the lambi (pronounced lahm-bee), which is the Haitian Creole word for conch shell. The conch shell, blown as a horn to herald impending danger and the need to assemble

The Lambi Fund of Haiti was founded in 1994 by Haitians, Haitian-Americans, and North Americans. The Lambi Fund draws its name from the lambi (pronounced lahm-bee), which is the Haitian Creole word for conch shell. The conch shell, blown as a horn, has played a vital role in community organizing throughout Haiti's history. During the slave rebellion against the French colonialists in 1791, the lambi's call alerted the slaves to impending danger and the need to assemble. Today, the echo of the lambi alerts villagers in distant hamlets that a community meeting is about to commence. The symbol of the lambi was chosen to represent the Haitian people's hope, strength, resistance, and struggle for self-determination. http://www.lambifund.org/about_history.shtml

Links of Interest

If you have a website related to Haiti, and are interested in a link swap, please contact us.

http://www.lambifund.org/links.shtml

***

Board of Directors

Marie Marthe Sain Cyr photoMarie Marthe Saint Cyr, Chair, is a social worker by profession. She holds a B.A. in International Relations and a Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She owns a non-profit consulting business and was previously the Executive Director of Iris House, the first and only comprehensive program for women living with HIV and AIDS and their families, and served as an appointee of Mayor Giuliani as Community Co-Chair of the HIV Planning Council of New York City. She was the chairperson of the Board of the National Minority AIDS Council in Washington, DC, and was the Director of the Haitian Coalition on AIDS in New York City. Ms. St. Cyr developed the first program for women, Women and AIDS Resource Network (WARN), in Brooklyn, NY. Responding to the needs of the constituency she serves, she became the first Haitian Deputy Commissioner in New York City under the Dinkins Administration. She was Deputy Commissioner for Human Rights, responsible for the Community Relations Department and the AIDS Discrimination Unit, and initiated the Commission’s Prison Project for Offenders with AIDS. She has been a Huntington resident since 1966.

Max Blanchet photoMax Blanchet, Vice Chair, M.S. and B.S. in Chemical Engineering, MBA in Finance, has had a long experience evaluating, designing and implementing energy and environmental projects at Shell, Chevron and Pacific Gas and Electric Company. He was a founding member of the Bay Area Haitian American Council (BAHACO), and has served on the Boards of Global Exchange, the Northern Coalition for Immigrant Rights, and the Data Center. He is currently on the Boards of East Bay Sanctuary Covenant (EBSC), the Haiti Culture Association, the Berkeley-based KPFA of the Pacifica Network, and the National Coalition for Haitian Rights (NCHR). Mr. Blanchet is a dedicated activist for the cause of democracy and justice in Haiti, combining thoughtful analysis with excellent organizational skills. Mr. Blanchet resides in Berkeley, California and is married with two daughters.

Gyliane Morgan PhotoGyliane Morgan, Board Treasurer, holds a Masters degree in Public Finance and Financial Management and has over 20 years experience as an analyst and consultant in the private sector, including the securities, money management and banking industries. Most recently, she was a Vice President at JP Morgan Chase’s Investment Banking/Public Finance area where she was engaged in public sector financing for the Bank. Ms. Morgan has been an avid supporter of the Lambi Fund since its inception. She resides in Montclair, NJ with her husband and their two children.

Wendy Emrich photoWendy Emrich, Board Secretary, a single mother of two adopted Haitian children. She is on the board of KGNU community radio station and is involved in starting two small sustainable businesses in the for profit world, which focus on energy efficiency, fair trade and environmentally sustainable products. She has a B.A. in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Colorado and a Certificate in French from Laval University in Quebec. She spent four years in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) working in public health and agriculture. She is a long term environmental and peace activist with an interest in sustainable development and social justice. She was a founder of the Chinook Fund and the Global Greengrants Fund, Colorado based foundations that support grassroots social justice and environmental projects on a statewide and international basis, respectively.

Marie Racine photoMarie M. B. Racine, Ph.D., holds a doctorate in French, Theoretical Linguistics and Applied Linguistics from Georgetown University and is currently Professor of Foreign Languages at the University of District of Columbia. She has served as Acting Dean, Associate Dean and Chair of several University Departments. Her areas of expertise include Administration/Education, Language/Linguistics (including English as a Second Language and Creole Studies), Literature/Culture (particularly Haitian and Caribbean with an emphasis on the African Diaspora), Evaluation/ Research and Curriculum Development. Dr. Racine serves on the Board of the Washington Office for Haiti and has extensive Haitian advocacy organizing experience in the D.C. area. She has long been involved with community-based projects in the remote northern areas of Haiti.

Julie Meyer photoJulie Meyer helped found the Lambi Fund and served on its staff for over nine years. She brings 25 years of activist and non-profit experience to the Fund including administrative, fundraising and leadership roles. She worked in the El Salvador solidarity movement for thirteen years, filling regional and national leadership roles for the leading grassroots solidarity movement, taking delegations to El Salvador, organizing national conferences and trainings, and so on. She has been a founder of numerous organizations including Grantmakers Without Borders, the New England Central American Network, and most recently Bilingual DC, and helped re-structure others such as La Clinica del Pueblo and Women’s Health Consultants in Washington, DC. She remains active in the Latino community and school issues in the DC area and serves on several nonprofit boards.

Benjamine Saint-Dic photoBenjamin Saint-Dic is a Doctor of Law and holds degrees in Journalism, French studies, and Labor and Developing Countries. He has practiced journalism and served as a professor of French at the university and secondary school levels. He has been very active in the Canadian Haitian community and has served as a resource person in matters related to Haitians residing in Canada. A founding member of Ayiti Dwa Moun (ADM), a group formed to defend and protect the human rights of Haitians, he currently is responsible for ADM’s public relations work. He also volunteers his services in various schools tutoring Haitian students with learning problems. Ben is well known for his active commitment to the democratic movement in Haiti.

William SmarthFather William Smarth is a Haitian-born diocesan priest who has lived and worked with the Spiritans for many years. His Creole translations of the liturgy and his catechetical texts are widely used in Haiti. As a member of the Spiritans “formation” (consciousness-raising and training) team, Father Smarth has coordinated, evaluated and worked with several indigenous training institutes. As a religious leader promoting social justice, Father Smarth has worked closely with dozens of peasant, youth and popular organizations in religious and civic training throughout Haiti, but especially in the North.

Nadège Clitandre photoNadège T. Clitandre was born in Haiti and received a Ph.D. in African Diaspora Studies, with an emphasis in Women, Gender, and Sexuality, from the University of California. Clitandre received her Bachelors degree in English Literature at Hampton University and a Masters Degree in the Humanities at the University of Chicago.

Clitandre is an activist for social change and youth empowerment in Haiti as well as an educator of Haitian studies. After spending a year teaching English in Port-au-Prince, Clitandre wanted to get involved in community-based projects that focus on youth education and free access to knowledge for social change. She founded HaitiSoleil because of her commitment and dedication to the intellectual growth of young Haitians in her native land. Clitandre is a board member of the Haitian Studies Association and a member of the Haitian Culture Association in Berkeley, California, where she currently resides. She is the daughter of famed Haitian author, Pierre Clitandre.

Jay Schoenberger photoJay Schoenberger holds a B.S. from Vanderbilt University where he double majored in Human & Organizational Development and Spanish. He develops utility-scale wind energy farms throughout the Eastern United States for independent power producer, Invenergy LLC. Prior to Invenergy, he worked in business development for REC Solar, a California-based solar electricity integrator. Jay first became involved with the Lambi Fund when he and a classmate successfully founded and chaired a campus-wide fundraiser called “Fast for Hunger” aimed at raising both awareness and funds for Lambi Fund’s projects. At Vanderbilt, Jay served as president of Hillel, the Jewish student organization, and served on Hillel’s board the three previous years. While in college, he also studied in Santiago, Chile. Jay has a passion for the sustainable development that the Lambi Fund advances, development that is strategic, community driven, and continuously effective. Jay currently lives in Washington D.C.

Anouk Shambook photoAnouk Shambrook has a PhD. in Astrophysics and is a Program Manager at the Insight Center for Community Economic Development. She manages a grants program and has created a network of experts across multiple fields working to close the racial wealth gap in the U.S. Anouk has researched and highlighted innovative asset programs to improve policies. While at ICCED, Anouk has been the primary author of a number of reports on saving and investment strategies to increase economic well-being and security. She currently serves on the Board of Building Diversity in Science and resides in Oakland, California.

Lambi Fund of Haiti

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The Lambi Fund of Haiti  Rest in Peace MYRIAM MERLET, MAGALIE MARCELIN, ANNE MARIE CORIOLAN, FANM VANYAN, who have fought all their lives for the rights of women and girls in Haiti. They all perished in the collapse of the Ministry of the Condition of Women where they worked. The lives of Haitian Woman, Haitian Girls, Haitian Families have imp…roved thanks to your relentless fights for justice and gender equity!
See More
January 19 at 7:09pm

The Lambi Fund of Haiti  New York-based Grammy nominated Jazz artists, Groove Collective are putting together an impromptu benefit concert for Haiti this Tuesday the 19th. Le Poisson Rouge has donated their venue for the event. DJ Logic, Bernie Worrell and Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio will perform and will feature various other special guests TBA. Al…l artists, production, promotion and venue are volunteering their services for the effort. Those wishing to donate to the concert fundraising effort who cannot attend or who wish to donate more than the suggested ticket price may do so.
See More
Haiti Benefit Concert
Time:8:00PM Tuesday, January 19th
Location:Le Poisson Rouge
January 18 at 7:44pm
Lambi Fund – supporting economic justice, democracy and sustainable development in Haiti.

http://www.lambifund.org/

***

History
Sculpture

The Lambi Fund of Haiti was founded in 1994 by Haitians, Haitian-Americans, and North Americans. The Lambi Fund draws its name from the lambi (pronounced lahm-bee), which is the Haitian Creole word for conch shell. The conch shell, blown as a horn, has played a vital role in community organizing throughout Haiti’s history.

