,384
53

Pakistan
0.08672
6,437
6,384
53

Panama
0.02559
1,900
1,930
(30)

Papua New Guinea
0.00853
633
668
(35)

Paraguay
0.02275
1,689
1,707
(18)

Peru
0.16775
12,452
12,396
56

Philippines
0.14216
10,553
10,541
12

Poland
0.53736
39,889
39,787
102

Portugal
0.65678
48,753
48,621
132

Qatar
0.04833
3,588
3,563
25

Republic of Korea
2.63137
195,328
194,706
622

Republic of Moldova
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Romania
0.08245
6,120
6,087
33

Russian Federation
1.70591
126,631
126,192
439

Rwanda
0.00100
74
74


Saint Kitts and Nevis
0.00100
74
74


Saint Lucia
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
0.00100
74
74


Sao Tome and Principe
0.00100
74
74


Saudi Arabia
0.78756
58,461
58,271
190

Senegal
0.00711
528
520
8

Serbia and Montenegro
0.02843
2,110
2,078
32

Seychelles
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Sierra Leone
0.00100
74
74


Slovakia
0.06113
4,538
4,528
10

Slovenia
0.11515
8,548
7,307
247
994

Somalia
0.00100
74
74


South Africa
0.58001
43,054
42,910
144

Spain
3.58064
265,792
264,852
940

Sri Lanka
0.02275
1,689
1,707
(18)

Sudan
0.00853
633
668
(35)

Suriname
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Page 15
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 15
Scale of assessment
Amount of
Collections
Adjustments Collections
Amount
M e m b e r S t a t e
(per cent)
advance
1986-2003
2004
2004 outstanding
Swaziland
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Sweden
1.45962
108,348
107,965
383

Switzerland
1.81111
134,439
133,986
453

Syrian Arab Republic
0.11373
8,442
8,388
54

Tajikistan
0.00100
74
74


Thailand
0.41795
31,025
30,954
71

TFYR of Macedonia
0.00853
633
668
(35)

Timor-Leste
0.00100
74
74

Togo
0.00100
74
74


Tonga
0.00100
74
74


Trinidad and Tobago
0.02275
1,689
1,707
(18)

Tunisia
0.04265
3,166
3,192
(26)

Turkey
0.62550
46,431
46,245
186

Turkmenistan
0.00426
316
27
29
260
Uganda
0.00711
528
520
8

Ukraine
0.07534
5,593
5,567
26

United Arab Emirates
0.28716
21,316
21,230
86

United Kingdom
7.86994
584,189
582,189
2,000

United Republic of Tanzania
0.00569
422
445
(23)

Uruguay
0.11373
8,442
8,388
54

Uzbekistan
0.01564
1,161
1,188
(27)

Vanuatu
0.00100
74
74


Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)
0.29569
21,949
21,898
51

Viet Nam
0.02275
1,689
1,707
(18)

Yemen
0.00853
633
668
(35)

Zambia
0.00284
211
223
(12)

Zimbabwe
0.01137
844
817
27

T O T A L
100
7,423,030
7,325,458
(9,567)
13,399
93,740
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Statement III
GENERAL FUND AND WORKING CAPITAL FUND
Statement of cash flow for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Total 2004 Total 2002
Cash flows from operating activities
Excess (shortfall) of income over expenditure (Statement I)
13,652.5
8,423.4
(Increase) decrease in contributions receivable
(3,419.9)
(389.9)
(Increase) decrease other accounts receivable
120.8
5,235.7
Increase (decrease) in contributions or payments received in advance
1,134.1
955.4
Increase (decrease) in unliquidated obligations
(7,059.9)
(9,908.9)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable
(2,198.5)
(5,416.9)
Increase (decrease) in other funds and special accounts
(182.3)
Less:
Interest income
660.5
Currency exchange adjustments
174.3
834.8
880.3
Net cash from operating activities
1,394.3
(2,163.8)
Cash flows from investing and financing activities
Increase (decrease) in interfund balances
(404.3)
(909.9)
Increase (decrease) in borrowings
(865.0)
(1,618.0)
Plus:
Interest income
660.5
Currency exchange adjustments
174.3
834.8
880.3
Net cash from investing and financing activities
(434.5)
(1,647.6)
Cash flows from other sources
Savings on or cancellation of prior period’s obligations
3,281.3
4,315.7
Transfers to (from) reserves
410.5
2,278.8
Credits to Member States and prior bienniums adjustments
(3,063.9)
9.1
Net cash from other sources
627.9
6,603.6
Net increase (decrease) in cash
1,587.7
2,792.2
Cash at beginning of period
23,393.9
18,328.7
Cash at end of period (Statement II)
24,981.6
21,120.9
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Statement IV
GENERAL FUND
Status of appropriations by major programme for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major Programme
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Governing Bodies
2,507.3
0.0
2,507.3
2,302.2
0.2
2,302.4
204.9
General Management
5,960.3
0.0
5,960.3
5,140.7
389.7
5,530.4
429.9
Strengthening of Industrial Capacities
14,561.0
0.0
14,561.0
9,846.3
266.9
10,113.2
4,447.8
Cleaner and Sustainable Industrial Development
11,782.7
0.0
11,782.7
11,157.3
237.2
11,394.5
388.2
Regional Programme
17,409.9
0.0
17,409.9
9,739.6
2,068.2
11,807.8
5,602.1
Administration
13,159.3
0.0
13,159.3
9,628.8
663.8
10,292.6
2,866.7
Indirect Costs
8,010.4
0.0
8,010.4
7,082.1
285.9
7,368.0
642.4
Total A
73,390.9
0.0
73,390.9
54,897.0
3,911.9
58,808.9
14,582.0
Approved estimates
Actual income
Accrued income
Total income
(Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme
802.9
0.0
802.9
260.9
0.0
260.9
542.0
Miscellaneous Income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17
689.8
0.0
689.8
698.2
0.0
698.2
(8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17
502.3
0.0
502.3
(502.3)
Total B
1,492.7
0.0
1,492.7
1,461.4
0.0
1,461.4
31.3
Total A—B
71,898.2
0.0
71,898.2
53,435.6
3,911.9
57,347.5
14,550.7
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Schedule 4.1
GENERAL FUND
Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Salaries and common staff costs
48,784.1
0.0
48,784.1
39,142.1
1,442.1
40,584.2
8,199.9
Official travel
1,439.6
0.0
1,439.6
731.6
156.1
887.7
551.9
Operating costs
13,139.2
0.0
13,139.2
8,506.1
1,528.9
10,035.0
3,104.2
Information and communication technology
2,948.2
0.0
2,948.2
1,359.2
436.4
1,795.6
1,152.6
RPTC and SRA activities
7,079.8
0.0
7,079.8
5,158.0
348.4
5,506.4
1,573.4
Total A
73,390.9
0.0
73,390.9
54,897.0
3,911.9
58,808.9
14,582.0
Approved estimates
Actual income
Accrued income
Total income
(Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme
802.9
0.0
802.9
260.9
0.0
260.9
542.0
Miscellaneous income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17
689.8
0.0
689.8
698.2
0.0
698.2
(8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17
502.3
0.0
502.3
(502.3)
Total B
1,492.7
0.0
1,492.7
1,461.4
0.0
1,461.4
31.3
Total A—B
71,898.2
0.0
71,898.2
53,435.6
3,911.9
57,347.5
14,550.7
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Schedule 4.1 (Supplementary)
OTHER HEADQUARTERS FUNDS—BUILDINGS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Staff costs
6,875.6
0.0
6,875.6
5,734.3
15.0
5,749.3
1,126.3
Official travel
5.8
0.0
5.8
2.2
0.0
2.2
3.6
Operating costs
16,795.8
0.0
16,795.8
5,896.0
5,714.7
11,610.7
5,185.1
Information and communication technology
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
RPTC and SRA activities
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total A
23,677.2
0.0
23,677.2
11,632.5
5,729.7
17,362.2
6,315.0
Estimated income
Actual
income
Accrued
income
Total
income
(Excess)
shortfall
Income
Common Buildings Management
22,777.1
0.0
22,777.1
19,711.6
93.3
19,804.9
2,972.2
Joint Buildings Management
900.1
0.0
900.1
585.5
13.6
599.1
301.0
Total B
23,677.2
0.0
23,677.2
20,297.1
106.9
20,404.0
3,273.2
Miscellaneous income
Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17
0.0
0.0
0.0
180.5
0.0
180.5
(180.5)
Total C
0.0
0.0
0.0
180.5
0.0
180.5
(180.5)
Total A—B—C
0.0
0.0
0.0
(8,845.1)
5,622.8
(3,222.3)
3,222.3
Cumulative fund balance — special account for BMS (GC.9/Dec.14)
Excess of income over expenditure
3,222.3