During the slave rebellion against the French colonialists in 1791, the lambi’s call alerted the slaves to impending danger and the need to assemble. Today, the echo of the lambi alerts villagers in distant hamlets that a community meeting is about to commence. The symbol of the lambi was chosen to represent the Haitian people’s hope, strength, resistance, and struggle for self-determination.

http://www.lambifund.org/about_history.shtml

***

***

As many as 1.5 million Haitians were left homeless by the earthquake and Interior Minister Paul Antoine Bien-Aime said some 400,000 of them would be moved to new villages to be built outside the ravaged capital.

The first wave of 100,000 refugees were to be sent to transitional tent villages of 10,000 each near the town of Croix Des Bouquets north of the capital, he said.

Brazilian U.N. peacekeepers there were already leveling land at a site where the Inter-American Development Bank planned to help build permanent houses for 30,000 people.

(From link and story above)

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Services

The American Association of Language Specialists (TAALS) provides you with a direct link to experienced, professional interpreters and translators. Please consult our on-line directory (left) to find qualified professionals to meet your translation and interpretation needs. If you would like a hard copy of our directory, contact us. Please include your name, title, and the company or organization you represent, along with the address where the directory should be sent.

http://www.taals.net/services.php

****

I was just wondering if any of your members or your organization generally are going to Haiti or currently involved in Haiti? It would be nice to hear about it on CNN, if that is the case.

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Haitians struggle . . .
Thu, Jan 21 2010

(Reuters)

PORT-AU-PRINCE (Reuters) – Shops began to reopen in Haiti’s capital on Thursday and banking services were to resume at the weekend but the government and aid workers still struggled to assist masses of earthquake survivors camped out in rubble-strewn streets.

World  |  Natural Disasters

As rescuers wound down more than a week of searching for trapped survivors of last week’s devastating quake, the government and its aid partners increasingly directed attention toward looking after the living — the hundreds of thousands of injured and homeless people needing medical assistance, food and shelter.

The seaport in the capital Port-au-Prince had been repaired enough to reopen for limited aid shipments, and a Dutch naval vessel unloaded pallets of water, juice and long-life milk.
Aid was flowing in to Haiti but was still not being distributed quickly enough to feed and shelter all those left hungry and destitute by the 7.0 magnitude quake that rocked Port-au-Prince on January 12 and killed up to 200,000 people.

It’s miserable here. It’s dirty and it’s boring,  said Judeline Pierre-Rose, 12, camped in a squalid park across from the collapsed national palace.  People go to the toilet everywhere here and I’m scared of getting sick.

A Florida search-and-rescue team had left and it was reported teams from Belgium, Luxembourg and Britain did too.

Teams from Brazil, the United States and Chile were still working with sniffer dogs at the collapsed Montana Hotel in Port-au-Prince, where a whiteboard listed the names of 10 people found dead and 20 more still missing inside.

You have to be realistic and after nine days, reality says it is more difficult to find people alive but it’s not impossible,  said Chilean Army Major Rodrigo Vasquez.

More than 13,000 U.S. military personnel are in Haiti and on 20 ships offshore. Troops landed helicopters on the lawn of the smashed presidential palace to pick up the seriously wounded and fly them to the U.S. Navy hospital ship Comfort, which has advanced surgical units.

Small grocery shops and barber shops, as well as some pharmacies, were open again in Port-au-Prince, some extending credit to regular customers short of cash.

Banks were to reopen on Friday in the provinces and on Saturday in Port-au-Prince, giving most Haitians their first access to cash since the quake hit, Commerce Minister Josseline Colimon Fethiere told Reuters.

WORLD BANK WAIVES DEBT PAYMENTS

While we are assessing the situation, we are making sure the basic services resume, starting with the banking system. The central bank has resumed operations and other banks are in the process of resuming operations as well,  said Haitian Finance Minister Ronald Baudin.

The World Bank on Thursday announced it will waive payments on Haiti’s $38 million debt for the next five years, while the IMF said its proposed $100 million loan for Haiti would be interest free until late 2011 to help the country rebuild.

Sensitive to appearances the United States was taking too forceful a role, President Barack Obama says the White House is being  very careful  to work with the Haitian government and the United Nations.

But a large flotilla of U.S. ships and aircraft, accompanied by Marines and airborne troops, dominated the Haiti relief effort, flying in supplies, evacuating the seriously wounded and protecting aid distribution points.

A U.S. military C-17 cargo plane carried out a second large airdrop this week of food and water supplies, this time inland at Mirebalais, northeast of Port-au-Prince. Supplies were also being flown in to Jacmel airstrip on the southern coast.

As we continue to have more aid flowing through both the airport and the seaport, we will reach out to help more Haitians in more areas,  Elton said.

Moving to speed donations for Haiti, the U.S. Congress approved legislation allowing U.S. taxpayers to make charitable contributions to Haiti relief programs before March 1, 2010, and claim those contributions on their 2009 income tax return.

The United Nations is adding 2,000 troops and 1,500 police to its 9,000-member peacekeeping mission in Haiti.

As many as 1.5 million Haitians were left homeless by the earthquake and Interior Minister Paul Antoine Bien-Aime said some 400,000 of them would be moved to new villages to be built outside the ravaged capital.

The first wave of 100,000 refugees were to be sent to transitional tent villages of 10,000 each near the town of Croix Des Bouquets north of the capital, he said.

Brazilian U.N. peacekeepers there were already leveling land at a site where the Inter-American Development Bank planned to help build permanent houses for 30,000 people.

[ . . . ]

The Brazilian government said on Thursday it would spend an additional 375 million reais ($208 million) on its security and reconstruction efforts in Haiti this year. Part of the funds, which include a donation of at least $15 million, would go to build 10 emergency health units in the Caribbean country.
Brazil has been commanding the U.N. stabilization force in Haiti since 2004.

The United Nations counted nearly 450 homeless encampments in Port-au-Prince alone and urged the government to begin consolidating them to streamline food distribution.

The city’s water system was only partially functional but tanker trucks began to deliver water to makeshift camps where people lined up to fill their buckets.

(Additional reporting by Catherine Bremer, Joseph Guyler Delva, Natuza Nery in Port-au-Prince, Lesley Wroughton, Adam Entous and Ana Nicolaci da Costa in Sao Paulo; Writing by Jane Sutton and Pascal Fletcher; Editing by Jackie Frank)
World
Natural Disasters

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE60B5IZ20100122

***

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What is required for me to ship charity goods to Haiti?

Posted by Global Reach on January 22, 2010 12:05:42 PM   0

By Omari

On Tuesday, January 12, 2010, a major earthquake struck southern Haiti. Many U.S. residents and organizations are generously donating food, water, medicines, and other supplies to aid in the relief efforts. In order to facilitate the movements of these goods, we offer the following guidance that applies to any goods not requiring a license, such as food, clothing, and medicines.

Schedule B Numbers

There are four Schedule B numbers that can be used when exporting humanitarian goods. Those numbers are found in Chapter 98 of the Schedule B book, under subheading 9802.

* 9802.10.0000 Food products
* 9802.20.0000 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products
* 9802.30.0000 Wearing apparel (including footwear and headwear)
* 9802.40.0000 Donated articles, not elsewhere specified

Any shipment valued over $2,500 per Schedule B number or that requires a license must be filed in the AES. However, if the shipment is valued less than $2,500 per Schedule B number and does not require a license, then the low value exemption (NOEEI FTR 30.37(a)) can be used. In this case, food, clothing, and medicines do not require a license; however, medical equipment and tools may require an export license.

The Export Information Code to be reported is “CH” for shipments of goods donated for relief or charity.

04 – OW
The value to be reported is the market value. If that value is not known, estimate how much you would receive if you sold the goods. The value should be consistent with the goods being exported, to avoid confusion and possible delays with U.S. Customs & Border Protection officers at the port of export.

There are different ways to file your export information. The most common is to report through the Census Bureau’s free Internet based filing system called AESDirect. We have provided training videos to help you get started with AESDirect. Another option is to file with a forwarder or agent who may be more familiar with export licensing and regulations.

Read more: What is required for me to ship charity goods to Haiti?
http://blogs.census.gov/globalreach/2010/01/on-tuesday-january-12-2010-a-major-earthquake-struck-southern-haiti–many-us-residents-and-organizations-are-generous.html#more

http://blogs.census.gov/globalreach/

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http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/reference/guides/tradestatsinfo.html#intro

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Trade with Haiti : 2009
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2009     47.5     20.9     26.6
February 2009     70.9     40.7     30.2
March 2009     82.2     44.5     37.7
April 2009     66.8     43.6     23.2
May 2009     77.7     51.5     26.2
June 2009     57.7     56.5     1.2
July 2009     72.9     54.9     17.9
August 2009     64.3     50.8     13.5
September 2009     60.1     49.5     10.6
October 2009     63.4     44.5     18.9
November 2009     66.7     46.0     20.7
TOTAL     730.2     503.4     226.8

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

Trade with Haiti : 1985
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1985     31.2     31.2     0.0
February 1985     31.8     30.4     1.4
March 1985     31.9     36.7     -4.8
April 1985     32.9     33.2     -0.3
May 1985     35.3     31.0     4.3
June 1985     28.8     39.6     -10.8
July 1985     33.3     30.2     3.1
August 1985     34.4     30.6     3.8
September 1985     29.7     27.2     2.5
October 1985     45.1     32.4     12.7
November 1985     34.7     32.0     2.7
December 1985     26.8     35.1     -8.3
TOTAL     395.9     389.6     6.3

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

(From – )

Additional Information

* Contact the Data Dissemination Branch of the Foreign Trade Division with any questions or for additional information.
* For information on data sources and methodology, check out the Information on the Collection and Publication of Trade Statistics.
* MORE DATA: Data for all countries are available online in a zipped Excel file. [Excel] or the letters [xls] indicate a document is in the Microsoft® Excel® Spreadsheet Format (XLS). To view the file, you will need the Microsoft® Excel® Viewer This link to a non-federal Web site does not imply endorsement of any particular product, company, or content. available for free from Microsoft®. This symbol Symbol indicating that file is external to this site. indicates a link to a non-government web site. Our linking to these sites does not constitute an endorsement of any products, services or the information found on them. Once you link to another site you are subject to the policies of the new site.

Source: FTDWebMaster, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, D.C. 20233
Location: MAIN: STATISTICS:COUNTRY DATA: TRADE BALANCE
Created: 12 January 2010
Last modified: 12 January 2010 at 08:32:14 AM

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Related Party Database Application:
Time series RELATED PARTY data for specific commodities and countries.

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c2450.html

***

_____________________________________
___________                             |                                     |                               January 7, 2010
|           |                            |        MAJOR SHIPPERS REPORT        |
|  HAITI    |                            |              By Country             |
|___________|                            | Data through 11/2009 in Million SME |
|_____________________________________|

Calendar Years       Year-to-Date                 Year-Endings                             YE 11/2009
Ctrl, Cat, Product        2007      2008    11/2008   11/2009  % Change   11/2008    9/2009   10/2009   11/2009  % Change % Share

Aggregations:
0 Total           247.114   222.441   203.301   217.068      6.77   220.967   234.187   231.623   236.207     6.90    0.51
1 Apparel         247.100   222.379   203.283   217.037      6.77   220.949   234.132   231.567   236.133     6.87    1.11
2 Non-Apparel       0.014     0.062     0.018     0.031     71.10     0.018     0.055     0.055     0.074   315.47    0.00
11 Yarns             0.000     0.001     0.001     0.000   -100.00     0.001     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00
12 Fabrics           0.000     0.042     0.000     0.007       *       0.000     0.044     0.044     0.049      *      0.00
14 Made Ups / Misc   0.014     0.019     0.017     0.024     37.29     0.017     0.012     0.012     0.025    44.86    0.00
30 Cotton Products 151.307   181.438   164.632   182.478     10.84   177.002   200.460   196.341   199.284    12.59    1.02
31 Cotton Apparel  151.294   181.437   164.631   182.476     10.84   177.001   200.457   196.337   199.282    12.59    1.59
32 Cot Non-Apparel   0.013     0.001     0.001     0.003     81.89     0.001     0.003     0.003     0.003    81.89    0.00
40 Wool Products     0.011     0.169     0.162     0.891    449.99     0.163     0.630     0.744     0.898   449.96    0.31
41 Wool Apparel      0.011     0.169     0.162     0.891    450.21     0.163     0.630     0.744     0.898   450.18    0.39
42 Wool Non-Appare   0.000     0.000     0.000     0.000   -100.00     0.000     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00
60 MMF Products     95.794    40.831    38.504    33.690    -12.50    43.798    33.088    34.530    36.017   -17.77    0.14
61 MMF Apparel      95.794    40.773    38.490    33.662    -12.54    43.784    33.036    34.478    35.945   -17.90    0.44
62 MMF Non-Apparel   0.000     0.058     0.014     0.028     99.43     0.014     0.052     0.052     0.072   411.26    0.00
80 S and V Product   0.001     0.003     0.003     0.009    168.24     0.003     0.009     0.009     0.009   168.24    0.00
81 S and V Apparel   0.000     0.001     0.001     0.009    835.75     0.001     0.009     0.009     0.009   835.75    0.00
82 S and V Non-App   0.001     0.002     0.002     0.000   -100.00     0.002     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00

Cotton or Man-Made Fiber:
237 Playsuit,Sunsui   0.007     0.163     0.163     0.000   -100.00     0.163     0.050     0.002     0.000  -100.00    0.00

Cotton:
338 Knit Shirts,MB   85.520    99.187    88.783    98.576     11.03    96.995   112.778   108.559   108.980    12.36   10.88
339 W/G Knit Blouse   4.504     2.722     2.567     3.201     24.71     2.811     3.329     3.241     3.356    19.38    0.26
347 Cot.M/B Trouser   5.173     6.651     6.333     7.162     13.10     6.853     7.054     7.124     7.481     9.16    0.72
348 W/G Slacks, etc   0.125     1.025     0.897     3.505    290.77     0.897     2.481     3.063     3.633   305.11    0.23
352 Cotton Underwea  54.879    71.052    65.303    68.908      5.52    68.649    73.672    73.246    74.657     8.75    4.26

Wool:
433 Suit-Typ Ct,MB    0.000     0.006     0.006     0.270   4689.30     0.006     0.173     0.215     0.270  4703.21    1.65
434 Oth. Coats, M/B   0.000     0.146     0.142     0.295    106.97     0.142     0.207     0.239     0.299   109.59    1.52
443 Wool Suits,M/B    0.000     0.000     0.000     0.124       *       0.000     0.115     0.119     0.124      *      0.68
447 Wool Trousers,M   0.000     0.005     0.004     0.144   3773.68     0.004     0.100     0.120     0.145  3820.24    0.98

Man-Made Fiber:
634 Other Coats, MB   2.730     1.008     1.007     0.032    -96.81     1.227     0.050     0.031     0.033   -97.27    0.01
635 Coats, W/G        0.791     1.421     1.415     0.099    -92.98     1.647     0.215     0.090     0.105   -93.62    0.02
638 Knit Shirts, MB  81.619    27.928    26.502    14.405    -45.65    30.562    16.293    16.317    15.831   -48.20    2.94
639 Knit Blouses,WG   0.009     0.001     0.001     0.671  46546.96     0.001     0.201     0.606     0.671 46546.96    0.11
640 N-K Shirts, MB    2.272     2.456     2.262     2.818     24.56     2.456     2.743     2.800     3.012    22.63    2.51
641 N-K Blouses, WG   0.013     0.210     0.177     1.016    474.63     0.177     0.911     0.976     1.049   493.40    0.63
647 Trousers,etc MB   5.747     5.836     5.581     3.462    -37.96     6.059     3.543     3.438     3.718   -38.64    0.87
648 Slacks,etc. WG    0.508     0.688     0.554     2.729    392.51     0.613     2.462     2.630     2.864   366.97    0.86
651 Nightwear/PJs     0.783     0.287     0.204     0.821    303.16     0.221     0.875     0.889     0.904   309.33    0.15
652 M-MF Underwear    0.258     0.365     0.330     2.336    608.14     0.340     1.697     2.065     2.371   597.16    0.45
659 Oth. MMF App.     0.989     0.462     0.352     4.886   1287.81     0.372     3.655     4.240     4.996  1244.70    0.25

Go Back To Major Shippers Country Page

Go Back To Trade Data Page

Go Back To OTEXA Home Page

http://otexa.ita.doc.gov/msrcty/a2450.htm

***

***

My Note – there are some obvious disparities in the numbers between raw materials shipped in and completed metric tons shipped out of Haiti. (That disparity is irreconcilable in its numbers among other things including the amount of money sent by the United States Departments of Commerce and Foreign Trade offices through economic development programs and funding grants along with those from the UN and international community for the same purpose. Obviously, the final target of improving the infrastructure, education, adult education, hospitals, roads, schools and general quality of and safety of life for Haitians was abrogated, diverted for private interests or something . . . I’m not sure what, but I do know there is precedent for clawbacks on that money through US treaties and International law. This includes going to the Grand Cayman and Swiss banks, the hedge funds and investment brokerage groups to relieve them of manipulating the previous windfalls of economic and charitable money for Haiti and to insure that it isn’t diverted or hijacked for profiteering and embezzlement this time.

– cricketdiane, 01-23-10

But there’s more –

***

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
from CQ / WorldRadio Online Newsroom on January 12, 2010
View comments about this article

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:

All radio amateurs are requested to keep 7045 kHz and 3720 kHz clear for possible emergency traffic related to today’s major earthquake in Haiti.

International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region II Area C Emergency Coordinator Arnie Coro, CO2KK, reports that as of 0245 UTC on January 13, nothing had been heard from radio amateurs in Haiti, but that the above frequencies were being kept active in case any Haitian hams manage to get on the air, and in case of other related events in surrounding areas, including aftershocks and a possible tsunami.

The following is from an e-mail from CO2KK:

A few minutes after the earthquake was felt in eastern Cuba’s cities, the Cuban Federation of Radio Amateurs Emergency Net was activated, with net control stations CO8WM and CO8RP located in the city of Santiago de Cuba, and in permanent contact with the National Seismology Center of Cuba located in that city.

Stations in the city of Baracoa, in Guantanamo province, were also activated immediately as the earth movements were felt even stronger there, due to its proximity to Haiti. CO8AZ and CO8AW went on the air immediately , with CM8WAL following. At the early phase of the emergency, the population of the city of Baracoa was evacuated far away from the coast, as there was a primary alert of a possible tsunami event or of a heavy wave trains sequence impacting the coast line at the city’s sea wall …

Baracoa could not contact Santiago de Cuba stations on 40 meters due to long skip after 5 PM local time, so several stations in western Cuba and one in the US State of Florida provided relays. CO2KK, as IARU Region II Area C Emergency Coordinator, helped to organize the nets , on 7045 kHz and also on 3720 kHz, while local nets in Santiago de Cuba and Baracoa operated on 2 meters.

As late as 9,45 PM local time 0245 UTC we have not been able to contact any amateur or emergency services stations in Haiti.

Amateurs from the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Venezuela were monitoring the 40 meter band frequency, that I notified to the IARU Region II executive Ramon Santoyo XE1KK as in use for the emergency, requesting that 7045 kHz be kept as clear as possible …

We are still keeping watch on 7045 kHz hoping that someone in Haiti may have access to a transceiver and at least a car battery to run it.