Savings on cancellation of obligations
740.8

Unliquidated obligations
(1,874.8)
Net surplus for 2004
2,088.3
Balance at the beginning of year
8,443.8
Balance at the end of year
10,532.1*
* The balance at year-end reported above is attributable to the special account for Buildings Management and is not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c).
As at 31 December 2004, contributions outstanding to the special account for Buildings Management from the VBOs are €4,815,676.
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II. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Preface
UNIDO MISSION STATEMENT
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) is a specialized United Nations agency
dedicated to promoting sustainable industrial development in countries with developing and transition economies.
UNIDO draws on the wide industrial expertise of its staff and the resources of government, the private sector and
other United Nations multilateral and national institutions to create productive employment, competitive economies and
a sound environment.
Fostering growth and productivity is central to UNIDO’s highly focused sectoral, regional and country-specific
programmes. UNIDO is committed to maintaining excellent standards in the implementation of these programmes with
the ultimate aim of assisting the developing countries and transition economies in their struggle against poverty and
marginalization.
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Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies
The following are the significant accounting policies of UNIDO:
(a) UNIDO’s accounts are maintained in accordance with the Financial Regulations of UNIDO, as adopted by
the General Conference, the rules formulated thereunder, administrative instructions in force as at the date of
conversion of UNIDO into a specialized agency, and in conformity with generally accepted government accounting
principles. UNIDO follows the accounting standards as approved by the High-Level Committee on Management
(HLCM) on behalf of the United Nations Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB) at its seventh session and
requested by General Assembly resolution 48/216, and the financial statements, of which these notes form an integral
part, are presented in accordance with those standards, as shown below:
(i) Going concern, consistency and accrual are fundamental accounting assumptions. Where fundamental
accounting assumptions are followed in financial statements, disclosure of such assumptions is not
required. If a fundamental accounting assumption is not followed, that fact should be disclosed
together with the reasons;
(ii) Prudence, substance over form, and materiality should govern the selection and application of
accounting policies;
(iii) Financial statements should include clear and concise disclosure of all significant accounting policies,
which have been used;
(iv) The disclosure of the significant accounting policies used should be an integral part of the financial
statements. The policies should normally be disclosed in one place;
(v) Financial statements should show corresponding figures for the preceding period;
(vi) A change in an accounting policy that has a material effect in the current period or may have a
material effect in subsequent periods should be disclosed together with the reasons. The effect of the
change should, if material, be disclosed and quantified.
(b) The UNIDO financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis of accounting and have not been
adjusted to reflect the effects of changing prices for goods and services.
(c) Until 31 December 2001, the accounts of the Organization were presented in United States dollars. With
effect from January 2002, the currency of accounts was changed to euros (GC.8/Dec.16). Therefore, all assets,
liabilities, reserves and fund balances of the General Fund and other Headquarters funds were converted to euros on
1 January 2002, using the exchange rates approved by the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.15), i.e. ATS 13.7603 = €1
and $1 = €1.123 (or €1 = $0.890472). Most extrabudgetary activities, however, continue to be in United States dollars.
Therefore, for the Organization’s consolidated financial statements purposes, these accounts are converted to euros
using the methodology stated in note 1(g) below.
(d) Fund accounting. The UNIDO accounts are maintained on a “fund accounting” basis. Separate funds for
general or special purposes may be established by the General Conference or the Director-General. Each fund is
maintained as a distinct financial and accounting entity, with a separate self-balancing double-entry group of accounts.
(e) The fiscal period of the Organization is a biennium and consists of two consecutive calendar years.
(f) The income, expenditure, assets and liabilities are recognized on the accrual basis of accounting except for
trust funds, the Industrial Development Fund, Montreal Protocol and Global Environmental Facility. For these funds,
the actual contributions received from donors are shown as income (voluntary contributions), which are held in trust by
UNIDO for the purpose of carrying out the implementation of projects/activities agreed to by the donors.
(g) Translation of currencies. In accordance with General Conference decision GC.8/Dec.16, the accounts of the
Organization are presented in euros. Transactions in other currencies are converted into euros as follows: income,
expenditure and changes in reserves and fund balances at the applicable United Nations operational rate of exchange at
the deemed date of the transaction; and assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances at the applicable United Nations
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operational rate of exchange at the date of the statement (see also note 1 (q) below on Other income—Gain/loss on
exchange).
(h) Assessed contributions. In accordance with financial regulation 5.6, payments made by a Member State are
credited first to the Working Capital Fund and then to the contributions due, in the order in which the Member State
was assessed.
(i) Contributions in kind received or receivable and the value thereof are not accounted for, but disclosed in the
notes to the financial statements. Where necessary, amounts are estimated locally based on a fair commercial value in
an arms-length transaction.
(j) Funds on deposit in interest-bearing bank accounts, certificates of deposit, time deposits and call accounts
are shown in the statements of assets and liabilities as cash.
(k) Deferred charges—shown under other assets:
(i) Deferred charges comprise expenditure items that are not properly chargeable in the current fiscal
period and that will be charged as expenditure in a subsequent fiscal period;
(ii) For balance sheet statement purposes only, that portion of the education grant advance, which is
assumed to pertain to the scholastic year completed as at the date of the financial statement is shown
under deferred charges. The full amount of the advance is maintained in the accounts receivable from
staff members until such time as the staff member produces the required proof of entitlement to the
education grant, at which time the budgetary account is charged and the advance recovered.
(l) Fixed assets. Furniture, equipment, other non-expendables and leasehold improvements are not included in
the assets of the Organization. Acquisitions are charged against budgetary accounts in the year of purchase.
(m) Commitments approved for future fiscal periods that are necessary in the interest of UNIDO, in accordance
with financial rule 109.6, are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements of the respective fund. Such
commitments are normally restricted to administrative requirements of a continuing nature and to other contracts or
legal obligations where long lead times are required for delivery.
(n) No provision is made in the General Fund for end-of-service entitlements or to meet contingencies under
appendix D to the Staff Rules of UNIDO, as funds are provided for in the budget appropriations. However, provision is
made to meet repatriation grant entitlements and contingency liabilities for compensation payments under appendix D
to the Staff Rules for personnel financed by technical cooperation other than UNDP and are calculated on the basis of
one per cent of net base pay.
(o) Special accounts. The General Conference at its ninth session established, with effect from 1 January 2002,
a special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs) and a special account for the Regular
Programme of Technical Cooperation (GC.9/Dec.14). These special accounts are not subject to financial
regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c); thus the budgetary surplus due to Member States excludes the balances available in these
special accounts.
(p) Surpluses due to Member States are funds available for credit to Member States arising from unencumbered
balances of the appropriations and contributions from new Member States. In accordance with financial
regulation 4.2(b), the unencumbered balance of the appropriations at the end of a fiscal period shall be surrendered to
the Members at the end of the first calendar year following the fiscal period after deducting therefrom any contributions
from Members relating to that fiscal period which remain unpaid, and shall be credited to the Members in proportion to
their assessed contributions in accordance with the provisions of the financial regulations 4.2(c) and 5.2(d). Financial
regulation 4.2(c) requires that, before the respective share of the balance is surrendered to any Member that has
outstanding regular budget obligations to the Organization, those obligations shall first be brought to account. Financial
regulation 5.2(d) requires that any balance of the appropriations shall be adjusted against future assessments unless the
General Conference decides otherwise.
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(q) Other income:
(i) One-half of the gross income from the sales of publications is reported under revenue-producing
activities. The other half of income attributable to the sales publications revolving fund less related
costs is disclosed in the note to the General Fund (note 2(b));
(ii) Refunds of expenditures charged to prior fiscal periods are credited to miscellaneous income;
(iii) Moneys accepted in respect of which no purpose is specified are treated as miscellaneous income;
(iv) Gain/loss on exchange arises from transactions conducted in currencies other than euros, for the
general and other Headquarters funds and the revaluation of assets and liabilities held in local
currencies. Unrealized exchange gains are not recorded as income, but set aside in accounts payable on
the grounds of prudence until realized at which point they would be treated as income. Gains arising
from the revaluation of non-euro cash and bank amounts are treated as realized;
(v) Gain/loss on exchange arises from transactions conducted in currencies other than dollars (i.e. for the
dollar-based extrabudgetary technical cooperation activities in annex I, dollar statements) and the
revaluation of assets and liabilities held in non-dollar currencies. Current year obligations have been
revalued at the year-end United Nations operational rate of exchange. Unrealized exchange gains are
not recorded as income, but set aside in accounts payable on the grounds of prudence until realized at
which point they would be treated as income. Gains arising from the revaluation of non-dollar cash
and bank amounts are treated as realized, with the exception of euro cash and bank deposits where
such gains are also set aside in accounts payable, pending utilization in the restoration of purchasing
power to projects with euro expenditures. However, for the euro presentation of dollar-based
extrabudgetary activities in annex I, euro statements, the gain/loss resulting from the revaluation of
non-euro assets, liabilities, reserves and funds balances is shown as “other adjustments to reserves and
funds balances” on statement 1;
(vi) Proceeds from the sale of surplus property are credited to the miscellaneous income of the respective
funds.
(r) Technical cooperation accounts:
(i) The appropriations for the Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation (RPTC) are administered in
accordance with the financial regulations of UNIDO, and in accordance with the General Conference
decision mentioned in paragraph (o) above;
(ii) Allocation income—UNDP. The figures for allocation income from UNDP and UNDP trust funds are
the same as reported for total expenditure in line with UNDP procedures, which require that
allocations be adjusted to equal actual expenditure;
(iii) Contributions income—trust funds and Industrial Development Fund (IDF). Voluntary contributions
from Governments or other donors are recorded upon receipt of cash. The use of such contributions is
governed by agreements between UNIDO and the Government/donor. Upon termination, expiration,
or revision of an agreement or receipt of other instructions from the Government/donor, any surplus
remaining in a trust/other funds is returned to the Government/donor or disposed of as requested by the
Government/donor;
(iv) Interest and miscellaneous income. Interest income arising from the RPTC is credited to the General
Fund; however, the miscellaneous income relating to the RPTC is credited to the special account.
Interest income arising from the special account for Buildings Management is credited to that account,
and finally prorated to the Vienna-based organizations taking into account the funds contributed by
them and the date of receipt of such funds in the account. Interest income arising from UNDP
activities is credited to the operating fund account maintained with that organization. Interest income
arising from the Industrial Development Fund, other than the general-purpose segment, as well as the
trust funds relating to the technical cooperation activities is credited to accounts payable until
instructions regarding its disposal are received from the donor. Interest accrued under the General
Purpose segment of the Industrial Development Fund is credited to that Fund. Interest income
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attributable to the Montreal Protocol is treated immediately as an additional programmable balance.
Interest income credited to the Global Environmental Facility, excluding interest income earned on
funds transferred as UNIDO fees, is set aside as accounts payable pending instructions to its return to
the trustee;
(v) The criteria for recording and reporting unliquidated obligations against the current biennium for the
RPTC are the same as those for the regular budget; however, as stated in paragraph (o) above, these
obligations are not subject to financial regulation 4.2(b) that requires that obligations shall remain
available for twelve months following the end of the fiscal period to which they relate. For all other
technical cooperation fund sources, obligations may be reported as expenditure of the current year on
the basis of the following criteria:
Personnel services
The cost of salaries and related expenses corresponding to services rendered within the calendar year.
Personnel services, in this context, include temporary assistance and overtime as well as consultants
who have subscribed to Special Service Agreements. However, when the remuneration of the
consultant is expressed as a lump sum rather than a sum per period worked, the full cost of the contract
may be treated as an obligation of the current year.
Supplies and equipment
The full cost of contracts or purchase orders entered into prior to the end of the year, whether or not
delivery has been effected, as long as there is budgetary provision in the current period.
Subcontracts
An obligation can be maintained on the basis of the payment schedule included in the signed contract
with the contractor. Where no payment schedule exists, the basis is the estimated timing of payments.
Fellowships
The cost of the fellowship from the date of commencement of study to completion of study or
31 December, whichever is earlier. The fellow must have been placed, i.e. the fellowship awarded to a
named individual and the place, course and the duration of the study established and the recipient
Government notified.
Travel
The full cost of travel, including the cost of transportation, subsistence allowances and other incidental
expenses if travel started prior to the end of the calendar year.
Group training
The cost of activities held in the current year. In the case of activities beginning in one year and
continuing into the next, the full cost of the activity should be charged to the current year.
(vi) Unliquidated obligations for the current period in respect of all technical cooperation activities other
than the regular budget remain valid for 12 months following the end of the year, rather than the
biennium, to which they relate. However, in accordance with UNDP reporting requirements, executing
agencies may retain unliquidated obligations beyond 12 months when a firm liability to pay still exists;
such liabilities are reported as accounts payable in the financial statements. Savings on or the
cancellation of obligations relating to the RPTC are credited to the special account approved by the
General Conference. Savings on or the liquidation of prior period obligations in respect of all other
technical activities are credited to individual projects as a reduction of current period expenditure in
accordance with UNDP reporting requirements. The UNDP requirements are also applied in the case
of the Industrial Development Fund, trust funds, Montreal Protocol and the Global Environmental
Facility.
(s) Trust funds. Director-General’s bulletin UNIDO/DG/B.18/Rev.1 dated 15 May 1992 sets out revised
policies for establishing and managing trust funds with effect from 26 May 1992. Extrabudgetary funds provided to
reimburse the Organization for the use of its facilities are excluded from the provisions of UNIDO/DG/B.18/Rev.1.
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(t) Special account for programme support costs:
(i) Reimbursement for programme support costs is provided for in respect of extrabudgetary technical
cooperation activities. Reimbursement is calculated as a percentage of programme resources
expended. The Montreal Protocol Fund, under a new arrangement that became effective January 2003,
makes an annual lump sum payment of US$ 1.5 million as support cost for the implementation of its
programme/projects; this amount is recorded as current year income. The Fund also pays a reduced
support cost in respect of each of its projects, which, similar to most other technical cooperation
activities, is calculated as a percentage of programme resources expended;
(ii) In the financial statements of the Organization, the special account for programme support costs is
shown separately from the inter-organization funds, from which its income derives;
(iii) Unliquidated obligations in respect of the special account for programme support costs are accounted
for on the same basis as for the regular budget.
(u) Ex gratia payments made in accordance with financial rule 109.13 are reported in the notes to the financial
statements of the respective fund pursuant to financial regulation 9.3.
Note 2. General Fund and Working Capital Fund
(a) Assessed contributions
The General Conference approved an amount of €142,000,000 for the regular budget for the biennium 2004-2005
(GC.10/Dec.17) to be financed from contributions by Member States, one half of which €71,000,000 was assessed to
Member States for 2004, in accordance with financial regulation 5.1(c). Full provision is made for contributions
outstanding from prior years of €110,666,788 as at 31 December 2004.
(b) Revenue-producing activities
Gross revenue from the sale of UNIDO publications was €75,455, one-half of which (€37,727) was transferred to
the sales publications revolving fund. Sales promotional activities and other costs charged to the sales publications
revolving fund of €26,576 resulted in a net surplus for the year 2004 of €11,152. The net balance of the sales
publications revolving fund as at 31 December 2004 is €132,267.
(c) Interest income in excess of the budgetary estimates
Interest income in excess of the budgetary estimate (€660,500) for the year 2004 is €57,870; actual amount, if any,
due for distribution to eligible Member States will be determined at the end of the biennium. Pursuant to decision
GC.8/Dec.10, this amount is added to accounts payable established for this purpose in 1999. As at 31 December 2004,
the balance on this account was €289,527, out of which funds amounting to €231,657 were credited to eligible Member
States, in accordance with the “S” curve formula, when their assessed contributions for the year 2005 were calculated.
(d) Currency exchange adjustments
The amount of €174,307 represents the net realized exchange gain from regular budget activities.
An unrealized exchange gain of €600,063 resulting from the revaluation of non-euro monetary assets and
liabilities using the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at 31 December 2004 has not been recorded as
income, but set aside within “accounts payable—other” until realized. Of this amount, €386,000 is attributable to the
revaluation of the outstanding loan from the United Nations.
(e) Miscellaneous income
Of the total miscellaneous income, an amount of €171,127 relates to CTBTO support costs charged on BMS
activities.
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(f) Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation
In accordance with General Conference decision GC.9/Dec.14, a special account was established for fully
programmable appropriations under the RPTC, not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c). Funds from
cancellation of obligations, if any, would be retained in the special account for carrying out RPTC activities. As of
31 December 2004, the accumulated fund balance in the special account amounts to €2,867,824, including a transfer of
€399,728 during 2004.
(g) Prior biennium adjustments
The total adjustment of €119,311 in 2004 comprises:
(i) A charge of €3,000 for the biennium 1996-1997 in respect for a payment made to a UNIDO staff
member as recommended by the Joint Appeals Board;
(ii) A payment against the biennium 1998-1999 of €50,853 to a UNIDO staff member as recommended by
the Joint Appeals Board;
(iii) Biennium 2000-2001 charges of €23,137 related to IAEA library staff costs;
(iv) Various late charges for the biennium 2002-2003 of €42,321 including €18,291 for projects under
IDDA.
(h) Savings on or cancellation of obligations from the prior biennium
An amount of €3,277,774 net saving arises from the cancellation of 2002-2003 obligations. This amount consists
of savings on the cancellation of obligations from the prior biennium of €3,287,665 less €9,891 exchange loss on
liquidation of prior biennium IDDA obligations.
(i) Accounts receivable—other
“Accounts receivable—other” include the Organization’s claim amounting to €955,784 submitted to the
Government of the United States of America in respect of United States income tax reimbursed to UNIDO staff
members during the period 1994 to 1996 under the Tax Reimbursement Agreement. The Government of the United
States of America had communicated to the Organization that it acknowledges this debt, however, no payment was
received during 2004.
The Organization’s claim to the International Atomic Energy Agency under the cost-sharing agreement for
termination indemnity costs for Buildings Management staff separated during the 1995 staff reduction exercise is not
resolved. The amount claimed is $644,453 (€723,720 at the United Nations operational rate of exchange approved by
the ninth session of the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.15)). A provision for a possible write off of this receivable is
included in accounts payable.
(j) Assessed contributions received in advance
Assessed contributions of €1,324,078 were received in advance from Member States in 2004 to be applied against
the 2005 assessment.
(k) Borrowings
At the time UNIDO became a specialized agency, an interest-free loan of $16,000,000 was received from the
United Nations. The loan is repayable at the rate of $1,000,000 a year, commencing in 1990. The total amount due as at
31 December 2004 amounts to $1,000,000 (€737,000 at the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at
31 December 2004).
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(l) Other reserves
Other reserves comprise the following:
€000’s
Separation indemnity reserves
5,499.3
Sales Publication Revolving Fund
132.3
Reserve for exchange rate fluctuations 1,840.8
Special account for RPTC
2,867.8
10,340.2
(m) Separation indemnity reserves
Pursuant to decision GC.6/Dec.15, paragraph (e), the amount of $9,546,732 representing the balance of
appropriations for the biennium 1992-1993, which was actually received by the Organization, was transferred to a
separation indemnity reserve in 1995. The reserve balance of €1,109,698 at the beginning of the year was unchanged at
31 December 2004 as no payments were made during 2004. Pursuant to General Conference decision GC.7/Dec.17, the
amount of $13.9 million was transferred from the unencumbered balance of appropriations for the biennium 1994-1995
for the funding of the separation indemnity reserve to meet the cost of staff separations resulting from the 1998-1999
programme and budgets. Unlike the previous allocation from the 1992-1993 biennium, the allocation from the
1994-1995 biennium was not supported by the actual cash, as large arrears for this biennium exist. This reserve had
effectively been reduced to $3,908,824 (€4,389,609) by payments made during the period 1998-2001 of $9,991,176. No
payments were made during 2004, thus the balance remained at €4,389,609. The total under separation indemnity
reserves as at 31 December 2004 was €5,499,308.
(n) Reserve for exchange rate fluctuations
In order to protect the Organization from exchange rate fluctuations resulting from the introduction of the euro as
a single currency for the preparation of the programme and budgets, appropriation and assessment, collection of
contributions and advances, and currency of accounts, the General Conference in decision GC.8/Dec.16 authorized the
Director-General to establish a reserve, not subject to the provisions of the financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c). The
balance of €1,840,776 as at 31 December 2004 in the reserve represents the amount set aside during the previous
biennium.
(o) Working Capital Fund
The amount of the Working Capital Fund was set by the General Conference at $9 million (GC.2/Dec.27). The
level of the Fund was reduced to $6,750,000 (GC.6/Dec.16) for the biennium 1996-1997 and was further reduced to
$6,610,000 for the biennium 1998-1999 (GC.7/Dec.12); $6,610,000 was approved for the biennium 2000-2001
(GC.8/Dec.14), and the biennium 2002-2003 (GC.9/Dec.13). Effective 1 January 2002, the amount ($6,610,000) was
converted to euros in accordance with GC.9/Dec.15, resulting in a Working Capital Fund of €7,423,030. The General
Conference decided (GC.10/Dec.15) to maintain the Fund at the same level for the biennium 2004-2005.
(p) Surplus due to Member States
The following is an analysis of the surpluses due to Member States, expressed in millions of euros, after
application of the provision for the delay in the collection of assessed contributions. The provision represents
contributions receivable from Member States for prior bienniums and from new Member States at the balance sheet
date. As at the balance sheet date, the surpluses due for distribution—representing assessed contributions received after
the end of a biennium together with receipts from new Member States are set aside in “accounts payable—other”,
pending receipt of Member States’ instructions. Of the total amount due for distribution of €3,624,342 as at
31 December 2004, an amount of €536,534 was applied against the 2005 assessments.
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Surplus
Surpluses disposed
and applied to
assessments
Prior
biennium
adjustments
Surpluses due
for
distribution
Provisions for
delays in the
collection of
contributions
Surpluses
due to
Member
States
Remarks
2004
2002-2003
2000-2001
1998-1999
1996-1997
(GC.8/Res.4)
13.6
10.3
10.3
14.3
46.9
3.7
5.3
7.1
0.1
2.2
0.5
0.6
0.2
7.9
6.0
8.2
40.0
13.6
0.2
0.1
0.1
(0.4)
Provisional
1994-1995
(GC.7/Dec.17)
35.4
15.6
44.9
(25.1)
1992-1993
(GC.6/Dec.15)
(GC.8/Dec.10)
(GC.8/Res.4)
16.5
14.4
0.1
2.0
0.0
1990-1991
9.8
1.3
8.5
Retained –
GC.5/Dec.14
1988-1989
7.3
0.2
7.1
Retained –
GC.4/Dec.15
1986-1987
(GC.4/Dec.15)
4.8
4.8
0.0
Total
169.2
50.9
0.1
3.6
110.5
4.1
Contributions
from new
Member States
1.9
1.7
0.0
0.2
0.0
Total
171.1
52.6
0.1
3.6
110.7
4.1
(q) Eliminations
Eliminations comprise two elements as shown below:
(a) Buildings Management Service costs charged to UNIDO. An amount of €3,101,107 is eliminated from both
operating costs and contractual services to avoid double counting of UNIDO’s contribution to buildings management
costs;
(b) Expenditure of €5,106,636 on RPTC and SRA activities is re-analysed into its component parts.
(r) Long-term contracts
Long-term contracts awarded for the operation of the VIC are not reported as commitments, as they may be
terminated at any time without penalty.
(s) Commitments
Commitments of €420,038 representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years
were entered into prior to 31 December 2004.
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(t) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at €152,011 were received from Member States in support of UNIDO field offices
during the year.
(u) Ex gratia payments
No ex gratia payments were made in 2004.
(v) Non-expendable equipment
The following table shows the non-expendable equipment, at cost, expressed in millions of euros, according to the
cumulative inventory records of UNIDO as at 31 December 2004. In accordance with UNIDO accounting policies, non-
expendable equipment is not included in the fixed assets of the Organization, but is charged against the appropriations
when acquired. The minimum euro value per item of non-expendable property is €1,500.
Balance as at 1 January 2004
12.6
Adjustments to the opening balance 0.1
Adjusted balance at 1 January 2004
12.7
Add: acquisitions during 2004
0.5
Deduct: disposals during 2004
1.0
Balance as at 31 December 2004
12.2
During the year 2004, non-expendable equipment to the value of €409 was reported as stolen and written off in
the inventory records.
(w) Contingent liabilities
(i)
End-of-service payment to staff
In accordance with the decision taken by the Panel of External Auditors in 1989 at Manila, UNIDO calculated the
amounts required to cover the estimated costs of contingency liabilities for end-of-service payment as at 31 December
2004.
In line with United Nations accounting standards, liabilities for end-of-service payments comprise end-of-service
allowance, repatriation grant and compensation for accrued annual leave. To provide a more realistic picture, the
amount required for the removal of household goods has also been included. The valuation is based on the United
Nations salary scale and the entitlements defined in the staff regulations and rules, as well as taking into account the
actual cost of staff separating during the year 2004. The amounts are estimated to be:
Regular budget
€19.2 million
Operational budget € 4.4 million
Post retirement benefits are excluded.
It should be noted that no budgetary provision has been made, except that in the case of the operational budget, as
reflected in statement II and note 3(f) (operating reserve).
(ii) The United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund
UNIDO is a member organization participating in the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, which was
established by the United Nations General Assembly to provide retirement, death, disability and related benefits. The
Pension Fund is a funded defined benefit plan. The financial obligation of the Organization to the United Nations Joint
Staff Pension Fund consists of its mandated contribution at the rate established by the United Nations General
Assembly, together with any share of any actuarial deficiency payments under Article 26 of the Regulations of the
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Fund. Such deficiency payments are only payable if and when the United Nations General Assembly has invoked the
provision of Article 26, following determination that there is a requirement for deficiency payments based on an
assessment of the actuarial sufficiency of the Fund as of the valuation date. At the time of this report, the United
Nations General Assembly has not invoked this provision.
(iii) After-service health insurance
Staff members (their spouses, dependent children or survivors) retiring from service under the Pension Fund
regulations at age 55 or later are eligible for after-service health insurance coverage after having been a participant in a
contributory health insurance scheme of the common system for at least 10 years. The same applies to staff members
receiving compensation for disability under Appendix D to the staff rules. Costs of participation in this scheme are
borne on the basis of joint contributions by UNIDO and the participants concerned.
During the year 2004, the Organization’s contribution to the scheme amounted to €1,659,567. The contributions
against the Buildings Management Services amounted to €57,538, which were cost-shared with other Vienna-based
organizations. In accordance with Programme and Budget Committee conclusion 2000/2, a detailed actuarial study to
determine the financial impact of the after-service health insurance was carried out, which showed the level of unfunded
liabilities as at December 2004 to be €35.2 million ($47.7 million based on the year-end exchange rate). A United
Nations system-wide solution is being sought to address the issue of unfunded liabilities. The lead agency on this issue,
established by the High-Level Committee on Management, Financial and Budget Network, is the United Nations who
are scheduled to submit a report to the General Assembly in 2005.
(x) Common Fund for Major Repairs and Replacements
On 1 January 1981, an agreement between the Republic of Austria, the United Nations and the IAEA went into
effect to establish a common fund for the purpose of financing the cost of major repairs and replacements of buildings,
facilities and technical installations, which are the property of the Republic of Austria and form part of the Headquarters
areas of the United Nations and IAEA at the Vienna International Centre. This agreement has also applied to UNIDO
since 1986, when it became a specialized agency. The Fund is administered by UNIDO through a joint committee.
Annual financial statements are prepared by UNIDO and audited by its Internal Oversight Group.
In 2002, an agreement was reached between the Vienna-based organizations and the Republic of Austria under
which reimbursement of the disbursements made during the year 2001 ($988,626) was not required. Under this
agreement, there will only be annual assessed contributions to the Fund as follows: the Republic of Austria
(€1,235,300) and the Vienna-based organizations (€1,235,300). Furthermore, unexpected major repairs and
replacements, which are not included in the agreed investment plan, will have to be shared by all parties. In the past,
such costs were fully absorbed by the Austrian Government.
The fund balance as at 31 December 2004 is €1,936,547.
Note 3. Other Headquarters funds
(a) Funds reported under this heading comprise:
(i) Special Account for Programme Support Costs;
(ii) Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting (COMFAR);
(iii) Buildings Management Services (BMS).
(b) With effect from 1 January 2002, the General Conference approved (GC.9/Dec.17) BMS as a separate, self-
balancing major programme in the programme and budgets of UNIDO. All BMS expenditures are offset by income, i.e.
contributions received from other Vienna-based organizations and from UNIDO. Consequently, under the UNIDO
General Fund, only UNIDO’s share of the BMS operations is included (reference IDB.24/3-PBC.17/3). In view of the
above, the BMS is reported under other funds rather than under General Fund and Working Capital Fund from the
previous biennium. The General Fund and Working Capital Fund now show only UNIDO’s contribution to BMS costs.
The BMS operations are further split into two components:
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(i) Staff costs: This continues to be subject to the provisions of financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c);
(ii) Special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs): The ninth session of
the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.14), established with effect from January 2002, a special account
for BMS (for other than staff costs), which is not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c).
Thus the budgetary surplus, if any, will not require distribution to Member States. Each Vienna-based
organization (UNIDO, IAEA, UNOV and CTBTO) is required to pay its share into this account.
Interest income is credited to the account. This amount is then prorated to each Vienna-based
organization taking into account the funds contributed by it and the date of receipt of such funds in the
special account.
Additional analysis of BMS operations is provided in schedule 4.1 (supplementary) and the analysis on the special
account is provided in annex III. The surplus on the special account for BMS costs of €10,532,077 does not form part of
the unencumbered balances of the appropriations due to Member States at the end of the biennium; this amount includes
€4,815,676 due from the Vienna-based organizations. The accumulation of funds under the special account is primarily
caused by the delay experienced in the removal of asbestos from the VIC complex and related maintenance work.
(c) Currency adjustment
The €415,683 exchange difference results primarily from the revaluation of the United States dollar cash and term
deposits held by the special account for programme support costs.
(d) Net excess (shortfall) of income over expenditure
The following is an analysis of income and expenditure during the year 2004 for the funds reported under this
heading:
Table 1
Special account for
programme support
costs
Computer Model for
Feasibility and Analysis
Buildings
Management
Services
Total
(In thousands of euros)
Income (including savings on cancellation of
obligations from prior biennium)
9,296.8
276.9
21,325.4
30,899.1
Expenditure (including loss on exchange)
8,779.5
367.7
19,237.1
28,384.3
Net (shortfall) of income over expenditure
517.3
(90.8)
2,088.3*
2,514.8
* Relates to the special account (see annex III).
(e) Accounts receivable—other
Within the Special Account for Buildings Management Services, there is an amount of €349,061 representing a
claim for reimbursement from the Austrian authorities for stranded costs, Renewable Energy Surcharge and KWK-
Zuschlag. In the unlikely event of the claim not being settled, full provision has been made within “accounts payable—
other”.
The first instalment of €1,220,000 due from the Austrian Government towards the replacement of carpets and
cables at the Vienna International Centre is reflected within “accounts receivable—other”. Pending the disbursement of
the funds, €1,000,000 of this amount is shown under “accounts payable—other”. The balance €220,000 is reported in
the financial statements of major repairs and replacements fund.
(f) Operating reserve
An operating reserve, established in respect of the special account for programme support costs in accordance
with PBC conclusion 1989/4 at $5,504,190 was reduced to $4,300,000 (€4,828,900) in accordance with Board decision
IDB.14/Dec.12.
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The net reserve as at 31 December 2004 amounts to €3,650,469 (€3,133,155 at 31 December 2003) as a result of a
net surplus of €517,313 for 2004.
(g) Commitments
Commitments, representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years, were entered
into prior to 31 December 2004 as below.
€000’s
Special account for programme support costs 84.5
Buildings Management Services
53.7
(h) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at €72,952 were received from Member States in support of UNIDO projects.
Note 4. Technical cooperation
(a) Technical cooperation activities
Technical cooperation activities reported under this heading comprise activities executed by UNIDO with funds
provided through the Industrial Development Fund, trust funds and inter-organization arrangements with UNDP, UNEP
and other organizations. These activities are governed by various agreements signed by two or more parties, i.e.
donor(s) and UNIDO.
(b) Euro presentation of technical cooperation activities
The significant majority of voluntary contributions are received in United States dollars for projects
programmable almost exclusively in that currency. From 2004, euro-based management of technical cooperation
programmes was introduced for some projects. In accordance with General Conference decision GC.9/Dec.15, donor
reporting is also undertaken in United States dollars.
However, in order to present consolidated financial statements (Statements I and II) of UNIDO for the year ending
31 December 2004, all technical cooperation activities required conversion to euros.
Annex I, Tables 1 and 2 are, therefore, provided in both United States dollars and euros.
The approach for preparing the euro statement is based on the following:
(i) Non-euro income, expenditure and changes in reserves and fund balances—other than as highlighted
below—will be stated at the equivalent amount of euros applicable as at the deemed date of the
transaction applying the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at that date;
(ii) Non-euro assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004 will be converted to a
euro equivalent using the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at 31 December 2004
(reference GC.9/Dec.15). The gain or loss that would result from these revaluations is reflected in the
“other adjustments to reserves and fund balances” figure;
(iii) The currency exchange adjustment figure essentially represents the realized gain or loss on non-euro
transactions during the year and the savings achieved in 2004 on the liquidation of prior year United
States dollar obligations.
(c) Montreal Protocol promissory notes
Promissory notes in favour of UNIDO held by the Multilateral Fund for the implementation of the Montreal
Protocol to the value of $20,264,334 (€16,231,732) at 31 December 2003 were encashed during 2004.
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(d) Interest on donor funds
For the Industrial Development Fund, other than the general pool, and from the last biennium for trust funds,
interest earned from the investment of funds, net of bank charges, realized exchange gains, realized and unrealized
losses is represented as a liability within “accounts payable—other”. As at 31 December 2004, the amounts were as
follows:
US$ 000’s
€000’s
Industrial Development Fund
5,801.9
4,276.0
Trust funds
2,748.7
2,025.8
Global Environment Fund
361.4
266.4
8,912.0
6,568.2
The disposal of the interest income is governed by agreements with donors. This may include the return of such
funds to donors, or their transfer to other projects, in which case they will be shown as voluntary contributions.
(e) Unrealized exchange gains and losses
In accordance with the United Nations System Accounting Standards, monetary assets and liabilities are revalued
at the United Nations operational rate of exchange in effect at 31 December 2004.
Any resultant unrealized gain is not recorded as income for the period, but set aside within “accounts payable—
other”. Gains arising from revaluation of cash and term deposits are considered realized, however specifically, for the
Industrial Development Fund and trust funds, any gain arising from the revaluation of euro cash and term deposits are
similarly set aside on the grounds of prudence (IDB.27/9-PBC.19/9 and decision IDB.27/Dec.5). Under the transition to
a single currency system, and in accordance with document IDB.28/9 and decision IDB.28/Dec.5, the euro-based
management of technical cooperation programmes was introduced during the year 2004. Consequently, distributions of
€789,415 ($985,537) and €832,467 ($1,039,285) were made to the Industrial Development Fund and trust funds,
respectively. The accumulated amounts of unrealized gains as at 31 December 2004, included in “accounts payable—
other”, are as follows:
US$ 000’s
€000’s
Industrial Development Fund
1,831.5
1,349.8
Trust funds
6,575.3
4,846.0
Global Environment Facility
0.6
0.4
Montreal Protocol
1.5
1.1
8,408.9
6,197.3
(f) Currency exchange adjustment
Annex I, table 1—US dollar statements
Table A shows the analysis of the currency exchange credit. A distinction is drawn between realized gains and
losses resulting through the conduct of transactions in other than United States dollars and gains and losses resulting
from the re-statement of non-United States dollar assets and liability values to an equivalent dollar value as at
31 December 2004.
For these funds, where contributions are received, programmed and disbursed almost exclusively in United States
dollars, any realized gains and both realized and unrealized losses from the revaluation of non-United States dollar
assets and liabilities, are recorded through table 1 and the programmable fund balance adjusted accordingly.
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Table A
Regular Programme
Montreal Protocol
GEF
IOA*
Total
(In thousands of US dollars)
Realized
On 2004 transactions
4.1
(0.1)
3.4
7.4
Unrealized
Revaluation of non-US dollar assets and liabilities
at 31 December 2004
(58.1)
1.4
(6.9)
(1.2)
(64.8)
Currency exchange adjustment
(54.0)
1.3
(3.5)
(1.2)
(57.4)
* IOA – Inter-organization arrangements.
Annex I, table 1—euro statements
Table B shows the analysis of the currency exchange credit. A distinction is drawn between realized gains and
losses resulting through the conduct of transactions in other than euros and the savings resulting from the settlement of
United States dollar obligations from prior years at a different euro rate of exchange.
Table B
Regular
programme
IDF
Montreal
Protocol
GEF
Trust fund
Total
(In thousands of euros)
Revaluation of US$ obligations
113.7
113.7
Realized
On 2004 transactions
1.9
(17.6)
(0.8)
(16.5)
On liquidation of prior year US$ obligations
(70.1)
(424.9)
(325.3)
(33.4)
(355.1)
(1,208.8)
Currency exchange adjustment
45.5
(424.9)
(342.9)
(34.2)
(355.1)
(1,111.6)
(g) Transfers to reserves
This represents the charge to projects in respect of the provision for compensation payments under Appendix D to
the staff rules.
The amount of $1,100,000 (€962,500) reflected in transfers to/from reserves represents the income received for
Global Environment Facility (GEF) projects under inter-organization arrangements with UNEP, previously recorded in
GEF main programme.
(h) Surplus
The amount of $3,101,237 (€2,285,613) represents the accumulated surplus under the general-purpose segment of
the Industrial Development Fund.
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(i) Cash and term deposits
The equivalent of $1,491,424 (€1,099,180) is held in currencies classified as non-convertible, as follows:
US$ 000’s
€000’s
Industrial Development Fund 1,083.1
798.2
Trust funds
408.3
300.9
1,491.4
1,099.1
(j) Operating reserves
The Industrial Development Board, in decision IDB.2/Dec.7, authorized the freezing of the operational reserve of
the Industrial Development Fund at $550,000 (€405,350 at the United Nations rate of exchange as at 31 December
2004).
(k) Commitments
Commitments, representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years, were entered
into prior to 31 December 2004, as below:
US$ 000’s
€000’s
Industrial Development Fund
3,232.3
2,515.3
Montreal Protocol
5,651.7
4,452.3
Global Environment Facility
4,033.8
3,262.7
Trust funds
5,738.0
4,474.4
Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation 784.1
618.9
Inter-organization arrangements
1,345.1
1,065.6
20,785.0
16,389.2
(l) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at $343,476 (€278,106) were received from Member States in support of UNIDO
projects and $39,778 (€32,207) in support of project travel.
(m) Ex gratia payments
No ex gratia payments were made in 2004.
(n) Field IOVs
The backlog of unprocessed field inter-office vouchers (IOVs) of $8,473,317 brought forward from the previous
year, together with a total of $19,863,927 inter-office vouchers received for the year 2004 was reduced to $4,528,761
(€3,337,697) by 31 December 2004. The unprocessed IOV balance at year-end comprises payroll charges of $509,757
for the entire 2004 received only in January 2005 and IOVs of $485,056 rejected due to insufficient information.
(o) Lost or stolen non-expendable equipment
No non-expendable equipment was written off from inventory as lost or stolen during 2004.
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Notes to the financial statements—Annex I
TECHNICAL COOPERATION ACTIVITIES EXECUTED BY UNIDO
Table 1. Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves
and fund balances for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Regular
Programme
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol
GEF
Trust
Fund
Inter-
organization
arrangements
Subtotal
Extra-
budgetary
Funds
Total
INCOME
Assessed contributions
Voluntary contributions
25,611.8 39,262.6
45,274.5
1,051.1 111,200.0 111,200.0
Other income
– Funds received under inter-
organization arrangements
5,048.0
5,048.0
5,048.0
– Allocations from other funds
3,914.2
3,914.2
– Interest income
12.2
641.3
28.7
682.2
682.2
– Currency exchange adjustments
45.5
(424.9)
(342.9)
(34.2)
(355.1)
(1,157.1)
(1,111.6)
– Miscellaneous
(0.3)
(2.2)
(11.7)
0.7
(0.3)
(13.5)
(13.8)
TOTAL INCOME
3,959.4
25,196.9 39,549.3
(34.2) 44,920.1
6,127.5 115,759.6 119,719.0
EXPENDITURE
Salaries and common staff costs
1,733.8
10,678.2
1,533.9
722.4 11,576.6
2,070.0
26,581.1
28,314.9
Contractual services
902.5
996.7 19,382.5
3,361.7
3,393.2
1,236.0
28,370.1
29,272.6
Operational expenses
162.2
967.4
384.6
24.6
822.6
118.0
2,317.2
2,479.4
Acquisitions
739.6
1,653.4
8,682.8
2,224.1
1,718.2
14,278.5
15,018.1
Fellowships
421.3
1,119.3
351.8
1.2
2,184.5
393.1
4,049.9
4,471.2
Programme support costs
1,869.8
4,002.3
450.9
1,886.0
336.9
8,545.9
8,545.9
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
3,959.4
17,284.8 34,337.9
4,560.8 22,087.0
5,872.2
84,142.7
88,102.1
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE
7,912.1
5,211.4 (4,595.0) 22,833.1
255.3
31,616.9
31,616.9
Prior biennium adjustments
Provision for delay in collection of
contributions
NET EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE
7,912.1
5,211.4 (4,595.0) 22,833.1
255.3
31,616.9
31,616.9
Savings on cancellation of prior
biennium’s obligations
Transfers to reserves
51.5
5.4
4.1
42.2
103.2
103.2
Transfers from reserves
Transfers to/from other funds
(962.5)
962.5
Credits to Member States
Other adjustments to reserves and
fund balances
(3,037.6) (3,086.0)
264.0 (3,539.1)
(158.8)
(9,557.5)
(9,557.5)
Reserves and fund balances,
beginning of year
36,772.7 26,730.3
7,461.7 28,849.4
99,814.1
99,814.1
RESERVES AND FUND
BALANCES, END OF YEAR
41,698.7 28,861.1
2,172.3 48,185.6
1,059.0 121,976.7 121,976.7
Page 37
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Table 1. Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves
and fund balances for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of United States dollars)
Regular
Programme
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol
GEF
Trust
Fund
Inter-
organization
arrangements
Subtotal
Extra-
budgetary
Funds
Total
INCOME
Assessed contributions
Voluntary contributions
32,415.2 46,750.9
56,884.9
1,300.0 137,351.0 137,351.0
Other income
– Funds received under inter-
organization arrangements
6,244.1
6,244.1
6,244.1
– Allocations from other funds
4,994.1
4,994.1
– Interest income
16.3
814.0
38.1
868.4
868.4
– Currency exchange adjustments
(54.0)
1.3
(3.5)
(1.2)
(3.4)
(57.4)
– Miscellaneous
(0.4)
(2.8)
(14.6)
1.1
(0.4)
(16.7)
(17.1)
TOTAL INCOME
4,939.7
32,428.7 47,551.6
(3.5) 56,886.0
7,580.6 144,443.4 149,383.1
EXPENDITURE
Salaries and common staff costs
2,171.4
13,397.1
1,913.9
901.0 14,488.8
2,596.9
33,297.7
35,469.1
Contractual services
1,107.7
1,258.9 23,213.2
3,815.2
4,143.4
1,497.2
33,927.9
35,035.6
Operational expenses
199.9
1,231.4
488.2
30.9
1,037.3
146.4
2,934.2
3,134.1
Acquisitions
933.8
2,122.3 10,830.5
2,833.1
2,096.3
17,882.2
18,816.0
Fellowships
526.9
1,460.8
448.3
4.3
2,735.5
493.2
5,142.1
5,669.0
Programme support costs
2,352.2
4,875.3
518.1
2,336.5
413.7
10,495.8
10,495.8
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
4,939.7
21,822.7 41,769.4
5,269.5 27,574.6
7,243.7 103,679.9 108,619.6
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE
10,606.0
5,782.2 (5,273.0) 29,311.4
336.9
40,763.5
40,763.5
Prior biennium adjustments
Provision for delay in collection of
contributions
NET EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE
10,606.0
5,782.2 (5,273.0) 29,311.4
336.9
40,763.5
40,763.5
Savings on cancellation of prior
biennium’s obligations
Transfers to reserves
64.5
6.8
5.1
52.4
128.8
128.8
Transfers from reserves
Transfers to/from other funds
(1,100.0)
1,100.0
Credits to Member States
Other adjustments to reserves and
fund balances
Reserves and fund balances,
beginning of year
45,908.5 33,371.2
9,315.5 36,016.8
124,612.0 124,612.0
RESERVES AND FUND
BALANCES, END OF YEAR
56,579.0 39,160.2
2,947.6 65,380.6
1,436.9 165,504.3 165,504.3
Page 38
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Page 38
Table 2. Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances
as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol
GEF
Trust Fund
Inter-
organization
arrangements
Total
2004
ASSETS
Cash and term deposits
51,161.1
46,079.1
5,669.1
62,278.6
8,569.9 173,757.8
Accounts receivable
Assessed contributions receivable from
Member States
Voluntary contributions receivable
Other contributions receivable
154.7
154.7
Less provision for delay in collection of
contributions
Interfund balances
120.4
72.9
301.4
1,196.4
1,691.1
Other
575.2
395.9
81.2
555.3
284.3
1,891.9
Other assets
44.9
8.1
0.1
89.4
4,056.8
4,199.3
TOTAL ASSETS
51,781.2
46,603.5
5,823.3
63,224.7
14,262.1 181,694.8
LIABILITIES
Payments or contributions received in advance
7,780.6
7,780.6
Unliquidated obligations
3,216.8
11,866.5
2,578.6
5,692.5
2,647.9
26,002.3
Accounts payable
Interfund balances
211.0
97.8
308.8
Other
6,654.7
5,875.9
1,072.4
9,346.6
2,676.8
25,626.4
Other funds and special accounts
Other liabilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES
10,082.5
17,742.4
3,651.0
15,039.1
13,203.1
59,718.1
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
Operating reserves
405.3
405.3
Other reserves
1,017.6
12.1
12.8
878.8
1,921.3
Balances relating to projects funded by donors
37,990.2
28,849.0
2,159.5
47,306.8
1,059.0 117,364.5
Working capital funds
Surplus (deficit)
2,285.6
2,285.6
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
41,698.7
28,861.1
2,172.3
48,185.6
1,059.0 121,976.7
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND
FUND BALANCES
51,781.2
46,603.5
5,823.3
63,224.7
14,262.1 181,694.8
Page 39
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Page 39
Table 2. Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances
as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of United States dollars)
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol
GEF
Trust Fund
Inter-
organization
arrangements
Total
2004
ASSETS
Cash and term deposits
69,418.0
62,522.5
7,692.1
84,502.7
11,628.2
235,763.5
Accounts receivable
Assessed contributions receivable
from Member States
Voluntary contributions receivable
Other contributions receivable
209.9
209.9
Less provision for delay in collection
of contributions
Interfund balances
163.4
98.9
409.1
1,623.4
2,294.8
Other
780.4
537.2
110.2
753.5
385.8
2,567.1
Other assets
61.0
10.9
0.2
121.3
5,504.4
5,697.8
TOTAL ASSETS
70,259.4
63,234.0
7,901.4
85,786.6
19,351.6
246,533.0
LIABILITIES
Payments or contributions received in advance
10,557.1
10,557.1
Unliquidated obligations
4,364.7
16,101.0
3,498.7
7,724.0
3,592.8
35,281.2
Accounts payable
Interfund balances
286.3
132.8
419.1
Other
9,029.4
7,972.8
1,455.1
12,682.0
3,632.0
34,771.3
Other funds and special accounts
Other liabilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES
13,680.4
24,073.8
4,953.8
20,406.0
17,914.7
81,028.7
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
Operating reserves
550.0
550.0
Other reserves
1,380.7
16.4
17.4
1,192.4
2,606.9
Balances relating to projects funded by donors
51,547.1
39,143.8
2,930.2
64,188.2
1,436.9
159,246.2
Working capital funds
Surplus (deficit)
3,101.2
3,101.2
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND
BALANCES
56,579.0
39,160.2
2,947.6
65,380.6
1,436.9
165,504.3
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES
AND FUND BALANCES
70,259.4
63,234.0
7,901.4
85,786.6
19,351.6
246,533.0
Page 40
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Page 40
Table 3. Summary of transactions on sub-accounts of the Industrial Development Fund
for the year 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In United States dollars)
Fund balance
at 01/01/2004
Cash received
in 2004
Expenditures
2004
Misc. income
incl. General
Pool interest
Fund balance
as at 31/12/2004
General-purpose convertible
2,902,353
371,370
187,874
15,387
3,101,237
Agence de Coopération Culturelle et Technique
30,295
0
0
0
30,295
Agence Wallonne à l’Exportation
425,247
46,288
236,312
0
235,223
Argentina
20,170
0
0
0
20,170
Australia
55,469
295
0
0
55,764
Austria
3,789,938
4,422,282
2,477,029
(20)
5,735,170
Austria—Integrated Programme
430,401
12,608
119,420
(336)
323,253
Bahrain
120,293
409,090
389,268
0
140,115
Belgium
130,736
183,451
152,398
0
161,790
Brazil
75,117
0
13,735
0
61,383
Chile
0
10,000
0
0
10,000
China
1,973,501
530,990
143,218
0
2,361,273
Côte d’Ivoire
(108,618)
0
0
0
(108,618)
Czech Republic (Ministry of Agriculture)
106,770
138,660
103,136
0
142,294
Czech Republic (Ministry of Trade and Industry)
28
(28)
0
0
0
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
41,439
714
0
0
42,153
Denmark
4,908,809
85,699
1,663,589
(463)
3,330,455
Egypt
(101,718)
0
0
0
(101,718)
Finland
214,660
3,781
8,198
0
210,242
France
199,467
803,158
793,971
0
208,653
France (Ministry of Agriculture)
678,961
201,904
274,879
0
605,987
Germany
375,639
(29,673)
21,163
0
324,803
Germany—Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische
Zusammenarbeit
28,098
0
23,698
0
4,400
Greece
368,685
1,134,142
538,941
0
963,886
Guatemala
12,201
545,556
115,733
0
442,025
Honduras
193
(193)
0
0
0
Hungary
373,557
7,829
94,858
337
286,866
India
3,766,057
1,128,540
726,565
9,972
4,178,004
Indonesia
14,986
14,784
0
0
29,770
Ireland
31,909
807
867
0
31,849
Italy
8,947,939
9,563,983
5,370,716
(767)
13,140,438
Japan
688,385
1,603,774
1,950,474
0
341,684
Japan Overseas Development Corporation,
Bangkok
424
0
0
0
424
Kuwait
108,455
2,728
1,529
0
109,654
Luxembourg
142,191
3,226
40,097
0
105,320
Mexico
0
76,925
0
0
76,925
Myanmar
577
0
0
0
577
Netherlands
575,982
134,838
101,232
17
609,606
New Zealand
34,510
0
0
0
34,510
Norway
182,507
(26,458)
0
0
156,049
Page 41
IDB.30/9
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Page 41
Fund balance
at 01/01/2004
Cash received
in 2004
Expenditures
2004
Misc. income
incl. General
Pool interest
Fund balance
as at 31/12/2004
Norway—Integrated programme (Africa)
128,206
29,840
73,826
0
84,220
Poland
80,133
577,759
598,129
0
59,763
Portugal
1,281,461
122,086
5,717
0
1,397,829
Republic of Korea
1,301,307
112,763
335,950
0
1,078,121
Romania
13,434
0
0
0
13,434
Russian Federation
321,933
8,063
64,513
0
265,483
Rwanda
355
0
355
0
0
Saudi Arabia
1,401,979
(120,369)
(13,938)
(2,336)
1,293,212
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority
0
306,489
0
0
306,489
Slovakia
54,268
0
0
0
54,268
Spain
1,254,924
206,162
586,345
0
874,741
Sweden
52,231
0
11,549
0
40,681
Switzerland
4,406,275
7,978,814
3,906,637
(1,217)
8,477,234
Thailand
4,911
0
2,622
0
2,289
Turkey
1,025
51,980
47,468
(206)
5,332
United Kingdom—Integrated programme
1,022,769
443,850
605,876
(62)
860,681
Undefined
6,837
0
0
(5,145)
1,693
UB—Millennium Development Goals
0
209,798
0
0
209,798
UB—Integrated programmes and country service
framework activities
0
531,616
0
0
531,616
UB—post-crisis situation
0
473,620
55,035
0
418,584
Special-purpose convertible
39,975,309
31,942,169
21,641,110
(225)
50,276,143
Bulgaria
28
0
0
0
28
China
55,638
84,684
14,633
0
125,690
Cuba
391,148
21,000
0
0
412,148
Egypt
(45,546)
0
0
0
(45,546)
Egypt Iron and Steel Co.
31,942
0
0
0
31,942
India
568,714
388
(20,885)
9,364
599,351
Poland
15,034
(15,034)
0
0
0
Slovakia
147,001
0
0
0
147,001
Tifac, New Delhi
388
(388)
0
0
0
Undefined
295
0
0
0
295
Special-purpose non-convertible
1,164,643
90,650
(6,252)
9,364
1,270,909
44,042,305
32,404,190
21,822,733
24,527
54,648,289
Page 42
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Page 42
Table 4. Summary of technical cooperation activities financed by trust funds
for the year 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In United States dollars)
Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Projects financed by recipient Governments
Algeria
66,052
0
52,033
14,019
Argentina
424,860
0
0
424,860
Argentina—Centro de investigacion de celulosa y
papel
10,887
0
(594)
11,480
Bolivia
12,460
0
0
12,460
Brazil
204,135
0
41,422
162,713
Bulgaria
0
16,274
9,419
6,855
Belarus
26,204
0
0
26,204
Chile
6,824
0
0
6,824
Colombia
242,377
190,557
109,399
323,535
China
929,524
371,203
498,849
801,877
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
50,746
113,011
124,833
38,924
Ecuador
369,782
74,800
203,409
241,173
Egypt
3,462,983
1,151,166
1,274,856
3,339,293
Egypt—Social Fund for Development
240,823
88,612
156,570
172,865
Gabon
2,790
0
(813)
3,604
Honduras
2,577
20
84
2,513
India
1,662,709
1,576,282
912,925
2,326,066
Iran (Islamic Republic of)
413,353
45,000
130,946
327,407
Iran—Organization for Investment, Economic and
Technical Assistance of Iran
47,322
0
(4,790)
52,112
Iraq
210,936
13,837
111,030
113,744
Côte d’Ivoire
49,807
0
41,735
8,073
Kenya
11,904
28,673
6,530
34,047
Lebanon
27,308
0
(3,272)
30,580
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—Benghazi Development
Centre
8,093
0
0
8,093
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—General Pipe Company
Benghazi
2,700
0
0
2,700
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—Industrial Research Centre
of Libya
10,049
0
0
10,049
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—Secretariat of Strategic
Industry
53,081
0
0
53,081
Lithuania
28,250
0
20,263
7,987
Madagascar
135,093
0
0
135,093
Mauritius
18,826
0
(8,112)
26,938
Mexico
10,596
0
(10,461)
21,058
Nigeria
2,500,605
766,701
692,933
2,574,373
Oman
11,311
0
0
11,311
Panama
10,057
0
0
10,057
Paraguay
17,780
0
0
17,780
Russian Federation
176,831
121,583
195,876
102,538
Russian Federation—The Foundation NEM and
CPCOGI
1,662
0
(110)
1,772
Saudi Arabia
0
1,337,867
8,668
1,329,198
Page 43
IDB.30/9
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Page 43
Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority
189,908
(137,730)
(1)
52,179
Saudi German Hospitals Group
21,127
0
4,977
16,150
Slovenia
22,674
0
0
22,674
Thailand
18,243
0
113
18,130
Turkey
118,176
1,500,000
743,069
875,108
Subtotal
11,831,425
7,257,855
5,311,785
13,777,495
Associate Experts & JPOs
Austria
40,565
(42,057)
(1,491)
0
Belgium
214,679
3,502
102,609
115,572
Denmark
292,234
312,906
288,307
316,833
France
21,388
0
1,053
20,335
Germany
45,930
107,702
37,643
115,989
Italy
532,056
572,544
605,019
499,581
Japan
529,794
72,877
436,020
166,651
Netherlands
368,880
605,979
606,089
368,771
Norway
288,888
318,417
303,437
303,868
Republic of Korea
12,143
0
15,659
(3,516)
Russian Federation
4,617
87,959
80,149
12,428
Spain
34,783
0
9,477
25,307
Switzerland
126,295
121,928
113,914
134,309
Subtotal
2,512,254
2,161,759
2,597,886
2,076,127
JPOs travel
Belgium
31,514
0
0
31,514
Denmark
32,193
0
0
32,193
Germany
10,661
0
0
10,661
Japan
61,564
(61,564)
0
0
Netherlands
348,537
(348,537)
0
0
Norway
4,267
0
0
4,267
Subtotal
488,736
(410,101)
0
78,635
Projects financed by donor Governments
Australia
23,155
0
(119)
23,274
Austria
46,664
13,953
(2,398)
63,015
Belgium
114,892
0
33,612
81,280
Canada
5,493
(5,493)
0
0
Czech Republic
99,303
(23,410)
66,310
9,583
Denmark
451,208
0
213,977
237,231
Finland
772,086
786,905
550,522
1,008,469
France
1,600,428
1,075,358
582,284
2,093,502
Germany
101,339
113,017
111,748
102,608
Greece
23,427
0
(97)
23,524
Italy
5,474,318
18,667,978
8,461,448
15,680,847
Japan
2,232,270
439,546
1,043,006
1,628,810
Japanese Embassy—Guinea TF/GUI/00/001
1,539
84
1,623
0
Norway
2,482
1,906,617
177,323
1,731,776
Republic of Korea
500,980
(10,698)
263,710
226,573
Page 44
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Page 44
Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Republic of Korea—Korean Research Institute of
Standards and Science
131,305
0
(1,697)
133,002
Slovakia
7,398
0
0
7,398
Spain
125,891
0
0
125,891
Sweden
4,632
0
4,059
572
United Kingdom
984,561
568,293
676,383
876,470
United States of America
373,232
0
0
373,232
Subtotal
13,076,601
23,532,150
12,181,694
24,427,057
Undefined
23,107
151,087
127,961
46,233
Subtotal
23,107
151,087
127,961
46,233
Other trust funds
African Productive Capacity Facility
0
61,245
0
61,245
AIDC (Automative Industry Development Centre),
South Africa
30,253
0
(9)
30,262
Aluminium Company of America (Alcoa), USA
17,507
0
0
17,507
Austria Rural Energy
1,076,613
0
0
1,076,613
Badea: Arab Bank for Economic Development in
Africa
2,450
0
0
2,450
Beni-Suef Cement Company, Egypt
33,822
0
0
33,822
Centro de Investigaciones Textiles, Argentina
116,969
95,286
151,694
60,561
Ceylon Steel Corporation Ltd., Sri Lanka
5,284
0
0
5,284
CFC—FC/INT/97/021
54,708
0
162,806
(108,098)
CFC—FC/RAF/03/065
132,715
0
478,624
(345,909)
CFC—FC/RAF/04/088
0
250,000
9,172
240,828
CFC—FC/RAF/96/001
(164,337)
149,990
339,947
(354,294)
CFC—FC/RAS/00/153
(24,241)
148,462
116,500
7,721
CFC—FC/URT/04/118
0
149,990
0
149,990
Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Japan
137,747
0
82,925
54,821
Eastern and Southern African Leather Industries
Association
6,660
0
2,620
4,040
Engineering for the Petroleum and Process Industry
(ENPPI), Egypt
8,179
0
0
8,179
Engineering Consulting Firms Association, Japan
11,441
0
0
11,441
Epstein Engineering Export Ltd., USA
807
0
0
807
European Union
439,182
4,396,016
2,456,637
2,378,561
European Union Commission
74,701
171,778
52,622
193,857
FAO
275
0
0
275
Federal Chemical and Ceramics Corporation, Pakistan
(1,677)
0
0
(1,677)
France
0
463,120
441,067
22,053
Glucosan Factories, Iran (Islamic Republic of)
13
0
185
(172)
Gulf Co-Operation Council, Saudi Arabia
11,676
0
0
11,676
Gulf Organization for Industrial Consulting, Qatar
38,420
38,420
52,065
24,775
IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural
Development)
57,380
0
(885)
58,265
Institute for Scientific and Technological
Development (IDCT), Brazil
88,958
0
83,777
5,181
International Development Association
144,643
0
0
144,643
Inversiones Cofide S.A., Peru
15,405
0
0
15,405
Page 45
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Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Iranian Fuel Conservation Organization (IFCO), Iran
(Islamic Republic of)
0
45,000
1,929
43,071
Islamic Development Bank, Saudi Arabia
5,840
0
(249)
6,090
Italy
0
152,430
152,418
12
Jiangsu Baixue Electric Appliances Company Ltd.,
China
407
0
0
407
Kuwait Finance House
0
153,680
0
153,680
MAGFA Information Technology Development
Centre, Iran (Islamic Republic of)
0
46,887
5,558
41,329
Magnetti Marelli:Fiat Group TFIND99009, Italy
10,103
0
0
10,103
Nadsme—Slovak Republic
8,181
0
0
8,181
New Energy and Industrial Technology Development
Organization, Japan
24,664
44,893
53,177
16,380
New Nigeria Development Company, Nigeria
28,325
0
0
28,325
Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Nigeria
492,155
0
(10,494)
502,649
Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation
(NORAD), Norway
1,221,545
1,790,826
721,500
2,290,870
Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd, India
33,727
1,030,000
205,845
857,882
Petroliam Nasional Berhad (Petronas), Malaysia
28,179
0
0
28,179
Premag Handelsges.M.B.H, Austria
2,595
0
0
2,595
Procter & Gamble Far East Inc., Japan
475
0
0
475
RENPAP Member Countries
0
27,688
0
27,688
Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Ind., Brazil
51,126
11,684
27,566
35,245
Sezione Speciale per l’assicurazione del Credito, Italy
36,448
0
0
36,448
Shahid Modarres Industrial Pharmaceutical Complex,
Iran (Islamic Republic of)
53,878
0
0
53,878
Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON), Nigeria
0
243,341
0
243,341
Staudhammer Finanz AG, Switzerland
3,357
0
0
3,357
Sudan
329
0
0
329
Swedish International Enterprise Development
Corporation (Swedcorp), Sweden
201,445
0
144,259
57,186
TESIDE (Turkish Electronic Industry Association),
Turkey
1,781
0
0
1,781
The Ford Foundation, USA
1,762
18,000
0
19,762
Trust Fund Trade
665,444
540,905
307,453
898,897
United Nations Fund for International Partnerships
517,479
570,870
666,496
421,854
UNDG Iraq Trust Fund
0
10,950,550
66,254
10,884,296
UNDP/UNDHA
499
(499)
0
0
Unilever Research, United Kingdom
2,497
0
0
2,497
United Nations Trust Fund for Human Security
1,221,608
2,135,399
583,862
2,773,145
UNOPS
0
507,324
0
507,324
US Agency for International Development, USA
(399)
0
0
(399)
Yemen Corporation for Cement Industry and
Marketing
15,708
0
0
15,708
Subtotal
6,944,712
24,193,287
7,355,323
23,782,675
GRAND TOTAL
34,876,835
56,886,037
27,574,648
64,188,223
Note now includes FC Projects
Page 46
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Table 5. Summary of technical cooperation activities for 2004
financed under inter-organization agreements
(in United States dollars)
Project expenditure
Programme support
Total expenditure
UNDP
UNDP main programme
975,398
97,605
1,073,003
Project for which UNIDO is the associated agency
155,991
25,810
181,801
Government-executed projects for which UNIDO is
the implementing agency
2,328,797
66,154
2,394,951
UNDP trust funds
2,449,771
144,548
2,594,319
5,909,957
334,117
6,244,074
UNEP
UNEP/GEF
919,947
79,624
999,571
919,947
79,624
999,571
Total
6,829,904
413,741
7,243,645
Page 47
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Annex II
Operating Funds—UNDP and UNDP Trust Funds
Report No. 1
UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
(Name of Executing Agency)
(UNIDO)
Status of Funds as at 31 December 2004
(Expressed in US dollars)
Operating Funds
Opening balance as at 1 January 2004
18,308,560
Credited to project clearing account
(15,897,201)
Other charges and credits for prior years
(4,054,999)
(1,643,640)
Add: Service Clearing Account
Cash drawings from UNDP
(22,700,000)
IOV’s
19,863,927
2004 charges and credits
2,950
Miscellaneous income and exchange adjustments (Report No. 8)
131,724
Miscellaneous items refunded to UNDP (Report No. 8)
7,095
Closing balance as at 31 December 2004
(2,694,304)
Add: Project Clearing Account
Opening balance as at 1 January 2004
15,897,201
Less: Expenditure and support costs for lines implemented for
self-executed projects (Executing PDRs)
1,073,003
Expenditure and support costs for lines implemented for
projects executed by other agencies and Governments
(Implementing PDRs)
2,576,752
3,649,755
Page 48
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Closing balance as at 31 December 2004
12,247,446
Balance as at 31 December 2004
7,909,502
Represented by:
Cash at banks, on hand and in transit
9,553,051
Accounts receivable (Report No. 9)
5,882,140
15,435,191
Less: Accounts payable (Report No. 10)
6,976,563
2004 unliquidated obligations
549,126
7,525,689
Balance as at 31 December 2004
7,909,502
Page 49
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Page 49
STATEMENT I
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY
(Title of Trust Fund)
(Name of Participating and Executing Agency)
(UNIDO)
Status of Funds at 31 December 2004
(Expressed in US dollars)
Operating Fund
$
$
Balance at 1 January 2004
(1,013,070)
Add: Cash drawings from UNDP
IOVs
Other charges/credits (net)
Miscellaneous income and exchange adjustments (net)
(Report No. 19)
(3,515)
Miscellaneous items charged to trust fund (net)
(Report No. 19)
(9,108)
(12,623)
(1,025,693)
Less: Expenditure during 2004
For projects
Disbursements (Report No. 15A)
1,423,193
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16)
849,746
For AOS (Report No. 15A)
126,865
2,399,804
(3,425,497)
Add/subtract:
Adjustments to prior years (Report No. 15B):
Expenditure
6,014,113
Support costs
AOS
59,024
Balance at 31 December 2004
2,647,640
Represented by:
Cash at banks, on hand and in transit
0
Accounts receivable (Report No. 20)
3,864,219
3,864,219
Less: Accounts payable (Report No. 21)
363,389
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16)
853,190
1,216,579
2,647,640
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STATEMENT I
REPUBLIC OF KOREA FOR THE TUMEN REGION
(Title of Trust Fund)
(Name of Participating and Executing Agency)
(UNIDO)
Status of Funds at 31 December 2004
(Expressed in US dollars)
Operating Fund
Balance at 1 January 2004
(14,352)
Add:
Cash drawings from UNDP
IOV’s
Other charges/credits (net)
Miscellaneous income and exchange adjustments
(net) (Report No. 19)
(1,026)
Miscellaneous items refunded to trust fund (net)
(Report No. 18)
(1,026)
(15,378)
Less:
Expenditure during 2004
For projects
Disbursements (Report No. 15A)
101,669
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16)
75,163
For AOS (Report No. 15A)
17,683
194,515
(209,893)
Add/subtract:
Adjustments to prior years (Report No. 15B):
Expenditure
Support costs
AOS
Balance at 31 December 2004
(209,893)
Represented by:
Cash at banks, on hand and in transit
0
Accounts receivable (Report No. 20)
0
0
Less:
Accounts payable (Report No. 21)
134,071
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16)
75,822
209,893
(209,893)
Page 51
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Annex III
SPECIAL ACCOUNT FOR BUILDINGS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
(FOR OTHER THAN STAFF COSTS)
(In euros)
Statement of income and expenditure for the year ended 31 December 2004
INCOME
Contributions received
IAEA
7,493,565
UNIDO
2,339,502
UNOV
3,147,843
CTBTO
1,225,440
14,206,350
Interest income
159,591
Currency exchange loss
(83)
Miscellaneous income
20,973
TOTAL INCOME
14,386,831
EXPENDITURE
Rental and maintenance of premises
7,556,955
Utilities
5,286,288
Supplies and materials
74,791
Capital goods
103,430
Bank charges
4,792
Other general operating expenses
13,069
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
13,039,325
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE FOR 2004
1,347,506
Savings on cancellation of obligations
740,779
NET SURPLUS FOR 2004
2,088,285
Statement of assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004
ASSETS
Cash
11,961,926
Accounts receivable
Taxation
1,100,575
Contributions receivable*
4,815,676
Other
1,560,610
TOTAL ASSETS
19,438,787
LIABILITIES
Unliquidated obligations
7,500,884
Accounts payable
Other
1,405,826
TOTAL LIABILITIES
8,906,710
FUND BALANCE
Balance available as at 1 January 2004
8,443,792
Add:
Net surplus for 2004
2,088,285
Balance available as at 31 December 2004
10,532,077
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCE
10,532,077
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND FUND BALANCE
19,438,787
Page 52
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IAEA
UNIDO
UNOV
CTBTO
Total
2004 opening fund balance
4,399,747
1,456,095
1,865,459
722,491
8,443,792
2004 contributions
7,493,565
2,339,502
3,147,843
1,225,440
14,206,350
Interest (net of bank charges)
32,285
43,721
50,601
28,192
154,799
Net expenditure
(6,473,690)
(2,021,095)
(2,719,421)
(1,058,658)
(12,272,864)
5,451,907
1,818,223
2,344,482
917,465
10,532,077
* Contributions receivable
4,812,392
0
3,205
79
4,815,676

http://74.125.47.132/custom?q=cache:je4NuoCewQcJ:www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/36455_einterimfinancialperformancereport+haiti&cd=54&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=google-coop-np

***

http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/36455_einterimfinancialperformancereport

36455_einterimfinancialperformancereport.pdf

United Nations Industrial Development Organization
Distr.
GENERAL
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
30 March 2005
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH
Industrial Development Board
Thirtieth session
Vienna, 20-23 June 2005
Item 4 (a) of the provisional agenda
Programme and Budget Committee
Twenty-first session
Vienna, 10-12 May 2005
Item 3 of the provisional agenda
PERFORMANCE REPORT AND PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE
REPORT FOR THE BIENNIUM 2004-2005
Interim financial performance report for the biennium 2004-2005
Submitted by the Director-General
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Chapter
I. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE 12-MONTH PERIOD OF THE
BIENNIUM 2004-2005 ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2004 ……………………………………………………… 3
Statement I Statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004…………………………………………. 4
Statement II Statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 ………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Schedule 2.1 Status of assessed contributions to the regular budget as at 31 December 2004 6
Schedule 2.2 Status of advances to the Working Capital Fund as at 31 December 2004 …….. 12
Itemizes the utilization of financial resources during the period 1 January – 31 December 2004 in accordance
with Programme and Budget Committee conclusion 1987/19.