All information that has so far come from the Cuban seismologists tell us of a very intense earthquake, and also of the possibility of other events following.

Following the advice of the geophysicists, we are keeping the 7045 and 3720 kiloHertz frequencies active until further notice.

Member Comments:

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
by WA2FDU on January 13, 2010
SALVATION ARMY TEAM EMERGENCY RADIO NETWORK

SATERN

North American Command
Chicago

Radio Team Locked in on Haiti:
http://www.eham.net/articles/23232

***

QUAKELINE®

QUAKELINE® is a bibliographic database developed and maintained by the Information Service. It covers earthquakes, earthquake engineering, natural hazard mitigation, and related topics. Additional features include records for various publication types, such as books, journal articles, conference papers, technical reports, CDs, slides, and videos.

QUAKELINE® was launched in 1987 and is updated on a monthly basis. The database currently provides content for over 57,000 records; IS has access to all documents cited in the database.

Meetings & Conferences

Visit the Meetings & Conferences database for the latest information on domestic and international events.

Hurricanes Katrina & Rita

In an effort to serve a diverse audience including, but not limited to, academic researchers and professional organizations, the MCEER Information Service has compiled an extensive searchable Hurricane Database to assist in locating information regarding hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The data is accessible through four search configurations resulting in a comprehensive list of active URLs.

(from – )

http://mceer.buffalo.edu/infoService/databases.asp

***

The USA Pavilion at the Shanghai 2010 World ExpoDate: 11/11/2009 Description: U.S. Pavilion 2010 © U.S. Pavilion 2010

Nov. 10, 2009

The 2010 Shanghai World Expo will be the largest Expo in history and the first ever hosted by China. During its 6 month operation, it is expected to attract 70 million visitors – more than any Expo in the 150 years of Expo history. The Special Representative for Global Partnerships gave a press briefing describing how over $45 million has been raised out of the $61 million required to build and operate the USA Pavilion.

| Press Briefing

| Secretary’ Clinton’s Letter

Date: 11/19/2009 Description: Presidential Summit on Entrepreneurship Logo © White House Image

America has entered a new era of engagement through partnerships with the private sector and civil society; and one of the most noteworthy opportunities for partnerships will be the Presidential Summit on Entrepreneurship to be held early in 2010. Click the image above if you are interested in learning more about partnering with the U.S. Government on Summit activities. -More

http://www.state.gov/s/partnerships/index.htm

***

But to start off, we have Ambassador Elizabeth Bagley, who is our Special Representative for Global Partnerships. The Secretary, in many of her speeches, has talked about the concept of partnerships, the fact that in the 21st century, in solving the major challenges that we face in the world, not all of those solutions are going to come from governments. In many cases, they can, but in some cases, it’ll be a collaboration that might involve governments, nongovernmental organizations or a private initiative. And Elizabeth is at the forefront of those efforts. She’ll describe a little bit more broadly what her office is up to. But very specifically today, we thought it was important for her to outline what has been happening with the Shanghai Expo, obviously a manifestation of the importance of the relationship between China and the United States and the commitment that the United States has to that relationship and also to Asia as a whole.

So Elizabeth, you want to start us off? Thank you very much.

AMBASSADOR BAGLEY: Thanks, P.J. Thank you all, and welcome to Kentucky. I’ll – as P.J. said, I’ll talk a little bit about and answer, of course, any questions you have about our new office. But first, let me just run through the facts as we know them on the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

It will run from – many of you know – in Shanghai from May 1st to October 31st, and it’s the largest expo in history, and the first ever hosted by China. During its six-month operation, it is expected to attract 70 million visitors, most of whom are Chinese, more than any expo in the 150 years of expo history.

To date, 190 countries and 48 international organizations have accepted invitations to attend. The theme for the expo is “Better City, Better Life,” and it will present a vision of a sustainable, healthy, prosperous world in the 21st century. There will be, of course, an exposition of American values, culture, business. This is, of course, China’s most dynamic city, so it’s very important to be there and to bring our own American businesses in as partners. The Secretary is very committed to this. She has been since she went to China in February, right – soon after she was sworn in.

The Chinese have been extremely supportive; in fact, urging us to be part of this expo, and we – and they have been our partners throughout. And it is, of course, a very important manifestation of our relationship with them, of our bilateral relationship and also of our commercial diplomacy, because it’s very important to have our American businesses support and participate in this in order to get into the Chinese economy and also to express the importance of American culture, our diversity, our freedom. And it’s a great opportunity for us to show public diplomacy and also commercial diplomacy and to show what our values, our core values, are to the Chinese people. That’s pretty much – I can answer questions on that.

There’s a 501(c)(3), just so you know, that the funds are private funds. So we’re raising money from corporations, because there’s a piece of legislation in the early ‘90s that prohibited any public funds. So we are raising – $61 million is our goal. We’ve raised 45 million of that. So we’re still – any of you who want to contribute are most welcome. We’re – we have some major – wonderful major corporations, great participation. We’re in the middle of hopefully closing this off.

The Secretary will be visiting. As P.J. said, she will be in Shanghai on Sunday and will visit the site on Monday and we’ll have our sponsors there, so we’ll encourage – thank them all, of course, and encourage those who haven’t decided to participate to join our efforts.

That’s pretty much – just a final – just to let you know that the progression of events – there was a participation agreement that was signed in June, in the end of June. A visit – Commissioner General Jose Villarreal was also appointed in April, I believe it was. Shanghai Expo 2010 is the 501(c)(3) that is accepting the contributions. Groundbreaking in July by Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke, which was very successful, and also a topping-off ceremony, where they actually finished the construction of the frame, and apparently have a broom and a U.S. flag that they bring. And that was done – officiated by our new Ambassador Jon Huntsman, who also said if you’re not – if businesses are not here, they’re not players. So he has been very forthcoming, very excited about this, and has encouraged participation by the business community both in Beijing and Shanghai.

To just go through a little bit about what we’re doing – in fact, this is probably one of the best examples of public-private partnerships. It’s – the public being the State Department, along with our 501(c)(3) and with our friends in business, have put together a really important partnership that will, I think, show the importance not only of our U.S. bilateral relationship with the U.S. – between the U.S. and China, but also the importance of our companies in a commercial diplomacy.

Beyond what we’re doing at Shanghai Expo, we have a whole host of issues that we’re working on in terms of developing priorities, fulfilling the priorities that the Secretary and the President have already set forth such as food security, Muslim outreach, women empowerment, diaspora engagement – meaning those ethnic groups that are here in the country and that want to relate to their homeland – not only sending remittances, monies back home, but also we’re engaging in a diasporas corps that will actually help them invest or encourage direct investment, help them to help their relatives in their homelands, their respective homelands. So we’re working – that’s something the Secretary cares very much about. We’re actually working with the Filipino community now in anticipation of the Secretary’s trip to the Philippines.

http://www.state.gov/s/partnerships/131747.htm

***

Contact the Global Partnership Initiative
Email: Partnerships@State.gov
Phone: (202) 647-2200
Fax: (202) 647-7631

Mail:
Global Partnership Initiative
Harry S Truman Building, US Department of State
2201 C Street NW Suite 6817
Washington, DC 20520

Kris M. Balderston
Deputy Special Representative for Global Partnerships
BalderstonKM@state.gov

Kris Balderston serves as the Managing Director of the Global Partnership Initiative and the Deputy Special Representative for Global Partnerships in the Office of the Secretary of State. Prior to his role at the U.S. Department of State, Kris was Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton’s first Legislative Director in January 2001 before serving as her Deputy Chief of Staff from 2002 to 2009.

Kris began his career with the National Governors’ Association and then ran the Massachusetts State Office for Governor Michael Dukakis from 1987-1991. He became Senior Policy Advisor to Majority Leader George Mitchell at the US Senate Democratic Policy Committee from 1991 to 1993. From 1993 to 1995, he served as the Deputy Chief of Staff at the U.S. Department of Labor under Secretary of Labor Robert Reich. Kris served in the White House from 1995 to 2001, as Special Assistant for Cabinet Affairs to President William Jefferson Clinton and then later as the Deputy Assistant to the President and the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet.

Kris holds his BA in Political Science from LeMoyne College and his MA in Government from Georgetown University.

Gloria Cabe
Senior Advisor
CabeGC@state.gov

Gloria Cabe serves as Senior Advisor at the Global Partnership Initiative in the Office of the Secretary of State, focusing on democratic governance and human rights issues. Prior to this role, she worked at James Lee Witt Associates, a crisis and emergency management consulting firm, where she provided guidance and support for several of the firm’s clients as Managing Director of International affairs in numerous countries including the Maldives, Budapest, Albania, Greece, Trinidad, Tobago, and tsunami affected countries in south and southeast Asia. Under her management, the International Practice grew significantly, with the practice opening an office in Beijing, China, in 2008 and entering into many partnership agreements around the world, from Australia, to Norway to Greece.

Prior to joining James Lee Witt Associates, Gloria’s previous private sector experience included serving as President of Emerging Market Strategies, Vice President and COO of the Corporate Council on Africa, and Vice President of The Ridley Group, all based in Washington, D.C. Gloria has over 20 years experience in public service as a senior advisor to the highest level executives at the state, federal and international levels of government, including as Counselor to the Chairman and Board of Directors of the Export-Import Bank of the United States. While serving 10 years as a member of the House of Representatives in the Arkansas State Legislature, Gloria provided leadership in many areas and served as Floor Whip for Governor Bill Clinton; and in 1991, Gloria became the Chief of Staff for Governor Clinton, where she shepherded the most successful legislative program in the Governor’s 13 year tenure.