***

V.05-82685 (E)
For reasons of economy, this document has been printed in a limited number. Delegates are kindly requested to bring
their copies of documents to meetings.
United Nations Industrial Development Organization
Distr.
GENERAL
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
30 March 2005
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH
Industrial Development Board
Thirtieth session
Vienna, 20-23 June 2005
Item 4 (a) of the provisional agenda
Programme and Budget Committee
Twenty-first session
Vienna, 10-12 May 2005
Item 3 of the provisional agenda
PERFORMANCE REPORT AND PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE
REPORT FOR THE BIENNIUM 2004-2005
Interim financial performance report for the biennium 2004-2005
Submitted by the Director-General
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Chapter
I. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE 12-MONTH PERIOD OF THE
BIENNIUM 2004-2005 ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2004 ……………………………………………………… 3
Statement I Statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004…………………………………………. 4
Statement II Statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 ………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Schedule 2.1 Status of assessed contributions to the regular budget as at 31 December 2004 6
Schedule 2.2 Status of advances to the Working Capital Fund as at 31 December 2004 …….. 12
Itemizes the utilization of financial resources during the period 1 January – 31 December 2004 in accordance
with Programme and Budget Committee conclusion 1987/19.
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 2
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
Statement III General Fund and Working Capital Fund: Statement of cash flow for the year
ended 31 December 2004……………………………………………………………………….. 16
Statement IV General Fund: Status of appropriations by major programme for 2004 as at
31 December 2004………………………………………………………………………………… 17
Schedule 4.1 General Fund: Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for
2004 as at 31 December 2004 …………………………………………………………………. 18
Schedule 4.1 Other Headquarters funds—Buildings Management Services:
(Supplementary) Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at
31 December 2004…………………………………………………………………………………. 19
II. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS …………………………………………………………………. 20
Preface: UNIDO MISSION STATEMENT………………………………………………………………………… 20
Annexes
I. Technical cooperation activities executed by UNIDO………………………………………………………….. 36
Table 1: Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004 in euros…………………………………………. 36
Table 1: Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves and fund
balances for the year ended 31 December 2004 in US dollars …………………………………. 37
Table 2: Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 in euros………………………………………………………………………………… 38
Table 2: Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances as at
31 December 2004 in US dollars ………………………………………………………………………… 39
Table 3: Summary of transactions on sub-accounts of the Industrial Development Fund for the
year 2004 as at 31 December 2004 ……………………………………………………………………… 40
Table 4: Summary of technical cooperation activities financed by trust funds for the year 2004
as at 31 December 2004 …………………………………………………………………………………….. 42
Table 5: Summary of technical cooperation activities for 2004 financed under interorganization
agreements ……………………………………………………………………………………. 46
II. Operating funds—UNDP and UNDP trust funds…………………………………………………………………. 47
III. Special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs): …………………….. 51
Statement of income and expenditure for the year ended 31 December 2004…………………………… 51
Statement of assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004 ………………… 51
IDB.30/9
PBC.21/9
Page 3
Introduction
1. In its conclusion 1987/19, paragraph (j), the Programme and Budget Committee requested the Director-General to
submit each year to the Industrial Development Board through the Committee a clear and detailed financial
performance report itemizing the utilization of financial resources.
2. The present financial report covers the period 1 January 2004 – 31 December 2004 and is based on the
appropriations contained in the programme and budgets 2004-2005, as adopted by the General Conference at its tenth
session (decision GC.10/Dec.17).
I. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE 12-MONTH PERIOD OF THE
BIENNIUM 2004-2005 ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2004
Certification of financial statements
Director-General’s responsibility
The Director-General of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization is responsible for the
preparation and integrity of the financial statements. These statements have been prepared in accordance with the
United Nations System Accounting Standards and article X of the Financial Regulations of UNIDO and include certain
amounts that are based on management’s best estimates and judgements. Financial information used elsewhere is
consistent with that in the financial statements. Management considers that the statements present fairly the financial
position of the Organization and of funds held in trust by it, the results of their operations and the changes in their
financial position.
To fulfil its responsibility, the Organization maintains systems of internal accounting controls, policies and
procedures to ensure the reliability of financial information and the safeguarding of assets. The internal control systems
and financial records are subject to reviews by the Office of the Comptroller General and the External Auditor during
their respective audits.
The following appended financial statements, comprising Statements I to IV, relevant schedules and supporting
notes, were properly prepared in accordance with the United Nations System Accounting Standards and article X of the
Financial Regulations of UNIDO.
[signed] [signed]
Amita Misra Carlos A. Magariños
Director, Financial Services Branch Director-General
IDB.30/9
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Page 4
Statement I
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURE AND CHANGES IN RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
General Fund and Other Headquarters Technical Total Total
Heading Working Capital Fund funds cooperation Eliminations 2004 2002
(Note or schedule No. 2) (Note or schedule No. 3) (Note or schedule No. 4) (Note No. 2 q)
INCOME
Assessed contributions 71,000.0 (a) 71,000.0 66,844.9
Voluntary contributions 260.9 111,200.0 111,460.9 87,547.3
OTHER INCOME
Revenue-producing activities 37.7 (b) 8,846.3 8,884.0 9,522.0
Funds under inter-organization arrangements 5,048.0 5,048.0 10,461.7
Jointly-financed activities 19,804.9 (2,897.2) 16,907.7 14,454.2
Income for services rendered 599.2 (203.9) 395.3 689.2
Interest income 660.5 (c) 267.9 682.2 (d) 1,610.6 1,921.6
Currency exchange adjustments 174.3 (d) (415.7) (c) (1,157.1) (e, f) 45.5 (1,353.0) 417.8
Miscellaneous income 328.0 (e) 21.0 (13.5) (0.3) 335.2 784.0
TOTAL INCOME 72,461.4 29,123.6 115,759.6 (3,055.9) 214,288.7 192,642.7
EXPENDITURE . .
Salaries and common staff costs 41,471.9 13,980.0 26,581.1 2,755.2 84,788.2 90,256.3
Operating costs and contractual services 11,830.6 13,947.1 30,687.3 (1,880.9) 54,584.1 49,841.2
Acquisitions 14,278.5 749.3 15,027.8 16,825.4
Fellowships 4,049.9 427.1 4,477.0 4,003.5
RPTC and SRA activities 5,506.4 (f) (5,106.6) 399.8 2,312.9
Programme support costs 41.0 8,545.9 8,586.9 9,227.2
TOTAL EXPENDITURE 58,808.9 27,968.1 84,142.7 (3,055.9) 167,863.8 172,466.5
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE 13,652.5 1,155.5 31,616.9 0.0 46,424.9 20,176.2
Prior biennium adjustments (119.3) (g) (119.3) 9.1
Savings on cancellation of obligations from prior biennium 3,277.8 (h) 1,359.3 4,637.1 5,187.7
Provision for delays in the collection of contributions (6,093.9) (6,093.9) (4,680.4)
NET EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER
EXPENDITURE 10,717.1 2,514.8 (d) 31,616.9 44,848.8 20,692.6
Transfers to reserves 410.9 (b, f) 103.2 (g) 514.1 2,431.4
Transfers from reserves (0.4) (0.4) (34.1)
Credits to Member States (2,941.1) (p) (2,941.1)
Transfers to and from other funds 0.0 (247.9)
Other adjustments to reserves and fund balances (9,557.5) (9,557.5) (23,762.1)
Reserves and fund balances, beginning of biennium 13,623.3 12,174.6 99,814.1 125,612.0 135,147.4
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES, END OF BIENNIUM 21,809.8 14,689.4 121,976.7 0.0 158,475.9 134,227.3
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Statement II
STATEMENT OF ASSETS, LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
General Fund and Other Headquarters Technical Total Total
Heading Working Capital Fund funds cooperation Eliminations 2004 2002
(Note or schedule No. 2) (Note or schedule No. 3) (Note or schedule No. 4) (Note 2 q)
ASSETS
Cash and term deposits 24,981.6 16,684.4 173,757.8 (i) 215,423.8 194,676.4
Accounts receivable
Assessed contributions receivable from Member States 117,401.9 117,401.9 111,404.2
Voluntary contributions receivable
Other contributions receivable 93.7 154.7 248.4 6,133.7
Provision for delays in the collection of contributions (110,666.8) (110,666.8) (106,756.7)
Interfund balances 458.1 1,691.2 2,149.3 5,571.4
Other 3,741.2 (i) 8,352.9 (e) 1,891.9 13,986.0 11,850.0
Other assets 614.5 0.6 4,199.3 4,814.4 5,413.0
TOTAL ASSETS 36,166.1 25,496.0 181,694.9 0.0 243,357.0 228,292.0
LIABILITIES . .
Payments or contributions received in advance 1,324.0 (j) 54.5 7,780.6 9,159.1 14,126.8
Borrowings payable within one year 737.0 (k) 737.0 958.0
Unliquidated obligations 5,116.7 8,109.0 26,002.4 39,228.1 38,945.2
Accounts payable—interfund 677.7 1,162.8 308.8 2,149.3 5,571.4
Accounts payable—other 6,500.9 (d, i, p) 1,480.3 (e) 25,626.4 (d, e) 33,607.6 32,547.3
Other funds and special accounts
Other liabilities
Borrowings payable after one year 1,916.0
TOTAL LIABILITIES 14,356.3 10,806.6 59,718.2 0.0 84,881.1 94,064.7
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
Operating reserves 4,828.9 (f) 405.3 (j) 5,234.2 5,355.8
Other reserves 10,340.2 (l, m, n) 1,921.3 12,261.5 10,213.8
Balances relating to projects funded by donors 117,364.5 117,364.5 104,087.3
Working Capital Fund 7,423.0 (o) 7,423.0 7,423.0
Surplus (deficit) 4,046.6 (p) 9,860.5 2,285.6 (h) 16,192.7 7,147.4
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES 21,809.8 14,689.4 121,976.7 0.0 158,475.9 134,227.3
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES 36,166.1 25,496.0 181,694.9 0.0 243,357.0 228,292.0
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Schedule 2.1
STATUS OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE REGULAR BUDGET (in euros)
as at 31 December 2004
Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Afghanistan 0.00100 90,146 710 18,934 – 71,212 710 71,922
Albania 0.00426 – 3,025 – 3,025 – – –
Algeria 0.09951 – 70,652 – 6,050 – 64,602 64,602
Angola 0.00284 – 2,016 – 2,016 – – –
Argentina 1.37752 4,638,854 978,039 20,215 – 4,618,639 978,039 5,596,678
Armenia 0.00284 912,755 2,016 2,080 – 910,675 2,016 912,691
Austria 1.34625 – 955,838 – 955,838 – – –
Azerbaijan 0.00569 1,021,570 4,040 10,213 – 1,011,357 4,040 1,015,397
Bahamas 0.01706 – 12,113 – 12,113 – – –
Bahrain 0.02559 506 18,169 506 664 – 17,505 17,505
Bangladesh 0.01000 – 7,100 – 639 – 6,461 6,461
Barbados 0.01279 688 9,081 538 – 150 9,081 9,231
Belarus 0.02701 275,188 19,177 143,574 – 131,614 19,177 150,791
Belgium 1.60498 – 1,139,535 – 1,139,535 – – –
Belize 0.00100 562 710 562 710 – – –
Benin 0.00284 2,620 2,016 2,603 – 17 2,016 2,033
Bhutan 0.00100 – 710 – 710 – – –
Bolivia 0.01137 14,666 8,073 1,180 – 13,486 8,073 21,559
Bosnia and Herzegovina 0.00569 – 4,040 – 4,040 – – –
Botswana 0.01422 – 10,096 – 10,096 – – –
Brazil 3.39761 16,554,949 2,412,303 – – 16,554,949 2,412,303 18,967,252
Bulgaria 0.01848 – 13,121 – 13,121 – – –
Burkina Faso 0.00284 – 2,016 – 2,016 – – –
Burundi 0.00100 66,368 710 7 – 66,361 710 67,071
Cambodia 0.00284 4,010 2,016 25 – 3,985 2,016 6,001
Cameroon 0.01279 – 9,081 – 3,345 – 5,736 5,736
Cape Verde 0.00100 96,115 710 7 – 96,108 710 96,818
Central African Republic 0.00100 111,478 710 7 – 111,471 710 112,181
Chad 0.00100 84,776 710 – – 84,776 710 85,486
Chile 0.30138 211,795 213,980 159,755 – 52,040 213,980 266,020
China 2.17788 – 1,546,295 – 1,474,600 – 71,695 71,695
Colombia 0.28574 205,274 202,875 78,184 – 127,090 202,875 329,965
Comoros 0.00100 121,682 710 – – 121,682 710 122,392
Congo 0.00100 109,354 710 108,246 – 1,108 710 1,818
Costa Rica 0.02843 105,580 20,185 1,880 – 103,700 20,185 123,885
Côte d’Ivoire 0.01279 – 9,081 – 9,081 – – –
Croatia 0.05544 – 39,362 – 39,362 – – –
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Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Cuba 0.04265 26,672 30,282 26,672 – – 30,282 30,282
Cyprus 0.05402 – 38,354 – 38,354 – – –
Czech Republic 0.28858 – 204,892 – 204,892 – – –
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 0.01279 4,279 9,081 926 – 3,353 9,081 12,434
Democratic Republic of the Congo 0.00569 121,858 4,040 30 121,828 4,040 125,868
Denmark 1.06477 – 755,987 – 755,987 – – –
Djibouti 0.00100 84,776 710 – – 84,776 710 85,486
Dominica 0.00100 649 710 93 – 556 710 1,266
Dominican Republic 0.03270 350,535 23,217 – – 350,535 23,217 373,752
Ecuador 0.03554 – 25,233 – 25,233 – – –
Egypt 0.11515 71,745 81,757 71,745 81,757 – – –
El Salvador 0.02559 158,458 18,169 – – 158,458 18,169 176,627
Equatorial Guinea 0.00100 121,682 710 – – 121,682 710 122,392
Eritrea 0.00100 639 710 86 – 553 710 1,263
Ethiopia 0.00569 – 4,040 – 4,040 – – –
Fiji 0.00569 – 4,040 – 560 – 3,480 3,480
Finland 0.74207 – 526,870 – 526,870 – – –
France 9.19202 – 6,526,334 – 6,526,334 – – –
Gabon 0.01990 38,458 14,129 70 – 38,388 14,129 52,517
Gambia 0.00100 74,084 710 7 – 74,077 710 74,787
Georgia 0.00711 1,599,047 5,048 102 – 1,598,945 5,048 1,603,993
Germany 13.88754 – 9,860,153 – 9,860,153 – – –
Ghana 0.00711 1,610 5,048 436 – 1,174 5,048 6,222
Greece 0.76624 – 544,030 – 544,030 – – –
Grenada 0.00100 76,959 710 10,496 – 66,463 710 67,173
Guatemala 0.03838 280 27,250 280 27,250 – – –
Guinea 0.00426 – 3,025 – 516 – 2,509 2,509
Guinea-Bissau 0.00100 116,788 710 7 – 116,781 710 117,491
Guyana 0.00100 1,800 710 1,800 208 – 502 502
Haiti 0.00284 – 2,016 – 2,016 – – –
Honduras 0.00711 – 5,048 – 5,048 – – –
Hungary 0.17059 – 121,119 – 121,119 – – –
India 0.48476 – 344,180 – 344,180 – – –
Indonesia 0.28432 – 201,867 – 201,867 – – –
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 0.38667 437,147 274,536 192,640 – 244,507 274,536 519,043
Iraq 0.19334 1,697,868 137,271 – – 1,697,868 137,271 1,835,139
Ireland 0.41795 – 296,745 – 296,745 – – –
Israel 0.58996 – 418,872 – 418,872 – – –
Italy 7.20001 – 5,112,007 – 5,112,007 – – –
Jamaica 0.00569 11,530 4,040 11,530 4,040 – – –
Japan 22.00000 – 15,620,000 – 15,620,000 – – –
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Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Jordan 0.01137 – 8,073 – 378 – 7,695 7,695
Kazakhstan 0.03980 495,863 28,258 122,173 – 373,690 28,258 401,948
Kenya 0.01137 – 8,073 – 8,073 – – –
Kuwait 0.20897 – 148,369 – 148,369 – – –
Kyrgyzstan 0.00100 375,752 710 30 – 375,722 710 376,432
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 0.00100 – 710 – 710 – – –
Lebanon 0.01706 20,479 12,113 20,479 12,113 – – –
Lesotho 0.00100 – 710 – 171 – 539 539
Liberia 0.00100 87,358 710 – – 87,358 710 88,068
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 0.09525 – 67,628 – 25,844 – 41,784 41,784
Lithuania 0.02417 335,321 17,161 101,073 – 234,248 17,161 251,409
Luxembourg 0.11373 73,672 80,748 73,672 80,748 – – –
Madagascar 0.00426 – 3,025 – 2,471 – 554 554
Malawi 0.00284 38,194 2,016 26 – 38,168 2,016 40,184
Malaysia 0.33407 – 237,190 – 237,190 – – –
Maldives 0.00100 577 710 577 467 – 243 243
Mali 0.00284 19,136 2,016 18,678 – 458 2,016 2,474
Malta 0.02132 – 15,137 – 15,137 – – –
Mauritania 0.00100 113,982 710 7 – 113,975 710 114,685
Mauritius 0.01564 – 11,104 – 11,104 – – –
Mexico 1.54385 210,056 1,096,133 210,056 1,096,133 – – –
Monaco 0.00569 – 4,040 – 4,040 – – –
Mongolia 0.00100 – 710 – 171 – 539 539
Morocco 0.06255 100 44,411 100 44,411 – – –
Mozambique 0.00100 – 710 – 93 – 617 617
Myanmar 0.01000 6,577 7,100 522 – 6,055 7,100 13,155
Namibia 0.00995 – 7,065 – 7,065 – – –
Nepal 0.00569 – 4,040 – 311 – 3,729 3,729
Netherlands 2.47073 – 1,754,218 – 1,754,218 – – –
New Zealand 0.34260 – 243,246 – 243,246 – – –
Nicaragua 0.00100 134,643 710 7 – 134,636 710 135,346
Niger 0.00100 96,150 710 7 – 96,143 710 96,853
Nigeria 0.09667 89,011 68,636 2,654 86,357 68,636 154,993
Norway 0.91835 – 652,029 – 652,029 – – –
Oman 0.08672 – 61,571 – 61,571 – – –
Pakistan 0.08672 – 61,571 – 61,571 – – –
Panama 0.02559 2,193 18,169 833 – 1,360 18,169 19,529
Papua New Guinea 0.00853 5,241 6,056 479 – 4,762 6,056 10,818
Paraguay 0.02275 57,580 16,153 15,125 – 42,455 16,153 58,608
Peru 0.16775 296,101 119,103 344 – 295,757 119,103 414,860
Philippines 0.14216 32,009 100,934 32,009 37,103 – 63,831 63,831
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Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
Poland 0.53736 41,061 381,526 41,061 381,526 – – –
Portugal 0.65678 – 466,314 – 466,314 – – –
Qatar 0.04833 – 34,314 – 2,183 – 32,131 32,131
Republic of Korea 2.63137 – 1,868,272 – 634,678 – 1,233,594 1,233,594
Republic of Moldova 0.00284 872,848 2,016 93 – 872,755 2,016 874,771
Romania 0.08245 50,631 58,540 50,631 58,540 – – –
Russian Federation 1.70591 – 1,211,196 – 1,211,196 – – –
Rwanda 0.00100 9,263 710 27 – 9,236 710 9,946
Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.00100 – 710 – 93 – 617 617
Saint Lucia 0.00284 1,914 2,016 1,914 2,016 – – –
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 0.00100 110,948 710 7 – 110,941 710 111,651
Sao Tome and Principe 0.00100 121,682 710 – – 121,682 710 122,392
Saudi Arabia 0.78756 – 559,168 – 559,168 – – –
Senegal 0.00711 – 5,048 – 5,048 – – –
Serbia and Montenegro 0.02843 18,049 20,185 18,017 – 32 20,185 20,217
Seychelles 0.00284 45,828 2,016 26 – 45,802 2,016 47,818
Sierra Leone 0.00100 82,375 710 16,788 – 65,587 710 66,297
Slovakia 0.06113 – 43,402 – 43,402 – – –
Slovenia 0.11515 331,781 81,757 184,206 – 147,575 81,757 229,332
Somalia 0.00100 134,656 710 7 – 134,649 710 135,359
South Africa 0.58001 – 411,807 – 411,807 – – –
Spain 3.58064 – 2,542,254 – 2,542,254 – – –
Sri Lanka 0.02275 – 16,153 – 16,153 – – –
Sudan 0.00853 4,615 6,056 4,615 6,056 – – –
Suriname 0.00284 41,522 2,016 26 – 41,496 2,016 43,512
Swaziland 0.00284 – 2,016 – 482 – 1,534 1,534
Sweden 1.45962 – 1,036,330 – 1,036,330 – – –
Switzerland 1.81111 – 1,285,888 – 1,285,888 – – –
Syrian Arab Republic 0.11373 – 80,748 – 80,748 – – –
Tajikistan 0.00100 277,104 710 651 – 276,453 710 277,163
Thailand 0.41795 75,331 296,745 75,331 296,745 – – –
TFYR of Macedonia 0.00853 6,021 6,056 6,021 – – 6,056 6,056
Timor-Leste 0.00100 – 710 – 710 – – –
Togo 0.00100 72,475 710 15,186 – 57,289 710 57,999
Tonga 0.00100 – 710 – 710 – – –
Trinidad and Tobago 0.02275 14,457 16,153 14,457 16,153 – – –
Tunisia 0.04265 2,336 30,282 2,336 28,293 – 1,989 1,989
Turkey 0.62550 – 444,105 – 444,105 – – –
Turkmenistan 0.00426 155,308 3,025 – – 155,308 3,025 158,333
Uganda 0.00711 – 5,048 – 4,690 – 358 358
Ukraine 0.07534 6,804,134 53,491 1,025,511 – 5,778,623 53,491 5,832,114
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Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
United Arab Emirates 0.28716 – 203,884 – 203,884 – – –
United Kingdom 7.86994 – 5,587,656 – 5,587,656 – – –
United Republic of Tanzania 0.00569 – 4,040 – 4,040 – – –
Uruguay 0.11373 192,516 80,748 31,366 – 161,150 80,748 241,898
Uzbekistan 0.01564 469,275 11,104 159 – 469,116 11,104 480,220
Vanuatu 0.00100 78,344 710 7 – 78,337 710 79,047
Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) 0.29569 328,131 209,940 328,131 – – 209,940 209,940
Viet Nam 0.02275 – 16,153 – 16,153 – – –
Yemen 0.00853 323 6,056 323 6,056 – – –
Zambia 0.00284 55,544 2,016 26 – 55,518 2,016 57,534
Zimbabwe 0.01137 7,226 8,073 7,226 8,046 – 27 27
Subtotal: 100 42,521,493 71,000,000 3,288,436 64,264,899 39,233,057 6,735,101 45,968,158
FORMER MEMBER STATES:
USA 69,228,235 – 21,887 – 69,206,348 – 69,206,348
Yugoslavia (former) 2,081,702 – – – 2,081,702 – 2,081,702
Sub total: 71,309,937 – 21,887 – 71,288,050 – 71,288,050
NEW MEMBER STATES:
Chad 9,809 – 7 – 9,802 – 9,802
Comoros 12,975 – 7 – 12,968 – 12,968
Djibouti 8,787 – 7 – 8,780 – 8,780
El Salvador 17,250 – – – 17,250 – 17,250
Equatorial Guinea 12,975 – 7 – 12,968 – 12,968
Liberia 18,620 – 7 – 18,613 – 18,613
Sao Tome and Principe 12,975 – 7 – 12,968 – 12,968
Timor-Leste 668 – 668 – – – –
Turkmenistan 52,332 – – – 52,332 – 52,332
Subtotal: 146,391 – 710 – 145,681 – 145,681
TOTAL 113,977,821 71,000,000 3,311,033 64,264,899 110,666,788 6,735,101 117,401,889
1986 50,465 35 50,430 50,430
1987 53,410 – 53,410 53,410
1988 82,281 17 82,264 82,264
1989 109,948 1,094 108,854 108,854
1990 525,661 9,835 515,826 515,826
1991 763,259 9,856 753,403 753,403
1992 942,764 26,744 916,020 916,020
1993 1,140,298 48,632 1,091,666 1,091,666
1994 8,072,707 56,864 8,015,843 8,015,843
1995 37,918,785 1,040,500 36,878,285 36,878,285
1996 35,079,800 24,831 35,054,969 35,054,969
1997 5,047,707 95,669 4,952,038 4,952,038
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Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
1998 3,956,766 133,424 3,823,342 3,823,342
1999 4,628,093 235,359 4,392,734 4,392,734
2000 3,028,794 87,689 2,941,105 2,941,105
2001 3,172,139 100,188 3,071,951 3,071,951
2002 3,985,584 388,833 3,596,751 3,596,751
2003 5,419,360 1,051,463 4,367,897 4,367,897
TOTAL 113,977,821 71,000,000 3,311,033 64,264,899 110,666,788 6,735,101 117,401,889
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Schedule 2.2
STATUS OF ADVANCES TO THE WORKING CAPITAL FUND
as at 31 December 2004
Scale of assessment Amount of Collections M e m b e r S t a t e Adjustments Collections Amount
(per cent) advance 1986-2003 2004 2004 outstanding
Afghanistan 0.00100 74 308 (234) –
Albania 0.00426 316 297 19 –
Algeria 0.09951 7,387 7,349 38 –
Angola 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Argentina 1.37752 102,254 120,847 (18,593) –
Armenia 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Austria 1.34625 99,933 99,617 316 –
Azerbaijan 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Bahamas 0.01706 1,266 1,262 4 –
Bahrain 0.02559 1,900 1,930 (30) –
Bangladesh 0.01000 742 742 – –
Barbados 0.01279 949 965 (16) –
Belarus 0.02701 2,005 2,005 – –
Belgium 1.60498 119,139 118,769 20 350 –
Belize 0.00100 74 74 – –
Benin 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Bhutan 0.00100 74 74 – –
Bolivia 0.01137 844 817 27 –
Bosnia and Herzegovina 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Botswana 0.01422 1,056 1,039 17 –
Brazil 3.39761 252,206 170,093 3,064 79,049
Bulgaria 0.01848 1,372 1,336 36 –
Burkina Faso 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Burundi 0.00100 74 74 – –
Cambodia 0.00284 211 150 61 –
Cameroon 0.01279 949 965 (16) –
Cape Verde 0.00100 74 74 – –
Central African Republic 0.00100 74 74 – –
Chad 0.00100 74 74 – –
Chile 0.30138 22,372 22,269 103 –
China 2.17788 161,665 161,080 585 –
Colombia 0.28574 21,211 21,156 55 –
Comoros 0.00100 74 74 – –
Congo 0.00100 74 74 – –
Costa Rica 0.02843 2,110 2,078 14 18 –
Côte d’Ivoire 0.01279 949 965 (16) –
Croatia 0.05544 4,115 4,083 32 –
Cuba 0.04265 3,166 3,192 (26) –
Cyprus 0.05402 4,010 4,010 – –
Czech Republic 0.28858 21,421 21,376 45 –
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 0.01279 949 965 (16) –
Democratic Republic of the Congo 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Denmark 1.06477 79,039 78,759 280 –
Djibouti 0.00100 74 74 – –
Dominica 0.00100 74 74 – –
Dominican Republic 0.03270 2,427 318 7 2,102
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Scale of assessment Amount of Collections M e m b e r S t a t e Adjustments Collections Amount
(per cent) advance 1986-2003 2004 2004 outstanding
Ecuador 0.03554 2,638 2,598 40 –
Egypt 0.11515 8,548 8,536 12 –
El Salvador 0.02559 1,900 146 7 1,747
Equatorial Guinea 0.00100 74 74 – –
Eritrea 0.00100 74 74 – –
Ethiopia 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Fiji 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Finland 0.74207 55,084 54,930 154 –
France 9.19202 682,327 680,024 2,303 –
Gabon 0.01990 1,477 1,485 (8) –
Gambia 0.00100 74 74 – –
Georgia 0.00711 528 520 8 –
Germany 13.88754 1,030,877 1,027,422 3,455 –
Ghana 0.00711 528 520 8 –
Greece 0.76624 56,878 56,712 166 –
Grenada 0.00100 74 74 – –
Guatemala 0.03838 2,849 2,821 28 –
Guinea 0.00426 316 297 19 –
Guinea-Bissau 0.00100 74 74 – –
Guyana 0.00100 74 74 – –
Haiti 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Honduras 0.00711 528 520 8 –
Hungary 0.17059 12,663 12,619 44 –
India 0.48476 35,984 35,853 131 –
Indonesia 0.28432 21,105 21,007 98 –
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 0.38667 28,703 28,579 124 –
Iraq 0.19334 14,352 3,630 140 10,582
Ireland 0.41795 31,025 30,954 71 –
Israel 0.58996 43,793 43,647 146 –
Italy 7.20001 534,459 532,567 1,892 –
Jamaica 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Japan 22.00000 1,633,067 1,633,067 – –
Jordan 0.01137 844 817 27 –
Kazakhstan 0.03980 2,954 2,969 (15) –
Kenya 0.01137 844 817 27 –
Kuwait 0.20897 15,512 15,440 72 –
Kyrgyzstan 0.00100 74 74 – –
Lao People’s Democratic Republic 0.00100 74 74 – –
Lebanon 0.01706 1,266 1,262 4 –
Lesotho 0.00100 74 74 – –
Liberia 0.00100 74 74 – –
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 0.09525 7,070 7,052 18 –
Lithuania 0.02417 1,794 1,782 12 –
Luxembourg 0.11373 8,442 8,388 54 –
Madagascar 0.00426 316 297 19 –
Malawi 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Malaysia 0.33407 24,798 24,719 79 –
Maldives 0.00100 74 74 – –
Mali 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
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Scale of assessment Amount of Collections M e m b e r S t a t e Adjustments Collections Amount
(per cent) advance 1986-2003 2004 2004 outstanding
Malta 0.02132 1,583 1,559 24 –
Mauritania 0.00100 74 74 – –
Mauritius 0.01564 1,161 1,188 (27) –
Mexico 1.54385 114,600 114,240 360 –
Monaco 0.00569 422 297 125 –
Mongolia 0.00100 74 74 – –
Morocco 0.06255 4,643 4,602 41 –
Mozambique 0.00100 74 74 – –
Myanmar 0.01000 742 742 – –
Namibia 0.00995 739 742 (3) –
Nepal 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Netherlands 2.47073 183,404 182,755 649 –
New Zealand 0.34260 25,431 25,313 118 –
Nicaragua 0.00100 74 74 – –
Niger 0.00100 74 74 – –
Nigeria 0.09667 7,176 7,126 50 –
Norway 0.91835 68,170 67,921 249 –
Oman 0.08672 6,437 6,384 53 –
Pakistan 0.08672 6,437 6,384 53 –
Panama 0.02559 1,900 1,930 (30) –
Papua New Guinea 0.00853 633 668 (35) –
Paraguay 0.02275 1,689 1,707 (18) –
Peru 0.16775 12,452 12,396 56 –
Philippines 0.14216 10,553 10,541 12 –
Poland 0.53736 39,889 39,787 102 –
Portugal 0.65678 48,753 48,621 132 –
Qatar 0.04833 3,588 3,563 25 –
Republic of Korea 2.63137 195,328 194,706 622 –
Republic of Moldova 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Romania 0.08245 6,120 6,087 33 –
Russian Federation 1.70591 126,631 126,192 439 –
Rwanda 0.00100 74 74 – –
Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.00100 74 74 – –
Saint Lucia 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 0.00100 74 74 – –
Sao Tome and Principe 0.00100 74 74 – –
Saudi Arabia 0.78756 58,461 58,271 190 –
Senegal 0.00711 528 520 8 –
Serbia and Montenegro 0.02843 2,110 2,078 32 –
Seychelles 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Sierra Leone 0.00100 74 74 – –
Slovakia 0.06113 4,538 4,528 10 –
Slovenia 0.11515 8,548 7,307 247 994 –
Somalia 0.00100 74 74 – –
South Africa 0.58001 43,054 42,910 144 –
Spain 3.58064 265,792 264,852 940 –
Sri Lanka 0.02275 1,689 1,707 (18) –
Sudan 0.00853 633 668 (35) –
Suriname 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
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Scale of assessment Amount of Collections M e m b e r S t a t e Adjustments Collections Amount
(per cent) advance 1986-2003 2004 2004 outstanding
Swaziland 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Sweden 1.45962 108,348 107,965 383 –
Switzerland 1.81111 134,439 133,986 453 –
Syrian Arab Republic 0.11373 8,442 8,388 54 –
Tajikistan 0.00100 74 74 – –
Thailand 0.41795 31,025 30,954 71 –
TFYR of Macedonia 0.00853 633 668 (35) –
Timor-Leste 0.00100 74 74 –
Togo 0.00100 74 74 – –
Tonga 0.00100 74 74 – –
Trinidad and Tobago 0.02275 1,689 1,707 (18) –
Tunisia 0.04265 3,166 3,192 (26) –
Turkey 0.62550 46,431 46,245 186 –
Turkmenistan 0.00426 316 27 29 260
Uganda 0.00711 528 520 8 –
Ukraine 0.07534 5,593 5,567 26 –
United Arab Emirates 0.28716 21,316 21,230 86 –
United Kingdom 7.86994 584,189 582,189 2,000 –
United Republic of Tanzania 0.00569 422 445 (23) –
Uruguay 0.11373 8,442 8,388 54 –
Uzbekistan 0.01564 1,161 1,188 (27) –
Vanuatu 0.00100 74 74 – –
Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of) 0.29569 21,949 21,898 51 –
Viet Nam 0.02275 1,689 1,707 (18) –
Yemen 0.00853 633 668 (35) –
Zambia 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Zimbabwe 0.01137 844 817 27 –
T O T A L 100 7,423,030 7,325,458 (9,567) 13,399 93,740
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Statement III
GENERAL FUND AND WORKING CAPITAL FUND
Statement of cash flow for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Total 2004 Total 2002
Cash flows from operating activities
Excess (shortfall) of income over expenditure (Statement I) 13,652.5 8,423.4
(Increase) decrease in contributions receivable (3,419.9) (389.9)
(Increase) decrease other accounts receivable 120.8 5,235.7
Increase (decrease) in contributions or payments received in advance 1,134.1 955.4
Increase (decrease) in unliquidated obligations (7,059.9) (9,908.9)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable (2,198.5) (5,416.9)
Increase (decrease) in other funds and special accounts (182.3)
Less: Interest income 660.5
Currency exchange adjustments 174.3 834.8 880.3
Net cash from operating activities 1,394.3 (2,163.8)
Cash flows from investing and financing activities
Increase (decrease) in interfund balances (404.3) (909.9)
Increase (decrease) in borrowings (865.0) (1,618.0)
Plus: Interest income 660.5
Currency exchange adjustments 174.3 834.8 880.3
Net cash from investing and financing activities (434.5) (1,647.6)
Cash flows from other sources
Savings on or cancellation of prior period’s obligations 3,281.3 4,315.7
Transfers to (from) reserves 410.5 2,278.8
Credits to Member States and prior bienniums adjustments (3,063.9) 9.1
Net cash from other sources 627.9 6,603.6
Net increase (decrease) in cash 1,587.7 2,792.2
Cash at beginning of period 23,393.9 18,328.7
Cash at end of period (Statement II) 24,981.6 21,120.9
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Statement IV
GENERAL FUND
Status of appropriations by major programme for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major Programme
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Governing Bodies 2,507.3 0.0 2,507.3 2,302.2 0.2 2,302.4 204.9
General Management 5,960.3 0.0 5,960.3 5,140.7 389.7 5,530.4 429.9
Strengthening of Industrial Capacities 14,561.0 0.0 14,561.0 9,846.3 266.9 10,113.2 4,447.8
Cleaner and Sustainable Industrial Development 11,782.7 0.0 11,782.7 11,157.3 237.2 11,394.5 388.2
Regional Programme 17,409.9 0.0 17,409.9 9,739.6 2,068.2 11,807.8 5,602.1
Administration 13,159.3 0.0 13,159.3 9,628.8 663.8 10,292.6 2,866.7
Indirect Costs 8,010.4 0.0 8,010.4 7,082.1 285.9 7,368.0 642.4
Total A 73,390.9 0.0 73,390.9 54,897.0 3,911.9 58,808.9 14,582.0
Approved estimates Actual income Accrued income Total income (Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme 802.9 0.0 802.9 260.9 0.0 260.9 542.0
Miscellaneous Income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 689.8 0.0 689.8 698.2 0.0 698.2 (8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 502.3 0.0 502.3 (502.3)
Total B 1,492.7 0.0 1,492.7 1,461.4 0.0 1,461.4 31.3
Total A—B 71,898.2 0.0 71,898.2 53,435.6 3,911.9 57,347.5 14,550.7
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Schedule 4.1
GENERAL FUND
Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Salaries and common staff costs 48,784.1 0.0 48,784.1 39,142.1 1,442.1 40,584.2 8,199.9
Official travel 1,439.6 0.0 1,439.6 731.6 156.1 887.7 551.9
Operating costs 13,139.2 0.0 13,139.2 8,506.1 1,528.9 10,035.0 3,104.2
Information and communication technology 2,948.2 0.0 2,948.2 1,359.2 436.4 1,795.6 1,152.6
RPTC and SRA activities 7,079.8 0.0 7,079.8 5,158.0 348.4 5,506.4 1,573.4
Total A 73,390.9 0.0 73,390.9 54,897.0 3,911.9 58,808.9 14,582.0
Approved estimates Actual income Accrued income Total income (Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme 802.9 0.0 802.9 260.9 0.0 260.9 542.0
Miscellaneous income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 689.8 0.0 689.8 698.2 0.0 698.2 (8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 502.3 0.0 502.3 (502.3)
Total B 1,492.7 0.0 1,492.7 1,461.4 0.0 1,461.4 31.3
Total A—B 71,898.2 0.0 71,898.2 53,435.6 3,911.9 57,347.5 14,550.7
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Schedule 4.1 (Supplementary)
OTHER HEADQUARTERS FUNDS—BUILDINGS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Staff costs 6,875.6 0.0 6,875.6 5,734.3 15.0 5,749.3 1,126.3
Official travel 5.8 0.0 5.8 2.2 0.0 2.2 3.6
Operating costs 16,795.8 0.0 16,795.8 5,896.0 5,714.7 11,610.7 5,185.1
Information and communication technology 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
RPTC and SRA activities 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total A 23,677.2 0.0 23,677.2 11,632.5 5,729.7 17,362.2 6,315.0
Estimated income
Actual
income
Accrued
income
Total
income
(Excess)
shortfall
Income
Common Buildings Management 22,777.1 0.0 22,777.1 19,711.6 93.3 19,804.9 2,972.2
Joint Buildings Management 900.1 0.0 900.1 585.5 13.6 599.1 301.0
Total B 23,677.2 0.0 23,677.2 20,297.1 106.9 20,404.0 3,273.2
Miscellaneous income
Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 0.0 0.0 0.0 180.5 0.0 180.5 (180.5)
Total C 0.0 0.0 0.0 180.5 0.0 180.5 (180.5)
Total A—B—C 0.0 0.0 0.0 (8,845.1) 5,622.8 (3,222.3) 3,222.3
Cumulative fund balance — special account for BMS (GC.9/Dec.14)
Excess of income over expenditure 3,222.3
– Savings on cancellation of obligations 740.8
– Unliquidated obligations (1,874.8)
Net surplus for 2004 2,088.3
Balance at the beginning of year 8,443.8
Balance at the end of year 10,532.1*
* The balance at year-end reported above is attributable to the special account for Buildings Management and is not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c).
As at 31 December 2004, contributions outstanding to the special account for Buildings Management from the VBOs are €4,815,676.
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II. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Preface
UNIDO MISSION STATEMENT
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) is a specialized United Nations agency
dedicated to promoting sustainable industrial development in countries with developing and transition economies.
UNIDO draws on the wide industrial expertise of its staff and the resources of government, the private sector and
other United Nations multilateral and national institutions to create productive employment, competitive economies and
a sound environment.
Fostering growth and productivity is central to UNIDO’s highly focused sectoral, regional and country-specific
programmes. UNIDO is committed to maintaining excellent standards in the implementation of these programmes with
the ultimate aim of assisting the developing countries and transition economies in their struggle against poverty and
marginalization.
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Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies
The following are the significant accounting policies of UNIDO:
(a) UNIDO’s accounts are maintained in accordance with the Financial Regulations of UNIDO, as adopted by
the General Conference, the rules formulated thereunder, administrative instructions in force as at the date of
conversion of UNIDO into a specialized agency, and in conformity with generally accepted government accounting
principles. UNIDO follows the accounting standards as approved by the High-Level Committee on Management
(HLCM) on behalf of the United Nations Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB) at its seventh session and
requested by General Assembly resolution 48/216, and the financial statements, of which these notes form an integral
part, are presented in accordance with those standards, as shown below:
(i) Going concern, consistency and accrual are fundamental accounting assumptions. Where fundamental
accounting assumptions are followed in financial statements, disclosure of such assumptions is not
required. If a fundamental accounting assumption is not followed, that fact should be disclosed
together with the reasons;
(ii) Prudence, substance over form, and materiality should govern the selection and application of
accounting policies;
(iii) Financial statements should include clear and concise disclosure of all significant accounting policies,
which have been used;
(iv) The disclosure of the significant accounting policies used should be an integral part of the financial
statements. The policies should normally be disclosed in one place;
(v) Financial statements should show corresponding figures for the preceding period;
(vi) A change in an accounting policy that has a material effect in the current period or may have a
material effect in subsequent periods should be disclosed together with the reasons. The effect of the
change should, if material, be disclosed and quantified.
(b) The UNIDO financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis of accounting and have not been
adjusted to reflect the effects of changing prices for goods and services.
(c) Until 31 December 2001, the accounts of the Organization were presented in United States dollars. With
effect from January 2002, the currency of accounts was changed to euros (GC.8/Dec.16). Therefore, all assets,
liabilities, reserves and fund balances of the General Fund and other Headquarters funds were converted to euros on
1 January 2002, using the exchange rates approved by the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.15), i.e. ATS 13.7603 = €1
and $1 = €1.123 (or €1 = $0.890472). Most extrabudgetary activities, however, continue to be in United States dollars.
Therefore, for the Organization’s consolidated financial statements purposes, these accounts are converted to euros
using the methodology stated in note 1(g) below.
(d) Fund accounting. The UNIDO accounts are maintained on a “fund accounting” basis. Separate funds for
general or special purposes may be established by the General Conference or the Director-General. Each fund is
maintained as a distinct financial and accounting entity, with a separate self-balancing double-entry group of accounts.
(e) The fiscal period of the Organization is a biennium and consists of two consecutive calendar years.
(f) The income, expenditure, assets and liabilities are recognized on the accrual basis of accounting except for
trust funds, the Industrial Development Fund, Montreal Protocol and Global Environmental Facility. For these funds,
the actual contributions received from donors are shown as income (voluntary contributions), which are held in trust by
UNIDO for the purpose of carrying out the implementation of projects/activities agreed to by the donors.
(g) Translation of currencies. In accordance with General Conference decision GC.8/Dec.16, the accounts of the
Organization are presented in euros. Transactions in other currencies are converted into euros as follows: income,
expenditure and changes in reserves and fund balances at the applicable United Nations operational rate of exchange at
the deemed date of the transaction; and assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances at the applicable United Nations
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operational rate of exchange at the date of the statement (see also note 1 (q) below on Other income—Gain/loss on
exchange).
(h) Assessed contributions. In accordance with financial regulation 5.6, payments made by a Member State are
credited first to the Working Capital Fund and then to the contributions due, in the order in which the Member State
was assessed.
(i) Contributions in kind received or receivable and the value thereof are not accounted for, but disclosed in the
notes to the financial statements. Where necessary, amounts are estimated locally based on a fair commercial value in
an arms-length transaction.
(j) Funds on deposit in interest-bearing bank accounts, certificates of deposit, time deposits and call accounts
are shown in the statements of assets and liabilities as cash.
(k) Deferred charges—shown under other assets:
(i) Deferred charges comprise expenditure items that are not properly chargeable in the current fiscal
period and that will be charged as expenditure in a subsequent fiscal period;
(ii) For balance sheet statement purposes only, that portion of the education grant advance, which is
assumed to pertain to the scholastic year completed as at the date of the financial statement is shown
under deferred charges. The full amount of the advance is maintained in the accounts receivable from
staff members until such time as the staff member produces the required proof of entitlement to the
education grant, at which time the budgetary account is charged and the advance recovered.
(l) Fixed assets. Furniture, equipment, other non-expendables and leasehold improvements are not included in
the assets of the Organization. Acquisitions are charged against budgetary accounts in the year of purchase.
(m) Commitments approved for future fiscal periods that are necessary in the interest of UNIDO, in accordance
with financial rule 109.6, are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements of the respective fund. Such
commitments are normally restricted to administrative requirements of a continuing nature and to other contracts or
legal obligations where long lead times are required for delivery.
(n) No provision is made in the General Fund for end-of-service entitlements or to meet contingencies under
appendix D to the Staff Rules of UNIDO, as funds are provided for in the budget appropriations. However, provision is
made to meet repatriation grant entitlements and contingency liabilities for compensation payments under appendix D
to the Staff Rules for personnel financed by technical cooperation other than UNDP and are calculated on the basis of
one per cent of net base pay.
(o) Special accounts. The General Conference at its ninth session established, with effect from 1 January 2002,
a special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs) and a special account for the Regular
Programme of Technical Cooperation (GC.9/Dec.14). These special accounts are not subject to financial
regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c); thus the budgetary surplus due to Member States excludes the balances available in these
special accounts.
(p) Surpluses due to Member States are funds available for credit to Member States arising from unencumbered
balances of the appropriations and contributions from new Member States. In accordance with financial
regulation 4.2(b), the unencumbered balance of the appropriations at the end of a fiscal period shall be surrendered to
the Members at the end of the first calendar year following the fiscal period after deducting therefrom any contributions
from Members relating to that fiscal period which remain unpaid, and shall be credited to the Members in proportion to
their assessed contributions in accordance with the provisions of the financial regulations 4.2(c) and 5.2(d). Financial
regulation 4.2(c) requires that, before the respective share of the balance is surrendered to any Member that has
outstanding regular budget obligations to the Organization, those obligations shall first be brought to account. Financial
regulation 5.2(d) requires that any balance of the appropriations shall be adjusted against future assessments unless the
General Conference decides otherwise.
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(q) Other income:
(i) One-half of the gross income from the sales of publications is reported under revenue-producing
activities. The other half of income attributable to the sales publications revolving fund less related
costs is disclosed in the note to the General Fund (note 2(b));
(ii) Refunds of expenditures charged to prior fiscal periods are credited to miscellaneous income;
(iii) Moneys accepted in respect of which no purpose is specified are treated as miscellaneous income;
(iv) Gain/loss on exchange arises from transactions conducted in currencies other than euros, for the
general and other Headquarters funds and the revaluation of assets and liabilities held in local
currencies. Unrealized exchange gains are not recorded as income, but set aside in accounts payable on
the grounds of prudence until realized at which point they would be treated as income. Gains arising
from the revaluation of non-euro cash and bank amounts are treated as realized;
(v) Gain/loss on exchange arises from transactions conducted in currencies other than dollars (i.e. for the
dollar-based extrabudgetary technical cooperation activities in annex I, dollar statements) and the
revaluation of assets and liabilities held in non-dollar currencies. Current year obligations have been
revalued at the year-end United Nations operational rate of exchange. Unrealized exchange gains are
not recorded as income, but set aside in accounts payable on the grounds of prudence until realized at
which point they would be treated as income. Gains arising from the revaluation of non-dollar cash
and bank amounts are treated as realized, with the exception of euro cash and bank deposits where
such gains are also set aside in accounts payable, pending utilization in the restoration of purchasing
power to projects with euro expenditures. However, for the euro presentation of dollar-based
extrabudgetary activities in annex I, euro statements, the gain/loss resulting from the revaluation of
non-euro assets, liabilities, reserves and funds balances is shown as “other adjustments to reserves and
funds balances” on statement 1;
(vi) Proceeds from the sale of surplus property are credited to the miscellaneous income of the respective
funds.
(r) Technical cooperation accounts:
(i) The appropriations for the Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation (RPTC) are administered in
accordance with the financial regulations of UNIDO, and in accordance with the General Conference
decision mentioned in paragraph (o) above;
(ii) Allocation income—UNDP. The figures for allocation income from UNDP and UNDP trust funds are
the same as reported for total expenditure in line with UNDP procedures, which require that
allocations be adjusted to equal actual expenditure;
(iii) Contributions income—trust funds and Industrial Development Fund (IDF). Voluntary contributions
from Governments or other donors are recorded upon receipt of cash. The use of such contributions is
governed by agreements between UNIDO and the Government/donor. Upon termination, expiration,
or revision of an agreement or receipt of other instructions from the Government/donor, any surplus
remaining in a trust/other funds is returned to the Government/donor or disposed of as requested by the
Government/donor;
(iv) Interest and miscellaneous income. Interest income arising from the RPTC is credited to the General
Fund; however, the miscellaneous income relating to the RPTC is credited to the special account.
Interest income arising from the special account for Buildings Management is credited to that account,
and finally prorated to the Vienna-based organizations taking into account the funds contributed by
them and the date of receipt of such funds in the account. Interest income arising from UNDP
activities is credited to the operating fund account maintained with that organization. Interest income
arising from the Industrial Development Fund, other than the general-purpose segment, as well as the
trust funds relating to the technical cooperation activities is credited to accounts payable until
instructions regarding its disposal are received from the donor. Interest accrued under the General
Purpose segment of the Industrial Development Fund is credited to that Fund. Interest income
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attributable to the Montreal Protocol is treated immediately as an additional programmable balance.
Interest income credited to the Global Environmental Facility, excluding interest income earned on
funds transferred as UNIDO fees, is set aside as accounts payable pending instructions to its return to
the trustee;
(v) The criteria for recording and reporting unliquidated obligations against the current biennium for the
RPTC are the same as those for the regular budget; however, as stated in paragraph (o) above, these
obligations are not subject to financial regulation 4.2(b) that requires that obligations shall remain
available for twelve months following the end of the fiscal period to which they relate. For all other
technical cooperation fund sources, obligations may be reported as expenditure of the current year on
the basis of the following criteria:
Personnel services
The cost of salaries and related expenses corresponding to services rendered within the calendar year.
Personnel services, in this context, include temporary assistance and overtime as well as consultants
who have subscribed to Special Service Agreements. However, when the remuneration of the
consultant is expressed as a lump sum rather than a sum per period worked, the full cost of the contract
may be treated as an obligation of the current year.
Supplies and equipment
The full cost of contracts or purchase orders entered into prior to the end of the year, whether or not
delivery has been effected, as long as there is budgetary provision in the current period.
Subcontracts
An obligation can be maintained on the basis of the payment schedule included in the signed contract
with the contractor. Where no payment schedule exists, the basis is the estimated timing of payments.
Fellowships
The cost of the fellowship from the date of commencement of study to completion of study or
31 December, whichever is earlier. The fellow must have been placed, i.e. the fellowship awarded to a
named individual and the place, course and the duration of the study established and the recipient
Government notified.
Travel
The full cost of travel, including the cost of transportation, subsistence allowances and other incidental
expenses if travel started prior to the end of the calendar year.
Group training
The cost of activities held in the current year. In the case of activities beginning in one year and
continuing into the next, the full cost of the activity should be charged to the current year.
(vi) Unliquidated obligations for the current period in respect of all technical cooperation activities other
than the regular budget remain valid for 12 months following the end of the year, rather than the
biennium, to which they relate. However, in accordance with UNDP reporting requirements, executing
agencies may retain unliquidated obligations beyond 12 months when a firm liability to pay still exists;
such liabilities are reported as accounts payable in the financial statements. Savings on or the
cancellation of obligations relating to the RPTC are credited to the special account approved by the
General Conference. Savings on or the liquidation of prior period obligations in respect of all other
technical activities are credited to individual projects as a reduction of current period expenditure in
accordance with UNDP reporting requirements. The UNDP requirements are also applied in the case
of the Industrial Development Fund, trust funds, Montreal Protocol and the Global Environmental
Facility.
(s) Trust funds. Director-General’s bulletin UNIDO/DG/B.18/Rev.1 dated 15 May 1992 sets out revised
policies for establishing and managing trust funds with effect from 26 May 1992. Extrabudgetary funds provided to
reimburse the Organization for the use of its facilities are excluded from the provisions of UNIDO/DG/B.18/Rev.1.
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(t) Special account for programme support costs:
(i) Reimbursement for programme support costs is provided for in respect of extrabudgetary technical
cooperation activities. Reimbursement is calculated as a percentage of programme resources
expended. The Montreal Protocol Fund, under a new arrangement that became effective January 2003,
makes an annual lump sum payment of US$ 1.5 million as support cost for the implementation of its
programme/projects; this amount is recorded as current year income. The Fund also pays a reduced
support cost in respect of each of its projects, which, similar to most other technical cooperation
activities, is calculated as a percentage of programme resources expended;
(ii) In the financial statements of the Organization, the special account for programme support costs is
shown separately from the inter-organization funds, from which its income derives;
(iii) Unliquidated obligations in respect of the special account for programme support costs are accounted
for on the same basis as for the regular budget.
(u) Ex gratia payments made in accordance with financial rule 109.13 are reported in the notes to the financial
statements of the respective fund pursuant to financial regulation 9.3.
Note 2. General Fund and Working Capital Fund
(a) Assessed contributions
The General Conference approved an amount of €142,000,000 for the regular budget for the biennium 2004-2005
(GC.10/Dec.17) to be financed from contributions by Member States, one half of which €71,000,000 was assessed to
Member States for 2004, in accordance with financial regulation 5.1(c). Full provision is made for contributions
outstanding from prior years of €110,666,788 as at 31 December 2004.
(b) Revenue-producing activities
Gross revenue from the sale of UNIDO publications was €75,455, one-half of which (€37,727) was transferred to
the sales publications revolving fund. Sales promotional activities and other costs charged to the sales publications
revolving fund of €26,576 resulted in a net surplus for the year 2004 of €11,152. The net balance of the sales
publications revolving fund as at 31 December 2004 is €132,267.
(c) Interest income in excess of the budgetary estimates
Interest income in excess of the budgetary estimate (€660,500) for the year 2004 is €57,870; actual amount, if any,
due for distribution to eligible Member States will be determined at the end of the biennium. Pursuant to decision
GC.8/Dec.10, this amount is added to accounts payable established for this purpose in 1999. As at 31 December 2004,
the balance on this account was €289,527, out of which funds amounting to €231,657 were credited to eligible Member
States, in accordance with the “S” curve formula, when their assessed contributions for the year 2005 were calculated.
(d) Currency exchange adjustments
The amount of €174,307 represents the net realized exchange gain from regular budget activities.
An unrealized exchange gain of €600,063 resulting from the revaluation of non-euro monetary assets and
liabilities using the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at 31 December 2004 has not been recorded as
income, but set aside within “accounts payable—other” until realized. Of this amount, €386,000 is attributable to the
revaluation of the outstanding loan from the United Nations.
(e) Miscellaneous income
Of the total miscellaneous income, an amount of €171,127 relates to CTBTO support costs charged on BMS
activities.
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(f) Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation
In accordance with General Conference decision GC.9/Dec.14, a special account was established for fully
programmable appropriations under the RPTC, not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c). Funds from
cancellation of obligations, if any, would be retained in the special account for carrying out RPTC activities. As of
31 December 2004, the accumulated fund balance in the special account amounts to €2,867,824, including a transfer of
€399,728 during 2004.
(g) Prior biennium adjustments
The total adjustment of €119,311 in 2004 comprises:
(i) A charge of €3,000 for the biennium 1996-1997 in respect for a payment made to a UNIDO staff
member as recommended by the Joint Appeals Board;
(ii) A payment against the biennium 1998-1999 of €50,853 to a UNIDO staff member as recommended by
the Joint Appeals Board;
(iii) Biennium 2000-2001 charges of €23,137 related to IAEA library staff costs;
(iv) Various late charges for the biennium 2002-2003 of €42,321 including €18,291 for projects under
IDDA.
(h) Savings on or cancellation of obligations from the prior biennium
An amount of €3,277,774 net saving arises from the cancellation of 2002-2003 obligations. This amount consists
of savings on the cancellation of obligations from the prior biennium of €3,287,665 less €9,891 exchange loss on
liquidation of prior biennium IDDA obligations.
(i) Accounts receivable—other
“Accounts receivable—other” include the Organization’s claim amounting to €955,784 submitted to the
Government of the United States of America in respect of United States income tax reimbursed to UNIDO staff
members during the period 1994 to 1996 under the Tax Reimbursement Agreement. The Government of the United
States of America had communicated to the Organization that it acknowledges this debt, however, no payment was
received during 2004.
The Organization’s claim to the International Atomic Energy Agency under the cost-sharing agreement for
termination indemnity costs for Buildings Management staff separated during the 1995 staff reduction exercise is not
resolved. The amount claimed is $644,453 (€723,720 at the United Nations operational rate of exchange approved by
the ninth session of the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.15)). A provision for a possible write off of this receivable is
included in accounts payable.
(j) Assessed contributions received in advance
Assessed contributions of €1,324,078 were received in advance from Member States in 2004 to be applied against
the 2005 assessment.
(k) Borrowings
At the time UNIDO became a specialized agency, an interest-free loan of $16,000,000 was received from the
United Nations. The loan is repayable at the rate of $1,000,000 a year, commencing in 1990. The total amount due as at
31 December 2004 amounts to $1,000,000 (€737,000 at the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at
31 December 2004).
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(l) Other reserves
Other reserves comprise the following:
€000’s
Separation indemnity reserves 5,499.3
Sales Publication Revolving Fund 132.3
Reserve for exchange rate fluctuations 1,840.8
Special account for RPTC 2,867.8
10,340.2
(m) Separation indemnity reserves
Pursuant to decision GC.6/Dec.15, paragraph (e), the amount of $9,546,732 representing the balance of
appropriations for the biennium 1992-1993, which was actually received by the Organization, was transferred to a
separation indemnity reserve in 1995. The reserve balance of €1,109,698 at the beginning of the year was unchanged at
31 December 2004 as no payments were made during 2004. Pursuant to General Conference decision GC.7/Dec.17, the
amount of $13.9 million was transferred from the unencumbered balance of appropriations for the biennium 1994-1995
for the funding of the separation indemnity reserve to meet the cost of staff separations resulting from the 1998-1999
programme and budgets. Unlike the previous allocation from the 1992-1993 biennium, the allocation from the
1994-1995 biennium was not supported by the actual cash, as large arrears for this biennium exist. This reserve had
effectively been reduced to $3,908,824 (€4,389,609) by payments made during the period 1998-2001 of $9,991,176. No
payments were made during 2004, thus the balance remained at €4,389,609. The total under separation indemnity
reserves as at 31 December 2004 was €5,499,308.
(n) Reserve for exchange rate fluctuations
In order to protect the Organization from exchange rate fluctuations resulting from the introduction of the euro as
a single currency for the preparation of the programme and budgets, appropriation and assessment, collection of
contributions and advances, and currency of accounts, the General Conference in decision GC.8/Dec.16 authorized the
Director-General to establish a reserve, not subject to the provisions of the financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c). The
balance of €1,840,776 as at 31 December 2004 in the reserve represents the amount set aside during the previous
biennium.
(o) Working Capital Fund
The amount of the Working Capital Fund was set by the General Conference at $9 million (GC.2/Dec.27). The
level of the Fund was reduced to $6,750,000 (GC.6/Dec.16) for the biennium 1996-1997 and was further reduced to
$6,610,000 for the biennium 1998-1999 (GC.7/Dec.12); $6,610,000 was approved for the biennium 2000-2001
(GC.8/Dec.14), and the biennium 2002-2003 (GC.9/Dec.13). Effective 1 January 2002, the amount ($6,610,000) was
converted to euros in accordance with GC.9/Dec.15, resulting in a Working Capital Fund of €7,423,030. The General
Conference decided (GC.10/Dec.15) to maintain the Fund at the same level for the biennium 2004-2005.
(p) Surplus due to Member States
The following is an analysis of the surpluses due to Member States, expressed in millions of euros, after
application of the provision for the delay in the collection of assessed contributions. The provision represents
contributions receivable from Member States for prior bienniums and from new Member States at the balance sheet
date. As at the balance sheet date, the surpluses due for distribution—representing assessed contributions received after
the end of a biennium together with receipts from new Member States are set aside in “accounts payable—other”,
pending receipt of Member States’ instructions. Of the total amount due for distribution of €3,624,342 as at
31 December 2004, an amount of €536,534 was applied against the 2005 assessments.
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Surplus
Surpluses disposed
and applied to
assessments
Prior
biennium
adjustments
Surpluses due
for
distribution
Provisions for
delays in the
collection of
contributions
Surpluses
due to
Member
States
Remarks
2004
2002-2003
2000-2001
1998-1999
1996-1997
(GC.8/Res.4)
13.6
10.3
10.3
14.3
46.9
3.7
5.3
7.1
0.1
2.2
0.5
0.6
0.2
7.9
6.0
8.2
40.0
13.6
0.2
0.1
0.1
(0.4)
Provisional
1994-1995
(GC.7/Dec.17)
35.4
15.6
44.9
(25.1)
1992-1993
(GC.6/Dec.15)
(GC.8/Dec.10)
(GC.8/Res.4)
16.5
14.4
0.1
2.0
0.0
1990-1991
9.8
1.3
8.5
Retained –
GC.5/Dec.14
1988-1989
7.3
0.2
7.1
Retained –
GC.4/Dec.15
1986-1987
(GC.4/Dec.15)
4.8
4.8
0.0
Total 169.2 50.9 0.1 3.6 110.5 4.1
Contributions
from new
Member States
1.9
1.7
0.0
0.2
0.0
Total 171.1 52.6 0.1 3.6 110.7 4.1
(q) Eliminations
Eliminations comprise two elements as shown below:
(a) Buildings Management Service costs charged to UNIDO. An amount of €3,101,107 is eliminated from both
operating costs and contractual services to avoid double counting of UNIDO’s contribution to buildings management
costs;
(b) Expenditure of €5,106,636 on RPTC and SRA activities is re-analysed into its component parts.
(r) Long-term contracts
Long-term contracts awarded for the operation of the VIC are not reported as commitments, as they may be
terminated at any time without penalty.
(s) Commitments
Commitments of €420,038 representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years
were entered into prior to 31 December 2004.
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(t) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at €152,011 were received from Member States in support of UNIDO field offices
during the year.
(u) Ex gratia payments
No ex gratia payments were made in 2004.
(v) Non-expendable equipment
The following table shows the non-expendable equipment, at cost, expressed in millions of euros, according to the
cumulative inventory records of UNIDO as at 31 December 2004. In accordance with UNIDO accounting policies, nonexpendable
equipment is not included in the fixed assets of the Organization, but is charged against the appropriations
when acquired. The minimum euro value per item of non-expendable property is €1,500.
Balance as at 1 January 2004 12.6
Adjustments to the opening balance 0.1
Adjusted balance at 1 January 2004 12.7
Add: acquisitions during 2004 0.5
Deduct: disposals during 2004 1.0
Balance as at 31 December 2004 12.2
During the year 2004, non-expendable equipment to the value of €409 was reported as stolen and written off in
the inventory records.
(w) Contingent liabilities
(i) End-of-service payment to staff
In accordance with the decision taken by the Panel of External Auditors in 1989 at Manila, UNIDO calculated the
amounts required to cover the estimated costs of contingency liabilities for end-of-service payment as at 31 December
2004.
In line with United Nations accounting standards, liabilities for end-of-service payments comprise end-of-service
allowance, repatriation grant and compensation for accrued annual leave. To provide a more realistic picture, the
amount required for the removal of household goods has also been included. The valuation is based on the United
Nations salary scale and the entitlements defined in the staff regulations and rules, as well as taking into account the
actual cost of staff separating during the year 2004. The amounts are estimated to be:
Regular budget €19.2 million
Operational budget € 4.4 million
Post retirement benefits are excluded.
It should be noted that no budgetary provision has been made, except that in the case of the operational budget, as
reflected in statement II and note 3(f) (operating reserve).
(ii) The United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund
UNIDO is a member organization participating in the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, which was
established by the United Nations General Assembly to provide retirement, death, disability and related benefits. The
Pension Fund is a funded defined benefit plan. The financial obligation of the Organization to the United Nations Joint
Staff Pension Fund consists of its mandated contribution at the rate established by the United Nations General
Assembly, together with any share of any actuarial deficiency payments under Article 26 of the Regulations of the
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Fund. Such deficiency payments are only payable if and when the United Nations General Assembly has invoked the
provision of Article 26, following determination that there is a requirement for deficiency payments based on an
assessment of the actuarial sufficiency of the Fund as of the valuation date. At the time of this report, the United
Nations General Assembly has not invoked this provision.
(iii) After-service health insurance
Staff members (their spouses, dependent children or survivors) retiring from service under the Pension Fund
regulations at age 55 or later are eligible for after-service health insurance coverage after having been a participant in a
contributory health insurance scheme of the common system for at least 10 years. The same applies to staff members
receiving compensation for disability under Appendix D to the staff rules. Costs of participation in this scheme are
borne on the basis of joint contributions by UNIDO and the participants concerned.
During the year 2004, the Organization’s contribution to the scheme amounted to €1,659,567. The contributions
against the Buildings Management Services amounted to €57,538, which were cost-shared with other Vienna-based
organizations. In accordance with Programme and Budget Committee conclusion 2000/2, a detailed actuarial study to
determine the financial impact of the after-service health insurance was carried out, which showed the level of unfunded
liabilities as at December 2004 to be €35.2 million ($47.7 million based on the year-end exchange rate). A United
Nations system-wide solution is being sought to address the issue of unfunded liabilities. The lead agency on this issue,
established by the High-Level Committee on Management, Financial and Budget Network, is the United Nations who
are scheduled to submit a report to the General Assembly in 2005.
(x) Common Fund for Major Repairs and Replacements
On 1 January 1981, an agreement between the Republic of Austria, the United Nations and the IAEA went into
effect to establish a common fund for the purpose of financing the cost of major repairs and replacements of buildings,
facilities and technical installations, which are the property of the Republic of Austria and form part of the Headquarters
areas of the United Nations and IAEA at the Vienna International Centre. This agreement has also applied to UNIDO
since 1986, when it became a specialized agency. The Fund is administered by UNIDO through a joint committee.
Annual financial statements are prepared by UNIDO and audited by its Internal Oversight Group.
In 2002, an agreement was reached between the Vienna-based organizations and the Republic of Austria under
which reimbursement of the disbursements made during the year 2001 ($988,626) was not required. Under this
agreement, there will only be annual assessed contributions to the Fund as follows: the Republic of Austria
(€1,235,300) and the Vienna-based organizations (€1,235,300). Furthermore, unexpected major repairs and
replacements, which are not included in the agreed investment plan, will have to be shared by all parties. In the past,
such costs were fully absorbed by the Austrian Government.
The fund balance as at 31 December 2004 is €1,936,547.
Note 3. Other Headquarters funds
(a) Funds reported under this heading comprise:
(i) Special Account for Programme Support Costs;
(ii) Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting (COMFAR);
(iii) Buildings Management Services (BMS).
(b) With effect from 1 January 2002, the General Conference approved (GC.9/Dec.17) BMS as a separate, selfbalancing
major programme in the programme and budgets of UNIDO. All BMS expenditures are offset by income, i.e.
contributions received from other Vienna-based organizations and from UNIDO. Consequently, under the UNIDO
General Fund, only UNIDO’s share of the BMS operations is included (reference IDB.24/3-PBC.17/3). In view of the
above, the BMS is reported under other funds rather than under General Fund and Working Capital Fund from the
previous biennium. The General Fund and Working Capital Fund now show only UNIDO’s contribution to BMS costs.
The BMS operations are further split into two components:
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(i) Staff costs: This continues to be subject to the provisions of financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c);
(ii) Special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs): The ninth session of
the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.14), established with effect from January 2002, a special account
for BMS (for other than staff costs), which is not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c).
Thus the budgetary surplus, if any, will not require distribution to Member States. Each Vienna-based
organization (UNIDO, IAEA, UNOV and CTBTO) is required to pay its share into this account.
Interest income is credited to the account. This amount is then prorated to each Vienna-based
organization taking into account the funds contributed by it and the date of receipt of such funds in the
special account.
Additional analysis of BMS operations is provided in schedule 4.1 (supplementary) and the analysis on the special
account is provided in annex III. The surplus on the special account for BMS costs of €10,532,077 does not form part of
the unencumbered balances of the appropriations due to Member States at the end of the biennium; this amount includes
€4,815,676 due from the Vienna-based organizations. The accumulation of funds under the special account is primarily
caused by the delay experienced in the removal of asbestos from the VIC complex and related maintenance work.
(c) Currency adjustment
The €415,683 exchange difference results primarily from the revaluation of the United States dollar cash and term
deposits held by the special account for programme support costs.
(d) Net excess (shortfall) of income over expenditure
The following is an analysis of income and expenditure during the year 2004 for the funds reported under this
heading:
Table 1
Special account for
programme support
costs
Computer Model for
Feasibility and Analysis
Buildings
Management
Services Total
(In thousands of euros)
Income (including savings on cancellation of
obligations from prior biennium) 9,296.8 276.9 21,325.4 30,899.1
Expenditure (including loss on exchange) 8,779.5 367.7 19,237.1 28,384.3
Net (shortfall) of income over expenditure 517.3 (90.8) 2,088.3* 2,514.8
* Relates to the special account (see annex III).
(e) Accounts receivable—other
Within the Special Account for Buildings Management Services, there is an amount of €349,061 representing a
claim for reimbursement from the Austrian authorities for stranded costs, Renewable Energy Surcharge and KWKZuschlag.
In the unlikely event of the claim not being settled, full provision has been made within “accounts payable—
other”.
The first instalment of €1,220,000 due from the Austrian Government towards the replacement of carpets and
cables at the Vienna International Centre is reflected within “accounts receivable—other”. Pending the disbursement of
the funds, €1,000,000 of this amount is shown under “accounts payable—other”. The balance €220,000 is reported in
the financial statements of major repairs and replacements fund.
(f) Operating reserve
An operating reserve, established in respect of the special account for programme support costs in accordance
with PBC conclusion 1989/4 at $5,504,190 was reduced to $4,300,000 (€4,828,900) in accordance with Board decision
IDB.14/Dec.12.
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The net reserve as at 31 December 2004 amounts to €3,650,469 (€3,133,155 at 31 December 2003) as a result of a
net surplus of €517,313 for 2004.
(g) Commitments
Commitments, representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years, were entered
into prior to 31 December 2004 as below.
€000’s
Special account for programme support costs 84.5
Buildings Management Services 53.7
(h) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at €72,952 were received from Member States in support of UNIDO projects.
Note 4. Technical cooperation
(a) Technical cooperation activities
Technical cooperation activities reported under this heading comprise activities executed by UNIDO with funds
provided through the Industrial Development Fund, trust funds and inter-organization arrangements with UNDP, UNEP
and other organizations. These activities are governed by various agreements signed by two or more parties, i.e.
donor(s) and UNIDO.
(b) Euro presentation of technical cooperation activities
The significant majority of voluntary contributions are received in United States dollars for projects
programmable almost exclusively in that currency. From 2004, euro-based management of technical cooperation
programmes was introduced for some projects. In accordance with General Conference decision GC.9/Dec.15, donor
reporting is also undertaken in United States dollars.
However, in order to present consolidated financial statements (Statements I and II) of UNIDO for the year ending
31 December 2004, all technical cooperation activities required conversion to euros.
Annex I, Tables 1 and 2 are, therefore, provided in both United States dollars and euros.
The approach for preparing the euro statement is based on the following:
(i) Non-euro income, expenditure and changes in reserves and fund balances—other than as highlighted
below—will be stated at the equivalent amount of euros applicable as at the deemed date of the
transaction applying the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at that date;
(ii) Non-euro assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004 will be converted to a
euro equivalent using the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at 31 December 2004
(reference GC.9/Dec.15). The gain or loss that would result from these revaluations is reflected in the
“other adjustments to reserves and fund balances” figure;
(iii) The currency exchange adjustment figure essentially represents the realized gain or loss on non-euro
transactions during the year and the savings achieved in 2004 on the liquidation of prior year United
States dollar obligations.
(c) Montreal Protocol promissory notes
Promissory notes in favour of UNIDO held by the Multilateral Fund for the implementation of the Montreal
Protocol to the value of $20,264,334 (€16,231,732) at 31 December 2003 were encashed during 2004.
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(d) Interest on donor funds
For the Industrial Development Fund, other than the general pool, and from the last biennium for trust funds,
interest earned from the investment of funds, net of bank charges, realized exchange gains, realized and unrealized
losses is represented as a liability within “accounts payable—other”. As at 31 December 2004, the amounts were as
follows:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 5,801.9 4,276.0
Trust funds 2,748.7 2,025.8
Global Environment Fund 361.4 266.4
8,912.0 6,568.2
The disposal of the interest income is governed by agreements with donors. This may include the return of such
funds to donors, or their transfer to other projects, in which case they will be shown as voluntary contributions.
(e) Unrealized exchange gains and losses
In accordance with the United Nations System Accounting Standards, monetary assets and liabilities are revalued
at the United Nations operational rate of exchange in effect at 31 December 2004.
Any resultant unrealized gain is not recorded as income for the period, but set aside within “accounts payable—
other”. Gains arising from revaluation of cash and term deposits are considered realized, however specifically, for the
Industrial Development Fund and trust funds, any gain arising from the revaluation of euro cash and term deposits are
similarly set aside on the grounds of prudence (IDB.27/9-PBC.19/9 and decision IDB.27/Dec.5). Under the transition to
a single currency system, and in accordance with document IDB.28/9 and decision IDB.28/Dec.5, the euro-based
management of technical cooperation programmes was introduced during the year 2004. Consequently, distributions of
€789,415 ($985,537) and €832,467 ($1,039,285) were made to the Industrial Development Fund and trust funds,
respectively. The accumulated amounts of unrealized gains as at 31 December 2004, included in “accounts payable—
other”, are as follows:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 1,831.5 1,349.8
Trust funds 6,575.3 4,846.0
Global Environment Facility 0.6 0.4
Montreal Protocol 1.5 1.1
8,408.9 6,197.3
(f) Currency exchange adjustment
Annex I, table 1—US dollar statements
Table A shows the analysis of the currency exchange credit. A distinction is drawn between realized gains and
losses resulting through the conduct of transactions in other than United States dollars and gains and losses resulting
from the re-statement of non-United States dollar assets and liability values to an equivalent dollar value as at
31 December 2004.
For these funds, where contributions are received, programmed and disbursed almost exclusively in United States
dollars, any realized gains and both realized and unrealized losses from the revaluation of non-United States dollar
assets and liabilities, are recorded through table 1 and the programmable fund balance adjusted accordingly.
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Table A
Regular Programme Montreal Protocol GEF IOA* Total
(In thousands of US dollars)
Realized
On 2004 transactions 4.1 (0.1) 3.4 7.4
Unrealized
Revaluation of non-US dollar assets and liabilities
at 31 December 2004 (58.1) 1.4 (6.9) (1.2) (64.8)
Currency exchange adjustment (54.0) 1.3 (3.5) (1.2) (57.4)
* IOA – Inter-organization arrangements.
Annex I, table 1—euro statements
Table B shows the analysis of the currency exchange credit. A distinction is drawn between realized gains and
losses resulting through the conduct of transactions in other than euros and the savings resulting from the settlement of
United States dollar obligations from prior years at a different euro rate of exchange.
Table B
Regular
programme IDF
Montreal
Protocol GEF Trust fund Total
(In thousands of euros)
Revaluation of US$ obligations 113.7 113.7
Realized
On 2004 transactions 1.9 (17.6) (0.8) (16.5)
On liquidation of prior year US$ obligations (70.1) (424.9) (325.3) (33.4) (355.1) (1,208.8)
Currency exchange adjustment 45.5 (424.9) (342.9) (34.2) (355.1) (1,111.6)
(g) Transfers to reserves
This represents the charge to projects in respect of the provision for compensation payments under Appendix D to
the staff rules.
The amount of $1,100,000 (€962,500) reflected in transfers to/from reserves represents the income received for
Global Environment Facility (GEF) projects under inter-organization arrangements with UNEP, previously recorded in
GEF main programme.
(h) Surplus
The amount of $3,101,237 (€2,285,613) represents the accumulated surplus under the general-purpose segment of
the Industrial Development Fund.
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(i) Cash and term deposits
The equivalent of $1,491,424 (€1,099,180) is held in currencies classified as non-convertible, as follows:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 1,083.1 798.2
Trust funds 408.3 300.9
1,491.4 1,099.1
(j) Operating reserves
The Industrial Development Board, in decision IDB.2/Dec.7, authorized the freezing of the operational reserve of
the Industrial Development Fund at $550,000 (€405,350 at the United Nations rate of exchange as at 31 December
2004).
(k) Commitments
Commitments, representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years, were entered
into prior to 31 December 2004, as below:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 3,232.3 2,515.3
Montreal Protocol 5,651.7 4,452.3
Global Environment Facility 4,033.8 3,262.7
Trust funds 5,738.0 4,474.4
Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation 784.1 618.9
Inter-organization arrangements 1,345.1 1,065.6
20,785.0 16,389.2
(l) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at $343,476 (€278,106) were received from Member States in support of UNIDO
projects and $39,778 (€32,207) in support of project travel.
(m) Ex gratia payments
No ex gratia payments were made in 2004.
(n) Field IOVs
The backlog of unprocessed field inter-office vouchers (IOVs) of $8,473,317 brought forward from the previous
year, together with a total of $19,863,927 inter-office vouchers received for the year 2004 was reduced to $4,528,761
(€3,337,697) by 31 December 2004. The unprocessed IOV balance at year-end comprises payroll charges of $509,757
for the entire 2004 received only in January 2005 and IOVs of $485,056 rejected due to insufficient information.
(o) Lost or stolen non-expendable equipment
No non-expendable equipment was written off from inventory as lost or stolen during 2004.
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Notes to the financial statements—Annex I
TECHNICAL COOPERATION ACTIVITIES EXECUTED BY UNIDO
Table 1. Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves
and fund balances for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Regular
Programme
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol GEF
Trust
Fund
Interorganization
arrangements
Subtotal
Extrabudgetary
Funds Total
INCOME
Assessed contributions
Voluntary contributions 25,611.8 39,262.6 45,274.5 1,051.1 111,200.0 111,200.0
Other income
– Funds received under interorganization
arrangements 5,048.0 5,048.0 5,048.0
– Allocations from other funds 3,914.2 3,914.2
– Interest income 12.2 641.3 28.7 682.2 682.2
– Currency exchange adjustments 45.5 (424.9) (342.9) (34.2) (355.1) (1,157.1) (1,111.6)
– Miscellaneous (0.3) (2.2) (11.7) 0.7 (0.3) (13.5) (13.8)
TOTAL INCOME 3,959.4 25,196.9 39,549.3 (34.2) 44,920.1 6,127.5 115,759.6 119,719.0
EXPENDITURE
Salaries and common staff costs 1,733.8 10,678.2 1,533.9 722.4 11,576.6 2,070.0 26,581.1 28,314.9
Contractual services 902.5 996.7 19,382.5 3,361.7 3,393.2 1,236.0 28,370.1 29,272.6
Operational expenses 162.2 967.4 384.6 24.6 822.6 118.0 2,317.2 2,479.4
Acquisitions 739.6 1,653.4 8,682.8 2,224.1 1,718.2 14,278.5 15,018.1
Fellowships 421.3 1,119.3 351.8 1.2 2,184.5 393.1 4,049.9 4,471.2
Programme support costs 1,869.8 4,002.3 450.9 1,886.0 336.9 8,545.9 8,545.9
TOTAL EXPENDITURE 3,959.4 17,284.8 34,337.9 4,560.8 22,087.0 5,872.2 84,142.7 88,102.1
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE 7,912.1 5,211.4 (4,595.0) 22,833.1 255.3 31,616.9 31,616.9
Prior biennium adjustments
Provision for delay in collection of
contributions
NET EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE 7,912.1 5,211.4 (4,595.0) 22,833.1 255.3 31,616.9 31,616.9
Savings on cancellation of prior
biennium’s obligations
Transfers to reserves 51.5 5.4 4.1 42.2 103.2 103.2
Transfers from reserves
Transfers to/from other funds (962.5) 962.5
Credits to Member States
Other adjustments to reserves and
fund balances (3,037.6) (3,086.0) 264.0 (3,539.1) (158.8) (9,557.5) (9,557.5)
Reserves and fund balances,
beginning of year 36,772.7 26,730.3 7,461.7 28,849.4 99,814.1 99,814.1
RESERVES AND FUND
BALANCES, END OF YEAR 41,698.7 28,861.1 2,172.3 48,185.6 1,059.0 121,976.7 121,976.7
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Table 1. Combined statement of income and expenditure and changes in reserves
and fund balances for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of United States dollars)
Regular
Programme
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol GEF
Trust
Fund
Interorganization
arrangements
Subtotal
Extrabudgetary
Funds Total
INCOME
Assessed contributions
Voluntary contributions 32,415.2 46,750.9 56,884.9 1,300.0 137,351.0 137,351.0
Other income
– Funds received under interorganization
arrangements 6,244.1 6,244.1 6,244.1
– Allocations from other funds 4,994.1 4,994.1
– Interest income 16.3 814.0 38.1 868.4 868.4
– Currency exchange adjustments (54.0) 1.3 (3.5) (1.2) (3.4) (57.4)
– Miscellaneous (0.4) (2.8) (14.6) 1.1 (0.4) (16.7) (17.1)
TOTAL INCOME 4,939.7 32,428.7 47,551.6 (3.5) 56,886.0 7,580.6 144,443.4 149,383.1
EXPENDITURE
Salaries and common staff costs 2,171.4 13,397.1 1,913.9 901.0 14,488.8 2,596.9 33,297.7 35,469.1
Contractual services 1,107.7 1,258.9 23,213.2 3,815.2 4,143.4 1,497.2 33,927.9 35,035.6
Operational expenses 199.9 1,231.4 488.2 30.9 1,037.3 146.4 2,934.2 3,134.1
Acquisitions 933.8 2,122.3 10,830.5 2,833.1 2,096.3 17,882.2 18,816.0
Fellowships 526.9 1,460.8 448.3 4.3 2,735.5 493.2 5,142.1 5,669.0
Programme support costs 2,352.2 4,875.3 518.1 2,336.5 413.7 10,495.8 10,495.8
TOTAL EXPENDITURE 4,939.7 21,822.7 41,769.4 5,269.5 27,574.6 7,243.7 103,679.9 108,619.6
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE 10,606.0 5,782.2 (5,273.0) 29,311.4 336.9 40,763.5 40,763.5
Prior biennium adjustments
Provision for delay in collection of
contributions
NET EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF
INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE 10,606.0 5,782.2 (5,273.0) 29,311.4 336.9 40,763.5 40,763.5
Savings on cancellation of prior
biennium’s obligations
Transfers to reserves 64.5 6.8 5.1 52.4 128.8 128.8
Transfers from reserves
Transfers to/from other funds (1,100.0) 1,100.0
Credits to Member States
Other adjustments to reserves and
fund balances
Reserves and fund balances,
beginning of year 45,908.5 33,371.2 9,315.5 36,016.8 124,612.0 124,612.0
RESERVES AND FUND
BALANCES, END OF YEAR 56,579.0 39,160.2 2,947.6 65,380.6 1,436.9 165,504.3 165,504.3
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Table 2. Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances
as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol GEF Trust Fund
Interorganization
arrangements
Total
2004
ASSETS
Cash and term deposits 51,161.1 46,079.1 5,669.1 62,278.6 8,569.9 173,757.8
Accounts receivable
Assessed contributions receivable from
Member States
Voluntary contributions receivable
Other contributions receivable 154.7 154.7
Less provision for delay in collection of
contributions
Interfund balances 120.4 72.9 301.4 1,196.4 1,691.1
Other 575.2 395.9 81.2 555.3 284.3 1,891.9
Other assets 44.9 8.1 0.1 89.4 4,056.8 4,199.3
TOTAL ASSETS 51,781.2 46,603.5 5,823.3 63,224.7 14,262.1 181,694.8
LIABILITIES
Payments or contributions received in advance 7,780.6 7,780.6
Unliquidated obligations 3,216.8 11,866.5 2,578.6 5,692.5 2,647.9 26,002.3
Accounts payable
Interfund balances 211.0 97.8 308.8
Other 6,654.7 5,875.9 1,072.4 9,346.6 2,676.8 25,626.4
Other funds and special accounts
Other liabilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES 10,082.5 17,742.4 3,651.0 15,039.1 13,203.1 59,718.1
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
Operating reserves 405.3 405.3
Other reserves 1,017.6 12.1 12.8 878.8 1,921.3
Balances relating to projects funded by donors 37,990.2 28,849.0 2,159.5 47,306.8 1,059.0 117,364.5
Working capital funds
Surplus (deficit) 2,285.6 2,285.6
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES 41,698.7 28,861.1 2,172.3 48,185.6 1,059.0 121,976.7
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND
FUND BALANCES 51,781.2 46,603.5 5,823.3 63,224.7 14,262.1 181,694.8
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Table 2. Combined statement of assets, liabilities, and reserves and fund balances
as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of United States dollars)
Industrial
Development
Fund
Montreal
Protocol GEF Trust Fund
Interorganization
arrangements
Total
2004
ASSETS
Cash and term deposits 69,418.0 62,522.5 7,692.1 84,502.7 11,628.2 235,763.5
Accounts receivable
Assessed contributions receivable
from Member States
Voluntary contributions receivable
Other contributions receivable 209.9 209.9
Less provision for delay in collection
of contributions
Interfund balances 163.4 98.9 409.1 1,623.4 2,294.8
Other 780.4 537.2 110.2 753.5 385.8 2,567.1
Other assets 61.0 10.9 0.2 121.3 5,504.4 5,697.8
TOTAL ASSETS 70,259.4 63,234.0 7,901.4 85,786.6 19,351.6 246,533.0
LIABILITIES
Payments or contributions received in advance 10,557.1 10,557.1
Unliquidated obligations 4,364.7 16,101.0 3,498.7 7,724.0 3,592.8 35,281.2
Accounts payable
Interfund balances 286.3 132.8 419.1
Other 9,029.4 7,972.8 1,455.1 12,682.0 3,632.0 34,771.3
Other funds and special accounts
Other liabilities
TOTAL LIABILITIES 13,680.4 24,073.8 4,953.8 20,406.0 17,914.7 81,028.7
RESERVES AND FUND BALANCES
Operating reserves 550.0 550.0
Other reserves 1,380.7 16.4 17.4 1,192.4 2,606.9
Balances relating to projects funded by donors 51,547.1 39,143.8 2,930.2 64,188.2 1,436.9 159,246.2
Working capital funds
Surplus (deficit) 3,101.2 3,101.2
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND
BALANCES 56,579.0 39,160.2 2,947.6 65,380.6 1,436.9 165,504.3
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES
AND FUND BALANCES 70,259.4 63,234.0 7,901.4 85,786.6 19,351.6 246,533.0
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Table 3. Summary of transactions on sub-accounts of the Industrial Development Fund
for the year 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In United States dollars)
Fund balance
at 01/01/2004
Cash received
in 2004
Expenditures
2004
Misc. income
incl. General
Pool interest
Fund balance
as at 31/12/2004
General-purpose convertible 2,902,353 371,370 187,874 15,387 3,101,237
Agence de Coopération Culturelle et Technique 30,295 0 0 0 30,295
Agence Wallonne à l’Exportation 425,247 46,288 236,312 0 235,223
Argentina 20,170 0 0 0 20,170
Australia 55,469 295 0 0 55,764
Austria 3,789,938 4,422,282 2,477,029 (20) 5,735,170
Austria—Integrated Programme 430,401 12,608 119,420 (336) 323,253
Bahrain 120,293 409,090 389,268 0 140,115
Belgium 130,736 183,451 152,398 0 161,790
Brazil 75,117 0 13,735 0 61,383
Chile 0 10,000 0 0 10,000
China 1,973,501 530,990 143,218 0 2,361,273
Côte d’Ivoire (108,618) 0 0 0 (108,618)
Czech Republic (Ministry of Agriculture) 106,770 138,660 103,136 0 142,294
Czech Republic (Ministry of Trade and Industry) 28 (28) 0 0 0
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 41,439 714 0 0 42,153
Denmark 4,908,809 85,699 1,663,589 (463) 3,330,455
Egypt (101,718) 0 0 0 (101,718)
Finland 214,660 3,781 8,198 0 210,242
France 199,467 803,158 793,971 0 208,653
France (Ministry of Agriculture) 678,961 201,904 274,879 0 605,987
Germany 375,639 (29,673) 21,163 0 324,803
Germany—Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische
Zusammenarbeit 28,098 0 23,698 0 4,400
Greece 368,685 1,134,142 538,941 0 963,886
Guatemala 12,201 545,556 115,733 0 442,025
Honduras 193 (193) 0 0 0
Hungary 373,557 7,829 94,858 337 286,866
India 3,766,057 1,128,540 726,565 9,972 4,178,004
Indonesia 14,986 14,784 0 0 29,770
Ireland 31,909 807 867 0 31,849
Italy 8,947,939 9,563,983 5,370,716 (767) 13,140,438
Japan 688,385 1,603,774 1,950,474 0 341,684
Japan Overseas Development Corporation,
Bangkok 424 0 0 0 424
Kuwait 108,455 2,728 1,529 0 109,654
Luxembourg 142,191 3,226 40,097 0 105,320
Mexico 0 76,925 0 0 76,925
Myanmar 577 0 0 0 577
Netherlands 575,982 134,838 101,232 17 609,606
New Zealand 34,510 0 0 0 34,510
Norway 182,507 (26,458) 0 0 156,049
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Fund balance
at 01/01/2004
Cash received
in 2004
Expenditures
2004
Misc. income
incl. General
Pool interest
Fund balance
as at 31/12/2004
Norway—Integrated programme (Africa) 128,206 29,840 73,826 0 84,220
Poland 80,133 577,759 598,129 0 59,763
Portugal 1,281,461 122,086 5,717 0 1,397,829
Republic of Korea 1,301,307 112,763 335,950 0 1,078,121
Romania 13,434 0 0 0 13,434
Russian Federation 321,933 8,063 64,513 0 265,483
Rwanda 355 0 355 0 0
Saudi Arabia 1,401,979 (120,369) (13,938) (2,336) 1,293,212
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority 0 306,489 0 0 306,489
Slovakia 54,268 0 0 0 54,268
Spain 1,254,924 206,162 586,345 0 874,741
Sweden 52,231 0 11,549 0 40,681
Switzerland 4,406,275 7,978,814 3,906,637 (1,217) 8,477,234
Thailand 4,911 0 2,622 0 2,289
Turkey 1,025 51,980 47,468 (206) 5,332
United Kingdom—Integrated programme 1,022,769 443,850 605,876 (62) 860,681
Undefined 6,837 0 0 (5,145) 1,693
UB—Millennium Development Goals 0 209,798 0 0 209,798
UB—Integrated programmes and country service
framework activities 0 531,616 0 0 531,616
UB—post-crisis situation 0 473,620 55,035 0 418,584
Special-purpose convertible 39,975,309 31,942,169 21,641,110 (225) 50,276,143
Bulgaria 28 0 0 0 28
China 55,638 84,684 14,633 0 125,690
Cuba 391,148 21,000 0 0 412,148
Egypt (45,546) 0 0 0 (45,546)
Egypt Iron and Steel Co. 31,942 0 0 0 31,942
India 568,714 388 (20,885) 9,364 599,351
Poland 15,034 (15,034) 0 0 0
Slovakia 147,001 0 0 0 147,001
Tifac, New Delhi 388 (388) 0 0 0
Undefined 295 0 0 0 295
Special-purpose non-convertible 1,164,643 90,650 (6,252) 9,364 1,270,909
44,042,305 32,404,190 21,822,733 24,527 54,648,289
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Table 4. Summary of technical cooperation activities financed by trust funds
for the year 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In United States dollars)
Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Projects financed by recipient Governments
Algeria 66,052 0 52,033 14,019
Argentina 424,860 0 0 424,860
Argentina—Centro de investigacion de celulosa y
papel 10,887 0 (594) 11,480
Bolivia 12,460 0 0 12,460
Brazil 204,135 0 41,422 162,713
Bulgaria 0 16,274 9,419 6,855
Belarus 26,204 0 0 26,204
Chile 6,824 0 0 6,824
Colombia 242,377 190,557 109,399 323,535
China 929,524 371,203 498,849 801,877
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 50,746 113,011 124,833 38,924
Ecuador 369,782 74,800 203,409 241,173
Egypt 3,462,983 1,151,166 1,274,856 3,339,293
Egypt—Social Fund for Development 240,823 88,612 156,570 172,865
Gabon 2,790 0 (813) 3,604
Honduras 2,577 20 84 2,513
India 1,662,709 1,576,282 912,925 2,326,066
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 413,353 45,000 130,946 327,407
Iran—Organization for Investment, Economic and
Technical Assistance of Iran 47,322 0 (4,790) 52,112
Iraq 210,936 13,837 111,030 113,744
Côte d’Ivoire 49,807 0 41,735 8,073
Kenya 11,904 28,673 6,530 34,047
Lebanon 27,308 0 (3,272) 30,580
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—Benghazi Development
Centre 8,093 0 0 8,093
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—General Pipe Company
Benghazi 2,700 0 0 2,700
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—Industrial Research Centre
of Libya 10,049 0 0 10,049
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya—Secretariat of Strategic
Industry 53,081 0 0 53,081
Lithuania 28,250 0 20,263 7,987
Madagascar 135,093 0 0 135,093
Mauritius 18,826 0 (8,112) 26,938
Mexico 10,596 0 (10,461) 21,058
Nigeria 2,500,605 766,701 692,933 2,574,373
Oman 11,311 0 0 11,311
Panama 10,057 0 0 10,057
Paraguay 17,780 0 0 17,780
Russian Federation 176,831 121,583 195,876 102,538
Russian Federation—The Foundation NEM and
CPCOGI 1,662 0 (110) 1,772
Saudi Arabia 0 1,337,867 8,668 1,329,198
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Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority 189,908 (137,730) (1) 52,179
Saudi German Hospitals Group 21,127 0 4,977 16,150
Slovenia 22,674 0 0 22,674
Thailand 18,243 0 113 18,130
Turkey 118,176 1,500,000 743,069 875,108
Subtotal 11,831,425 7,257,855 5,311,785 13,777,495
Associate Experts & JPOs
Austria 40,565 (42,057) (1,491) 0
Belgium 214,679 3,502 102,609 115,572
Denmark 292,234 312,906 288,307 316,833
France 21,388 0 1,053 20,335
Germany 45,930 107,702 37,643 115,989
Italy 532,056 572,544 605,019 499,581
Japan 529,794 72,877 436,020 166,651
Netherlands 368,880 605,979 606,089 368,771
Norway 288,888 318,417 303,437 303,868
Republic of Korea 12,143 0 15,659 (3,516)
Russian Federation 4,617 87,959 80,149 12,428
Spain 34,783 0 9,477 25,307
Switzerland 126,295 121,928 113,914 134,309
Subtotal 2,512,254 2,161,759 2,597,886 2,076,127
JPOs travel
Belgium 31,514 0 0 31,514
Denmark 32,193 0 0 32,193
Germany 10,661 0 0 10,661
Japan 61,564 (61,564) 0 0
Netherlands 348,537 (348,537) 0 0
Norway 4,267 0 0 4,267
Subtotal 488,736 (410,101) 0 78,635
Projects financed by donor Governments
Australia 23,155 0 (119) 23,274
Austria 46,664 13,953 (2,398) 63,015
Belgium 114,892 0 33,612 81,280
Canada 5,493 (5,493) 0 0
Czech Republic 99,303 (23,410) 66,310 9,583
Denmark 451,208 0 213,977 237,231
Finland 772,086 786,905 550,522 1,008,469
France 1,600,428 1,075,358 582,284 2,093,502
Germany 101,339 113,017 111,748 102,608
Greece 23,427 0 (97) 23,524
Italy 5,474,318 18,667,978 8,461,448 15,680,847
Japan 2,232,270 439,546 1,043,006 1,628,810
Japanese Embassy—Guinea TF/GUI/00/001 1,539 84 1,623 0
Norway 2,482 1,906,617 177,323 1,731,776
Republic of Korea 500,980 (10,698) 263,710 226,573
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Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Republic of Korea—Korean Research Institute of
Standards and Science 131,305 0 (1,697) 133,002
Slovakia 7,398 0 0 7,398
Spain 125,891 0 0 125,891
Sweden 4,632 0 4,059 572
United Kingdom 984,561 568,293 676,383 876,470
United States of America 373,232 0 0 373,232
Subtotal 13,076,601 23,532,150 12,181,694 24,427,057
Undefined 23,107 151,087 127,961 46,233
Subtotal 23,107 151,087 127,961 46,233
Other trust funds
African Productive Capacity Facility 0 61,245 0 61,245
AIDC (Automative Industry Development Centre),
South Africa 30,253 0 (9) 30,262
Aluminium Company of America (Alcoa), USA 17,507 0 0 17,507
Austria Rural Energy 1,076,613 0 0 1,076,613
Badea: Arab Bank for Economic Development in
Africa 2,450 0 0 2,450
Beni-Suef Cement Company, Egypt 33,822 0 0 33,822
Centro de Investigaciones Textiles, Argentina 116,969 95,286 151,694 60,561
Ceylon Steel Corporation Ltd., Sri Lanka 5,284 0 0 5,284
CFC—FC/INT/97/021 54,708 0 162,806 (108,098)
CFC—FC/RAF/03/065 132,715 0 478,624 (345,909)
CFC—FC/RAF/04/088 0 250,000 9,172 240,828
CFC—FC/RAF/96/001 (164,337) 149,990 339,947 (354,294)
CFC—FC/RAS/00/153 (24,241) 148,462 116,500 7,721
CFC—FC/URT/04/118 0 149,990 0 149,990
Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Japan 137,747 0 82,925 54,821
Eastern and Southern African Leather Industries
Association 6,660 0 2,620 4,040
Engineering for the Petroleum and Process Industry
(ENPPI), Egypt 8,179 0 0 8,179
Engineering Consulting Firms Association, Japan 11,441 0 0 11,441
Epstein Engineering Export Ltd., USA 807 0 0 807
European Union 439,182 4,396,016 2,456,637 2,378,561
European Union Commission 74,701 171,778 52,622 193,857
FAO 275 0 0 275
Federal Chemical and Ceramics Corporation, Pakistan (1,677) 0 0 (1,677)
France 0 463,120 441,067 22,053
Glucosan Factories, Iran (Islamic Republic of) 13 0 185 (172)
Gulf Co-Operation Council, Saudi Arabia 11,676 0 0 11,676
Gulf Organization for Industrial Consulting, Qatar 38,420 38,420 52,065 24,775
IFAD (International Fund for Agricultural
Development) 57,380 0 (885) 58,265
Institute for Scientific and Technological
Development (IDCT), Brazil 88,958 0 83,777 5,181
International Development Association 144,643 0 0 144,643
Inversiones Cofide S.A., Peru 15,405 0 0 15,405
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Fund balance
01/01/2004
Contributions
received, interest
and miscellaneous
income 2004
Expenditures
2004
Fund balance
31/12/2004
Iranian Fuel Conservation Organization (IFCO), Iran
(Islamic Republic of) 0 45,000 1,929 43,071
Islamic Development Bank, Saudi Arabia 5,840 0 (249) 6,090
Italy 0 152,430 152,418 12
Jiangsu Baixue Electric Appliances Company Ltd.,
China 407 0 0 407
Kuwait Finance House 0 153,680 0 153,680
MAGFA Information Technology Development
Centre, Iran (Islamic Republic of) 0 46,887 5,558 41,329
Magnetti Marelli:Fiat Group TFIND99009, Italy 10,103 0 0 10,103
Nadsme—Slovak Republic 8,181 0 0 8,181
New Energy and Industrial Technology Development
Organization, Japan 24,664 44,893 53,177 16,380
New Nigeria Development Company, Nigeria 28,325 0 0 28,325
Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Nigeria 492,155 0 (10,494) 502,649
Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation
(NORAD), Norway 1,221,545 1,790,826 721,500 2,290,870
Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd, India 33,727 1,030,000 205,845 857,882
Petroliam Nasional Berhad (Petronas), Malaysia 28,179 0 0 28,179
Premag Handelsges.M.B.H, Austria 2,595 0 0 2,595
Procter & Gamble Far East Inc., Japan 475 0 0 475
RENPAP Member Countries 0 27,688 0 27,688
Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Ind., Brazil 51,126 11,684 27,566 35,245
Sezione Speciale per l’assicurazione del Credito, Italy 36,448 0 0 36,448
Shahid Modarres Industrial Pharmaceutical Complex,
Iran (Islamic Republic of) 53,878 0 0 53,878
Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON), Nigeria 0 243,341 0 243,341
Staudhammer Finanz AG, Switzerland 3,357 0 0 3,357
Sudan 329 0 0 329
Swedish International Enterprise Development
Corporation (Swedcorp), Sweden 201,445 0 144,259 57,186
TESIDE (Turkish Electronic Industry Association),
Turkey 1,781 0 0 1,781
The Ford Foundation, USA 1,762 18,000 0 19,762
Trust Fund Trade 665,444 540,905 307,453 898,897
United Nations Fund for International Partnerships 517,479 570,870 666,496 421,854
UNDG Iraq Trust Fund 0 10,950,550 66,254 10,884,296
UNDP/UNDHA 499 (499) 0 0
Unilever Research, United Kingdom 2,497 0 0 2,497
United Nations Trust Fund for Human Security 1,221,608 2,135,399 583,862 2,773,145
UNOPS 0 507,324 0 507,324
US Agency for International Development, USA (399) 0 0 (399)
Yemen Corporation for Cement Industry and
Marketing 15,708 0 0 15,708
Subtotal 6,944,712 24,193,287 7,355,323 23,782,675
GRAND TOTAL 34,876,835 56,886,037 27,574,648 64,188,223
Note now includes FC Projects
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Table 5. Summary of technical cooperation activities for 2004
financed under inter-organization agreements
(in United States dollars)
Project expenditure Programme support Total expenditure
UNDP
UNDP main programme 975,398 97,605 1,073,003
Project for which UNIDO is the associated agency 155,991 25,810 181,801
Government-executed projects for which UNIDO is
the implementing agency 2,328,797 66,154 2,394,951
UNDP trust funds 2,449,771 144,548 2,594,319
5,909,957 334,117 6,244,074
UNEP
UNEP/GEF 919,947 79,624 999,571
919,947 79,624 999,571
Total 6,829,904 413,741 7,243,645
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Annex II
Operating Funds—UNDP and UNDP Trust Funds
Report No. 1
UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
(Name of Executing Agency)
(UNIDO)
Status of Funds as at 31 December 2004
(Expressed in US dollars)
Operating Funds
Opening balance as at 1 January 2004 18,308,560
Credited to project clearing account (15,897,201)
Other charges and credits for prior years (4,054,999)
(1,643,640)
Add: Service Clearing Account
Cash drawings from UNDP (22,700,000)
IOV’s 19,863,927
2004 charges and credits 2,950
Miscellaneous income and exchange adjustments (Report No. 8) 131,724
Miscellaneous items refunded to UNDP (Report No. 8) 7,095
Closing balance as at 31 December 2004 (2,694,304)
Add: Project Clearing Account
Opening balance as at 1 January 2004 15,897,201
Less: Expenditure and support costs for lines implemented for
self-executed projects (Executing PDRs) 1,073,003
Expenditure and support costs for lines implemented for
projects executed by other agencies and Governments
(Implementing PDRs) 2,576,752 3,649,755
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Closing balance as at 31 December 2004 12,247,446
Balance as at 31 December 2004 7,909,502
Represented by:
Cash at banks, on hand and in transit 9,553,051
Accounts receivable (Report No. 9) 5,882,140 15,435,191
Less: Accounts payable (Report No. 10) 6,976,563
2004 unliquidated obligations 549,126 7,525,689
Balance as at 31 December 2004 7,909,502
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STATEMENT I
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY
(Title of Trust Fund)
(Name of Participating and Executing Agency)
(UNIDO)
Status of Funds at 31 December 2004
(Expressed in US dollars)
Operating Fund $ $
Balance at 1 January 2004 (1,013,070)
Add: Cash drawings from UNDP
IOVs
Other charges/credits (net)
Miscellaneous income and exchange adjustments (net)
(Report No. 19) (3,515)
Miscellaneous items charged to trust fund (net)
(Report No. 19) (9,108) (12,623)
(1,025,693)
Less: Expenditure during 2004
For projects
Disbursements (Report No. 15A) 1,423,193
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16) 849,746
For AOS (Report No. 15A) 126,865 2,399,804
(3,425,497)
Add/subtract:
Adjustments to prior years (Report No. 15B):
Expenditure 6,014,113
Support costs
AOS 59,024
Balance at 31 December 2004 2,647,640
Represented by:
Cash at banks, on hand and in transit 0
Accounts receivable (Report No. 20) 3,864,219 3,864,219
Less: Accounts payable (Report No. 21) 363,389
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16) 853,190 1,216,579
2,647,640
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STATEMENT I
REPUBLIC OF KOREA FOR THE TUMEN REGION
(Title of Trust Fund)
(Name of Participating and Executing Agency)
(UNIDO)
Status of Funds at 31 December 2004
(Expressed in US dollars)
Operating Fund
Balance at 1 January 2004 (14,352)
Add: Cash drawings from UNDP
IOV’s
Other charges/credits (net)
Miscellaneous income and exchange adjustments
(net) (Report No. 19) (1,026)
Miscellaneous items refunded to trust fund (net)
(Report No. 18) (1,026)
(15,378)
Less: Expenditure during 2004
For projects
Disbursements (Report No. 15A) 101,669
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16) 75,163
For AOS (Report No. 15A) 17,683 194,515
(209,893)
Add/subtract:
Adjustments to prior years (Report No. 15B):
Expenditure
Support costs
AOS
Balance at 31 December 2004 (209,893)
Represented by:
Cash at banks, on hand and in transit 0
Accounts receivable (Report No. 20) 0 0
Less: Accounts payable (Report No. 21) 134,071
Unliquidated obligations (Report No. 16) 75,822 209,893
(209,893)
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Annex III
SPECIAL ACCOUNT FOR BUILDINGS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
(FOR OTHER THAN STAFF COSTS)
(In euros)
Statement of income and expenditure for the year ended 31 December 2004
INCOME
Contributions received
IAEA 7,493,565
UNIDO 2,339,502
UNOV 3,147,843
CTBTO 1,225,440 14,206,350
Interest income 159,591
Currency exchange loss (83)
Miscellaneous income 20,973
TOTAL INCOME 14,386,831
EXPENDITURE
Rental and maintenance of premises 7,556,955
Utilities 5,286,288
Supplies and materials 74,791
Capital goods 103,430
Bank charges 4,792
Other general operating expenses 13,069
TOTAL EXPENDITURE 13,039,325
EXCESS (SHORTFALL) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE FOR 2004 1,347,506
Savings on cancellation of obligations 740,779
NET SURPLUS FOR 2004 2,088,285
Statement of assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004
ASSETS
Cash 11,961,926
Accounts receivable
Taxation 1,100,575
Contributions receivable* 4,815,676
Other 1,560,610
TOTAL ASSETS 19,438,787
LIABILITIES
Unliquidated obligations 7,500,884
Accounts payable
Other 1,405,826
TOTAL LIABILITIES 8,906,710
FUND BALANCE
Balance available as at 1 January 2004 8,443,792
Add: Net surplus for 2004 2,088,285
Balance available as at 31 December 2004 10,532,077
TOTAL RESERVES AND FUND BALANCE 10,532,077
TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND FUND BALANCE 19,438,787
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IAEA UNIDO UNOV CTBTO Total
2004 opening fund balance 4,399,747 1,456,095 1,865,459 722,491 8,443,792
2004 contributions 7,493,565 2,339,502 3,147,843 1,225,440 14,206,350
Interest (net of bank charges) 32,285 43,721 50,601 28,192 154,799
Net expenditure (6,473,690) (2,021,095) (2,719,421) (1,058,658) (12,272,864)
5,451,907 1,818,223 2,344,482 917,465 10,532,077
* Contributions receivable 4,812,392 0 3,205 79 4,815,676