Andrea Görög
Special Assistant to Ambassador Bagley
GorogA@state.gov

Robert R. Haynie
Global Partnerships Liaison
HaynieRR@state.gov

Robert Haynie is a Senior Consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton’s Diplomacy and International Development practice. He is on a full-time assignment with the U.S. Department of State’s Global Partnership Initiative, focusing on global health issues and managing the Department’s database of public-private partnerships. Robert has experience with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) working within the Global Development Alliance office building public-private alliances and implementing economic growth projects in Serbia. He also lived in Jordan for a year under USAID’s Emerging Markets Development Advisors Program focused on small business promotion. Robert graduated from Georgetown University’s MBA program and obtained an honors certificate in International Business Diplomacy from the School of Foreign Service. Prior to graduate school, Robert lived in China for three years working with Microsoft Corporation focusing on regional support services and process integration.

Robert Tice Lalka
Global Partnerships Liaison
Presidential Management Fellow
LalkaRT@state.gov
Robert Tice Lalka serves as Global Partnerships Liaison for the Global Partnership Initiative in the Office of the Secretary of State, focusing on partnership initiatives with faith-based communities, entrepreneurship and economic development, and promoting educational opportunity, as outlined in the President’s A New Beginning speech in Cairo. He previously worked at the United Nations’ Geneva office; the World Bank’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., and AmeriCorps in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. He is a cum laude graduate of Yale University, where he received honors in both English and history, and he holds his master’s degree with a concentration in global public policy from Duke University.

G. Kevin Saba
Regional Director
SabaGK@state.gov

Kevin Saba serves as Regional Director for Global Partnerships, focusing on economic recovery and growth issues. He has over 20 years of private sector experience serving in various leadership capacities as well as having gained experience in start-ups, and  turnarounds  of ongoing concerns. His most recent experience in the private sector included service as President of Managed Care USA and President of Nations’ Care, a subsidiary of the Orion Capital Companies. Kevin’s public private partnering experience includes being recruited by the State of Connecticut to create and implement a strategic plan to reduce a $7 billion unfunded liability that had accumulated over the period of 1945 through 1995. Approximately two years later, the liability had been reduced to less than $1 billion and a plan was in place to finance and administer the remaining unfunded liability. The initiative was recognized by a Connecticut think tank as the  most significant government success in 20 years.

Kevin joined the Department of State in 2002 and was involved in the start-up of the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC). He then joined the MCC as its first Managing Director of Threshold Country Programs and served for approximately two years in this capacity, successfully overseeing the start-up of a number of threshold programs. Kevin was accredited in June 2008 by the Overseas Development Institute (United Kingdom’s leading think tank on international development) and the International Business Leaders Forum (internationally recognized leader in cross-sector partnerships) as a professional broker of multi-sector partnerships. In addition to his public and private service he has enjoyed teaching college courses in business and has a Masters Degree in Business Administration from the University of Hartford.

Jim Thompson
Regional Director
ThompsonJF2@state.gov
Jim Thompson serves as Regional Director for Global Partnerships, focusing on food security and water security issues. Jim served as the Acting Director of the U.S. Department of State’s Global Partnership Center and is the former Acting Director of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) Global Development Alliance, which is the Agency’s business model for the replicable use of public-private alliances. He was responsible for overall management and strategy of the activity and managed major corporate partner relationships for the Agency. Jim has over 17 years of Government experience, previously serving at USAID as a Food for Peace Officer and a Program Officer in the Europe and Eurasia bureau. He also was a Contracting Officer at USAID and at the U.S. Department of Energy and has used his acquisition and assistance experience to create new public-private partnership models.
Jim has taught management courses throughout Africa, Latin America and Europe for the USAID, and he was also responsible for developing the alliance builder training program delivered by GDA both in Washington and at USAID missions globally. Jim is a frequent speaker on public-private partnerships and practitioner building numerous alliances. Jim was a Rotary Ambassadorial scholar to New Zealand in 1990 and completed his Master of Arts in Political Studies at the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

http://www.state.gov/s/partnerships/contact/index.htm

***

“First,”  Mr. Root said,  “before there is any question of international law, you must be a lawyer.”

– Elihu Root quote from a passage by Philip C. Jessup recounted on page 157 of the book,  Listen to Leaders in Law and on page 159 of the same text, it says,  Perhaps you don’t know that to make sure the United States would observe its international obligations, Congress in 1789 passed a law (still on the books) providing that the federal district courts should have original jurisdiction . . . of any civil action by an alien for a tort only, committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States.

Further, it states,  Did you know that the United States has pressed and defended claims for breaches of international law before some thirty different international tribunals? (etc.)

1963, Tupper & Love, Inc.,  Listen to Leaders in Law

***

USAID Development 2.0 Challenge
USAID’s Global Development Commons – (by the way, I couldn’t figure out any contact point in order to participate on their website – but the site is glorious otherwise and offered welcome news about the Shanghai World Expo)

Dear Secretary of State Hillary Clinton,
I had an idea for Haiti that incorporates the use of structural reinforcing fabrics like the geotextiles and the carbon nanofiber technologies which could be manufactured through the existing woven textile and apparel manufacturing economic development funded industries’ facilities already made available to Haiti. Using the H.O.P.E. program tariff incentives and other international economic development programs, the existing development needs could be fulfilled by manufacturing and using these earthquake and hurricane resistant technology-based building systems to rebuild Haiti and to upgrade existing structures.

There are a number of architectural engineers from around the world, who have developed systems for fabric-formed architectural forms using concrete reinforced with these novel fibers, carbon impregnated fabrics and geotextiles. Could you pave the way for them to partnership with the USAID and UNESCO / UN International Development groups to accomplish a safer Haiti and create the possibilities for it to provide economic development for the people of Haiti at the same time? I am not a lawyer, let alone an international lawyer, but I know that the income to be derived from licensing these structural fabrics for manufacture in and export from Haiti would provide a very real economic development plan far in excess of the apparel industry.

The Global Partnerships Initiative looked like a good way to bring the patent holders together with the construction and architectural engineers, but I don’t know how to do it. Your office does it all the time. There must be a number of ways that it could be quickly facilitated. Today, I’ve sent several emails requesting those involved in the Society for Fabric Forming and Materials Science Engineering to become involved in the project in Haiti.

The old economic development plan was not created with the new possibilities in mind. Please see to it that the range of options and fields of possibilities aren’t narrowed, but rather are increased in their thresholds and magnitudes. There is no excuse for Haiti to be treated as if it is a prison colony or enslaved and exploited by its governing class any longer. The days when that happened can become far removed from today by your actions to insure a strong new future for Haiti and all of her people hand in hand with the US.

– cricketdiane

***

Thematic Priorities of UN International Development Organization (UNIDO)

http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=7847

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/plumbook/2008/p109-119_state.pdf

Participate

Icon: Je participe, tu participes, il participe, nous participons, vous participez, ils profitent.

Help build the Commons  Join our group on Facebook, watch Commons and USAID videos on Youtube. Are you on Twitter and Delicious? Follow us there. Better yet, tag your videos, tweets, and use  Global Development Commons  or  Commons  on your bookmarks and hash tags so everyone can hear what you have to say.

Please feel free to connect to the Global Development Commons from your own sites and blogs. You can link to us here at usaid.gov or at the complementary USAID Global Development Commons site.

Identifying and fostering innovations through open approaches can improve our ability to deliver on our core mission at the US Agency for International Development. The Global Development Commons seek to enable citizens of the world to innovate and empower citizen activists, development organizations, private sector companies, and many others to co-create solutions and make better informed collaborative decisions that address development challenges.

Though the GlobalDevelopmentCommons.net site is a small activity of the larger GDC portfolio, it is critical for networking a diverse community of actors. In terms of the larger GDC vision, the goal of the Commons.net site was the initial investment for catalyzing a broad and diverse network of individuals and organizations to problem solve around development challenges. The site is a virtual space where anyone interested in international development and technology can participate in open dialogue, collaborate, and experiment to find innovative solutions to development challenges.

http://www.usaid.gov/about_usaid/gdc/participate.html

***

Through the Global Partnership Initiative, the Department of State

* Is a convener, bringing together people from across regions and sectors to work together on issues of common interest.
* Is a catalyst, launching new projects, actively seeking new solutions, providing vital training and technical assistance to facilitate additional projects.
* Is a collaborator, working closely with our partners to plan and implement projects – avoiding duplication, learning from each other, maximizing our impact by looking for best practices.

The Global Partnership Initiative located in the Office of the Secretary of State, is being led by the Special Representative for Global Partnerships, Ambassador Elizabeth Bagley, and the Deputy Special Representative for Global Partnerships, Kris Balderston. Follow the latest initiatives at TwitterTwitter and signup for email updates.

http://www.state.gov/s/partnerships/index.htm

***

Obama noted that the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti “appears to have suffered its own losses,” and appointed USAID administrator Rajiv Shah unified disaster coordinator for government efforts as the United States takes the lead in bringing relief to the island.

(From:)
http://www.worldmag.com/webextra/16288
***

HOLMES: The United States is taking a lead role in organizing and supplying relief to Haiti. CNN foreign affairs correspondent, Jill Dougherty, is following that angle for us live.

I can’t imagine how huge of a process and challenge this is to coordinate all of this. You got a tour, though. I guess you could call it the nerve center there in Washington, USAID.

JILL DOUGHERTY, CNN FOREIGN AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT: Absolutely. You know, T.J., early this morning, we got an exclusive look at the epicenter of the U.S. government Haiti operation. It’s working 24/7 at the USAID, Agency for International Development, headquarters here in Washington.

First, we sat in on a conference call for the Haiti Interagency Task Force, head up by the new head of the USAID, Rajiv Shah. And there’s a real sense of urgency there. Seventy people on that call. Representatives from a slew of government agencies, USAID, the State Department, Defense Department, FEMA.

And then we had an exclusive tour, seeing the USAID response team in action. And they’re the people who send search-and-rescue teams to Haiti. They coordinate food supplies. And our guide was Susan Reichle. She’s the coordinator for the Haiti Interagency Task Force.

(From:)
http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1001/15/cnr.04.html

***

January 16 – Secretary Clinton’s visit – ( looking for the priorities)

RENE GARCIA PREVAL, PRESIDENT OF HAITI (through translator): His last initiative of putting the two last receiving Presidents, Bush and Clinton, together to form a fund, a special fund for Haiti is again a sign of great support. The USAID is already on the territory. I just visited a victim who has been, since five days, taken and he is, again, taken care of by the military and the medical support — American medical support in Haiti. Mrs. Clinton’s visit really warms our heart today but especially to reinsure the priorities and the needs and coordination that needs to be done with the effect of the earthquake.

http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1001/16/cnr.07.html

***

[PDF]
Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity through Partnership Encouragement …
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – Quick View
BACKGROUND: The United States Congress enacted the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity through. Partnership Encouragement (HOPE) Act of 2006, …
www.usaid.gov/ht/docs/ege/hope_2.pdf

(From Google search – )
http://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=navclient&gfns=1&q=Haitian+Hemispheric+Opportunity+through+Partnership+Encouragement+%28HOPE%29+Act

***

Ted Koppel on BBC World News America talking about the Haiti situation and possibility of rebuilding and a good note or two about how their natural resources have been mined, bootlegged, stolen and pillaged over centuries including in recent times.

BBC America – 10:12pm ET 01-21-10

***

***

General Douglas Frazer – US Southern Command Commander (in Miami) – on CSPAN today
(chnnl 30)  – aired 10.55 pm ET – 01-21-10

Defense Department Briefing – Haiti Earthquake Relief Efforts

Haiti has to request the medical field hospitals? – cnn question
USAID, international community – to determine if there is a greater medical need than being currently served – paraphrased answer – (my note – is he out of touch or what would cause him not to know?)

Special Representative (UN) – find out who this is ****** ?????
spoke to Gen. Frazer when he was in Haiti

MINUSTAH has the mission to provide security in the region – for the entire region beyond Port au Prince

***

department of health and human services US are responsible for the health, medicine, facilities, medical supplies, field hospitals – they are on the ground and where the hell are they and why haven’t they solved these problems by day nine? General Frazer says they are on the ground and responsible for the ground efforts in the medical and health efforts.

***

http://www.commerce.gov/

84 results for Haiti  out of at least 12,200 ( Details )     Web results by Bing Search
These sources have been queried:

* Web Results – Top 100 results retrieved out of 12,200 in 0.797s, 100 requested. (4 pages requested – 2 OK)

1.
Haiti Weather [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
Government Internet Service Home page. The starting point for official governemnt weather forecasts, warning, and meteorological products for forecasting the weather.
weather.noaa.gov/weather/HT_cc.html- Cached -More from NOAA
2.
The United States Contributes to Economic Prosperity in PDF
[X]
The United States Contributes to Economic Prosperity in Haiti The U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration (www.trade.gov) and the Association of American …
trade.gov/promotingtrade/westhemprosperity/haiti.pdf– Cached -More from International Trade Administration
3.
NOAA – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
NOAA Produces Images of Haiti for First Responders A specially equipped NOAA jet conducted aerial surveys of earthquake-stricken Haiti on Jan. 17 and 18 as part of NOAA’s effort …
http://www.noaa.gov- Cached -More from NOAA
4.
Current Weather Conditions: [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
Current Weather Conditions: Port-Au-Prince / Aeroport International, Haiti (MTPP) 18-34N 072-18W 34M
weather.noaa.gov/weather/current/MTPP.html- Cached -More from NOAA
5.
Trade Compliance Center – Making America’s Trade Agreements Work for … [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
PRESS RELEASE: PRESS/TPRB/222. 6 November 2003. TRADE POLICY REVIEW: HAITI. Socio-political stability would help Haiti to benefit from its liberalization efforts
tcc.export.gov/…/All_Research_Reports/exp_005748.asp- Cached -More from U.S. Government Export Portal
6.
Welcome to the Department of Commerce [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
Commerce Department Mobilizes to Assist Relief Efforts in Haiti. Washington (Jan. 15) —The U.S. Department of Commerce is mobilizing to assist in the earthquake relief efforts in …
http://www.commerce.gov/?ifs=1- Cached -More from Department of Commerce
7.
FTD – Statistics – Country Data – U.S. Trade Balance with Haiti [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
All trade with Haiti from, at most, 1985 to present
http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c2450.html- Cached -More from Census Bureau
8.
TPC NHC GORDON 1994 PRELIMINARY REPORT [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
Its torrential rains caused a catastrophic loss of life in Haiti and extensive agricultural damage in south Florida. a. Synoptic History
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/1994gordon.html- Cached -More from NOAA
9.
Tropical Cyclone Report PDF [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
Heavy rainfall that occurred in Haiti as Hanna passed just north of the north coast of that island on 2-3 September was responsible for severe flooding and an estimated 500 …
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL082008_Hanna.pdf- Cached -More from NOAA
10.
Electric Current Information for Haiti [new window][preview][close preview]
[X]
Cities: Type of current: Frequency of current: Number of phases: Nominal voltage: Number of wires: Frequency stability: All : a.c. 60 : 1,3 : 110/220 : 2,3,4 : no
ita.doc.gov/td/industry/otea/ecw/ha.html- Cached -More from International Trade Administration

***

hope_2.pdf

?Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity through Partnership Encouragement (HOPE) II Legislation
BACKGROUND: The United States Congress enacted the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity through Partnership Encouragement (HOPE) Act of 2006, which was implemented on March 19, 2007. HOPE provided duty-free entry to the United State garments manufactured in Haiti. This legislation was aimed at progress toward a market-based economy, increasing employment, enhancing the rule of law, eliminating barriers to U.S. trade, combating corruption, and protecting internationally recognized human and worker rights.
In May, 2008, the U.S. Congress passed the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-246/ “Farm Bill”), which included an extended HOPE bill — HOPE II. HOPE II includes:
?    an extension of duty-free access to the U.S. market for the next 10 years, effective October 2008;
?    an extension of eligible woven products from three years to 10 years;
?    an increase in the Tariff Preference Level (TPL) for woven and knit products from 50,000,000 to 70,000,000 square meter equivalent;
?    co-production with and direct shipment from the Dominican Republic; and
?    the inclusion of luggage, headgear, and sleepwear.

The new bill also requires social and administrative provisions for labor reform aligned with International Labor Organization (ILO) standards. After 16 months, Haiti must have established an Office of Labor Relations (Technical Assistance Improvement and Compliance Needs Assessment and Remediation program – TAICNAR), and must have appointed a Labor Ombudsman. TAICNAR will benefit from USD 10 million over five years to establish a labor program to ensure that Haiti meets the five core ILO standards.
The HOPE legislation has created approximately 11,000 jobs to date. HOPE II is expected to create more employment and offer additional assurances to potential investors due to the 10-year extension. HOPE II offers additional assurances to potential investors due to the 10-year extension, and it is expected to create more employment.
USAID assistance for implementation of HOPE II and the apparel sector:
?    Through its implementer CHF/KATA, USAID is providing a consultant to the sector to help it adapt to HOPE II opportunities by improving the industry’s sourcing, production and marketing.
?    The CHF/KATA program will also provide financial and technical assistance for an apparel industry training center in Port-au-Prince, in collaboration with the GoH and the textile industry.
?    CHF/KATA also provides technical assistance for seminars and workshops on international trends in the apparel sector.
?    CHF/KATA will rehabilitate sections of roads leading to two industrial park areas (Ounaminthe and Carrefour).
?    Funding an Executive Director for CTMO-HOPE;

Additional USAID support to the export sector consists of:
1
?    Providing technical assistance for the development of a garment sector strategic plan to enable firms to take advantage of trade preferences; and
?    Supporting to the Investment Facilitation Center (CFI);

The HOPE Commission, which is made up of public sector, private sector and labor union representatives, will pursue in 2009:
?    Implementation of the electronic visa system (ELVIS) at the Ministry of Commerce and Industry to regulate and better track HOPE export visas.
?    Establishment of an industrial park for future garment sector facilities.
?    Implementation of the Enhancing Workers’ Access to Labor Rights and Decent Employment in Haiti project (or TAICNAR, a requirement of HOPE II legislation) in coordination with the International Labor Organization; and
?    Establishment of the rules and procedures for co-production with the Dominican Republic (an additional benefit of HOPE II).

2

http://www.usaid.gov/ht/docs/ege/hope_2.pdf

***

Foreign Policy and International Relations Subcommittee (US Congress)

Cspan – 01-21-10

***

in their “situation room” – across the international community
keep in mind the Haiti of five years from now and ten years from now
(Black caucus members announcement about Haiti on CSPAN today)