***

Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding

Haiti 0.00284 – 2,016 – 2,016 – – –
Honduras 0.00711 – 5,048 – 5,048 – – –

Dominican Republic 0.03270 350,535 23,217 – – 350,535 23,217 373,752

United Arab Emirates 0.28716 – 203,884 – 203,884 – – –
United Kingdom 7.86994 – 5,587,656 – 5,587,656 – – –

***

Subtotal: 146,391 – 710 – 145,681 – 145,681
TOTAL 113,977,821 71,000,000 3,311,033 64,264,899 110,666,788 6,735,101 117,401,889
1986 50,465 35 50,430 50,430
1987 53,410 – 53,410 53,410
1988 82,281 17 82,264 82,264
1989 109,948 1,094 108,854 108,854
1990 525,661 9,835 515,826 515,826
1991 763,259 9,856 753,403 753,403
1992 942,764 26,744 916,020 916,020
1993 1,140,298 48,632 1,091,666 1,091,666
1994 8,072,707 56,864 8,015,843 8,015,843
1995 37,918,785 1,040,500 36,878,285 36,878,285
1996 35,079,800 24,831 35,054,969 35,054,969
1997 5,047,707 95,669 4,952,038 4,952,038
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Scale % Contributions payable 1 January 2004 Credits and Collections in 2004 Contributions outstanding
M e m b e r S t a t e s
2004 Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium Prior biennium Current biennium
Total outstanding
1998 3,956,766 133,424 3,823,342 3,823,342
1999 4,628,093 235,359 4,392,734 4,392,734
2000 3,028,794 87,689 2,941,105 2,941,105
2001 3,172,139 100,188 3,071,951 3,071,951
2002 3,985,584 388,833 3,596,751 3,596,751
2003 5,419,360 1,051,463 4,367,897 4,367,897
TOTAL 113,977,821 71,000,000 3,311,033 64,264,899 110,666,788 6,735,101 117,401,889

***
STATUS OF ADVANCES TO THE WORKING CAPITAL FUND
as at 31 December 2004
Scale of assessment Amount of Collections M e m b e r S t a t e Adjustments Collections Amount
(per cent) advance 1986-2003 2004 2004 outstanding

Haiti 0.00284 211 223 (12) –
Honduras 0.00711 528 520 8 –

GENERAL FUND AND WORKING CAPITAL FUND
Statement of cash flow for the year ended 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)

Total 2004 Total 2002
Cash flows from operating activities
Excess (shortfall) of income over expenditure (Statement I) 13,652.5 8,423.4
(Increase) decrease in contributions receivable (3,419.9) (389.9)
(Increase) decrease other accounts receivable 120.8 5,235.7
Increase (decrease) in contributions or payments received in advance 1,134.1 955.4
Increase (decrease) in unliquidated obligations (7,059.9) (9,908.9)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable (2,198.5) (5,416.9)
Increase (decrease) in other funds and special accounts (182.3)
Less: Interest income 660.5
Currency exchange adjustments 174.3 834.8 880.3
Net cash from operating activities 1,394.3 (2,163.8)
Cash flows from investing and financing activities
Increase (decrease) in interfund balances (404.3) (909.9)
Increase (decrease) in borrowings (865.0) (1,618.0)
Plus: Interest income 660.5
Currency exchange adjustments 174.3 834.8 880.3
Net cash from investing and financing activities (434.5) (1,647.6)
Cash flows from other sources
Savings on or cancellation of prior period’s obligations 3,281.3 4,315.7
Transfers to (from) reserves 410.5 2,278.8
Credits to Member States and prior bienniums adjustments (3,063.9) 9.1
Net cash from other sources 627.9 6,603.6
Net increase (decrease) in cash 1,587.7 2,792.2
Cash at beginning of period 23,393.9 18,328.7
Cash at end of period (Statement II) 24,981.6 21,120.9

***

GENERAL FUND
Status of appropriations by major programme for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major Programme
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Governing Bodies 2,507.3 0.0 2,507.3 2,302.2 0.2 2,302.4 204.9
General Management 5,960.3 0.0 5,960.3 5,140.7 389.7 5,530.4 429.9
Strengthening of Industrial Capacities 14,561.0 0.0 14,561.0 9,846.3 266.9 10,113.2 4,447.8
Cleaner and Sustainable Industrial Development 11,782.7 0.0 11,782.7 11,157.3 237.2 11,394.5 388.2
Regional Programme 17,409.9 0.0 17,409.9 9,739.6 2,068.2 11,807.8 5,602.1
Administration 13,159.3 0.0 13,159.3 9,628.8 663.8 10,292.6 2,866.7
Indirect Costs 8,010.4 0.0 8,010.4 7,082.1 285.9 7,368.0 642.4
Total A 73,390.9 0.0 73,390.9 54,897.0 3,911.9 58,808.9 14,582.0
Approved estimates Actual income Accrued income Total income (Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme 802.9 0.0 802.9 260.9 0.0 260.9 542.0
Miscellaneous Income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 689.8 0.0 689.8 698.2 0.0 698.2 (8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 502.3 0.0 502.3 (502.3)
Total B 1,492.7 0.0 1,492.7 1,461.4 0.0 1,461.4 31.3
Total A—B 71,898.2 0.0 71,898.2 53,435.6 3,911.9 57,347.5 14,550.7

Statement IV

***

GENERAL FUND
Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)

Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Salaries and common staff costs 48,784.1 0.0 48,784.1 39,142.1 1,442.1 40,584.2 8,199.9
Official travel 1,439.6 0.0 1,439.6 731.6 156.1 887.7 551.9
Operating costs 13,139.2 0.0 13,139.2 8,506.1 1,528.9 10,035.0 3,104.2
Information and communication technology 2,948.2 0.0 2,948.2 1,359.2 436.4 1,795.6 1,152.6
RPTC and SRA activities 7,079.8 0.0 7,079.8 5,158.0 348.4 5,506.4 1,573.4
Total A 73,390.9 0.0 73,390.9 54,897.0 3,911.9 58,808.9 14,582.0
Approved estimates Actual income Accrued income Total income (Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme 802.9 0.0 802.9 260.9 0.0 260.9 542.0
Miscellaneous income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 689.8 0.0 689.8 698.2 0.0 698.2 (8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 502.3 0.0 502.3 (502.3)
Total B 1,492.7 0.0 1,492.7 1,461.4 0.0 1,461.4 31.3
Total A—B 71,898.2 0.0 71,898.2 53,435.6 3,911.9 57,347.5 14,550.7

Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/
other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Salaries and common staff costs 48,784.1 0.0 48,784.1 39,142.1 1,442.1 40,584.2 8,199.9
Official travel 1,439.6 0.0 1,439.6 731.6 156.1 887.7 551.9
Operating costs 13,139.2 0.0 13,139.2 8,506.1 1,528.9 10,035.0 3,104.2
Information and communication technology 2,948.2 0.0 2,948.2 1,359.2 436.4 1,795.6 1,152.6
RPTC and SRA activities 7,079.8 0.0 7,079.8 5,158.0 348.4 5,506.4 1,573.4
Total A 73,390.9 0.0 73,390.9 54,897.0 3,911.9 58,808.9 14,582.0
Approved estimates Actual income Accrued income Total income (Excess) shortfall
Income
Regional Programme 802.9 0.0 802.9 260.9 0.0 260.9 542.0
Miscellaneous income
(i) Estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 689.8 0.0 689.8 698.2 0.0 698.2 (8.4)
(ii) Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 502.3 0.0 502.3 (502.3)
Total B 1,492.7 0.0 1,492.7 1,461.4 0.0 1,461.4 31.3
Total A—B 71,898.2 0.0 71,898.2 53,435.6 3,911.9 57,347.5 14,550.7

***

OTHER HEADQUARTERS FUNDS—BUILDINGS MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Status of appropriations by major object of expenditure for 2004 as at 31 December 2004
(In thousands of euros)
Major object of expenditure
Original
appropriation
Transfers/other
adjustments
Revised
appropriation
Disbursements
during 2004
Unliquidated
obligations
as at 31/12/04
Total
expenditure
Balance of
appropriations
Staff costs 6,875.6 0.0 6,875.6 5,734.3 15.0 5,749.3 1,126.3
Official travel 5.8 0.0 5.8 2.2 0.0 2.2 3.6
Operating costs 16,795.8 0.0 16,795.8 5,896.0 5,714.7 11,610.7 5,185.1
Information and communication technology 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
RPTC and SRA activities 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total A 23,677.2 0.0 23,677.2 11,632.5 5,729.7 17,362.2 6,315.0
Estimated income
Actual
income
Accrued
income
Total
income
(Excess)
shortfall
Income
Common Buildings Management 22,777.1 0.0 22,777.1 19,711.6 93.3 19,804.9 2,972.2
Joint Buildings Management 900.1 0.0 900.1 585.5 13.6 599.1 301.0
Total B 23,677.2 0.0 23,677.2 20,297.1 106.9 20,404.0 3,273.2
Miscellaneous income
Not estimated in GC.9/Dec.17 0.0 0.0 0.0 180.5 0.0 180.5 (180.5)
Total C 0.0 0.0 0.0 180.5 0.0 180.5 (180.5)
Total A—B—C 0.0 0.0 0.0 (8,845.1) 5,622.8 (3,222.3) 3,222.3
Cumulative fund balance — special account for BMS (GC.9/Dec.14)
Excess of income over expenditure 3,222.3
– Savings on cancellation of obligations 740.8
– Unliquidated obligations (1,874.8)
Net surplus for 2004 2,088.3
Balance at the beginning of year 8,443.8
Balance at the end of year 10,532.1*
* The balance at year-end reported above is attributable to the special account for Buildings Management and is not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c).
As at 31 December 2004, contributions outstanding to the special account for Buildings Management from the VBOs are €4,815,676.

Schedule 4.1 – pg. 19

***

II. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Preface
UNIDO MISSION STATEMENT
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) is a specialized United Nations agency dedicated to promoting sustainable industrial development in countries with developing and transition economies.

UNIDO draws on the wide industrial expertise of its staff and the resources of government, the private sector and other United Nations multilateral and national institutions to create productive employment, competitive economies and a sound environment.

Fostering growth and productivity is central to UNIDO’s highly focused sectoral, regional and country-specific programmes. UNIDO is committed to maintaining excellent standards in the implementation of these programmes with the ultimate aim of assisting the developing countries and transition economies in their struggle against poverty and marginalization.

***

(r) Technical cooperation accounts:
(i) The appropriations for the Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation (RPTC) are administered in
accordance with the financial regulations of UNIDO, and in accordance with the General Conference
decision mentioned in paragraph (o) above;
(ii) Allocation income—UNDP. The figures for allocation income from UNDP and UNDP trust funds are
the same as reported for total expenditure in line with UNDP procedures, which require that
allocations be adjusted to equal actual expenditure;
(iii) Contributions income—trust funds and Industrial Development Fund (IDF). Voluntary contributions
from Governments or other donors are recorded upon receipt of cash. The use of such contributions is
governed by agreements between UNIDO and the Government/donor. Upon termination, expiration,
or revision of an agreement or receipt of other instructions from the Government/donor, any surplus
remaining in a trust/other funds is returned to the Government/donor or disposed of as requested by the
Government/donor;
(iv) Interest and miscellaneous income. Interest income arising from the RPTC is credited to the General
Fund; however, the miscellaneous income relating to the RPTC is credited to the special account.
Interest income arising from the special account for Buildings Management is credited to that account,
and finally prorated to the Vienna-based organizations taking into account the funds contributed by
them and the date of receipt of such funds in the account. Interest income arising from UNDP
activities is credited to the operating fund account maintained with that organization. Interest income
arising from the Industrial Development Fund, other than the general-purpose segment, as well as the
trust funds relating to the technical cooperation activities is credited to accounts payable until
instructions regarding its disposal are received from the donor. Interest accrued under the General
Purpose segment of the Industrial Development Fund is credited to that Fund. Interest income
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attributable to the Montreal Protocol is treated immediately as an additional programmable balance.
Interest income credited to the Global Environmental Facility, excluding interest income earned on
funds transferred as UNIDO fees, is set aside as accounts payable pending instructions to its return to
the trustee;
(v) The criteria for recording and reporting unliquidated obligations against the current biennium for the
RPTC are the same as those for the regular budget; however, as stated in paragraph (o) above, these
obligations are not subject to financial regulation 4.2(b) that requires that obligations shall remain
available for twelve months following the end of the fiscal period to which they relate. For all other
technical cooperation fund sources, obligations may be reported as expenditure of the current year on
the basis of the following criteria:
Personnel services
The cost of salaries and related expenses corresponding to services rendered within the calendar year.
Personnel services, in this context, include temporary assistance and overtime as well as consultants
who have subscribed to Special Service Agreements. However, when the remuneration of the
consultant is expressed as a lump sum rather than a sum per period worked, the full cost of the contract
may be treated as an obligation of the current year.
Supplies and equipment
The full cost of contracts or purchase orders entered into prior to the end of the year, whether or not
delivery has been effected, as long as there is budgetary provision in the current period.
Subcontracts
An obligation can be maintained on the basis of the payment schedule included in the signed contract
with the contractor. Where no payment schedule exists, the basis is the estimated timing of payments.
Fellowships
The cost of the fellowship from the date of commencement of study to completion of study or
31 December, whichever is earlier. The fellow must have been placed, i.e. the fellowship awarded to a
named individual and the place, course and the duration of the study established and the recipient
Government notified.
Travel
The full cost of travel, including the cost of transportation, subsistence allowances and other incidental
expenses if travel started prior to the end of the calendar year.
Group training
The cost of activities held in the current year. In the case of activities beginning in one year and
continuing into the next, the full cost of the activity should be charged to the current year.
(vi) Unliquidated obligations for the current period in respect of all technical cooperation activities other
than the regular budget remain valid for 12 months following the end of the year, rather than the
biennium, to which they relate. However, in accordance with UNDP reporting requirements, executing
agencies may retain unliquidated obligations beyond 12 months when a firm liability to pay still exists;
such liabilities are reported as accounts payable in the financial statements. Savings on or the
cancellation of obligations relating to the RPTC are credited to the special account approved by the
General Conference. Savings on or the liquidation of prior period obligations in respect of all other
technical activities are credited to individual projects as a reduction of current period expenditure in
accordance with UNDP reporting requirements. The UNDP requirements are also applied in the case
of the Industrial Development Fund, trust funds, Montreal Protocol and the Global Environmental
Facility.
(s) Trust funds. Director-General’s bulletin UNIDO/DG/B.18/Rev.1 dated 15 May 1992 sets out revised
policies for establishing and managing trust funds with effect from 26 May 1992. Extrabudgetary funds provided to
reimburse the Organization for the use of its facilities are excluded from the provisions of UNIDO/DG/B.18/Rev.1.

***

(t) Special account for programme support costs:
(i) Reimbursement for programme support costs is provided for in respect of extrabudgetary technical
cooperation activities. Reimbursement is calculated as a percentage of programme resources
expended. The Montreal Protocol Fund, under a new arrangement that became effective January 2003,
makes an annual lump sum payment of US$ 1.5 million as support cost for the implementation of its
programme/projects; this amount is recorded as current year income. The Fund also pays a reduced
support cost in respect of each of its projects, which, similar to most other technical cooperation
activities, is calculated as a percentage of programme resources expended;
(ii) In the financial statements of the Organization, the special account for programme support costs is
shown separately from the inter-organization funds, from which its income derives;
(iii) Unliquidated obligations in respect of the special account for programme support costs are accounted
for on the same basis as for the regular budget.
(u) Ex gratia payments made in accordance with financial rule 109.13 are reported in the notes to the financial
statements of the respective fund pursuant to financial regulation 9.3.
Note 2. General Fund and Working Capital Fund
(a) Assessed contributions
The General Conference approved an amount of €142,000,000 for the regular budget for the biennium 2004-2005
(GC.10/Dec.17) to be financed from contributions by Member States, one half of which €71,000,000 was assessed to
Member States for 2004, in accordance with financial regulation 5.1(c). Full provision is made for contributions
outstanding from prior years of €110,666,788 as at 31 December 2004.
(b) Revenue-producing activities
Gross revenue from the sale of UNIDO publications was €75,455, one-half of which (€37,727) was transferred to
the sales publications revolving fund. Sales promotional activities and other costs charged to the sales publications
revolving fund of €26,576 resulted in a net surplus for the year 2004 of €11,152. The net balance of the sales
publications revolving fund as at 31 December 2004 is €132,267.
(c) Interest income in excess of the budgetary estimates
Interest income in excess of the budgetary estimate (€660,500) for the year 2004 is €57,870; actual amount, if any,
due for distribution to eligible Member States will be determined at the end of the biennium. Pursuant to decision
GC.8/Dec.10, this amount is added to accounts payable established for this purpose in 1999. As at 31 December 2004,
the balance on this account was €289,527, out of which funds amounting to €231,657 were credited to eligible Member
States, in accordance with the “S” curve formula, when their assessed contributions for the year 2005 were calculated.
(d) Currency exchange adjustments
The amount of €174,307 represents the net realized exchange gain from regular budget activities.
An unrealized exchange gain of €600,063 resulting from the revaluation of non-euro monetary assets and
liabilities using the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at 31 December 2004 has not been recorded as
income, but set aside within “accounts payable—other” until realized. Of this amount, €386,000 is attributable to the
revaluation of the outstanding loan from the United Nations.
(e) Miscellaneous income
Of the total miscellaneous income, an amount of €171,127 relates to CTBTO support costs charged on BMS
activities.

(g) Prior biennium adjustments
The total adjustment of €119,311 in 2004 comprises:
(i) A charge of €3,000 for the biennium 1996-1997 in respect for a payment made to a UNIDO staff
member as recommended by the Joint Appeals Board;
(ii) A payment against the biennium 1998-1999 of €50,853 to a UNIDO staff member as recommended by
the Joint Appeals Board;
(iii) Biennium 2000-2001 charges of €23,137 related to IAEA library staff costs;
(iv) Various late charges for the biennium 2002-2003 of €42,321 including €18,291 for projects under
IDDA.
(h) Savings on or cancellation of obligations from the prior biennium
An amount of €3,277,774 net saving arises from the cancellation of 2002-2003 obligations. This amount consists
of savings on the cancellation of obligations from the prior biennium of €3,287,665 less €9,891 exchange loss on
liquidation of prior biennium IDDA obligations.
(i) Accounts receivable—other
“Accounts receivable—other” include the Organization’s claim amounting to €955,784 submitted to the
Government of the United States of America in respect of United States income tax reimbursed to UNIDO staff
members during the period 1994 to 1996 under the Tax Reimbursement Agreement. The Government of the United
States of America had communicated to the Organization that it acknowledges this debt, however, no payment was
received during 2004.
The Organization’s claim to the International Atomic Energy Agency under the cost-sharing agreement for
termination indemnity costs for Buildings Management staff separated during the 1995 staff reduction exercise is not
resolved. The amount claimed is $644,453 (€723,720 at the United Nations operational rate of exchange approved by
the ninth session of the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.15)). A provision for a possible write off of this receivable is
included in accounts payable.
(j) Assessed contributions received in advance
Assessed contributions of €1,324,078 were received in advance from Member States in 2004 to be applied against
the 2005 assessment.
(k) Borrowings
At the time UNIDO became a specialized agency, an interest-free loan of $16,000,000 was received from the
United Nations. The loan is repayable at the rate of $1,000,000 a year, commencing in 1990. The total amount due as at
31 December 2004 amounts to $1,000,000 (€737,000 at the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at
31 December 2004).

(l) Other reserves
Other reserves comprise the following:
€000’s
Separation indemnity reserves 5,499.3
Sales Publication Revolving Fund 132.3
Reserve for exchange rate fluctuations 1,840.8
Special account for RPTC 2,867.8
10,340.2
(m) Separation indemnity reserves
Pursuant to decision GC.6/Dec.15, paragraph (e), the amount of $9,546,732 representing the balance of
appropriations for the biennium 1992-1993, which was actually received by the Organization, was transferred to a
separation indemnity reserve in 1995. The reserve balance of €1,109,698 at the beginning of the year was unchanged at
31 December 2004 as no payments were made during 2004. Pursuant to General Conference decision GC.7/Dec.17, the
amount of $13.9 million was transferred from the unencumbered balance of appropriations for the biennium 1994-1995
for the funding of the separation indemnity reserve to meet the cost of staff separations resulting from the 1998-1999
programme and budgets. Unlike the previous allocation from the 1992-1993 biennium, the allocation from the
1994-1995 biennium was not supported by the actual cash, as large arrears for this biennium exist. This reserve had
effectively been reduced to $3,908,824 (€4,389,609) by payments made during the period 1998-2001 of $9,991,176. No
payments were made during 2004, thus the balance remained at €4,389,609. The total under separation indemnity
reserves as at 31 December 2004 was €5,499,308.
(n) Reserve for exchange rate fluctuations
In order to protect the Organization from exchange rate fluctuations resulting from the introduction of the euro as
a single currency for the preparation of the programme and budgets, appropriation and assessment, collection of
contributions and advances, and currency of accounts, the General Conference in decision GC.8/Dec.16 authorized the
Director-General to establish a reserve, not subject to the provisions of the financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c). The
balance of €1,840,776 as at 31 December 2004 in the reserve represents the amount set aside during the previous
biennium.
(o) Working Capital Fund
The amount of the Working Capital Fund was set by the General Conference at $9 million (GC.2/Dec.27). The
level of the Fund was reduced to $6,750,000 (GC.6/Dec.16) for the biennium 1996-1997 and was further reduced to
$6,610,000 for the biennium 1998-1999 (GC.7/Dec.12); $6,610,000 was approved for the biennium 2000-2001
(GC.8/Dec.14), and the biennium 2002-2003 (GC.9/Dec.13). Effective 1 January 2002, the amount ($6,610,000) was
converted to euros in accordance with GC.9/Dec.15, resulting in a Working Capital Fund of €7,423,030. The General
Conference decided (GC.10/Dec.15) to maintain the Fund at the same level for the biennium 2004-2005.
(p) Surplus due to Member States
The following is an analysis of the surpluses due to Member States, expressed in millions of euros, after
application of the provision for the delay in the collection of assessed contributions. The provision represents
contributions receivable from Member States for prior bienniums and from new Member States at the balance sheet
date. As at the balance sheet date, the surpluses due for distribution—representing assessed contributions received after
the end of a biennium together with receipts from new Member States are set aside in “accounts payable—other”,
pending receipt of Member States’ instructions. Of the total amount due for distribution of €3,624,342 as at
31 December 2004, an amount of €536,534 was applied against the 2005 assessments.

***

Page 28
Surplus
Surpluses disposed
and applied to
assessments
Prior
biennium
adjustments
Surpluses due
for
distribution
Provisions for
delays in the
collection of
contributions
Surpluses
due to
Member
States
Remarks
2004
2002-2003
2000-2001
1998-1999
1996-1997
(GC.8/Res.4)
13.6
10.3
10.3
14.3
46.9
3.7
5.3
7.1
0.1
2.2
0.5
0.6
0.2
7.9
6.0
8.2
40.0
13.6
0.2
0.1
0.1
(0.4)
Provisional
1994-1995
(GC.7/Dec.17)
35.4
15.6
44.9
(25.1)
1992-1993
(GC.6/Dec.15)
(GC.8/Dec.10)
(GC.8/Res.4)
16.5
14.4
0.1
2.0
0.0
1990-1991
9.8
1.3
8.5
Retained –
GC.5/Dec.14
1988-1989
7.3
0.2
7.1
Retained –
GC.4/Dec.15
1986-1987
(GC.4/Dec.15)
4.8
4.8
0.0
Total 169.2 50.9 0.1 3.6 110.5 4.1
Contributions
from new
Member States
1.9
1.7
0.0
0.2
0.0
Total 171.1 52.6 0.1 3.6 110.7 4.1
(q) Eliminations
Eliminations comprise two elements as shown below:
(a) Buildings Management Service costs charged to UNIDO. An amount of €3,101,107 is eliminated from both
operating costs and contractual services to avoid double counting of UNIDO’s contribution to buildings management
costs;
(b) Expenditure of €5,106,636 on RPTC and SRA activities is re-analysed into its component parts.
(r) Long-term contracts
Long-term contracts awarded for the operation of the VIC are not reported as commitments, as they may be
terminated at any time without penalty.
(s) Commitments
Commitments of €420,038 representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years
were entered into prior to 31 December 2004.