***

haiti.pdf

http://trade.gov/promotingtrade/westhemprosperity/haiti.pdf

The United States Contributes to
Economic Prosperity in
Haiti
The U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration (www.trade.gov) and the Association of American Chambers of
Commerce in Latin America (AACCLA, http://www.aaccla.org) compiled this fact sheet. Last update – January 2008.
.. In 2006, U.S. direct investment in Haiti reached $154 million (BEA, Survey of Current
Business, Sept. 2007). This is equivalent to 3.1 percent of Haiti’s GDP of almost $5 billion
(World Bank, World Development Indicators).
.. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) provided over $168.6
million in aid to Haiti in 2006.
.. The United States purchased nearly 80 percent of Haiti’s total merchandise exports in 2006
(IMF Direction of Trade).
.. U.S. merchandise exports to Haiti grew from $474.8 million in 1996 to $817.4 million in
2006, an increase of 72 percent (U.S. Census Bureau).
.. In 2006 over $1.65 billion in remittance money was sent by Haitians living abroad; this is
equivalent to 33.2 percent of Haiti’s GDP (Inter-American Development Bank).
United States Trade in Goods with Haiti
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Millions of Dollars
US Imports US Exports
Total Market Share the United States Represents for
Haiti’s Merchandise Exports – 2006
Rest of World
6%
Canada
3%
Mexico
2%
Belguim
1%
United States
80%
Dominican
Republic
8%
Haiti
U.S. Companies Contribute to
Economic Prosperity and Social Development
The snapshots of U.S. company contributions to economic prosperity were submitted by the companies themselves, and reprinted with
their permission. Use of Department of Commerce logo does not imply DOC endorsement of the specific companies, products or
services covered herein. For more information or to submit contributions to future publications, please contact us at
uscep@aaccla.org. Snapshots last updated – April 2007.
Citibank – Reaching out to Women and Children
Citibank has been providing corporate banking services in Haiti for 35 years and employs 44
people. For the last 10 years and with the help of the Citigroup Foundation, they have been
directing approximately $45,000 each year to programs focusing mainly on low-income women and
children. The Micro Credit Enterprise Program in Deschapelles gives women intensive hands-on
training in business and in how to request formal credit. It has been able to train 2,000 women in
the past 3 years. Similarly, the program From Business Skills to Financial Literacy: Reforming
and Implementing Financial Education for Fonkoze Borrowers is designed to develop the core
skills necessary for low-income women to plan and expand their businesses. Approximately 750
women have benefited from this program. Moreover, as part of their commitment towards
education, Citibank directed $30,000 for the rehabilitation of the 450-student Sainte Claire school
of Bois-Neuf. Finally, partnering with the “Groupe Croissance” Citibank provided computers and
internet services through the Alphabetization Project for children in low-income schools reaching
5,000 kids in approximately 10 schools across the country.
Comcel – Enriching the lives of Students
Comcel, owned by U.S. based Trilogy International Partners, is a telecommunications company
that has been operating in Haiti for 7 years. Its 557 employees benefit from a variety of programs
such as a pension plan through which the company invests up to 10% of the employee’s monthly
salary. In support of the community, Comcel partners with NGOs across the country to direct
more than one million dollars to projects focusing mainly on education. In partnership with Yéle
Haiti, Comcel has supported 6,800 scholarships for students from elementary school to university
age, making Comcel among the largest corporate sponsors of scholarships in Haiti. Comcel also
supports extra-curricular activities to supplement students’ education. For example, the company
sponsors an after school soccer program for hundreds of students from poor communities and
funds Yele Cinema, a customized truck that screens movies every night, rotating among 12
different locations in Port-au-Prince. Comcel also funds Ecole Verte, an environmental education
program that takes students from urban areas on excursions to Parc La Visite where they
participate in reforestation projects and learn about the complexities of factors that lead to
deforestation. This program also promotes dialogue between children from the local population
and their counterparts from the city.

***

PRESS RELEASE: PRESS/TPRB/222

6 November 2003

TRADE POLICY REVIEW: HAITI
Socio-political stability would help Haiti to benefit from its liberalization efforts

The WTO report, along with a policy statement by the Government of Haiti, will be the basis for the first Trade Policy Review (TPR) of Haiti by the Trade Policy Review Body of the WTO on 4 and 6 November 2003.

Haiti, one of the poorest countries in the world, has implemented reforms that have greatly liberalized its economy and made it one of the most open in Latin America and the Caribbean; nevertheless, the implementation of the structural component of the reforms has not followed and this has had a negative impact on the economy’s performance, according to a report on the trade policies and practices of Haiti released November 6 by the WTO Secretariat.

The report says that the priority would currently appear to be socio-political stability that would allow Haiti to proceed with its reforms and to fully exploit non-reciprocal preferential treatment provided by developed countries. Adapting domestic legislation to the reforms already implemented, some adjustments in taxation and other measures, including improving Haiti’s multilateral commitments on both goods and services, would improve the transparency and credibility of its trade regime.

The report adds that it is important that the international community support the liberalization efforts made unilaterally by Haiti under difficult socio-political circumstances and give it all the assistance and support needed to increase its participation in the multilateral trading system.

Note  – These links will take you to the site operated and maintained by the World Trade Organization (WTO). You may wish to review any wto.org privacy notices to determine their information collection practices.

The following documents are available in MS Word format.

Secretariat report

> Contents and summary observations (12 pages, 90KB)

> Economic environment (11 pages, 289KB)

> Trade policy regime: framework and objectives (19 pages, 136KB)

> Trade policies and practices by measure (22 pages, 273KB)

> Trade policies by sector (26 pages, 195KB)

> Appendix tables (10 pages, 133KB)

Government report (21 pages, 184KB)
Chairperson’s concluding remarks

Minutes of the meeting are available approximately 6 weeks after the meeting.

Note back to top

Trade Policy Reviews are an exercise, mandated in the WTO agreements, in which member countries’ trade and related policies are examined and evaluated at regular intervals. Significant developments that may have an impact on the global trading system are also monitored. For each review, two documents are prepared: a policy statement by the government of the member under review, and a detailed report written independently by the WTO Secretariat. These two documents are then discussed by the WTO’s full membership in the Trade Policy Review Body (TPRB). These documents and the proceedings of the TPRB’s meetings are published shortly afterwards.

Print copies of previous TPR publications are available for sale from the WTO Secretariat, Centre William Rappard, 154 rue de Lausanne, 1211 Genève 21 and through the on-line bookshop.

The TPR publications are also available from our co-publisher Bernan Press, 4611-F Assembly Drive, Lanham, MD 20706-4391, United States.

Schedule of forthcoming reviews back to top

Thailand: 12, 14 November 2003

Chile: 2, 4 December 2003

Turkey: 17, 19 December 2003

The TCC offers these agreements electronically as a public service for general reference. Every effort has been made to ensure that the text presented is complete and accurate. However, copies needed for legal purposes should be obtained from official archives maintained by the appropriate agency.

http://tcc.export.gov/Country_Market_Research/All_Research_Reports/exp_005748.asp

***

US Census Bureau
People Business Geography Newsroom Subjects A to Z Search@Census

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Trade in Goods (Imports, Exports and Trade Balance) with Haiti
Available years:

* 2009
* 2008
* 2007
* 2006
* 2005
* 2004
* 2003
* 2002
* 2001
* 2000
* 1999
* 1998
* 1997
* 1996
* 1995
* 1994
* 1993
* 1992
* 1991
* 1990
* 1989
* 1988
* 1987
* 1986
* 1985

* Additional information

Trade with Haiti : 2009
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2009     47.5     20.9     26.6
February 2009     70.9     40.7     30.2
March 2009     82.2     44.5     37.7
April 2009     66.8     43.6     23.2
May 2009     77.7     51.5     26.2
June 2009     57.7     56.5     1.2
July 2009     72.9     54.9     17.9
August 2009     64.3     50.8     13.5
September 2009     60.1     49.5     10.6
October 2009     63.4     44.5     18.9
November 2009     66.7     46.0     20.7
TOTAL     730.2     503.4     226.8

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2008
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2008     49.6     19.0     30.6
February 2008     67.4     28.1     39.3
March 2008     74.3     33.1     41.1
April 2008     63.1     37.9     25.2
May 2008     71.4     41.6     29.9
June 2008     68.9     41.8     27.1
July 2008     85.1     50.4     34.8
August 2008     93.6     36.6     57.0
September 2008     120.8     46.3     74.5
October 2008     95.6     45.4     50.2
November 2008     84.3     32.3     52.0
December 2008     69.9     37.7     32.2
TOTAL     944.0     450.1     493.9

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2007
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2007     54.1     26.2     28.0
February 2007     53.1     43.3     9.8
March 2007     67.3     46.2     21.0
April 2007     56.0     43.2     12.8
May 2007     54.6     41.4     13.1
June 2007     54.8     43.0     11.9
July 2007     53.6     38.3     15.3
August 2007     50.6     42.8     7.7
September 2007     55.0     40.7     14.3
October 2007     73.3     45.4     27.9
November 2007     54.6     39.7     14.9
December 2007     53.2     37.5     15.7
TOTAL     680.2     487.8     192.4

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2006
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2006     66.6     23.1     43.5
February 2006     65.8     31.5     34.2
March 2006     62.8     46.5     16.3
April 2006     78.6     40.1     38.4
May 2006     75.7     50.8     24.9
June 2006     68.9     39.8     29.1
July 2006     56.9     43.1     13.8
August 2006     61.0     42.1     18.9
September 2006     70.3     47.0     23.3
October 2006     76.8     47.0     29.8
November 2006     67.4     47.0     20.4
December 2006     66.6     38.1     28.5
TOTAL     817.4     496.1     321.3

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2005
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2005     45.5     21.0     24.5
February 2005     57.7     30.6     27.1
March 2005     49.1     46.1     3.0
April 2005     71.3     40.2     31.1
May 2005     60.7     39.7     21.0
June 2005     51.7     43.2     8.4
July 2005     53.8     42.4     11.4
August 2005     63.5     35.0     28.5
September 2005     52.6     34.7     17.9
October 2005     60.0     38.2     21.8
November 2005     70.9     41.0     29.9
December 2005     72.9     35.0     37.8
TOTAL     709.6     447.2     262.4

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2004
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2004     58.4     17.8     40.7
February 2004     38.6     29.4     9.2
March 2004     35.7     23.7     12.1
April 2004     55.2     34.1     21.1
May 2004     69.0     32.7     36.3
June 2004     64.0     29.7     34.3
July 2004     53.3     32.6     20.8
August 2004     51.1     35.5     15.6
September 2004     60.0     34.3     25.7
October 2004     60.8     30.8     30.1
November 2004     70.5     34.9     35.7
December 2004     56.3     35.4     20.9
TOTAL     673.0     370.7     302.3

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2003
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2003     56.5     16.2     40.3
February 2003     53.2     25.1     28.2
March 2003     60.2     27.0     33.1
April 2003     51.5     28.1     23.4
May 2003     45.6     31.4     14.2
June 2003     51.5     27.7     23.9
July 2003     51.5     31.4     20.1
August 2003     56.9     27.9     29.0
September 2003     54.5     28.4     26.2
October 2003     56.6     34.1     22.5
November 2003     53.8     27.5     26.3
December 2003     47.6     27.6     20.0
TOTAL     639.4     332.3     307.1