***

(t) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at €152,011 were received from Member States in support of UNIDO field offices
during the year.
(u) Ex gratia payments
No ex gratia payments were made in 2004.
(v) Non-expendable equipment
The following table shows the non-expendable equipment, at cost, expressed in millions of euros, according to the
cumulative inventory records of UNIDO as at 31 December 2004. In accordance with UNIDO accounting policies, nonexpendable
equipment is not included in the fixed assets of the Organization, but is charged against the appropriations
when acquired. The minimum euro value per item of non-expendable property is €1,500.
Balance as at 1 January 2004 12.6
Adjustments to the opening balance 0.1
Adjusted balance at 1 January 2004 12.7
Add: acquisitions during 2004 0.5
Deduct: disposals during 2004 1.0
Balance as at 31 December 2004 12.2
During the year 2004, non-expendable equipment to the value of €409 was reported as stolen and written off in
the inventory records.
(w) Contingent liabilities
(i) End-of-service payment to staff
In accordance with the decision taken by the Panel of External Auditors in 1989 at Manila, UNIDO calculated the
amounts required to cover the estimated costs of contingency liabilities for end-of-service payment as at 31 December
2004.
In line with United Nations accounting standards, liabilities for end-of-service payments comprise end-of-service
allowance, repatriation grant and compensation for accrued annual leave. To provide a more realistic picture, the
amount required for the removal of household goods has also been included. The valuation is based on the United
Nations salary scale and the entitlements defined in the staff regulations and rules, as well as taking into account the
actual cost of staff separating during the year 2004. The amounts are estimated to be:
Regular budget €19.2 million
Operational budget € 4.4 million
Post retirement benefits are excluded.
It should be noted that no budgetary provision has been made, except that in the case of the operational budget, as
reflected in statement II and note 3(f) (operating reserve).
(ii) The United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund
UNIDO is a member organization participating in the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, which was
established by the United Nations General Assembly to provide retirement, death, disability and related benefits. The
Pension Fund is a funded defined benefit plan. The financial obligation of the Organization to the United Nations Joint
Staff Pension Fund consists of its mandated contribution at the rate established by the United Nations General
Assembly, together with any share of any actuarial deficiency payments under Article 26 of the Regulations of the
Fund. Such deficiency payments are only payable if and when the United Nations General Assembly has invoked the
provision of Article 26, following determination that there is a requirement for deficiency payments based on an
assessment of the actuarial sufficiency of the Fund as of the valuation date. At the time of this report, the United
Nations General Assembly has not invoked this provision.
(iii) After-service health insurance
Staff members (their spouses, dependent children or survivors) retiring from service under the Pension Fund
regulations at age 55 or later are eligible for after-service health insurance coverage after having been a participant in a
contributory health insurance scheme of the common system for at least 10 years. The same applies to staff members
receiving compensation for disability under Appendix D to the staff rules. Costs of participation in this scheme are
borne on the basis of joint contributions by UNIDO and the participants concerned.
During the year 2004, the Organization’s contribution to the scheme amounted to €1,659,567. The contributions
against the Buildings Management Services amounted to €57,538, which were cost-shared with other Vienna-based
organizations. In accordance with Programme and Budget Committee conclusion 2000/2, a detailed actuarial study to
determine the financial impact of the after-service health insurance was carried out, which showed the level of unfunded
liabilities as at December 2004 to be €35.2 million ($47.7 million based on the year-end exchange rate). A United
Nations system-wide solution is being sought to address the issue of unfunded liabilities. The lead agency on this issue,
established by the High-Level Committee on Management, Financial and Budget Network, is the United Nations who
are scheduled to submit a report to the General Assembly in 2005.
(x) Common Fund for Major Repairs and Replacements
On 1 January 1981, an agreement between the Republic of Austria, the United Nations and the IAEA went into
effect to establish a common fund for the purpose of financing the cost of major repairs and replacements of buildings,
facilities and technical installations, which are the property of the Republic of Austria and form part of the Headquarters
areas of the United Nations and IAEA at the Vienna International Centre. This agreement has also applied to UNIDO
since 1986, when it became a specialized agency. The Fund is administered by UNIDO through a joint committee.
Annual financial statements are prepared by UNIDO and audited by its Internal Oversight Group.
In 2002, an agreement was reached between the Vienna-based organizations and the Republic of Austria under
which reimbursement of the disbursements made during the year 2001 ($988,626) was not required. Under this
agreement, there will only be annual assessed contributions to the Fund as follows: the Republic of Austria
(€1,235,300) and the Vienna-based organizations (€1,235,300). Furthermore, unexpected major repairs and
replacements, which are not included in the agreed investment plan, will have to be shared by all parties. In the past,
such costs were fully absorbed by the Austrian Government.
The fund balance as at 31 December 2004 is €1,936,547.
Note 3. Other Headquarters funds
(a) Funds reported under this heading comprise:
(i) Special Account for Programme Support Costs;
(ii) Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting (COMFAR);
(iii) Buildings Management Services (BMS).
(b) With effect from 1 January 2002, the General Conference approved (GC.9/Dec.17) BMS as a separate, selfbalancing
major programme in the programme and budgets of UNIDO. All BMS expenditures are offset by income, i.e.
contributions received from other Vienna-based organizations and from UNIDO. Consequently, under the UNIDO
General Fund, only UNIDO’s share of the BMS operations is included (reference IDB.24/3-PBC.17/3). In view of the
above, the BMS is reported under other funds rather than under General Fund and Working Capital Fund from the
previous biennium. The General Fund and Working Capital Fund now show only UNIDO’s contribution to BMS costs.
The BMS operations are further split into two components:

(i) Staff costs: This continues to be subject to the provisions of financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c);
(ii) Special account for Buildings Management Services (for other than staff costs): The ninth session of
the General Conference (GC.9/Dec.14), established with effect from January 2002, a special account
for BMS (for other than staff costs), which is not subject to financial regulations 4.2(b) and 4.2(c).
Thus the budgetary surplus, if any, will not require distribution to Member States. Each Vienna-based
organization (UNIDO, IAEA, UNOV and CTBTO) is required to pay its share into this account.
Interest income is credited to the account. This amount is then prorated to each Vienna-based
organization taking into account the funds contributed by it and the date of receipt of such funds in the
special account.
Additional analysis of BMS operations is provided in schedule 4.1 (supplementary) and the analysis on the special
account is provided in annex III. The surplus on the special account for BMS costs of €10,532,077 does not form part of
the unencumbered balances of the appropriations due to Member States at the end of the biennium; this amount includes
€4,815,676 due from the Vienna-based organizations. The accumulation of funds under the special account is primarily
caused by the delay experienced in the removal of asbestos from the VIC complex and related maintenance work.
(c) Currency adjustment
The €415,683 exchange difference results primarily from the revaluation of the United States dollar cash and term
deposits held by the special account for programme support costs.
(d) Net excess (shortfall) of income over expenditure
The following is an analysis of income and expenditure during the year 2004 for the funds reported under this
heading:
Table 1
Special account for
programme support
costs
Computer Model for
Feasibility and Analysis
Buildings
Management
Services Total
(In thousands of euros)
Income (including savings on cancellation of
obligations from prior biennium) 9,296.8 276.9 21,325.4 30,899.1
Expenditure (including loss on exchange) 8,779.5 367.7 19,237.1 28,384.3
Net (shortfall) of income over expenditure 517.3 (90.8) 2,088.3* 2,514.8
* Relates to the special account (see annex III).
(e) Accounts receivable—other
Within the Special Account for Buildings Management Services, there is an amount of €349,061 representing a
claim for reimbursement from the Austrian authorities for stranded costs, Renewable Energy Surcharge and KWKZuschlag.
In the unlikely event of the claim not being settled, full provision has been made within “accounts payable—
other”.
The first instalment of €1,220,000 due from the Austrian Government towards the replacement of carpets and
cables at the Vienna International Centre is reflected within “accounts receivable—other”. Pending the disbursement of
the funds, €1,000,000 of this amount is shown under “accounts payable—other”. The balance €220,000 is reported in
the financial statements of major repairs and replacements fund.
(f) Operating reserve
An operating reserve, established in respect of the special account for programme support costs in accordance
with PBC conclusion 1989/4 at $5,504,190 was reduced to $4,300,000 (€4,828,900) in accordance with Board decision
IDB.14/Dec.12.

***

The net reserve as at 31 December 2004 amounts to €3,650,469 (€3,133,155 at 31 December 2003) as a result of a
net surplus of €517,313 for 2004.
(g) Commitments
Commitments, representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years, were entered
into prior to 31 December 2004 as below.
€000’s
Special account for programme support costs 84.5
Buildings Management Services 53.7
(h) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at €72,952 were received from Member States in support of UNIDO projects.
Note 4. Technical cooperation
(a) Technical cooperation activities
Technical cooperation activities reported under this heading comprise activities executed by UNIDO with funds
provided through the Industrial Development Fund, trust funds and inter-organization arrangements with UNDP, UNEP
and other organizations. These activities are governed by various agreements signed by two or more parties, i.e.
donor(s) and UNIDO.
(b) Euro presentation of technical cooperation activities
The significant majority of voluntary contributions are received in United States dollars for projects
programmable almost exclusively in that currency. From 2004, euro-based management of technical cooperation
programmes was introduced for some projects. In accordance with General Conference decision GC.9/Dec.15, donor
reporting is also undertaken in United States dollars.
However, in order to present consolidated financial statements (Statements I and II) of UNIDO for the year ending
31 December 2004, all technical cooperation activities required conversion to euros.
Annex I, Tables 1 and 2 are, therefore, provided in both United States dollars and euros.
The approach for preparing the euro statement is based on the following:
(i) Non-euro income, expenditure and changes in reserves and fund balances—other than as highlighted
below—will be stated at the equivalent amount of euros applicable as at the deemed date of the
transaction applying the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at that date;
(ii) Non-euro assets, liabilities, reserves and fund balances as at 31 December 2004 will be converted to a
euro equivalent using the United Nations operational rate of exchange as at 31 December 2004
(reference GC.9/Dec.15). The gain or loss that would result from these revaluations is reflected in the
“other adjustments to reserves and fund balances” figure;
(iii) The currency exchange adjustment figure essentially represents the realized gain or loss on non-euro
transactions during the year and the savings achieved in 2004 on the liquidation of prior year United
States dollar obligations.
(c) Montreal Protocol promissory notes
Promissory notes in favour of UNIDO held by the Multilateral Fund for the implementation of the Montreal
Protocol to the value of $20,264,334 (€16,231,732) at 31 December 2003 were encashed during 2004.

***

(d) Interest on donor funds
For the Industrial Development Fund, other than the general pool, and from the last biennium for trust funds,
interest earned from the investment of funds, net of bank charges, realized exchange gains, realized and unrealized
losses is represented as a liability within “accounts payable—other”. As at 31 December 2004, the amounts were as
follows:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 5,801.9 4,276.0
Trust funds 2,748.7 2,025.8
Global Environment Fund 361.4 266.4
8,912.0 6,568.2
The disposal of the interest income is governed by agreements with donors. This may include the return of such funds to donors, or their transfer to other projects, in which case they will be shown as voluntary contributions
.
(e) Unrealized exchange gains and losses
In accordance with the United Nations System Accounting Standards, monetary assets and liabilities are revalued
at the United Nations operational rate of exchange in effect at 31 December 2004.
Any resultant unrealized gain is not recorded as income for the period, but set aside within “accounts payable—
other”. Gains arising from revaluation of cash and term deposits are considered realized, however specifically, for the
Industrial Development Fund and trust funds, any gain arising from the revaluation of euro cash and term deposits are
similarly set aside on the grounds of prudence (IDB.27/9-PBC.19/9 and decision IDB.27/Dec.5). Under the transition to
a single currency system, and in accordance with document IDB.28/9 and decision IDB.28/Dec.5, the euro-based
management of technical cooperation programmes was introduced during the year 2004. Consequently, distributions of
€789,415 ($985,537) and €832,467 ($1,039,285) were made to the Industrial Development Fund and trust funds,
respectively. The accumulated amounts of unrealized gains as at 31 December 2004, included in “accounts payable—
other”, are as follows:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 1,831.5 1,349.8
Trust funds 6,575.3 4,846.0
Global Environment Facility 0.6 0.4
Montreal Protocol 1.5 1.1
8,408.9 6,197.3
(f) Currency exchange adjustment
Annex I, table 1—US dollar statements
Table A shows the analysis of the currency exchange credit. A distinction is drawn between realized gains and
losses resulting through the conduct of transactions in other than United States dollars and gains and losses resulting
from the re-statement of non-United States dollar assets and liability values to an equivalent dollar value as at
31 December 2004.
For these funds, where contributions are received, programmed and disbursed almost exclusively in United States
dollars, any realized gains and both realized and unrealized losses from the revaluation of non-United States dollar
assets and liabilities, are recorded through table 1 and the programmable fund balance adjusted accordingly.

***

Table A
Regular Programme Montreal Protocol GEF IOA* Total
(In thousands of US dollars)
Realized
On 2004 transactions 4.1 (0.1) 3.4 7.4
Unrealized
Revaluation of non-US dollar assets and liabilities
at 31 December 2004 (58.1) 1.4 (6.9) (1.2) (64.8)
Currency exchange adjustment (54.0) 1.3 (3.5) (1.2) (57.4)
* IOA – Inter-organization arrangements.
Annex I, table 1—euro statements
Table B shows the analysis of the currency exchange credit. A distinction is drawn between realized gains and
losses resulting through the conduct of transactions in other than euros and the savings resulting from the settlement of
United States dollar obligations from prior years at a different euro rate of exchange.
Table B
Regular
programme IDF
Montreal
Protocol GEF Trust fund Total
(In thousands of euros)
Revaluation of US$ obligations 113.7 113.7
Realized
On 2004 transactions 1.9 (17.6) (0.8) (16.5)
On liquidation of prior year US$ obligations (70.1) (424.9) (325.3) (33.4) (355.1) (1,208.8)
Currency exchange adjustment 45.5 (424.9) (342.9) (34.2) (355.1) (1,111.6)
(g) Transfers to reserves
This represents the charge to projects in respect of the provision for compensation payments under Appendix D to
the staff rules.
The amount of $1,100,000 (€962,500) reflected in transfers to/from reserves represents the income received for
Global Environment Facility (GEF) projects under inter-organization arrangements with UNEP, previously recorded in
GEF main programme.
(h) Surplus
The amount of $3,101,237 (€2,285,613) represents the accumulated surplus under the general-purpose segment of
the Industrial Development Fund.

(i) Cash and term deposits
The equivalent of $1,491,424 (€1,099,180) is held in currencies classified as non-convertible, as follows:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 1,083.1 798.2
Trust funds 408.3 300.9
1,491.4 1,099.1
(j) Operating reserves
The Industrial Development Board, in decision IDB.2/Dec.7, authorized the freezing of the operational reserve of
the Industrial Development Fund at $550,000 (€405,350 at the United Nations rate of exchange as at 31 December
2004).
(k) Commitments
Commitments, representing legal obligations for which disbursements will be made in future years, were entered
into prior to 31 December 2004, as below:
US$ 000’s €000’s
Industrial Development Fund 3,232.3 2,515.3
Montreal Protocol 5,651.7 4,452.3
Global Environment Facility 4,033.8 3,262.7
Trust funds 5,738.0 4,474.4
Regular Programme of Technical Cooperation 784.1 618.9
Inter-organization arrangements 1,345.1 1,065.6
20,785.0 16,389.2
(l) Contributions in kind
Contributions in kind estimated at $343,476 (€278,106) were received from Member States in support of UNIDO
projects and $39,778 (€32,207) in support of project travel.
(m) Ex gratia payments
No ex gratia payments were made in 2004.
(n) Field IOVs
The backlog of unprocessed field inter-office vouchers (IOVs) of $8,473,317 brought forward from the previous
year, together with a total of $19,863,927 inter-office vouchers received for the year 2004 was reduced to $4,528,761
(€3,337,697) by 31 December 2004. The unprocessed IOV balance at year-end comprises payroll charges of $509,757
for the entire 2004 received only in January 2005 and IOVs of $485,056 rejected due to insufficient information.
(o) Lost or stolen non-expendable equipment
No non-expendable equipment was written off from inventory as lost or stolen during 2004.

***

[PDF]
Industrial Development Board Programme and Budget Committee
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – View as HTML
Haiti. 0.00284. -. 2016. -. 2016. -. -. -. Honduras. 0.00711 ….. Haiti. 0.00284. 211. 223. (12). -. Honduras. 0.00711. 528. 520. 8. -. Hungary. 0.17059 …
http://www.unido.org/fileadmin/…/36455_einterimfinancialperformancereport

(Stopped at page 36)

***

INTRODUCTION
The purpose of the list of technical cooperation activities is to provide
representatives of Member States, as well as the Secretariat, with a convenient
reference not only for use during discussions at the sessions of the governing bodies,
but throughout the year.
The list shows technical cooperation activities in three categories: integrated
programmes and country service frameworks, Montreal Protocol projects and other
projects approved in the period 1998 to 2004 (outside the integrated programmes
and country service frameworks).
This document provides various data, including title, approval date, budget
and delivery. The delivery figure represents expenditure and commitments incurred
through 31 December 2004. Each budget figure reflects the actual total allocation
available as of 31 December 2004 for the programme or project, rather than the
budget during the reporting year. Under each category, programmes and projects are
listed in their original language, as approved by the Government involved and
UNIDO, under the recipient country/area/territory.
Except for the first section of programme listings, projects are sorted
according to their project number within each country. The document also includes
listings of regional, global and interregional projects. Multifund projects, where
various funding sources exist for the same project, are listed with their respective
multiple project numbers, the project title and the total amounts of various funding
sources. For umbrella projects—for example those where donor financing covers
various projects—only the individual projects are listed. Other projects approved in
the period 1998 to 2004 and Montreal Protocol projects are broken down by project
status, thus grouping projects according to whether they were completed in 2004, or
were ongoing as of 31 December 2004. The list of projects approved before 1998 is
no longer included, since all projects approved before 1998 were completed in 2003

http://74.125.47.132/custom?q=cache:Svu-CK4orPMJ:www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/37481_addannualreport+haiti&cd=56&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=google-coop-np

***

HAITI
Ongoing
XP/HAI/04/059
04/11
66,239
27,166
PROGRAMME D’APPUI A L’INITIATIVE PRIVEE ET A LA PROMOTION DES PME/PMI DANS LE
SECTEUR AGRO-INDUSTRIEL

Project Number
Approval Date
Budget
Delivery
Project Title

04/11
66,239
27,166

http://74.125.47.132/custom?q=cache:Svu-CK4orPMJ:www.unido.org/fileadmin/import/37481_addannualreport+haiti&cd=56&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=google-coop-np

Except for the first section of programme listings, projects are sorted
according to their project number within each country. The document also includes
listings of regional, global and interregional projects. Multifund projects, where
various funding sources exist for the same project, are listed with their respective
multiple project numbers, the project title and the total amounts of various funding
sources. For umbrella projects—for example those where donor financing covers
various projects—only the individual projects are listed. Other projects approved in
the period 1998 to 2004 and Montreal Protocol projects are broken down by project
status, thus grouping projects according to whether they were completed in 2004, or
were ongoing as of 31 December 2004. The list of projects approved before 1998 is
no longer included, since all projects approved before 1998 were completed in 2003

(From this document – )

[PDF]
Annual Report 1998 (final)
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STOCKHOLM CONVENTION ON PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS. HAITI. Ongoing …… IN SELECTED COUNTRIES (AFGHANISTAN, HAITI, IRAQ, LIBERIA, SIERRA LEONE AND …
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Basic Facts

President:
Luis Alberto Moreno
Membership:
48 countries represented by the Board of Executive Directors
Approved lending and grants over the past 12 months:
$10 billion
Employees:
About 2,000
Offices:
Headquarters in Washington, DC, with country offices in 26 borrowing countries, plus a regional office in Tokyo and another one in Paris.
Clients:
Central governments, provinces, municipalities, private firms and non-governmental organizations.
Download:
PDF version of Basic Facts 2009 (We’re here)

http://www.iadb.org/aboutus/BasicFacts.cfm
Inter-American Development Bank

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http://74.125.47.132/custom?q=cache:-fC_5UnkG0oJ:https://unido.org/fileadmin/import/66122_UNIDOAnnualReport2006.pdf+haiti&cd=44&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=google-coop-np

The Annual Report opens with an introductory message by the Director-General of UNIDO,
Kandeh K. Yumkella. Chapter 2 reviews the year in brief, starting with a major event, the
celebration of UNIDO’s fortieth anniversary as a United Nations organization. This is fol-
lowed by an overview of technical cooperation management, funds mobilization, manage-
rial reforms, advocacy activities to raise UNIDO’s profile and efforts to strengthen
cooperation in the field with other United Nations agencies as well as partners outside
the United Nations system. Chapter 3 discusses the broader framework within which the
Organization pursues cooperation with other United Nations agencies: the reform of the
United Nations and the very active role UNIDO plays in that context. Chapters 4 to 8
present an overview of UNIDO’s operations in the field. The CD-ROM attached to this
report includes appendices that provide detailed figures on UNIDO’s technical coopera-
tion activities. For those who are unfamiliar with the Organization’s activities a brief
description of the principles guiding these operations may be useful.
The Organization’s assistance is based on two core functions and three thematic priorities.
Core functions:
Serving as a global forum which generates and disseminates industry-related knowl-
edge and provides a platform for all actors in the public and private sectors;
Designing and implementing technical cooperation programmes that support the
industrial development efforts of its clients

Page 1
UNITED NATIONS
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION
Annual Report
Page 2
Signing of MOU with FAO Director-General Mr. J. Diouf
Meeting with H.E. Ms. M. Bachelet, President Chile
High-Level Delegation, Japan
Mr. Yumkella with H.E. Ms. H. Wieczorek-Zeul, Development
Minister, and H.E. Ambassador K.P. Gottwald, Perm. Rep. of
Germany to UNIDO
Meeting with H.E. Mr. M. Singh, Prime Minister, India
Mr. Yumkella with Mr. W. Clinton, Former President, USA
17th Conference of African Ministers of Industry (CAMI 17)
Meeting with Rt. Hon. Rhodri Morgan, Welsh First Minister,
Rt. Hon. Mr. Hilary Benn, Secretary of State for International
Development, DFID
Meeting with H.E. Mr. R. Prodi, Prime Minister, Italy
H.E. Mr. H. Fakhro, Minister of Industry and Commerce,
Bahrain, with Graduates of 15th Entrepreneurship and
Enterprise Programme
10th China International Fair for Investment and Trade
Page 3
ANNUAL REPORT 2006
Industrial Development Board,
thirty-third session
Programme and Budget Committee,
twenty-third session
UNITED NATIONS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION
Vienna, 2007
Page 4
The designations employed and the presentation of material in this publication do
not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat
of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization concerning the legal
status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the
delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.
This document has not been formally edited.
ISSN 1020-7651
Distr.
GENERAL
IDB.33/2-PBC.23/2*
3 May 2007
Original: ENGLISH
*Reissued for technical reasons.
Page 5
iii
FOREWORD
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has a special place
in the United Nations system: it is the only organization specifically targeting the creation
of wealth through manufacturing, in which it mainly focuses on promoting growth in the
small and medium enterprise sector, the key generator of wealth in most developing
countries. To improve standards of living through industries that are both internationally
competitive and environmentally sustainable, the Organization has created the largest port-
folio of projects related to trade capacity-building in the United Nations system, and the
Organization plays a lead role in, among others, the implementation of the Montreal
Protocol for the elimination of ozone depleting substances (ODS) and the Stockholm
Convention for the elimination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).
The reforms that are underway to make the United Nations system an even more relevant
force for development, humanitarian assistance and environmental sustainability, also
require that the United Nations delivers its message better to build up broad-based sup-
port among the many stakeholders in development. UNIDO, as this document will show, is
in the vanguard when it comes to reforms. One measure to raise the Organization’s pro-
file is to make the Annual Report of UNIDO, a legislative document on UNIDO’s perform-
ance, accessible to a wider public. In this way, it will help to highlight the contribution of
UNIDO’s core activities to international development objectives, which—although evident
to those who work in the Organization—is often not recognized by the outside world.
The Annual Report opens with an introductory message by the Director-General of UNIDO,
Kandeh K. Yumkella. Chapter 2 reviews the year in brief, starting with a major event, the
celebration of UNIDO’s fortieth anniversary as a United Nations organization. This is fol-
lowed by an overview of technical cooperation management, funds mobilization, manage-
rial reforms, advocacy activities to raise UNIDO’s profile and efforts to strengthen
cooperation in the field with other United Nations agencies as well as partners outside
the United Nations system. Chapter 3 discusses the broader framework within which the
Organization pursues cooperation with other United Nations agencies: the reform of the
United Nations and the very active role UNIDO plays in that context. Chapters 4 to 8
present an overview of UNIDO’s operations in the field. The CD-ROM attached to this
report includes appendices that provide detailed figures on UNIDO’s technical coopera-
tion activities. For those who are unfamiliar with the Organization’s activities a brief
description of the principles guiding these operations may be useful.
The Organization’s assistance is based on two core functions and three thematic priorities.
Core functions:
Serving as a global forum which generates and disseminates industry-related knowl-
edge and provides a platform for all actors in the public and private sectors;
Designing and implementing technical cooperation programmes that support the
industrial development efforts of its clients.
Page 6
Thematic priorities:
Poverty reduction through productive activities, by promoting industry, especially
through small and medium enterprises, in less developed areas, with a focus on
employment creation, income generation and institutional capacity-building;
Trade capacity-building, by helping countries to develop both production and
trade-related capacities, including the capacity to conform to the standards of inter-
national markets;
Environment and energy, by promoting industrial energy efficiency and renewable
sources of energy, particularly in rural areas, and supporting other activities for sus-
tainable industrial development.
The two core functions complement and support each other: technical cooperation
experiences can be shared with policy makers and other actors; both analytical work helps
to identify areas of maximum impact for technical cooperation. Because of the complex
interrelations among development issues, programmes and projects often spill over
thematic borders.
Eight service modules translate the core functions and thematic priorities into action:
1. Industrial governance and statistics
2. Investment and technology promotion
3. Industrial competitiveness and trade
4. Private sector development
5. Agro-industry
6. Sustainable energy and climate change
7. Montreal Protocol
8. Environmental management
The services can be combined in integrated programmes (IPs) or country service frame-
works (CSFs), or be used in stand-alone projects

By 2010 there will be over 700 million more people of working age in developing coun-
tries than in 2005. Without increased opportunities to earn a living these people will have
little possibility of fulfilling their potential. Some will undoubtedly become alienated from
a society that they see as having failed them. The implications are obvious, and make it
all the more important that we work to create wealth and employment in developing and
transition countries, including those that are emerging from conflict. In this context,
providing employment to the youth is a pressing need

UNIDO believes that the only way to create the required jobs is to promote the develop-
ment of a dynamic private sector. Our focus is on small and medium enterprises as they
account for the lion’s share of the growth in jobs in developing countries. Whether we
are working to increase the ability of enterprises to export their goods—through our trade
capacity-building work—or training women entrepreneurs, our aim is to facilitate the
creation of employment and wealth. We have done so through a number of successful
programmes, but much more needs to be done

http://74.125.47.132/custom?q=cache:-fC_5UnkG0oJ:https://unido.org/fileadmin/import/66122_UNIDOAnnualReport2006.pdf+haiti&cd=44&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=google-coop-np

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66122_UNIDOAnnualReport2006.pdf

FOREWORD
The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has a special place
in the United Nations system: it is the only organization specifically targeting the creation
of wealth through manufacturing, in which it mainly focuses on promoting growth in the
small and medium enterprise sector, the key generator of wealth in most developing
countries. To improve standards of living through industries that are both internationally
competitive and environmentally sustainable, the Organization has created the largest portfolio
of projects related to trade capacity-building in the United Nations system, and the
Organization plays a lead role in, among others, the implementation of the Montreal
Protocol for the elimination of ozone depleting substances (ODS) and the Stockholm
Convention for the elimination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

https://unido.org/fileadmin/import/66122_UNIDOAnnualReport2006.pdf

***

An opportunity to celebrate and learn
The year 2006 was marked by the fortieth anniversary celebrations of UNIDO—an
important element in the Organization’s efforts to enhance its visibility and raise awareness
of its activities. The main commemorative ceremony took place in the morning of
28 November 2006 and was co-hosted with the Austrian Federal Ministry for Foreign
Affairs and the City of Vienna. Over 1,200 invitees, including the heads of other Viennabased
Organizations, UNIDO Goodwill Ambassadors, retirees and staff, gathered in the
Austria Center Vienna to pay tribute to UNIDO. The programme was interspersed with
musical interludes by various international artists, and a special exhibition entitled
“UNIDO Value Added—Investment, Business and Partnerships” was organized.

***

http://www.iadb.org/news-releases/2008-10/english/organizations-from-ecuador-el-salvador-haiti-honduras-and-nicaragua-win-idb-gran-4793.html

Oct 9, 2008
Organizations from Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras and Nicaragua win IDB grants for innovations to help the poor
Support for pilot projects involving wireless connectivity, child nutrition, medical technology and Internet sales for artisans

ASUNCION, Paraguay – Four pilot innovation projects will be financed by grants from the Inter-American Development Bank to improve the quality of life of the poor in Latin America and the Caribbean. The grant winners are international and regional organizations and the projects will be carried out in five different countries in the region.

IDB President Luis Alberto Moreno today presented the awards for projects in Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras and Nicaragua at a ceremony during the Microenterprise Forum, which is taking place October 8-10.

Many promising technologies do not reach the poor because of lack of communication or resources. A new IDB program tries to help bridge the gap by bringing innovators in developing and developed countries together with those who can benefit from the innovations. Often, those who produce technological solutions do not know that their inventions can benefit the problems of the poor, while the poor do not know that the technology exists.

The grant program “Innovation for Inclusive Development” is cosponsored by the Italian Trust Fund on Information and Communication Technologies and the IDB Fund for Special Operations.

The call was open to pilot projects new technologies, a new use or invention based on existing technologies featuring the adaptation and/or application of existing technologies to the needs of communities or to the local environmental, geographical or geological conditions, or the identification of new business models for large-scale use of innovative applications and tools accessible to the poor.

A special emphasis on private sector participation led to almost a third of the projects being submitted by private companies, while outreach to organizations in all IDB member countries allowed for fruitful collaboration between institutions in developing and developed countries.

An international jury including representatives from the academia, innovation, venture capital and technology fields selected the top four projects out of a total of 141 submissions.

Grants were awarded to the following projects:

* Building Haiti’s Value Chain: Growing, Processing, and Providing Nutritious Foods

Seeking to improve both childhood nutrition and the agricultural value chain, Meds and Food for Kids http://www.medsandfoodforkids.org (U.S./Haiti) will first enhance the Haitian peanut production through the UNICEF certification for food safety, which will allow domestic peanuts to be used in the production of export-grade Medika Mamba (“peanut butter medicine”), or Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF). In turn, this will allow Haitian-produced RUTF to be sold to UNICEF and other organizations working in Haiti; it will provide steady income to the mostly subsistence-level peanut farmers; and it will improve the access of Haiti’s children to this nutritious food. Currently, less than one per cent of Haiti’s children receive RUTF, while approximately 23% suffer from malnutrition.

****

A. Compete, conform, connect
Increased globalization and market liberalization provide great opportunities for developing
countries and economies in transition to trade their way out of poverty. However, the
benefits from open markets do not come automatically: they depend on the ability of
enterprises to enter into global production and supply value chains. This means that
they must be competitive not only in terms of price and quantity but also of quality,
reliability of supplies, and conformity to the buyer’s standards.
Through its trade capacity-building (TCB) programme, UNIDO helps developing countries
and economies in transition to reap the benefits of trade by increasing:
 The competitivity of industrial enterprises;
 The conformity of manufactured goods to standards;
 The connectivity of exporters to global markets.
The focus of activities is primarily on the first two of these issues.

B. Building competitive industries
To develop competitive industries, the potential for domestic value added and international
exports must be ascertained. In close coordination with its projects implemented under
the thematic area of poverty reduction through productive activities, UNIDO is working
on a methodology for trade-related analysis, and creating domestic capacity for competitiveness
analyses. The methodology for trade analysis, first developed as a pilot project
in Ecuador, was introduced in Paraguay during 2006.
UNIDO implements national and regional programmes to develop industrial capacities in
cooperation with international partner agencies such as the Common Fund for
Commodities (CFC), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations,
the International Trade Centre (ITC) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). A major
example is the support UNIDO and WTO gives to cotton producers in West Africa. Under
this programme, a UEMOA Cotton Quality Manual, consisting of a Quality Plan and five
Technical Guides, was published in French. It is a practical tool and reference guide for
continuous quality improvement and valorization of cotton in African countries.
UNIDO has also stimulated the diffusion of modern technologies, particularly through its
network of International Technology Centres and its support for technology management
programmes. It has especially promoted the adoption of modern technologies in agroprocessing,
so that the sector can respond better to the quantity and quality requirements
of world markets. Specific programmes include the introduction of automation technology
and process control, testing and evaluation of agricultural machinery; and production
optimization through computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing
(CAD/CAM) systems. An example of successful support is the strategy for the leather
and leather products industry in Ethiopia, which UNIDO prepared in cooperation with
Ethiopia’s Ministry of Trade and Industry. The exports of this sector have increased by
20 per cent between July 2005 and July 2006, from $66 million to $76 million. Footwear
was exported for the first time during this period, with a total value of approximately
$3 million.

An effective way of helping small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to compete in export
markets while limiting their risks is by building export consortia. An export consortium
is an SME network that enables the participating firms to improve their exports, cutting
the associated costs by combining knowledge, financial resources and contacts.
During 2006, UNIDO implemented export consortia projects in Jordan, Morocco, Peru,
Tunisia and Uruguay. This involved training consortium promoters in both the
public and private sectors, and improving the institutional and regulatory environment for
consortium development. Eleven export consortia have now been formed in Tunisia and
more than 10 institutions are engaged in their promotion. The project in Peru is supporting
six enterprise groups in the creation of export consortia. Activities included a oneweek
training programme for 40 export consortia promoters and two seminars to sensitize
key institutions on the subject. An international training course on consortia was conducted
in cooperation with the Italian Federation of Export Consortia and the
International Training Centre of the International Labour Organization (ILO). It was
attended by 26 participants from all over the world, representing both public and private
SME support institutions

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become an important element in global competitiveness:
international buyers are increasingly requiring exporter compliance with CSR
principles. There is growing evidence that respecting CSR in strategic planning and in
operations leads to increased economic output, or is at least neutral in its effect on
company profits in the short-term. Furthermore, a growing number of large companies
as well as SMEs have recognized the need to improve their social and environmental
risk management strategies, and engage more actively with small suppliers and community
groups.
Because many SMEs in developing countries find the application of CSR principles very
difficult, UNIDO has launched the Responsible Entrepreneurs Achievement Programme
(REAP). REAP contributes to international initiatives for good corporate governance, in
particular the United Nations Global Compact and the upcoming international standard
on social responsibility (ISO 26000), enabling SMEs to respond proactively to the environmental
and social requirements of global markets. At the global level, UNIDO, together
with UNODC, is developing a practical guide showing SMEs how to defend themselves
against corruption, which is a major obstacle to their development. As of this year, UNIDO
has been running an awareness-raising programme on the dissemination of CSR methodologies
for SMEs in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia as a followup
to its earlier CSR programme in Croatia.
Business partnerships are an important instrument for encouraging the adoption of CSR
principles as well as for productive capacity-building. The business partnership project in
the Indian automotive component industry entered into its sixth year in 2006 and has
become economically viable and self-sustaining. So far, the institutional framework has
been established and engineers and counsellors have been trained and fielded to provide
continuous services to the companies concerned.

Through the joint
efforts of local and
international
partners, the
programme for the
Indian automotive
industry has
become
economically
self-sustaining.

Pp. 41 – 42

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pp. 43 – 47 of above document –

C. Achieving conformity with market requirements
A country needs a globally recognized conformity infrastructure to participate effectively
in trade. UNIDO analyzes infrastructure gaps, establishes or upgrades standards and
accreditation bodies as well as internationally recognized product testing and calibration
services, and helps enterprises in high-potential export industries to achieve conformity.
National industrial and technological research institutions are of vital importance in
this context. UNIDO has developed a joint programme for these with the World
Association of Industrial and Technological Research Organizations (WAITRO), and developed
an Internet-based TC portal for laboratories called LABNET.
When countries have recently acceded or want to accede to WTO, UNIDO helps them
to improve their conformity infrastructure so that they can comply with WTO’s
Agreements on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) and the Application of Sanitary
and Phyto-Sanitary Measures (SPS). UNIDO also provides assistance that enables developing
countries and economies in transition to become full members and partners
in international standards and conformity assessment bodies such as the the International
Accreditation Forum (IAF), International Bureau of Weights and Measures
(BIPM), the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC), the International
Organization for Standards (ISO) and the International Organization of Legal
Metrology (OIML).
During 2006, UNIDO and the World Bank undertook a joint study on the challenges
faced by Pakistani exporters in complying with SPS requirements in international
markets. The study reviewed the legal and regulatory framework, assessed the roles and
responsibilities of ministries and support institutions, and made proposals for an SPS compliance
strategy and for support to potential exporters. It also proposed action plans for
achieving compliance with SPS requirements in major targeted markets such as the EU,
which will serve as a basis for the implementation of the compliance strategy. UNIDO’s
focus was on the fisheries sector. Pakistan is now upgrading its inspection services, fishing
boats, harbour facilities and processing plants in line with the recommendations of
the study.
For producers and retailers, food hygiene and food safety standards (ISO 22000) have
become particularly important. To facilitate the adoption by the private sector of good
hygiene practices and food safety systems, UNIDO helps to develop internationally
recognized certification services as well as consultancy and training capacity.
Projects to improve the food safety and quality infrastructure were implemented in Algeria,
Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Cuba, Ethiopia, Ghana, Lebanon, Morocco, Mozambique,
Nigeria, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania. They have helped to strengthen
food inspection services and laboratories, and assisted around 60 enterprises in adopting
hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) systems, ISO 22000, traceability and
organic certification. Most of the enterprises are now applying HACCP. In Ethiopia three
enterprises were certified and 11 are in the final stages of certification for ISO 22000.

Traceability of food products is becoming an important requirement, especially in the
European markets, where new legislation was introduced in 2005. The Egyptian Ministry
of Trade and Industry and UNIDO are cooperating in a project for the traceability of
agro-industrial products for the European market. This project adopts an innovative
approach to trade capacity-building by linking debt swaps and trade-related technical
cooperation, specifically to overcome TBT and SPS constraints. About five million lowincome
Egyptians in rural areas are benefiting from the positive impact of this project on
their livelihoods.

To promote market
access, UNIDO
supports
international
accreditation
of laboratories.

UNIDO also continues to improve the compliance of enterprises with other international
standards, including those for quality management (ISO 9001), environmental management
(ISO 14001) and social accountability (SA 8000), and supports producers in
performing Self Declarations of Conformity such as the Conformité Européenne (CE)
markings for the EU market.
Programmes that harmonize standardization and conformity assessment requirements and
organize an efficient division of labour among countries help to promote intra- and interregional
trade. UNIDO supports such programmes in Central America and the Mekong
region, and in member States of the following organizations: the Andean Community, the
East African Community (EAC), the Economic Community of Western African States
(ECOWAS), the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and the
West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA). With funding from the
Government of India and the Norwegian Agency for Development (Norad), for example,
UNIDO has helped to improve the standards, metrology, testing and quality (SMTQ) infrastructure,
and hence the competitiveness, of exports in the SAARC region countries of
Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives and Nepal.

D. Inter-agency cooperation
The previous paragraphs have already shown that in the field of trade capacity-building
UNIDO works intensively with other organizations. The United Nations system-wide
coherence exercise and work on the aid for trade initiative—UNIDO helped the African
Union (AU) to define its position on this initiative—have underlined the need for
inter-agency coordination in the field of trade. To intensify and harmonize the already
close cooperation of the AU and UNIDO, an agreement was signed between the two
organizations at the Conference of African Ministers of Industry (CAMI 17) in Egypt.
To initiate the creation of a common framework for collective and coordinated action
among United Nations organizations, UNIDO, as the issue leader for market efficiency
and integration under the auspices of the Task Force on Economic Development of the
High-level Committee on Programmes (HLCP), organized a meeting attended by representatives
from various United Nations organizations.1 It was agreed that, as a first step,
information on the services and (joint) activities of the participating organizations will be
compiled. The information will form part of a resource handbook on TCB. This exercise
will provide the United Nations Resident Coordinator system with comprehensive information
on capacities and expertise within the United Nations system, and will identify
complementarities among the agencies.
1FAO, ITC, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the United Nations Department of Economic
and Social Affairs, the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa,
the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, the United Nations Human Settlement Programme, the World
Bank and WTO.
UNIDO works
intensively
with other
organizations to
create a common
framework for
collective and
coordinated
action in trade
capacity-building.
UNIDO is a member of the Joint Committee on Coordination of Assistance to Developing
Countries in Metrology, Accreditation and Standardization (JCDCMAS), established by
the principal international organizations that have mandates to strengthen capacities

in the fields of metrology, accreditation and standardization. At present, the other
members are BIPM, IAF, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), ILAC, ISO,
OIML and the Telecommunication Standardization Bureau of the International
Telecommunication Union (ITU-T).
UNIDO currently holds the JCDCMAS Secretariat, promoting international agreements
on standards, measurement, certification, testing and conformity, and supporting the
development of Multilateral Recognition Agreements (MRAs) by IAF and ILAC. It has
also organized a regional workshop in Peru on developing metrology, accreditation and
standardization capacities in the Andean region. The workshop aimed to improve the
understanding of the importance of non-tariff barriers to trade and identify the needs to
modernize the existing technical infrastructure. Against the backgrounds of the failure of
the Doha Round of trade talks and the resulting interest in bilateral or regional free trade
agreements, the workshop also highlighted the technical assistance needed by the Andean
region countries to increase exports through the removal of TBTs.

For sustainable production and consumption
patterns, fundamental changes in industrial
product design and technology are needed.
UNIDO has identified the activities that must
be pursued to bring about such changes.

https://unido.org/fileadmin/import/66122_UNIDOAnnualReport2006.pdf

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petit fleur
jazz song

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A. Towards sustainable production and consumption patterns
The Millennium Declaration identifies respect for nature as one of the key values on which
international relations in the twenty-first century should be based. The Member States of
the United Nations have agreed that “the immeasurable riches provided to us by nature
[can] be preserved and passed on to our descendants” only through careful management
in accordance with the principles of sustainable development, and that current unsustainable
patterns of production and consumption have to be changed “in the interest of our
future welfare and that of our descendants”.1
For sustainable production and consumption patterns, fundamental changes in industrial
product design and technology are needed. While preparing its Strategic Long-term Vision
Statement, adopted at the General Conference in 2005,2 UNIDO identified four activities
that must be pursued simultaneously to bring about such fundamental changes:
 Continue to promote resource efficiency and eliminate hazardous and toxic materials;
 Move towards circular production-consumption flows of materials with maximized
recycling and reuse;
 Shift industry and all other sectors of society from non-renewable to renewable
energy sources;
 Encourage a shift from selling products to selling the services provided by products.
Complete elimination of industrial waste and pollution is not possible. UNIDO therefore
also continues to help countries reduce the environmental impacts of industry through
end-of-pipe pollution control and waste management, emphasizing the use of environmentally
sound technologies (EST).
B. Promoting resource efficiency
UNIDO promotes resource efficiency in enterprises through a number of its environmental
programmes:
 Under the cleaner production (CP) programme, UNIDO builds up National Cleaner
Production Centres (NCPCs). These help enterprises to adopt CP techniques and
technologies, reducing waste, pollution, energy and water use in a cost-effective
way.
1United Nations General Assembly resolution 55/2, para. 6.
2Resolution GC.11/Res.4.

 The transfer of environmentally sound technology (TEST) programme focuses on
eliminating pollution caused by industrial wastewater. It is broader than CP, allowing
industry support institutions to offer a complete package of environmental protection
services.
 UNIDO’s programmes under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic
Pollutants (POPs) aim at eliminating the production and use of POP chemicals that
are particularly resistant to biodegradation and are highly accumulative in body
tissues. The focus of the programme is on eliminating the production of POPs
generated as by-products, particularly dioxins and furans, through CP-based best
available techniques and best environmental practices.
 UNIDO’s industrial energy efficiency programme helps industries and support institutions
to adopt a systems approach to lower energy consumption, which can lead
to huge efficiency gains.
 In its climate programme, UNIDO promotes the Clean Development Mechanism of
the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
in the developing countries. This mechanism will allow enterprises in these countries
to mobilize international investments for the adoption of more energy-efficient
technologies.
UNIDO reduces the
environmental
inpacts of industry
through a variety of
instruments, from
pollution control to
promoting resource
efficiency.
Material and energy efficiency are stimulated through a number of UNIDO’s nonenvironmental
programmes as well, particularly those for the food, textile and leather industries.
The Organization’s business partnership programme also promotes more efficient
material and energy use in enterprises.

An important activity in the CP programme was the pilot project for Internet-based knowledge
management systems. Since its inception in 1994, the focus of the CP programme
has been on creating national capacity through NCPCs or related national projects. All
these were connected through a global CP network, but the flow of information through
the network was weak. Recognizing that the network members could be more effective if
they could tap into their common pool of experience, UNIDO decided to create regional
Internet-based CP knowledge management systems in 2005. The Latin American and
Caribbean region was chosen as a pilot area. CPLatinNet was officially launched in
February 2006 and can be accessed at http://www.cp-latin-unido.net. Currently, 14 countries
in the region are participating.
The knowledge management system has a dual function. There is a public communication
area with general information on CP activities in the region. This gives the NCPCs
and related programmes greater visibility and creates a common image of a strong and
efficient network. The Intranet section for authorized users is the main tool for
knowledge management and internal communication. It contains technical documents,
training materials and information on consultants on CP and EST. There are also working
areas for the development of joint initiatives, and where requests for CP and EST
services can be posted.
Currently 390 users have access to the platform. International experts are carrying out a
validation process of the uploaded documents to ensure their quality. The success of the
pilot project has led to plans for three additional regional CP knowledge management
systems. The next one will be established in Africa during 2007, followed by Eastern
Europe in 2008 and Asia in 2009.
C. Eliminating the use of hazardous and toxic materials
The Organization’s CP programme and activities, such as the elimination or reduction of
the use of mercury by artisanal gold miners, help to minimize the role and impact of
hazardous and toxic materials in industry. The Montreal Protocol programme, which started
14 years ago, is UNIDO’s flagship programme in this particular area. It eliminates ozonedepleting
substances (ODSs)—chemicals that destroy the Earth’s protective ozone layer.
The Montreal Protocol has been very successful. The bulk of the activities under the
Protocol will be completed by 2010, and the parties to the Protocol are turning their attention
to ODS uses that have been exempted to date. One of these is the use of ODSs in
aerosol metered dose inhalers (MDIs), widely used to treat asthma and other respiratory
illnesses. UNIDO has started a project in Egypt with the objective of managing the transition
to ODS-free MDIs. It helps companies to convert to ODS-free manufacturing technology
and assists the Government in implementing a national MDI transition strategy,
an important part of which is an awareness campaign to educate doctors prescribing MDIs
on the timing and reasons for the transition to ODS-free MDIs. This will be the first of
a number of such projects.

The production of
ODS-free aerosols in
the United Republic
of Tanzania was
a pioneering
project in the
Montreal Protocol
programme.

The parties to the Protocol are also turning their attention to chemicals that are less ozone
depleting but are used in significant quantities, such as the refrigerants used in many
chillers. In November 2005 the Executive Committee of the Protocol’s Multilateral Fund
approved three regional chiller demonstration projects for implementation by UNIDO,
covering Africa, Eastern Europe and West Asia, to demonstrate the viability of replacing
ODS-based chillers.
D. Maximizing recycling
Because of the close links between CP and recycling, UNIDO’s CP and TEST programmes
also help enterprises to recycle their waste products and use waste materials as inputs.
The mercury programme encourages the recycling of mercury where its use cannot be
eliminated. Finally, the textile and leather programmes partly focus on the recycling of
chemicals used during textile processing and tanning.
One way of maximizing recycling is to turn waste by-products into new products. This
allows enterprises to turn a cost, such as management of a waste stream, into an income,
thereby offering a new product on the market. The NCPCs in El Salvador, Guatemala and
Nicaragua have been helping their clients in the dairy industry to do this. Through their
traditional CP work, these centres had already developed much experience in the
industry. They decided to join forces to deal with a by-product of cheese production—
whey. Whey has always been discharged into water bodies, where its high biochemical
oxygen demand levels and salinity cause many problems. Stricter enforcement of water
protection legislation meant that dairy enterprises in these countries had to rethink what
they did with this by-product. Because traditional end-of-pipe treatment would raise
enterprise operation costs, the NCPCs have worked with their clients since 2005 to find
environmentally and economically better solutions.

In Nicaragua, after technical and initial market evaluations, a dairy enterprise has decided
to reuse its whey for the production of drinks. A market study is being undertaken to
identify the most acceptable drink flavours for the Nicaraguan market. It is intended to
link up with a national initiative for the provision of one glass of high-nutrition drink per
day to school children. The Government is currently distributing milk, but it has been
proposed to substitute milk with a whey drink. In El Salvador, a dairy enterprise has
decided to reuse its whey for the production of fresh cheese and a cream substitute. With
the assistance of the NCPC, it installed the ultra-filtration technology required to reprocess
the whey; the new products will be marketed in 2007. In Guatemala, yet another solution
has been adopted by a dairy enterprise. After evaluations during 2006, it has decided to
reuse its whey for yogurt production, substituting the powdered whey it previously purchased.
During 2007, the enterprise will adopt the necessary reverse osmosis technology,
with the continued assistance of the NCPC.

Turning whey into
a new product
reduces the
environmental
impact and
increases the
earning of the
dairy industry.

E. Promoting renewable sources of energy
UNIDO mainly promotes the adoption of renewable energy sources through its rural and
renewable energy programmes, which particularly target rural areas without connections
to the national electricity grid. Activities during 2006 under this programme are described
in more detail in chapter 4.
There was an important development with regard to biofuels this year, reflecting the
rapidly growing global interest in their potential contribution to the energy mix of
countries. Since biofuels can replace fuels from non-renewable sources and thus present
a possible response to climate change, and in view of the high price of traditional hydrocarbon-
based fuels, UNIDO has initiated the development of a strategy for biofuels with
the following areas of emphasis:

 The creation of profiles of sustainable biofuel provision and use, emphasizing that
fuel use comprises far more than transport;
 South-South transfer and market introduction of technology for the gasification of
solid biomass, building on the successful establishment of UNIDO’s Centre of
Excellence for biomass gasification in Bangalore, India;
 The conversion of waste residues, especially from the food industry, into ethanol as
a short-term priority;
 The promotion of decentralized biodiesel production and links between local rural
biofuel developments and global trade and markets;
 Setting up a clearinghouse service on biorefineries as a contribution to global
knowledge platforms within the United Nations system.
F. From selling products to selling product services
This comparatively new activity for UNIDO, which was launched in 2005, has primarily
been undertaken within the context of the CP programme. The new business model of
selling the services of products rather than the products themselves, which is now being
adopted in the developed countries, is being introduced by UNIDO to developing
countries and economies in transition. It can lead to dramatic reductions in the environmental
impacts of products throughout their life cycle, from manufacture to final disposal.
The Organization has focused its initial work on the chemical industry. A more detailed
description of these activities during 2006 can be found in chapter 8.
G. Abatement of industrial pollution and waste management
While promoting more sustainable production and consumption patterns, UNIDO recognizes
that industrial pollution and wastes cannot be eliminated fully. To minimize their
impact, UNIDO promotes environmentally sound abatement practices through the TEST
programme and its sector-specific programmes for textiles and leather.
In the context of the Stockholm Convention, UNIDO focuses on the elimination of old
stocks of POPs. Often these are obsolete pesticides, but stocks of industrial POPs, such
as polychlorinated biphenyls, which have seen heavy use as oils in electrical transformers
and other equipment, must also be eliminated.
In Slovakia, full-sized demonstration projects for various technologies that destroy POPs
without using combustion were launched. In the past, POPs were usually burned, but
because of controversies surrounding the use of incinerators the Stockholm Convention
proposed to explore whether non-combustion technologies can offer an effective, or more
effective, way of destroying these compounds. The project in Slovakia builds on several
years of assessments and evaluations, as well as the identification of stockpiles of POPs
that could be the subject of a demonstration project. UNIDO’s first step was to set up
the management structure of the project. The Organization then invited nine technology
suppliers to make presentations of various technologies. In 2007, technology suppliers
will be chosen on the basis of their bids, and demonstration projects will be set up.

UNIDO ANNUAL REPORT 2006

Industrial Development, trade and poverty reduction through South-South cooperation
Industrial
development,
trade and poverty
reduction through
South-South
cooperation was
published in
November 2006 as
part of UNIDO’s
efforts to promote
South-South
cooperation.

A. South-South cooperation and the least developed countries
Early this year UNIDO established a special unit to develop and coordinate South-South
cooperation activities. The links between UNIDO’s activities in LDCs and the promotion
of South-South cooperation were intensified. South-South cooperation was stimulated in
various ways:
 Mapping the potential in more developed countries in the South for support to other
developing countries, with emphasis on LDCs;
 Building partnerships among developing countries, particularly to strengthen production
capacities in LDCs;
 Promoting regional trade and regional cooperation;
 Supporting institutional networking through centres of excellence in the South;
 Enhancing triangular cooperation between the North and the South, with a special
focus on LDCs. In triangular cooperation, the North, or an agency based in the North,
among others in the context of the Tokyo International Conference on African
Development supports a programme of South-South cooperation.
UNIDO’s TC in LDCs is primarily aimed at fulfilling the following commitments of the
Brussels Programme of Action:1
Commitment 4: Building productive capacities to make globalization work for LDCs;
Commitment 5: Enhancing the role of trade in development;
Commitment 6: Reducing vulnerability and protecting the environment.
The focus is on increasing the value added and developing supply chain systems for SMEs
in agro-based industries. The activities are in line with and contribute to the Millennium
Development Goals.
UNIDO’s TC services covered many areas that benefited LDCs in the framework of South-
South cooperation. Highlights include:
 Promoting business linkages in the SME sector, including cluster and network
development;
 Supporting market access and trade facilitation in LDC members of the South Asian
Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC);
 Quality improvement in the countries of the West African Economic and Monetary
Union (UEMOA);
1The Programme of Action (A/CONF. 191/11) was adopted by the Third United Nations Conference on the Least
Developed Countries in Brussels on 20 May 2001.

 Capacity-building and technology partnerships linking African, Asian, Caribbean and
Latin American countries through the International Centre for Advancement of
Manufacturing Technology (ICAMT) established by UNIDO in India;
 The development of small hydropower plants in East and West Africa through the
International Centre for Small Hydro Power (ICSHP) established by UNIDO in China;
 The transfer of biomass technologies for rural and industrial energy needs;
 The implementation, with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and
the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), of the Guinea Current Large
Marine Ecosystem project for 16 countries for the Gulf of Guinea. This programme
was endorsed by NEPAD.
To streamline and deepen its South-South and LDC activities through better institutional
mechanisms, the Organization has embarked on a new initiative: The establishment of
South-South industrial cooperation centres in the emerging economies of the South.
The first South-South industrial cooperation centre opened in India in January 2007. A
similar centre is to be established in China. The aim of these centres will be to mobilize
technical, financial and managerial resources to enhance production capacities, provide a
platform for sharing development knowledge and solutions, promote regional trade and
encourage the replication of best practices for poverty reduction. Negotiations are underway
to establish a centre in Egypt, and further centres in Brazil and South Africa are
envisioned for the future.
A breakdown of TC delivery and project allotment documents (PADs) for LDCs is given
in tables 2 and 3. Both show a strong increase.
Table 2. Technical cooperation delivery to LDCs by year, in thousands of dollars
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
End of year delivery 9,342 10,505 8,157 9,363 15,283
Table 3. PADs to LDCs by year, in thousands of dollars
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
End of year 12,957 14,927 12,021 16,174 18,912
Furthermore, UNIDO has strengthened its relationship with the G-77, as discussed in
chapter 3. Interaction and coordination with other United Nations agencies implementing
the Brussels Programme of Action have been improved. UNIDO’s sectoral report2
2Industrial development cooperation. Note by the Secretary-General (A/61/305).
submitted to the United Nations General Assembly session in September 2006, reflecting
the Organization’s role and contribution to TC in LDCs, was well received by all
Member States. The Organization is working with UNDP’s South-South Cooperation Unit
on a global South-South report which will cover topics such as:
 The definition of South-South cooperation;
 South-South cooperation in industry;
 Beneficial outcomes of South-South initiatives;
 South-South cooperation beyond government—the private sector as a possible motor
for cooperation in industry;
 UNIDO’s role in promoting South-South cooperation.
The Organization’s work on South-South cooperation was also reflected in a document
on the implementation of the medium-term programme framework 2006-2009, submitted
to the thirty-second session of the Board.3 During the session, strong support was
expressed for the Organization’s efforts to strengthen United Nations inter-agency
cooperation and to support the industrial development efforts of the South, and in
particular the LDCs, through special initiatives.
3IDB.32/13 and IDB 32/CRP 5.
In line with the guidance provided by its policy-making organs and United Nations
mandates, UNIDO will continue to consolidate and sharpen its activities to promote
South-South cooperation, focusing on LDCs.

B. Human security coordination
Human security focuses on the most vulnerable groups of a society: those living below
the poverty line, who cannot satisfy their basic human needs because their access to
water, food, shelter and energy is not secure, or because they lack a secure source of
income. In developing countries, these groups are mainly found among rural populations,
women and youth. At the beginning of the twenty-first century there are many threats
to human security, ranging from endangered livelihoods to disease and violent death.
In 2000, the poorer half of the world adult population owned barely 1 per cent of
global wealth.4
At UNIDO, the Human Security Coordination Unit is part of the newly created
Special Programmes group. It undertakes both crisis prevention and post-crisis assistance.
Among the different kinds of threats, UNIDO addresses economic insecurity, environmental
hazards and lack of social capital at the community level. Projects tackle these
problems in various ways: by improving or restoring production capacities and
infrastructure, by re-building the institutional support infrastructure, by attracting foreign
and domestic investment. Some examples of projects include:
 The training of around 300 households in furniture making, carpentry, tailoring,
embroidery and other crafts in Lhokseumawe, Indonesia, to overcome the effects of
the tsunami;
 Support to over 40 villages in the Nuba mountains in south Sudan, boosting income
and employment among poor and marginalized farmers, artisans and former refugees
(see also chapter 4.D);
 Feasibility studies on tapping renewable energies for productive activities by particularly
vulnerable population groups in Haiti, Liberia and Sierra Leone;
 Attracting domestic investment to earthquake-affected areas of South Asia, to initiate
a process of locally-led recovery.
C. Research and statistics
Research and associated activities observe three guiding principles:
 Topics and fields of work are chosen from an area—defined by structural change,
international trade and growth—in which the classic themes relating to industry in
development can be analyzed fruitfully;
 The choice of specific fields of work from this area, and of some others related to it,
is guided by UNIDO’s general mandate, reducing poverty through sustainable
industrial growth, and informed by the Organization’s three thematic priorities;
4United Nations University-World Institute for Development Economics Research: The World Distribution of Household
Wealth, 5 December 2006.

 The formulation of individual research projects is motivated by the usefulness of their
results for fine-tuning the Organization’s programmes as well as for the design of
policy-related components in TC.
Economic research
Most research is concerned with the first thematic priority—poverty reduction through productive
activities. Research on productivity in developing countries continues to provide
insights that are relevant to this priority area. An important step is the presentation of
results in the form of a World Productivity Database that will go online early in 2007 and
be made available to Member States, international organizations, academia and other interested
parties. Furthermore, an investigation of the factors behind country performance
differences was initiated. Both domestic and international factors play important roles.
Technology transfer through imports of intermediates, capital goods and increased international
integration are particularly significant, the latter however only in the case of good
domestic absorptive capacity. The quality of institutions, competition and structural
transformation away from agriculture, are also important.
A dismal message on the technology gap between rich and poor countries was delivered
at a meeting at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Boston, United States of
America. UNIDO has measured the gap using six different approaches, which all showed
that the gap is not only wide but increasing. Unless action is taken, the gap will continue
to widen. A glimpse of hope, however, is provided by a handful of Asian countries
(the original “Tiger” economies and some emerging “Tigers” such as China, India and
Thailand) which are developing rapidly.
To determine the capacity of countries to participate successfully in global trade, in
line with UNIDO’s second thematic priority (trade capacity-building), preparatory work
has been carried out for a study on patterns of trade in manufacturing, the corresponding
international specialization trends and the implications for industrial as well as
overall growth.
Research has started on energy issues, which is part of UNIDO’s third thematic priority—
environment and energy. A model for analyzing current and future energy needs for
industrial development was applied to the case of China. It recommends improvements
in industrial energy efficiency, an increase in energy supply and more cost-effective sustainable
energy generation. The model is readily applicable to the regional and country
assessments (see below) and can also help Member States to design and implement longterm
energy policies and end-use strategies.
The research programme Combating Marginalization and Poverty through Industrial
Development (COMPID), funded by Denmark, published five studies on the contribution
of industry to the achievement of the MDGs. The recommendations in these reports provide
a basis for policymaking and industrial development strategies in low-income countries.
The reports also contain UNIDO-specific advice on TC.

UNIDO builds up medium- to long-term
visions for industrial and economic
development through a process
of mobilizing key actors for
joint action.

The llama, a member of the camelid family, is a very important factor in the economy of
the Bolivian highlands. Llama wool, for example, is the traditional raw material for textiles
produced by the indigenous population. The best quality llama wool is better than alpaca
wool, which is one of the most expensive camelid fibres in the market. However, the
productivity and competitiveness of Bolivia’s camelid fibre-based textiles industry is low
due to poor stock breeding methods as well as inadequate wool processing methods.
To address these problems, the Bolivian Government and UNIDO initiated a camelides
project in 2005. The longer-term aim of the project is to improve the whole wool production
chain, from llama breeding to spinning and weaving by local artisans. If llama farmers
and artisans can produce wool that meets the requirements of Bolivian textile
manufacturers competing in world markets for high-quality camelid wool textiles, then not
only the farmers, but the country as a whole, will benefit. Apart from improvements in
llama breeding methods and shearing and processing equipment, training courses are
planned for 120 persons to transfer expertise on the various stages of the camelid wool
chain. Cooperation and dialogue with other organizations and projects, within and outside
the United Nations system, of which only a few are mentioned in this brief overview,
are a key element in the project.
The first activity under the project was the supply of shearing equipment to indigenous
farmers in the southwest of the country in November 2005. The problem of highly dispersed,
small-scale production was tackled by providing portable low-voltage electric shearing
equipment. With the new equipment, traditional shearing methods producing limited
quantities of low-quality wool, that fetches low prices in the market, could be abandoned.
The new, far more productive equipment also solved the problem of labour shortages due
to the large number of young people migrating to urban areas. While the low-voltage
equipment can be powered by electricity generators, collaboration was initiated with a
Government project to install photovoltaic power systems—a low-cost, decentralized,
sustainable form of energy supply—in remote rural areas.

Consistently obtaining high-quality wool requires high-quality stock. Working with the
FAO, genetic improvements, with a focus on obtaining a larger proportion of fine, white
fibres (in the market, white fibres fetch $0.50 per kilo more than coloured fibres), are to
be introduced through a project component promoting genetic management through a
participatory approach which targets innovative farmers.
Future commercialization options of the increased llama fibre production were discussed
during a roundtable meeting with regional associations of llama farmers, spinning and
textile mills and various support institutions. In addition, the project received great
exposure at the International Camelides Export Fair in Bolivia.

A mid-term evaluation of the project in May suggested a number of adjustments to ensure
effective implementation and enhance the impact of the project. The original idea of
letting the regional llama farmers association manage the Centre for Innovation and
Technology Transfer (CITTE), which would provide support services to producers,
including equipment for common use, was reconsidered because of the limited managerial
capacity of the association and its problematic financial situation. The Danish-funded
Indigenous Centre for Sustainable Food Production (CIPAS) project, managed by a
Bolivian NGO, has been approached with the aim of sharing facilities, and an intensive
dialogue was established.
As a result of the camelides project, the seasonal wool yield has already increased from
0.8 to 5.0 tons, resulting in significant increases in sales and earnings by the farmers
involved.

https://unido.org/fileadmin/import/66122_UNIDOAnnualReport2006.pdf

F. Chemical leasing
Programme component: Cleaner and sustainable production.
Objective of the component: To promote sustainable industrial resource management
in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
Planned outcome: Greater resource efficiency of production chains in countries
where sustainable industrial resource management projects are located.
Performance indicator: Decreased quantities and toxicity of waste and pollution
generated per unit of final product.

Chemical leasing is a business model in which chemicals manufacturers shift from selling
chemicals to selling the functions performed by these chemicals—for example their cleaning
function as in solvents or their coating function as in paints. The number of pieces cleaned
or pieces coated becomes the basis of payment. In this business model, manufacturers
accept including the use and disposal of the chemicals in their responsibilities.
The advantages for the industrial users of chemicals are clear:
 The manufacturers know the properties of the chemicals better than the users.
Therefore, the manufacturer will use the optimal amount of the chemical and can
ensure that they are used in a safe way;
 The manufacturer knows best how to deal with the chemical once it is too contaminated
for further use, which will often mean lower disposal costs.
Due to these advantages, industrial users of chemicals can expect costs for the purchase
of chemicals to be lower.
The advantages for manufacturers are more subtle. In general, chemical leasing means selling
less, because chemicals are used more efficiently, and that the manufacturers become
responsible for waste disposal. However, these disadvantages can be outweighed by:
 More stable, long-term partnerships with the users, who are less likely to change suppliers
in this business model than in a standard product purchase model;
 A much more interesting package for customers: not only can manufacturers reduce
the costs of using chemicals, but they can also relieve customers of the burden of
dealing with unfamiliar, often hazardous or toxic materials.

The chemical
leasing approach
has also been
used in a project
to reduce the
volume of
effluents from
glue production in
a Russian factory.

In addition to this, the environment also gains: chemical use is reduced, which lowers the
production of chemicals and there are smaller quanThe partnership of a manufacturer and an industrial user of chemicals can be extended
to include plant and equipment suppliers and companies recycling chemicals. Key elements
of successful chemical leasing are proper benefit sharing among all participating
companies, high quality standards for the final product and any recycled chemicals, and
mutual trust among participants.
In cooperation with the Austrian Ministry of the Environment, UNIDO’s Cleaner Production
Programme began promoting chemical leasing business models in developing and transition
countries in 2005. During 2005 and 2006, projects involving around 20 companies
were being implemented with the NCPCs in Egypt, Mexico and the Russian Federation.
The NCPCs promoted the projects amongst their clients, and once partnerships were
established, they monitored and validated their performance.
In Egypt, one of the partnerships is between AKZO Nobel Powder Coatings SAE as the
supplier of electrostatic powder coatings and ABB Arab, a manufacturer of high and low
voltage equipment, as the industrial user of the chemical. AKZO Nobel’s product is used to
coat the frame components of ABB’s power equipment. Under the chemical leasing model
adopted, AKZO Nobel is offering the service of coating instead of selling its powder-coating
chemicals. ABB Arab pays a fee per square metre of final product coated per day. The
fee covers the powder used, the supervision of the coating line, which includes a transfer
of know-how on the techniques of powder application, and the recycling of waste powder.
The main environmental benefits of this partnership are:
 A reduction in the amount of powder coating used on ABB Arab’s premises, with a
consequent reduction in all the environmental impacts of coating powder production;
 The recycling of the waste coating powder, which was being landfilled before;
 Improved working conditions in ABB Arab, because of better coating process control
and better maintenance of the coating powder line;
 Reduced environmtities of waste chemicals, which are
managed in a more environmentally acceptable manner.

Pp.74

The partnership of a manufacturer and an industrial user of chemicals can be extended
to include plant and equipment suppliers and companies recycling chemicals. Key elements
of successful chemical leasing are proper benefit sharing among all participating
companies, high quality standards for the final product and any recycled chemicals, and
mutual trust among participants.
In cooperation with the Austrian Ministry of the Environment, UNIDO’s Cleaner Production
Programme began promoting chemical leasing business models in developing and transition
countries in 2005. During 2005 and 2006, projects involving around 20 companies
were being implemented with the NCPCs in Egypt, Mexico and the Russian Federation.
The NCPCs promoted the projects amongst their clients, and once partnerships were
established, they monitored and validated their performance.
In Egypt, one of the partnerships is between AKZO Nobel Powder Coatings SAE as the
supplier of electrostatic powder coatings and ABB Arab, a manufacturer of high and low
voltage equipment, as the industrial user of the chemical. AKZO Nobel’s product is used to
coat the frame components of ABB’s power equipment. Under the chemical leasing model
adopted, AKZO Nobel is offering the service of coating instead of selling its powder-coating
chemicals. ABB Arab pays a fee per square metre of final product coated per day. The
fee covers the powder used, the supervision of the coating line, which includes a transfer
of know-how on the techniques of powder application, and the recycling of waste powder.
The main environmental benefits of this partnership are:
 A reduction in the amount of powder coating used on ABB Arab’s premises, with a
consequent reduction in all the environmental impacts of coating powder production;
 The recycling of the waste coating powder, which was being landfilled before;
 Improved working conditions in ABB Arab, because of better coating process control
and better maintenance of the coating powder line;
 Reduced environmental impacts, previously generated by imperfectly maintained
equipment.
In addition, both companies now have a long-term business relationship.
G. Joint formulation of an industrial strategy for Saudi Arabia
Programme component: Technical cooperation services in industrial governance.
Objectives of the component: To improve the decision-making capabilities of
Governments, private sector and support institutions in the formulation, implementation
and monitoring of industrial strategies, policies and programmes.
Planned outcome: Improved effectiveness of systems of industrial governance
based on public-private partnerships and consultations.
Performance indicator: The Government worked directly with other stakeholders
in the formulation, implementation and monitoring of an industrial strategy.

In its Vision 2020 strategy document, Saudi Arabia commits itself to reducing its
dependence on oil. Income from the oil industry is to be used to build up a diversified
economy, with the private sector and the highly skilled Saudi labour force as the major
drivers. In the transformation of a natural resource-intensive economy into a knowledgebased
economy, the manufacturing sector will play a critically important part. UNIDO
supports the efforts of the Government with the integrated programme strategies to
enhance industrial competitiveness and diversification in Saudi Arabia.
The Vision 2020 recognizes that its ambitious aims can only be reached through an
intensive dialogue among the main stakeholders in development: the Government, in
particular the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, private businesses and the national
innovation system, including universities and research institutes. On the basis of a UNIDO
assessment of the industrial sector, interviews and meetings were held with all stakeholders
to define strategic concepts for the sector. This step-by-step process was guided by a
Steering Committee on which all key players were represented, ensuring the continuity
of the dialogue.
The outcome of the process was a draft strategy presented by the UNIDO project
team to a stakeholders’ meeting chaired by the Minister of Commerce and Industry.
The final strategy document, Industry 2020—Partners in Building a Promising Industrial
Future, was submitted to the Government for approval in December. Its strategic
pillars are:
 Building up domestic capabilities in areas such as skills, research and development,
information and communication technologies and investment promotion;
 Creation of a more stimulating business environment, especially for SMEs;
 Creation of an industrial innovation system at the national level as well as in the
country’s different regions;
 Promotion of industrial clusters;
 A stronger system of industrial governance at the national, regional and local
level (see figure 5 for its composition) to guide the implementation of the strategy.
An action plan with concrete programmes for each of the pillars was formulated, with a
budget of $3.9 billion. The lessons learned from the implementation of projects will be
used to develop industry-related activities for the new Five Year Plan which starts in 2010.
The successful process of dialogue and cooperation among development stakeholders,
leading to the formulation of Industry 2020, can be seen as a major result of the integrated
programme. However, other outcomes of the process deserve to be mentioned as well,
such as a plan for cluster formation, publication of a statistical survey, improvements in
the industrial data system, workshops on new forms of industrial governance for the stakeholders,
and training of the Ministry of Commerce and Industry staff in analysis, policy
formulation, implementation and monitoring.

Pp.77
See diagram
Figure 5. Proposed organization of the industrial governance system in Industry 2020
Industrial Strategy Commission >>> Ministry of Commerce and Industry
Industrial Development Agency >>>>
Framework conditions / Regional innovation systems / National innovation system by Industrial clusters
Industrial Competitiveness and Diversification Board + Regional and local government authorities interact and answer to the Ministry of Commerce and Industry along with the Industrial Development Agency (see chart diagram pp. 77 of text 2006 UNIDO Annual Report.)

***

© 2010 Inter-American Development Bank
IDB and Haiti –

Preparation

* Improving the competitiveness of the tourism enterprises in Jacmel
* Institutional strengthening of FHAPME

More
Approved

* 1/14/10. Emergency response to earthquake in Haiti
* 1/4/10. Co-financing – Rural Chains Program – Animal & Plant Health Protection

#
IDB considers additional Haiti debt relief

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the largest multinational source of assistance and debt relief for Haiti, is considering an effective mechanism for the further alleviation of Haiti’s $441 million debt to the IDB in the wake of the destruction caused by the Jan. 12 earthquake.

http://www.iadb.org/countries/Home.cfm?id_country=HA

#
Message from President Moreno on the passing of Philippe Dewez

It is with deep regret that we received confirmation of the death of Philippe Dewez, former IDB Representative in Haiti, as a consequence of injuries sustained during the January 12 earthquake.
#
IDB President visits Haiti, calls for expanded aid

Inter-American Development Bank President Luis Alberto Moreno today called for increased financial aid for Haiti, which last week suffered the worst natural disaster in its history

**

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Haiti Emergency response to earthquake in Haiti HA-T1125 Jan 14, 2010
Haiti Co-financing – Rural Chains Program – Animal & Plant Health Protection HA-X1015 Jan 4, 2010
Haiti New Technologies and Government Transformation in Haiti HA-T1122 Dec 10, 2009
Haiti Pilot Project to Provide Capacity Building for Cleft Lip andPalate Care in Haiti HA-T1112 Dec 10, 2009
Haiti Strengthening the Internal Debt Sustainability Analysis Unit HA-T1083 Dec 10, 2009
Haiti Support for Preparation of Civil Registry Project HA-T1114 Dec 10, 2009
Haiti Support for Teachers of XO-OLPC Project HA-T1102 Dec 10, 2009
Haiti Support to the Design of the HA-L1035 Program HA-T1080 Dec 8, 2009
Haiti Job Creation for Small-Scale Agricultural Producers through the Carifresh Fruit HA-S1006 Dec 4, 2009
Haiti Regional Indicators and Data for Readiness to Learn HA-T1118 Dec 3, 2009
Haiti Improving Child Survival and Building Blocks for Social Safety Nets HA-T1116 Dec 2, 2009
Haiti Improving Child Survival and Building Blocks for Social Safety Nets HA-L1042 Dec 2, 2009
Haiti Capitalization Fund for textile sector SMEs in Haiti HA-M1024 Oct 14, 2009
Haiti Water and Sanitation for Intermediate Cities (II) HA-L1039 Sep 30, 2009
Haiti Water and Sanitation for Intermediate Cities (II) HA-X1013 Sep 30, 2009
Haiti Sustainable Land Management of the Upper Watersheds of South Western Haiti HA-X1002 Sep 23, 2009
Haiti Improving remittance services and promoting investments in Haiti HA-M1020 Sep 18, 2009
Haiti Natural Disaster Mitigation Program in Priority Watersheds I HA-L1041 Sep 16, 2009
Haiti Expansion of financial services to secondary cities HA-S1005 Sep 15, 2009
Haiti Enhancement of Haitian Competitiveness in Key Economic Sectors HA-T1104 Sep 1, 2009

http://www.iadb.org/projects/search.cfm?country=HA&adv=true&lang=en

COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Fiscal Sustainability I HA-L1029 Aug 26, 2009
Haiti Development of the Industrial Park Model to Improve Trade Opportunities for Hait HA-T1074 Aug 13, 2009
Haiti Business Plan Competition in Haiti HA-M1023 Jul 22, 2009
Haiti Support to Reconstruction of Education Infrastructure HA-L1040 Jun 24, 2009
Haiti Handicraft and Local Development in Ganthier HA-T1108 Jun 18, 2009
Haiti Support for the preparation National Tourism Program HA-T1090 Jun 9, 2009
Haiti Support to maritime fishing development HA-T1101 Apr 30, 2009
Haiti Support to the competitiveness of quality coffee value chain in Baptiste HA-M1022 Apr 16, 2009
Haiti Support to the competitiveness of quality coffee value chain in Thiotte HA-M1021 Apr 16, 2009
Haiti Support for Watershed Management Plans for Preventive Disaster Risk Management HA-T1091 Apr 9, 2009
Haiti Technical Assistance for National Program of Flood Early Warning System HA-T1096 Apr 9, 2009
Haiti Hand Pump Program in Rural Plain of Gonaïves HA-T1109 Feb 18, 2009
Haiti Programa de Bombas a Motricidad Humana para Gonives HA-X1016 Feb 18, 2009
Haiti Creating Sustainable Recycling Businesses in Bel Air, Port Au Prince HA-M1017 Jan 27, 2009
Haiti Business Competitiveness and Cluster Support HA-T1076 Dec 17, 2008
Haiti Support to training of trainers for the TVET system HA-T1066 Dec 17, 2008
Haiti Support to the Presidential commission on Education Reform HA-T1098 Dec 5, 2008
Haiti Péligre Hydroelectric Plant Rehabilitation Pogram HA-L1032 Dec 2, 2008
Haiti Support for the Strengthenning of the DGI HA-X1011 Oct 30, 2008
Haiti Competitiveness and Profitability of Fruit-processing Microenterprises HA-M1016 Sep 22, 2008

COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Emergency Assistance Due to Hurricane Gustav HA-T1099 Sep 15, 2008
Haiti Emergency Assistance Due to Hurricane Hanna HA-T1100 Sep 15, 2008
Haiti Preparation of Full-Sized GEF Project HA-X1002 HA-X1009 Sep 5, 2008
Haiti Support for CHPs Rehabilitation HA-T1097 Aug 21, 2008
Haiti Support for Export Quality Fruits HA-M1015 Jul 25, 2008
Haiti II Aditional Cofinancing Rehabilitation Basic Economic Infrastructure Program HA-X1008 Jun 18, 2008
Haiti Strengthening Public Finance Management II HA-L1023 Apr 30, 2008
Haiti Promotion of Economic Opportunities in Rural Areas HA-M1010 Apr 17, 2008
Haiti Support for Planning, Programming and Monitoring Based on Results HA-T1053 Mar 5, 2008
Haiti Rehabilitation of Road Infrastructure for Integration of the Territory HA-X1007 Feb 21, 2008
Haiti Pilot of the One Laptop per Child Model HA-T1093 Feb 6, 2008
Haiti Supplemental Support for Preparation of Watershed Management Program HA-T1092 Jan 30, 2008
Haiti Promoting Micro Entrepreneurship in the Urban Slums in Haiti HA-M1009 Jan 18, 2008
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of the Ministry of Public Works HA-T1055 Jan 16, 2008
Haiti Third phase of the Household Survey 1-2-3 to Create the baseline for the PRSP HA-T1056 Dec 19, 2007
Haiti Competitivity and Profitability of Milk Processing Plants Lèt Agogo HA-M1014 Dec 18, 2007
Haiti Early Childhood Development Pilot HA-T1061 Dec 18, 2007
Haiti Promotion of Community Tourism in the North Department of Haiti HA-M1012 Dec 18, 2007
Haiti Promotion of Micro and Small Enterprises in Cap-Haitien HA-M1011 Dec 18, 2007
Haiti Support for Design EDH’s Mid Term Investment Plan HA-T1058 Dec 18, 2007

COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Support for Design EDH’s Mid Term Investment Plan HA-T1094 Dec 18, 2007
Haiti Education Sector Study – Assessing Education Quality HA-T1063 Dec 17, 2007
Haiti Feasibility Studies for a Second Landfill in Port-au-Prince HA-T1060 Dec 12, 2007
Haiti Rehabilitation of Road Infrastructure for Integration of the Territory HA-L1019 Nov 20, 2007
Haiti Supplemental Financing for the Agricultural Intensification Program HA-L1021 Nov 20, 2007
Haiti Executing Agencies Follow-up Support Program HA-T1062 Aug 20, 2007
Haiti Trade and Investment Forum HA-T1065 Aug 14, 2007
Haiti Strengthening Public Resource Management HA-L1017 Aug 1, 2007
Haiti Collective Remittances and Social Service Provision in Haiti HA-T1059 Jun 29, 2007
Haiti Additional Cofinancing for Rehabilitation Basic Economic Infrastructure Program HA-X1005 Jun 27, 2007
Haiti Promoting Micro Entrepreneurship through Institutional Capacity Strengthening HA-T1064 Jun 27, 2007
Haiti Support for the Integrated Mgmnt of the Upper Parts of Priority Watersheds in HA HA-T1054 Jun 1, 2007
Haiti Co-financing for the Vocational Training Program HA-X1001 Apr 12, 2007
Haiti Support for the Haitian Parliament HA-T1045 Jan 9, 2007
Haiti Policy and Forestry Action Plan for Haiti HA-T1046 Dec 20, 2006
Haiti Policy and Forestry Action Plan for Haiti HA-X1003 Dec 20, 2006
Haiti Support Human Resource Management in Public Sector HA-L1018 Dec 13, 2006
Haiti Financial Sector Reform Support Program HA-L1008 Dec 6, 2006
Haiti Rehabilitation of Electricity Distribution System in Port au Prince HA-L1014 Dec 6, 2006
Haiti Rural Supply Chain Market Linkage Services HA-T1043 Nov 29, 2006
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Rural Supply Chain Development Program HA-L1003 Oct 24, 2006
Haiti Enhancement of the Remittances Services to and within Rural Haiti HA-M1007 Oct 11, 2006
Haiti Economic and Project Work on the Development of the Rural Economy HA-T1052 Oct 4, 2006
Haiti Technical Assistance in the Potable Water and Sanitation Sector of Haiti HA-T1051 Oct 3, 2006
Haiti Improving Banking Supervision in Haiti HA-T1050 Oct 2, 2006
Haiti Investment Promotion Initiative HA-T1048 Sep 29, 2006
Haiti Basic Education Teacher Certification HA-T1047 Sep 28, 2006
Haiti Rural Water and Sanitation Program HA-L1007 Sep 20, 2006
Haiti Enhancing Readiness to Learn Initiatives for Haitian Children HA-T1038 Sep 15, 2006
Haiti Strengthening of Airport Security HA-M1006 Jul 31, 2006
Haiti Assessment of Early Childhood Services HA-T1049 Jul 10, 2006
Haiti Policy and Strategy for Integrated Watershed Management HA-T1039 Jun 14, 2006
Haiti Support for Port-au-Prince Electrical Distribution Rehabilitation Program HA-T1040 Apr 28, 2006
Haiti Communication Strategy for Sustainable Watershed Management HA-T1041 Apr 10, 2006
Haiti Institutional Analysis of the Rural Supply Chain Dev Program HA-T1042 Feb 27, 2006
Haiti Preparation of the Intervention for the Watershed Management Program HA-T1037 Jan 3, 2006
Haiti Preparation of Rural Water and Sanitation Feasibility Studies HA-T1030 Dec 13, 2005
Haiti Development of 2007 Country Strategy for Haiti HA-T1036 Nov 23, 2005
Haiti Feasibility Assessment of Social Protection Programs HA-T1035 Nov 23, 2005
Haiti Community Development to Support the Water and Sanitation Program HA-T1034 Nov 1, 2005
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Support for the National Service of Potable Water (SNEP) HA-T1032 Oct 27, 2005
Haiti Institutional Strengthening for Environmental Management HA-L1006 Oct 21, 2005
Haiti Support for Start up of National Flood Early Warning Program HA-T1025 Oct 18, 2005
Haiti Support for Preparation & Implementation of the Watershed Management Project HA-T1033 Sep 28, 2005
Haiti Support for the Service National del Eau Potable (SNEP) HA-T1031 Sep 28, 2005
Haiti Support for the Evaluation of the Urban Rehabilitation Program HA-T1022 Sep 21, 2005
Haiti Support for Preparation & Implementation of Rural Economy Projects HA-T1026 Aug 23, 2005
Haiti Program to Develop Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms HA-M1005 Aug 10, 2005
Haiti Support for the Competitive Position of Haitian Coffees HA-M1004 Aug 3, 2005
Haiti Ennery-Quinte Agricultural Intensification Project HA-L1009 Jul 20, 2005
Haiti Fiscal Reform and Governance HA-L1001 Jul 20, 2005
Haiti National Program of Flood Early Warning HA-L1005 Jul 20, 2005
Haiti Urban Rehabilitation Program HA-L1002 Jul 6, 2005
Haiti Support for the Transport Infrastructure Rehabilitation Program HA-T1024 Jun 30, 2005
Haiti Transport Infrastructure Rehabilitation Program HA0087 Jun 29, 2005
Haiti Support Preparation for Rural Water and Sanitation Program HA-T1029 Jun 22, 2005
Haiti Strengthening of Economic Governance Institutions HA0082 Jun 21, 2005
Haiti Didactic Materials for the Vocational Training Sector HA-T1023 Jun 6, 2005
Haiti Vocational Training HA0017 May 31, 2005
Haiti A Response to Gender Based Violence in Haiti HA-T1020 May 10, 2005
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Support for FAES’ Communication Strategy HA-T1028 Apr 26, 2005
Haiti Preparation Institutional Strengthening Program for Environmental Management HA-T1027 Mar 30, 2005
Haiti Preparation of the Support to the Competitiveness of Haitian Coffees HA-T1021 Mar 2, 2005
Haiti Agriculture Sector and the Rural Economy in Haiti HA-T1008 Jan 3, 2005
Haiti Microfinance Strengthening of the “Caisses Populaires” HA-M1002 Dec 10, 2004
Haiti Deepening of Financial Services to Microenterprise in Haiti HA-M1003 Dec 6, 2004
Haiti Quality Mechanisms in Vocational Training HA-T1014 Dec 2, 2004
Haiti Support for the Execution of IDB Transport Programs in Haiti HA-T1017 Nov 22, 2004
Haiti Support for the Execution of the Roads Program in Haiti HA-T1019 Nov 22, 2004
Haiti Updating of Road Inventory and Classification HA-T1006 Nov 19, 2004
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs and Rights (MCFDF HA-T1018 Nov 17, 2004
Haiti Technical Assistance to Support the Execution of Loan 1490/SF-HA HA-T1010 Nov 3, 2004
Haiti Support for the Creation of Anti-Corruption Bureau HA-T1003 Oct 12, 2004
Haiti Emergency Assistance in Response to Tropical Storm Jeanne HA-T1016 Sep 22, 2004
Haiti Targetting the Urban Poor HA-T1015 Sep 20, 2004
Haiti Support for Urban Rehabilitation HA-T1013 Sep 13, 2004
Haiti Support to the Sector Reform Unit (Loan 1010/SF-HA) HA-T1012 Aug 20, 2004
Haiti Support for the Execution of Loan 1010/SF-HA HA-T1009 Aug 9, 2004
Haiti Vocational Education and Training and its Linkages to the Labor Market HA-T1011 Jul 27, 2004
Haiti Emergency Floods in Response to Floods in Haiti HA-T1007 May 28, 2004
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Facilitation of Basic Economic Infrastructure Program HA-T1004 Feb 17, 2004
Haiti On-Line Networks for Culture, Tourism and Commerce in Haiti HA-M1001 Dec 18, 2003
Haiti Support for the Reform of Revenue Institutions TC0210058 Dec 17, 2003
Haiti Policy Research Study for New Sources of Growth in Haiti HA-T1005 Nov 27, 2003
Haiti Public Finance Reform HA0092 Nov 19, 2003
Haiti Agricultural Intensification HA0016 Nov 12, 2003
Haiti Local Development Program HA0079 Nov 12, 2003
Haiti Program for Rehabilitation of Basic Economic Infrastructure HA0093 Nov 12, 2003
Haiti Preparation of Local Development Program HA-T1002 Sep 3, 2003
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of ACME TC0302007 Aug 26, 2003
Haiti Management of Coffee Plantations II HA-T1001 Jul 11, 2003
Haiti Emergency Relief in Response to the Drought TC0306034 Jul 1, 2003
Haiti Organic Agriculture Practices TC0303042 Mar 21, 2003
Haiti Institutional Strengthening Initiatives TC0201093 Dec 18, 2002
Haiti Inventory of NGOs TC0210041 Dec 16, 2002
Haiti Poverty Map Validation, Production and Dissemination TC0210044 Dec 16, 2002
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of Micro Credit National S.A. TC0206035 Dec 6, 2002
Haiti Support to Haiti’s Poverty Map TC0210042 Oct 14, 2002
Haiti Construction Techniques with Bambou TC0210040 Sep 12, 2002
Haiti Support for the Cooperative System TC0207031 Jul 22, 2002
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Emergency Assistance to Flood Victims TC0206000 Jun 4, 2002
Haiti Processing of Meat Products TC0206003 May 24, 2002
Haiti Management of Coffee Plantations TC0206004 May 23, 2002
Haiti Renewable Alternative Energy Sources TC0111040 Dec 21, 2001
Haiti Support for Vulnerable Children TC0111041 Dec 21, 2001
Haiti Support to Civil Registry of Haiti TC0111039 Dec 21, 2001
Haiti Program to Support Hiv/Aids Strategy TC0109021 Nov 28, 2001
Haiti Activation of Rural Roads Program TC0009030 Dec 21, 2000
Haiti Preparation Environmental Action Plans TC0012030 Dec 21, 2000
Haiti Risk Management & Disaster Prevention TC0012032 Dec 21, 2000
Haiti Streng.comm. Groups in Coastal Area TC0012031 Dec 21, 2000
Haiti Reinforcement of National Accounts II TC9912038 Nov 30, 2000
Haiti Activation of Basic Education Program TC0009035 Nov 16, 2000
Haiti Local Governance Initiative TC0010031 Nov 16, 2000
Haiti Preparation Local Development Program TC9910074 Nov 16, 2000
Haiti Support to Project Implementation of the Agricultural Intensification Program TC9910010 Nov 16, 2000
Haiti Activation of Decentralization Program TC0009029 Oct 13, 2000
Haiti Drinking Water & Sanitation Sec. Reform TC9910067 Oct 6, 2000
Haiti Economic and Social Dev. Strategy TC0003039 May 31, 2000
Haiti Preparation of Census 2001 TC9910051 Feb 25, 2000
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Electricity Sector’s Modernization Prog. TC9910027 Oct 26, 1999
Haiti Private Training Market Initiative TC9708259 Oct 13, 1999
Haiti Urban Initiatives for Port-Au-Prince TC9712490 Oct 13, 1999
Haiti Rn1 Highway Rehabilitation TC9910007 Oct 12, 1999
Haiti Cap-Haitien Airport Concession Prefeasi. TC9910008 Oct 9, 1999
Haiti Cap-Haitien Port Concession Prefeasibi. TC9910006 Oct 9, 1999
Haiti Support for the Administrative Reform TC9809289 Oct 6, 1999
Haiti Potable Water Sector Reform TC9906031 Sep 21, 1999
Haiti Strength.textile Subsector TC9901031 Sep 13, 1999
Haiti Agriculture Intensification Project TC9810608 Sep 8, 1999
Haiti Highway Rehabilitation Program TC9902003 Sep 8, 1999
Haiti Private Participation Electric Sector TC9903024 May 13, 1999
Haiti Training Reform Transition TC9804495 May 5, 1999
Haiti Institutional Strengthening to Sogebank TC9810020 Jan 4, 1999
Haiti Assessment of the Financial Sector TC9804205 Dec 23, 1998
Haiti Rehabilitation of National Roads 3 TC9811135 Dec 15, 1998
Haiti Irrigation System Artibonite Valley TC9710212 Nov 23, 1998
Haiti Coastal and Marines Resources Manage. TC9806160 Oct 19, 1998
Haiti Statistics Experiences TC9806152 Oct 16, 1998
Haiti Education Reform TC9806144 Oct 12, 1998
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Tc Emergency Tropical Storm George TC9809403 Oct 2, 1998
Haiti Basic Education Program HA0038 Sep 30, 1998
Haiti Inst.streng. Managerial Capacityof Ihsi TC9809073 Sep 22, 1998
Haiti Drinking Water and Sanitation Sector Reform HA0014 Aug 12, 1998
Haiti Establishment Potable Water Agency TC9708465 Aug 12, 1998
Haiti Organization & Rationalization Health Sector HA0045 Aug 12, 1998
Haiti Hidrological Impact Ennery-Gonaives TC9806376 Jul 14, 1998
Haiti Potable Water Sector Reform TC9806102 Jul 14, 1998
Haiti Ennery-Gonaives Hydrological Impact Stud TC9805196 Jun 18, 1998
Haiti National Tariff Policy Development TC9803348 Jun 12, 1998
Haiti Ouanaminthe Water System Urban Study TC9803330 Jun 10, 1998
Haiti Strengt.management of Court of Accounts TC9801045 Jun 2, 1998
Haiti Strengthening National Account Unit TC9801037 Jun 2, 1998
Haiti Potable Water System of Jacmel City TC9803281 May 1, 1998
Haiti Potable Water and Sanitation Reform TC9712573 Apr 16, 1998
Haiti Coastal Marine Protection TC9610446 Feb 4, 1998
Haiti Employment & Professional Classification TC9801128 Feb 4, 1998
Haiti Support to Private Sector in Haiti (2) TC9712367 Dec 22, 1997
Haiti Agricultural Feasibility Studies TC9705461 Oct 16, 1997
Haiti Shipwrecked Emergency Fierte Gonaiviene TC9708332 Sep 17, 1997
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Feasibility Study Port Saint Louis TC9708100 Aug 21, 1997
Haiti Coordination Potable Water Sector Impl. TC9707144 Jul 29, 1997
Haiti Land Tenure Transfers Marginal Populat. TC9707136 Jul 18, 1997
Haiti Inst.strength.ministerio Medio Ambiente TC9705346 May 23, 1997
Haiti Coastal Action Plan Preparation TC9704405 May 7, 1997
Haiti Professional Education Program TC9701386 May 5, 1997
Haiti Assistance to the Private Sector TC9701500 Mar 21, 1997
Haiti Vocational Training TC9703051 Mar 17, 1997
Haiti Agricultural Feas.studies Trois Rivieres TC9701451 Mar 6, 1997
Haiti Employment & Professions Classification TC9702011 Mar 6, 1997
Haiti Social Capital Development Program TC9701394 Mar 6, 1997
Haiti Rural and Secondary Roads HA0075 Mar 5, 1997
Haiti Water Policy Formulation TC9601247 Feb 4, 1997
Haiti Action Plan C and D Countries TC9704497 Jan 1, 1997
Haiti Basic Education TC9605314 Dec 20, 1996
Haiti Inst. Strengthening Banque Republique D’haiti HA0091 Dec 11, 1996
Haiti Investment Sector Loan HA0046 Dec 11, 1996
Haiti Social Investment Help Fund HA0037 Nov 13, 1996
Haiti Potable Water Prog.-Preinvestment Study TC9604423 Oct 24, 1996
Haiti Potable Water Program TC9603178 Oct 24, 1996

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pp.12

COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Potable Water System Les Cayes Master P. TC9608235 Sep 20, 1996
Haiti Legal/Regulatory Reform Electric Sector TC9509136 Sep 11, 1996
Haiti Support to Civil Registry TC9608178 Sep 6, 1996
Haiti Foreign Trade and Investment TC9608144 Sep 4, 1996
Haiti Tropical Storm Emergency TC9607302 Aug 15, 1996
Haiti Potable Water Sector Reform TC9603087 Jul 3, 1996
Haiti Maps Structure Production TC9605497 Jun 27, 1996
Haiti Land Administration Reform Program TC9601239 Jun 17, 1996
Haiti Inst. Strengh. Ministry of Environment TC9605223 Jun 3, 1996
Haiti TC Loan for Decentralization HA0060 Feb 21, 1996
Haiti Eerp-Training of Supervition Firms TC9601320 Jan 31, 1996
Haiti Reform of Potable Water Sector TC9509269 Jan 3, 1996
Haiti Preinvestment Studies – Potable Water TC9509277 Dec 28, 1995
Haiti Private Sector Assessment TC9508493 Dec 22, 1995
Haiti Information System On Employment TC9509144 Dec 21, 1995
Haiti Inst. Strengthening for Customs Administration TC9509061 Dec 20, 1995
Haiti Inst. Strengthening for Tax Administration TC9509045 Dec 20, 1995
Haiti Emergency & Economic Recovery Program II HA0050 Nov 29, 1995
Haiti Secured Transactions Reform TC9505449 Nov 29, 1995
Haiti Support to Professional Bankers Associa. TC9508229 Nov 28, 1995

COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Urban Developmennt Master Plan TC9509011 Nov 28, 1995
Haiti Streng.large Taxpayers Unit (dgi) TC9509037 Nov 27, 1995
Haiti Preinvestment Studies Municipal Dev.prg. TC9509029 Nov 22, 1995
Haiti Support Economic & Social Fund TC9509160 Nov 21, 1995
Haiti Primary Education HA0028 Oct 25, 1995
Haiti Support to National Education Plan TC9508138 Sep 29, 1995
Haiti Economic Recovery Prog.-Bridge Rehab. TC9507289 Sep 11, 1995
Haiti Inst. Strength. Agriculture Ministry TC9507445 Sep 7, 1995
Haiti Technical & Professional Training Prog. TC9507114 Aug 8, 1995
Haiti Support Direccion General de Impuestos TC9506455 Jul 27, 1995
Haiti Expand Production of Crop Seeds & Plant SP9502370 Jul 25, 1995
Haiti Support Fonds Haitien D’aide a la Femme SP9501249 Jul 25, 1995
Haiti Support Societe D’epargne Et de Credit SP9501257 Jul 25, 1995
Haiti Studies Highway Component TC9504376 May 24, 1995
Haiti Study Drainage & Urban Routes Component TC9504368 May 24, 1995
Haiti Study Rivers Protection Component TC9504350 May 24, 1995
Haiti Support Faes in Design of Mgmt Ops Syst. TC9502388 May 22, 1995
Haiti Dredging of Ports and Channels Studies TC9503120 Mar 20, 1995
Haiti Road Maintenance & Rehab. National Program HA0041 Feb 8, 1995
Haiti Emergency Program: Port Component TC9411109 Feb 2, 1995
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Economic Emergency Recuperation Program TC9304411 Jan 11, 1995
Haiti Emergency and Economic Recuperation Program (EERP) HA0011 Jan 11, 1995
Haiti Emergency Program – Electrical Component TC9411167 Jan 6, 1995
Haiti Huracan Gordon Emergency TC9411026 Jan 6, 1995
Haiti Emergency Program – Drainage Component TC9411117 Dec 23, 1994
Haiti Emergency Program – Urban Component TC9411125 Dec 23, 1994
Haiti Emergency Program – Highway Component TC9411133 Dec 22, 1994
Haiti Emergency Program – Rural Component TC9411141 Dec 22, 1994
Haiti Colloquium On Vocational Training TC9110032 Sep 17, 1991
Haiti Inst.streng.of Stadistics Haitian Inst. TC9111197 Sep 10, 1991
Haiti Professional Technical Education TC9111189 Aug 27, 1991
Haiti Electric Energy Transmission TC9106114 Jul 8, 1991
Haiti Industrial Cap-Haitien Park Study TC9104209 Jul 8, 1991
Haiti Electric Transmission TC9106023 Jun 18, 1991
Haiti Support to Miniplan for Gcdec TC9104027 May 3, 1991
Haiti Management of Hidrographic Valleys TC9103102 Apr 15, 1991
Haiti Economic and Social Fund HA0081 Mar 28, 1991
Haiti National Conservation Road Program. TC9007479 Nov 21, 1990
Haiti Additional Financing Artibonite II HA0078 Nov 7, 1990
Haiti Ppf: Generation and Transmission Project TC9004277 Jul 24, 1990
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Prefeasibility Study of Artibonite Basin TC9004110 Jun 14, 1990
Haiti Small Projects Financing Program: Instit SP8802078 Jun 8, 1990
Haiti Ppf: Program for Professional Technical TC9002312 Apr 10, 1990
Haiti Pont-Sonde-Mirebalais Highways and Access Roads HA0049 Mar 28, 1990
Haiti Program, Rural Roads Project TC8803307 Dec 20, 1989
Haiti Public Health Services (ha-0045) TC8803323 Dec 13, 1989
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of Cmscs SP8803117 Nov 13, 1989
Haiti Design and Preparation of Projects TC8905286 Oct 5, 1989
Haiti Me-Cr Coop, Irrigation Districts Operat. TC8906151 Aug 29, 1989
Haiti Inst.strengt. of Ateliers-Ecoles de Camp SP8602262 Apr 7, 1989
Haiti Study, Irrigation & Drainage, Cul-De-Sac TC8904072 Apr 6, 1989
Haiti Advisory Services to Coasmar TC8901359 Mar 27, 1989
Haiti Advisory Services to Sce TC8903074 Mar 27, 1989
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of Fhaf SP8802060 Dec 13, 1988
Haiti Improvement of Teacher Training System TC8806260 Oct 27, 1988
Haiti Technical Support to the Opds TC8806210 Oct 17, 1988
Haiti Ch’s Coop, Electrical Energy TC8805436 Sep 1, 1988
Haiti Actualization of An Organizative Outline TC8804066 May 25, 1988
Haiti Prefeas. Study: Nutritional System TC8803068 Feb 18, 1988
Haiti Preparation, Request for Technical Coop. TC8803042 Feb 11, 1988
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Advisory Services, Educational Sector TC8703193 May 20, 1987
Haiti Advisory Services, Health Sector TC8703185 May 20, 1987
Haiti Advisory for Investment Projects TC8702450 Apr 2, 1987
Haiti Strength.of Public Sector, Planification TC8606321 Dec 9, 1986
Haiti Drainage Port-Au-Prince II HA0057 Nov 5, 1986
Haiti Support 3 Projects under Execution HA0077 Nov 5, 1986
Haiti Revision of the National Develop. Plan TC8605224 Aug 15, 1986
Haiti Rural Potable Water Pochep II HA0022 Dec 3, 1985
Haiti Studies & Design, Rural Potable Water TC8507389 Dec 3, 1985
Haiti Supervision of Public Works TC8402084 Oct 9, 1985
Haiti Riviere Blanche Irrigation & Agriculture Development HA0068 Oct 3, 1985
Haiti Primary & College Education Expansion & Improvement HA0031 Sep 26, 1985
Haiti Streng.primary & Normal Education System TC8506026 Sep 26, 1985
Haiti Dr’s Coop, Small Projects Development TC8506258 Aug 9, 1985
Haiti Codeva Institutional Strenghthening SP8409246 Feb 21, 1985
Haiti Study, Factory for Electrical Generation TC8205131 Dec 19, 1984
Haiti Preparation of Project Inventory TC8404022 Dec 17, 1984
Haiti Inst. Strengt., Oficina Minas y Energia TC8308076 Nov 28, 1984
Haiti Feasibil.studies for Industrial Parks TC8106264 Sep 6, 1984
Haiti Agricultural Development Project TC8407258 Aug 3, 1984
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Streng., Institut Haitien D’informatique TC8404105 Jul 3, 1984
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of the Mag TC8302359 Dec 15, 1983
Haiti Swine Repopulation HA0061 Dec 15, 1983
Haiti Ec-Co-Cr’s Coop., Pre-Investment Matters TC8310063 Jul 12, 1983
Haiti Organ., Information System of the Ihsi TC8210015 Nov 11, 1982
Haiti Agriculture and Industry Development Program HA0042 Nov 10, 1982
Haiti Bndai Institutional Strenghthening TC8211196 Nov 10, 1982
Haiti Fund for Productivity Sector Studies TC8211302 Nov 10, 1982
Haiti Improvement of the Idai & of the Sen TC8211097 Oct 15, 1982
Haiti Artibonite Valley- Phase II HA0029 Sep 30, 1982
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of the Odva TC8210148 Sep 30, 1982
Haiti Agric. Development, Valle del Artibonite TC8207228 May 28, 1982
Haiti Administrative Development of the Odva TC8207145 May 20, 1982
Haiti Empresa Estatal Le Minoterie D’haiti SP8105068 Feb 11, 1982
Haiti Evaluation of Idai’s Finance Systems TC8204159 Feb 4, 1982
Haiti Advising in Project Evaluation TC8110059 Nov 25, 1981
Haiti Expansion, Cement Industry in Haiti TC8109060 Oct 7, 1981
Haiti National Artesan Program SP8105042 Sep 2, 1981
Haiti Ja’s Coop. for Financial Training TC8108020 Aug 3, 1981
Haiti Quality of Puzolana’s Deposits TC8002165 Mar 19, 1981

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COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Construction of Rural Centers of Health TC7901152 Mar 18, 1981
Haiti Haiti Counterpart Funds Idb & Ibrd. HA0052 Mar 18, 1981
Haiti Training in Credit Administration SP8008303 Dec 16, 1980
Haiti Revolving Line of Credit:Exp Capital Goods HA0055 Nov 24, 1980
Haiti Country Development Southern Peninsula L’as HA0023 Nov 20, 1980
Haiti Reahab Road Project HA0053 Nov 20, 1980
Haiti Feasibility Studies, Agricultural Roads TC7902077 Oct 30, 1980
Haiti Rehabilitation of the Agricultural Sect. TC8009129 Oct 8, 1980
Haiti Pe’s Coop., Hidroelectrical Centrals TC8008345 Aug 19, 1980
Haiti Advising in Commercializ. & Organization TC8008270 Aug 1, 1980
Haiti Cul-De-Sac Valley Development Project TC8008361 Aug 1, 1980
Haiti Co’s Coop. for Administrative Training TC8006208 Jun 19, 1980
Haiti Feasib., Hydroelec. Project la Chapelle TC8001159 May 29, 1980
Haiti Potable Water Project, Port-Au-Prince TC8004111 May 15, 1980
Haiti Br Coop.,alcohol Production for Vehicles TC8002264 Feb 26, 1980
Haiti Community Stands Hygiene and Drinking Water HA0036 Dec 13, 1979
Haiti Projects for Hygiene & Potable Water TC7804017 Dec 13, 1979
Haiti Urban Development Project, Cap-Haitien TC7906194 Oct 30, 1979
Haiti Training Program in Administration TC7707237 Oct 17, 1979
Haiti Cr & Es Coop. for Rural Aqueducts Oper. TC7908158 Aug 14, 1979
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Strengten. of the Planification Systems TC7802087 May 23, 1979
Haiti Pluvial Sewerage in Port-Au-Prince TC7808035 Dec 7, 1978
Haiti Pluvial Sewerage of Port-Au-Prince TC7808100 Dec 7, 1978
Haiti Sewer System Port-Au-Prince HA0019 Dec 7, 1978
Haiti Country Irrigation Development Riviere Blanche HA0021 Oct 25, 1978
Haiti Cul-De-Sac Valley Agricult. Development TC7704142 Oct 25, 1978
Haiti Market Analysis of the Ak-1000 TC7804249 Oct 12, 1978
Haiti Prep. of Hygiene & Potable Water Posts TC7801170 Sep 21, 1978
Haiti Artesan Development TC7605168 Sep 7, 1978
Haiti Co’s Coop. for Radio Program. & Product. TC7807285 Jul 28, 1978
Haiti Bo & Ni’s Cooper. in Road Construction TC7806154 Jun 15, 1978
Haiti Feasibility, Road Construction Project TC7605134 Jun 15, 1978
Haiti Southern Roads Construction (Miragoane-Aquin) HA0043 Feb 23, 1978
Haiti Idai: Institutional Strenghthening TC7612030 Sep 15, 1977
Haiti Industrial/Farming Develop. Project HA0020 Sep 15, 1977
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of the Dag TC7704209 Jul 7, 1977
Haiti Integrated Project Education Rural Development HA0012 Jul 7, 1977
Haiti Inst.strength.of Telecom. D’haiti S.a.m. TC7609011 Jun 30, 1977
Haiti Fish Development Program TC7602213 Apr 7, 1977
Haiti Mexico’s Cooperation for Administration TC7612246 Dec 22, 1976
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of the Camep TC7503081 Oct 6, 1976
Haiti Institutional Strengthening of Odva TC7610224 Aug 5, 1976
Haiti Irrigation Rehabilitation System Agricultural Develop: Artibonite HA0018 Aug 5, 1976
Haiti Rural Education Integrated Project TC7510036 Dec 11, 1975
Haiti Rural Health Services HA0002 Nov 13, 1975
Haiti Strength.,public Health & Coloniz. Dept. TC7509063 Nov 13, 1975
Haiti Southern Roads Construction Leogane Cayes HA0010 Oct 16, 1975
Haiti Enlargement Port Au Prince HA0009 Sep 11, 1975
Haiti Drinking Water Port Au Prince II Stage HA0007 Feb 28, 1975
Haiti Port-Au-Prince’s Potable Water Supply TC7412034 Dec 4, 1974
Haiti 1st Stage, Pluvial Sewerage Project TC7407085 Jul 25, 1974
Haiti Educational Sector Studies TC7402019 Feb 14, 1974
Haiti Turistic Development Project TC7312028 Dec 6, 1973
Haiti Project: Rural Services for Health TC7311062 Nov 13, 1973
Haiti South Road Segment Leogane-Aquuin HA0001 Aug 2, 1973
Haiti Weight Control Program for Vehicles TC7308019 Aug 2, 1973
Haiti Identification of Agricultural Projects TC7212038 Dec 7, 1972
Haiti Enlargement Port Au Prince II Stage HA0006 Sep 7, 1972
Haiti Agricultural Credit Subprogram Global Loan HA0004 Oct 7, 1971
Haiti Program of Agricul. & Industrial Credit TC7110034 Oct 7, 1971
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Subprogram Industry Credit Global Loan HA0005 Oct 7, 1971
Haiti Expansion & Improvement Drinking Water Port Au Prince HA0003 Jun 18, 1970
Haiti Strengt., Administrat. Capacity of Camep TC7006051 Jun 18, 1970
Haiti Sewerage Studies in Puerto Principe TC7006019 Jun 11, 1970
Haiti Rural Potable Water TC6811013 Nov 18, 1968
Haiti Education Program TC6611083 Nov 17, 1966
Haiti Improvement Teaching Agriculture – Medicine HA0026 Nov 17, 1966
Haiti Develop. Institut. Officials’ Training TC6512033 Dec 6, 1965
Haiti Improvement Expansion Drinking Water Port Au Prince HA0025 Mar 5, 1964
Haiti Compania Sueriere Cubano Haitienne TC6310023 Oct 9, 1963
Haiti Analyse of Improving the Elect. Service TC6309050 Sep 16, 1963
Haiti General Coordination of Bid’s Missions TC6307046 Jul 8, 1963
Haiti Low Income Housing TC6302020 Feb 4, 1963
Haiti Peligre Project TC6207014 Jul 2, 1962
Haiti Housing Program TC6201016 Jan 1, 1962
Haiti Oea/Bid/Cepal Mission TC6110051 Oct 19, 1961
Haiti Industry & Agriculture Global Loan HA0024 Apr 9, 1961
Haiti Peligre Hydroelectric Project TC6103056 Mar 31, 1961
Haiti Improving the competitiveness of the tourism enterprises in Jacmel HA-M1027 N/A
Haiti Institutional strengthening of FHAPME HA-M1026 N/A
COUNTRY NAME PROJECT NUMBER APPROVAL DATE
Haiti Financial Reinforcement for Highway Rehabilitation Programs HA-L1046 N/A
Haiti Modernization of the Civil Registry HA-L1045 N/A
Haiti Rehabilitation of Road Infrastructure IV HA-L1027 N/A
Haiti Rehabilitation of the Electricity Distribution System in Port-au-Prince¿ PhaseII HA-L1035 N/A
Haiti Rural Water and Sanitation Program (II) HA-X1014 N/A
Haiti Strategic Plan for Solid Waste Management in Four Intermediate Towns HA-T1119 N/A
Haiti Support to the competitiveness of quality cocoa value chain in the North HA-M1019 N/A
Haiti Support to the creation of MSME in the Rice value chain in Artibonite Valley HA-M1018 N/A
Haiti Water and Sanitation for Port Au Prince HA-L1044 N/A

***

HA0024 : Industry & Agriculture Global Loan
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA0024
Operation Number 4/SF-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Agriculture and Rural Development
Subsector Agricultural Credit
Project Type Loan Operation
Project Subtype Export Financing Credit
Status Completed
Approval Date APR 9, 1961
Signing Date AUG 17, 1961
Financial Information
IDB Financing
Financing Type Loan
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 3,500,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 622,787
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 2,877,213
Repayments – Revalued USD 2,877,213
Principal Debt Relief Amount – Revalued USD 0
Amount Outstanding – Revalued USD 0
Income Collected – Revalued USD 715,806
Roles & Responsibilities
Borrower Banque De La Republique D’haiti
Guarantor Republique D’ Haiti

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA0024&lang=en

***

http://www5.iadb.org/idbppi/aspx/ppProcurement.aspx
Project procurement information for IDB Borrowing Countries – Projects Pipeline
Project Procurement Division VPC / PDP

***

Types of Financing

The IDB Group uses loans, grants, guarantees and investments to fund development programs.

***

HA-L1044 : Water and Sanitation for Port Au Prince
Project Description: Investments in bulk water supply to the city of Port au Prince and extension of the coverage in water services.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-L1044
Country Haiti
Sector Sanitation
Subsector Water Supply
Project Type Loan Operation
Project Subtype Specific Investment Operation
Pipeyear and Category 2010A
Status Preparation
Financial Information
Estimated Total Cost USD 15,000,000
Estimated IDB Financing
Financing Type IDB Grant Facility
Fund GRF
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollars
Amount USD 15,000,000
Roles & Responsibilities
IDB Team Leader Bouzerma, Dominique Malik
IDB Team Leader Mellinger, Yvon
Executing Agency Ministere De Travaux Publics, Transports

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-L1044&lang=en
Haiti Water and Sanitation for Port Au Prince HA-L1044 N/A

***

HA-M1018 : Support to the creation of MSME in the Rice value chain in Artibonite Valley
Project Description: General objective = to decrease the local bottlenecks that impeach the development of rice value chain in the Artibonite Valley.Specific objective = to support the development of services SMEs, upstream and downstream the rice value chains, following a “business plan competition” methodology.Activities = prepare and implement a business plan competition at the Valley level, focused on services to the rice value chain. The winners of the competition would have access to credit from SOCOLAVIM to concretize their project.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-M1018
Country Haiti
Sector Other
Subsector Other
Project Type Multilateral Investment Fund Operation
Project Subtype MIF Country Office Delegation
Pipeyear and Category 2010A
Status Preparation
Financial Information
Estimated Total Cost USD 215,000
Estimated IDB Financing
Financing Type Nonreimbursable
Fund MIF-Small Enterprise Dev. Facility
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollars
Amount USD 150,000
Roles & Responsibilities
IDB Team Leader Le Pommellec, Marion
Executing Agency Société Coopérative Lavi Miyò

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-M1018&lang=en
Haiti Support to the creation of MSME in the Rice value chain in Artibonite Valley HA-M1018 N/A

***

HA-M1019 : Support to the competitiveness of quality cocoa value chain in the North
Project Description: Goal : to improve the income of 2500 cocoa producers and their families.Purpose : to improve the competitiveness of the 6 cooperatives members of the “FECCANO”network (Federation of Cocoa Cooperatives in the North).Component 1. Institutional and entrepreneurship reinforcement- To train the cooperatives staff in management, accounting, finance¿ and entrepreneurship- To support the implementation of a management system- To design business plans for each cooperative and FECCANO- To support governance and democracy within cooperatives and FECCANO- To support FECCANO legal regognitionComponent 2. Production and quality improvement- To install a fermentation facility (infrastructures and equipment)- To design and implement (training) a quality control and monitoring system on organic production, drying and fermentationComponent 3. Marketing- To install a conditionning facility (infrastructures and equipment)- To design promotion tools (brochures, video¿) and implement promotion activities (participation in fairs¿)- To support the organization of export process- To train cooperatives and FECCANO managers on cocoa markets- To support negotiations with buyers
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-M1019
Country Haiti
Sector Agriculture and Rural Development
Subsector Agrobusiness
Project Type Multilateral Investment Fund Operation
Project Subtype MIF Country Office Delegation
Pipeyear and Category 2010A
Status Preparation
Financial Information
Estimated Total Cost USD 250,000
Estimated IDB Financing
Financing Type Nonreimbursable
Fund MIF-Small Enterprise Dev. Facility
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollars
Amount USD 150,000
Roles & Responsibilities
IDB Team Leader Le Pommellec, Marion
Executing Agency Agronomes Et Vétérinaires Sans Frontière

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-M1019&lang=en
Haiti Support to the competitiveness of quality cocoa value chain in the North HA-M1019 N/A

***

TC8002165 : Quality of Puzolana’s Deposits
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC8002165
Operation Number ATN/SF-1955-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Energy
Subsector Thermo-Electric Energy
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Regular TC
Status Completed
Approval Date MAR 19, 1981
Signing Date APR 17, 1981
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 41,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 36,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 36,000
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 0

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC8002165&lang=en
Haiti Quality of Puzolana’s Deposits TC8002165 Mar 19, 1981

***

TC8108020 : Ja’s Coop. for Financial Training
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC8108020
Operation Number ATN/SF-1920-HA(17)
Country Haiti
Sector Trade
Subsector Trade Financing
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype TC – CT/Intra
Status Completed
Approval Date AUG 3, 1981
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 4,700
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 4,700
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 2
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 4,698

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC8108020&lang=en

***

TC8109060 : Expansion, Cement Industry in Haiti
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC8109060
Operation Number ATN/SF-2025-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Industry
Subsector Manufacturing Industries
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Short Term Mission
Status Completed
Approval Date OCT 7, 1981
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 14,800
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 14,800
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 1,140
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 13,660

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC8109060&lang=en
Haiti Expansion, Cement Industry in Haiti TC8109060 Oct 7, 1981

***
TC8110059 : Advising in Project Evaluation
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC8110059
Operation Number ATN/SF-2044-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Multisector Credit & Preinvestment
Subsector Multisector Credit Programs
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Regular TC
Status Completed
Approval Date NOV 25, 1981
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 14,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 14,500
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 1,500
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 13,000

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC8110059&lang=en
Haiti Advising in Project Evaluation TC8110059 Nov 25, 1981

***

SP/SF-82-04-HA : Empresa Estatal Le Minoterie D’haiti
Status
Financial Information
Project Number SP8105068
Status Completed
IDB Financing
Financing Type Small Project
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Revalued USD 500,000
Cancelled Amount – Revalued USD 0
Undisbursed Amount – Revalued USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 333,899
Repayments – Revalued USD 197,269
Amount Outstanding – Revalued USD 136,630
Income Collected – Revalued USD 53,598

http://www.iadb.org/projects/loan.cfm?loan=SP/SF-82-04-HA
SP/SF-82-04-HA Completed FEB 11, 1982 JUN 25, 1982 – Signing Date

ATN/SF-2074-HA : Empresa Estatal Le Minoterie D’haiti
Status
Financial Information
Project Number SP8105068
Status Completed
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 153,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 41,343
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 111,657

http://www.iadb.org/projects/loan.cfm?loan=ATN/SF-2074-HA
ATN/SF-2074-HA Completed FEB 11, 1982 JUN 25, 1982 – Signing Date

SP8105068 : Empresa Estatal Le Minoterie D’haiti
Procurement Information
Basic Information
Project Number SP8105068

Operation Number

Status

Approval Date

Signing Date

Closing Date
SP/SF-82-04-HA Completed FEB 11, 1982 JUN 25, 1982 Not available
ATN/SF-2074-HA Completed FEB 11, 1982 JUN 25, 1982 Not available
Country Haiti
Sector Agriculture and Rural Development
Subsector Rural Community Development & Settlement
Project Type SEP & Small Projects
Project Subtype SEP & Small Project
Financial Information Summary
Total Cost – Historic USD 653,000
IDB Financing
Reporting currency(ies) USD – United States Dollar
Approved Amount(s) USD 653,000

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=SP8105068&lang=en

***

TC8606321 : Strength.of Public Sector, Planification
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC8606321
Operation Number ATN/SF-2818-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Reform / Modernization of the State
Subsector Planning and State Reform
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Short Term Mission
Status Completed
Approval Date DEC 9, 1986
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 26,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 26,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 25,790
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 210

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC8606321&lang=en
Haiti Strength.of Public Sector, Planification TC8606321 Dec 9, 1986

&&&

TC9702011 : Employment & Professions Classification
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC9702011
Operation Number ATN/BF-5500-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Education
Subsector Education
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype CT/Fondo Trust Funds
Status Completed
Approval Date MAR 6, 1997
Signing Date MAR 6, 1997
Project Completion Date OCT 1, 1999
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 150,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Belgian Consultants
Reporting currency EUR – Euro
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic EUR 128,285
Cancelled Amount – Historic EUR 128
Undisbursed Amount – Historic EUR 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued EUR 128,157

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC9702011&lang=en
Haiti Employment & Professions Classification TC9702011 Mar 6, 1997

***

HA0091 : Inst. Strengthening Banque Republique D’haiti
Project Description: The objective of the program is to stimulate private sector initiative and economic growth by lowering risk and transaction costs in the markets that allocate basic economic resources. The program will consist of fast-disbursing resources in support of the government’s fiscal/monetary program, backed by an Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility (ESAF) of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), as well as a reform program with technical assistance directed at controlling future fiscal costs related to the state-owned electricity company and financial sector and building the basic institutions and legal framework required for a efficient and stable open economy. The program consists of the following components: (a) legal and regulatory reform of the financial sector to establish a modern legal, regulatory and institutional framework, first addressing the most threatening weaknesses of the financial system; (b) secured transactions reform to address constraints to the extension of credit services to historically marginalized sectors for the few clients that can meet current requirements for collateral; (c) stabilization of state banks to bring the Banque National de Credit (BNC) into conformity with all prudential norms and regulatory measures required to establish the soundness of the bank; and (d) private sector participation in the management/ownership of the electricity sector (Electricite d’Haiti – EdH) to improve productivity and allocated efficiency, with appropriate legal and regulatory frameworks. The project includes a technical assistance component to modernize and strengthen those aspects of the Central Bank directly related to its essential role in managing monetary policy and the payments system. This component will finance the following activities: (a) development of a legal framework for the financial sector, with priority given to ensuring that the Central Bank has the appropriate level of authority and autonomy as the regulator and supervisor of a competitive and sound financial system; (b) modernization of the regulatory and supervision framework for the financial sector; (c) institutional strengthening of the Banque de la Republique d’Haiti (BRH), including modernization of its payments system, development of the Monetary and International Affairs Department, and consultant support for follow-up activities; and (d) a diagnostic assessment of the BNC.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA0091
Operation Number 990/SF-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Reform / Modernization of the State
Subsector Financial Management Reform & Moder
Project Type Loan Operation
Project Subtype Technical Cooperation Loan
Status Completed
Approval Date DEC 11, 1996
Signing Date JAN 23, 1997
Project Completion Date DEC 22, 2002
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 2,750,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Loan
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 2,495,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 1,853,168
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 641,832
Repayments – Revalued USD 10,697
Principal Debt Relief Amount – Revalued USD 631,135
Amount Outstanding – Revalued USD 0
Income Collected – Revalued USD 122,649
Debt Service Projection
Roles & Responsibilities
Borrower Banque De La Republique D’haiti

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA0091&lang=en
Haiti Inst. Strengthening Banque Republique D’haiti HA0091 Dec 11, 1996

***

TC9605314 : Basic Education
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC9605314
Operation Number ATN/SF-5459-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Education
Subsector Education
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Regular TC
Status Completed
Approval Date DEC 20, 1996
Signing Date FEB 7, 1997
Project Completion Date APR 27, 2001
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 330,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 300,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 40,225
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 259,775

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC9605314&lang=en
Haiti Basic Education TC9605314 Dec 20, 1996

***

TC9701451 : Agricultural Feas.studies Trois Rivieres
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number TC9701451
Operation Number ATN/BF-5499-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Agriculture and Rural Development
Subsector Agriculture and Rural Development
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype CT/Fondo Trust Funds
Status Completed
Approval Date MAR 6, 1997
Signing Date MAR 6, 1997
Project Completion Date OCT 1, 1999
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 150,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Belgian Consultants
Reporting currency EUR – Euro
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic EUR 128,285
Cancelled Amount – Historic EUR 17
Undisbursed Amount – Historic EUR 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued EUR 128,268

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=TC9701451&lang=en
Haiti Agricultural Feas.studies Trois Rivieres TC9701451 Mar 6, 1997

***

HA-T1007 : Emergency Floods in Response to Floods in Haiti
Project Description: The objective of this operation is to assist the Government’s activities in providing relief to the victims of the recent floods and ladndslides in Haiti. The assistance will take the form of relief supplies including the following: i) reinforcement of response units, ii) purchase and delivery of first aid and medical supplies, iii) purchase and delivery of clothing, food, water, sleeping bags and cooking supplies, iv) transportantion and logistics and v) distribution of chlorine for the reduction of risk from water-borne illnesses.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-T1007
Operation Number ATN/SF-8735-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Environment and Natural Disasters
Subsector Natural Disasters Prevention Relief
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Technical Cooperation Emergency
Status Completed
Approval Date MAY 28, 2004
Signing Date JUN 25, 2004
Project Completion Date JUL 16, 2004
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 50,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 50,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 0
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 50,000

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-T1007&lang=en
Haiti Emergency Floods in Response to Floods in Haiti HA-T1007 May 28, 2004

***

HA-T1015 : Targetting the Urban Poor
Project Description: The resources of this TC will finance: (i) the design and feasibility studies of urban and social investment projects; and (ii) capacity building.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-T1015
Operation Number ATN/CT-8852-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Urban Development and Housing
Subsector Integrated Urban Development
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype CT/Fondo Trust Funds
Status Completed
Approval Date SEP 20, 2004
Signing Date OCT 1, 2004
Project Completion Date MAR 9, 2006
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 152,000
Country Counterpart Financing – Historic USD 2,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Cantap 3-Canadian Tech. Prog.
Reporting currency CAD – Canadian Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic CAD 191,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic CAD 12,307
Undisbursed Amount – Historic CAD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued CAD 178,693

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-T1015&lang=en
Haiti Targetting the Urban Poor HA-T1015 Sep 20, 2004

***

HA-T1013 : Support for Urban Rehabilitation
Project Description: The proposed technical cooperation would finance: (i) consulting services to support of the counterpart project team in the preparation of the Urban Rehabilitation Program (HA-L1002); (ii) technical assistance for the organization of the executing agency; and (iii) equipment.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-T1013
Operation Number ATN/SF-8847-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Urban Development and Housing
Subsector Integrated Urban Development
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype Regular TC
Status Completed
Approval Date SEP 13, 2004
Signing Date FEB 17, 2005
Project Completion Date SEP 15, 2006
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 155,000
Country Counterpart Financing – Historic USD 5,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 150,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 0
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 150,000

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-T1013&lang=en
Haiti Support for Urban Rehabilitation HA-T1013 Sep 13, 2004

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HA-T1011 : Vocational Education and Training and its Linkages to the Labor Market
Project Description: To achieve its objectives, this TC will focus on two mutually reinforcing components: i) an analysis and recommendations for strengthening the capacity of the vocational education sector to respond to the demands of the labor market; and ii) the design of measures to improve the training provided in the centers and better position them to respond to the needs of the market.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-T1011
Operation Number ATN/CT-8790-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Education
Subsector Education
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype CT/Fondo Trust Funds
Status Completed
Approval Date JUL 27, 2004
Signing Date AUG 6, 2004
Project Completion Date AUG 23, 2005
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 100,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund Cantap 3-Canadian Tech. Prog.
Reporting currency CAD – Canadian Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic CAD 132,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic CAD 2,748
Undisbursed Amount – Historic CAD 0
Disbursed to Date – Revalued CAD 129,252

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-T1011&lang=en
Haiti Vocational Education and Training and its Linkages to the Labor Market HA-T1011 Jul 27, 2004

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HA-T1008 : Agriculture Sector and the Rural Economy in Haiti
Project Description: La politique agricole du gouvernement intérimaire vise à concilier l’urgence du court terme ¿ sans pour autant tomber dans le piège du saupoudrage ¿ et la nécessaire structuration sur le long terme d’un secteur agricole capable d’offrir sur une base durable des revenus décents à la majorité des ruraux en consolidant les avantages comparatifs actuels de certains produits destinés à l’exportation ou au marché intérieur et en sécurisant des productions stratégiques, telles que le riz et la banane plantain. C’est dans ce cadre là que le MARNDR a demande a la Banque de préparer un analyse du secteur agroalimentaire et de l’économie rural pour commencer le dialogue de politique relative a la promotion du monde rural et a la préparation du prêt HA1003, Programme de Développement de l’Economie Rural.
Procurement Information
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-T1008
Operation Number ATN/FC-9052-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Agriculture and Rural Development
Subsector Agricultural Development
Project Type Technical Cooperation
Project Subtype CT/Fondo Trust Funds
Status Implementation
Approval Date JAN 3, 2005
Signing Date MAR 2, 2005
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 149,000
IDB Financing
Financing Type Non-Reimbursable Technical Cooperation
Fund French Caribbean Contribution
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 149,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 0
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 2,053
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 146,947
Roles & Responsibilities
Executing Agency Ministere de l’agriculture des resources naturelles et du developpement rural
Haiti
Documents

* (TIF) TC Profile
Technical Cooperation Profile
Dec 17, 2004

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-T1008&lang=en
Haiti Agriculture Sector and the Rural Economy in Haiti HA-T1008 Jan 3, 2005

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HA-L1002 : Urban Rehabilitation Program
Project Description: The Program will tentatively comprise 2 components, as follows:Component 1. Neighborhood Upgrading. This component will finance: (i) a neighborhood development strategy (NDS) for Cite Soleil; (ii) a basic package of infrastructure and community facilities; and (iii) community development. The objective of the NDS is to develop a general vision of the economic, social and urban future of Cite Soleil. The purpose of the basic package is to guarantee an equitable minimum level of access to basic services such as: potable water; waste water disposal; storm drainage; street works; electrification; public lighting; and recreational facilities. The package could also finance complementary investments such as waste-water collectors, pumping and treatment stations, health facilities, and investments to reduce environmental risks. The community development activities would aim at increasing the capacity of individual and groups to make effective choices and influence and share control over priority setting, policy-making, resource allocations and access to public goods and services. The activities will focus on facilitating access to information and providing support for men and women to organize and work in partnership with demand-responsive support organizations and service providers. Component 2. Capacity building. This component will finance activities aimed at strengthening the capacity of the executing agency to implement the Program.
Procurement Information
News Release: Jul 8, 2005 – IDB approves $50 million soft loan to Haiti for urban rehabilitation
Status
Project Status
Basic Information
Project Number HA-L1002
Operation Number 1639/SF-HA
Country Haiti
Sector Urban Development and Housing
Subsector Integrated Urban Development
Project Type Loan Operation
Project Subtype Specific Investment Operation
Status Implementation
Approval Date JUL 6, 2005
Signing Date JUL 21, 2005
Financial Information
Total Cost – Historic USD 50,345,000
Country Counterpart Financing – Historic USD 345,000
Cofinancing USD 8,000,000 – Canadian International Development Agency
IDB Financing
Financing Type Loan
Fund Fund for Special Operations
Reporting currency USD – United States Dollar
Reporting Date DEC 31, 2009
Approved Amount – Historic USD 50,000,000
Cancelled Amount – Historic USD 0
Undisbursed Amount – Historic USD 15,908,290
Disbursed to Date – Revalued USD 34,767,898
Repayments – Revalued USD 0
Principal Debt Relief Amount – Revalued USD 0
Amount Outstanding – Revalued USD 34,767,898
Income Collected – Revalued USD 1,005,444
Debt Service Projection
Roles & Responsibilities
Borrower Republique D’ Haiti
Executing Agency Bureau du Premier Ministre
Monsieur Jacques A. Antoine
Documents

* (DOC) Programme de Réhabilitation Urbaine
Loan Contract
Jul 28, 2005
* (DOC) Programme de Réhabilitation Urbaine
Loan Contract
Jul 28, 2005
* (DOC) Programme de Réhabilitation Urbaine
Loan Contract
Jul 28, 2005
* (DOC) Programme de Réhabilitation Urbaine
Loan Contract
Jul 28, 2005
* (PDF) Programa de Rehabilitación Urbana
Loan Proposal
Jul 6, 2005
* (PDF) Urban Rehabilitation Program
Loan Proposal
Jul 6, 2005
* (PDF) Programa de Rehabilitación Urbana
Project Concept Document
Apr 1, 2005
* (PDF) Nouvelle Cité Soleil
Project Outline
Oct 23, 2003

http://www.iadb.org/projects/project.cfm?id=HA-L1002&lang=en
Haiti Urban Rehabilitation Program HA-L1002 Jul 6, 2005

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