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2002
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2002     34.3     13.9     20.4
February 2002     38.0     16.3     21.7
March 2002     43.8     21.8     22.0
April 2002     49.8     20.3     29.5
May 2002     57.0     26.0     31.0
June 2002     44.6     20.7     23.9
July 2002     52.4     23.5     28.9
August 2002     42.9     21.6     21.3
September 2002     40.6     24.4     16.2
October 2002     54.5     22.5     32.0
November 2002     58.3     18.2     40.1
December 2002     57.0     26.0     31.0
TOTAL     573.2     255.2     318.0
* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2001
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2001     39.3     17.7     21.6
February 2001     45.5     21.5     24.0
March 2001     55.6     24.6     31.0
April 2001     40.8     23.1     17.7
May 2001     54.9     24.5     30.4
June 2001     54.0     24.8     29.2
July 2001     41.8     22.8     19.0
August 2001     47.8     23.4     24.4
September 2001     45.0     19.3     25.7
October 2001     44.2     23.9     20.3
November 2001     38.2     20.4     17.8
December 2001     43.3     17.2     26.1
TOTAL     550.4     263.2     287.2

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 2000
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 2000     44.1     16.2     27.9
February 2000     49.6     23.1     26.5
March 2000     53.8     24.9     28.9
April 2000     50.2     22.7     27.5
May 2000     50.0     28.5     21.5
June 2000     48.0     27.7     20.3
July 2000     41.4     26.7     14.7
August 2000     47.0     27.3     19.7
September 2000     49.5     25.7     23.8
October 2000     46.2     24.2     22.0
November 2000     48.7     24.2     24.5
December 2000     48.2     25.7     22.5
TOTAL     576.7     296.9     279.8

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

[To top of page]
Trade with Haiti : 1999
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1999     43.9     14.3     29.6
February 1999     46.7     22.3     24.4
March 1999     51.1     26.3     24.8
April 1999     62.5     23.6     38.9
May 1999     58.8     25.1     33.7
June 1999     50.5     29.1     21.4
July 1999     56.5     30.9     25.6
August 1999     47.7     28.4     19.3
September 1999     44.6     29.0     15.6
October 1999     43.6     23.2     20.4
November 1999     52.2     22.9     29.3
December 1999     55.8     25.9     29.9
TOTAL     613.9     301.0     312.9

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1998
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1998     38.4     14.3     24.1
February 1998     36.6     19.9     16.7
March 1998     46.1     21.8     24.3
April 1998     45.9     21.2     24.7
May 1998     47.8     21.3     26.5
June 1998     44.6     24.6     20.0
July 1998     44.8     27.6     17.2
August 1998     48.5     23.1     25.4
September 1998     35.4     25.2     10.2
October 1998     60.6     26.2     34.4
November 1998     44.8     21.5     23.3
December 1998     55.1     25.0     30.1
TOTAL     548.6     271.7     276.9

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1997
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1997     33.2     8.4     24.8
February 1997     36.1     12.0     24.1
March 1997     40.7     14.5     26.2
April 1997     40.2     16.4     23.8
May 1997     36.3     16.9     19.4
June 1997     36.9     17.4     19.5
July 1997     47.2     17.8     29.4
August 1997     43.6     15.6     28.0
September 1997     45.9     16.8     29.1
October 1997     46.9     18.3     28.6
November 1997     45.7     15.1     30.6
December 1997     46.4     19.1     27.3
TOTAL     499.1     188.3     310.8

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1996
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1996     34.2     7.1     27.1
February 1996     47.2     8.5     38.7
March 1996     36.1     10.6     25.5
April 1996     44.1     11.0     33.1
May 1996     50.7     12.0     38.7
June 1996     32.8     11.8     21.0
July 1996     34.5     14.2     20.3
August 1996     37.4     14.7     22.7
September 1996     33.7     13.7     20.0
October 1996     46.6     13.7     32.9
November 1996     42.9     12.2     30.7
December 1996     34.6     13.9     20.7
TOTAL     474.8     143.4     331.4

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1995
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1995     50.5     5.2     45.3
February 1995     42.5     13.2     29.3
March 1995     43.6     9.8     33.8
April 1995     37.9     10.3     27.6
May 1995     53.2     13.3     39.9
June 1995     53.1     13.5     39.6
July 1995     39.9     13.2     26.7
August 1995     41.5     13.3     28.2
September 1995     60.4     10.3     50.1
October 1995     47.4     10.0     37.4
November 1995     31.6     8.4     23.2
December 1995     48.5     9.4     39.1
TOTAL     550.1     129.9     420.2

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1994
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1994     14.9     7.0     7.9
February 1994     13.5     8.2     5.3
March 1994     18.1     10.8     7.3
April 1994     14.3     8.2     6.1
May 1994     8.4     12.6     -4.2
June 1994     7.0     1.7     5.3
July 1994     4.2     0.1     4.1
August 1994     2.7     0.2     2.5
September 1994     5.0     0.0     5.0
October 1994     20.9     0.9     20.0
November 1994     45.3     4.2     41.1
December 1994     50.1     4.8     45.3
TOTAL     204.4     58.7     145.7

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1993
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1993     15.2     7.0     8.2
February 1993     17.4     11.1     6.3
March 1993     17.8     13.3     4.5
April 1993     25.2     13.7     11.5
May 1993     22.0     13.2     8.8
June 1993     21.2     17.4     3.8
July 1993     14.7     14.0     0.7
August 1993     19.3     14.2     5.1
September 1993     31.0     14.8     16.2
October 1993     24.2     10.8     13.4
November 1993     7.6     12.1     -4.5
December 1993     13.0     12.5     0.5
TOTAL     228.6     154.1     74.5

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1992
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1992     11.7     0.5     11.2
February 1992     13.9     1.5     12.4
March 1992     13.9     7.5     6.4
April 1992     13.5     10.3     3.2
May 1992     19.2     10.5     8.7
June 1992     17.2     11.0     6.2
July 1992     17.5     11.5     6.0
August 1992     20.0     9.8     10.2
September 1992     19.5     11.6     7.9
October 1992     23.6     10.8     12.8
November 1992     19.5     10.3     9.2
December 1992     19.8     11.7     8.1
TOTAL     209.3     107.0     102.3

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1991
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1991     34.2     15.0     19.2
February 1991     29.9     22.2     7.7
March 1991     39.5     29.6     9.9
April 1991     43.0     27.3     15.7
May 1991     41.1     29.4     11.7
June 1991     39.8     28.0     11.8
July 1991     39.2     26.7     12.5
August 1991     43.3     27.9     15.4
September 1991     40.1     29.0     11.1
October 1991     26.9     21.5     5.4
November 1991     15.1     16.7     -1.6
December 1991     3.1     10.9     -7.8
TOTAL     395.2     284.2     111.0
* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1990
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1990     43.1     26.1     17.0
February 1990     34.8     30.6     4.2
March 1990     37.6     31.0     6.6
April 1990     35.1     29.0     6.1
May 1990     45.3     32.1     13.2
June 1990     39.6     27.6     12.0
July 1990     40.4     29.0     11.4
August 1990     41.6     28.8     12.8
September 1990     36.8     28.7     8.1
October 1990     45.6     28.6     17.0
November 1990     43.5     27.8     15.7
December 1990     33.1     23.7     9.4
TOTAL     476.5     343.0     133.5

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1989
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1989     39.0     19.6     19.4
February 1989     34.4     30.3     4.1
March 1989     42.4     37.0     5.4
April 1989     38.6     26.3     12.3
May 1989     44.6     34.6     10.0
June 1989     39.2     33.3     5.9
July 1989     34.8     33.0     1.8
August 1989     45.1     32.8     12.3
September 1989     44.9     33.8     11.1
October 1989     41.7     34.0     7.7
November 1989     31.1     28.4     2.7
December 1989     35.7     31.2     4.5
TOTAL     471.5     374.3     97.2

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1988
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1988     29.5     25.8     3.7
February 1988     33.3     30.1     3.2
March 1988     42.6     39.5     3.1
April 1988     39.3     30.6     8.7
May 1988     42.4     34.5     7.9
June 1988     40.9     34.1     6.8
July 1988     41.0     34.3     6.7
August 1988     43.0     32.8     10.2
September 1988     37.1     31.9     5.2
October 1988     40.8     30.0     10.8
November 1988     42.1     28.4     13.7
December 1988     43.0     30.5     12.5
TOTAL     475.0     382.5     92.5

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1987
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1987     28.8     23.4     5.4
February 1987     34.5     36.7     -2.2
March 1987     42.5     36.5     6.0
April 1987     38.9     31.8     7.1
May 1987     48.8     33.7     15.1
June 1987     39.8     32.9     6.9
July 1987     32.2     28.5     3.7
August 1987     38.0     35.7     2.3
September 1987     41.6     36.6     5.0
October 1987     40.8     37.3     3.5
November 1987     42.5     30.4     12.1
December 1987     30.5     31.2     -0.7
TOTAL     458.9     394.7     64.2

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1986
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1986     21.8     29.9     -8.1
February 1986     25.9     24.6     1.3
March 1986     32.6     33.3     -0.7
April 1986     29.7     28.6     1.1
May 1986     38.3     39.7     -1.4
June 1986     31.3     33.5     -2.2
July 1986     32.3     34.1     -1.8
August 1986     38.3     33.7     4.6
September 1986     34.6     29.2     5.4
October 1986     36.9     27.2     9.7
November 1986     36.1     34.6     1.5
December 1986     29.5     26.9     2.6
TOTAL     387.3     375.3     12.0

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Trade with Haiti : 1985
NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.
Month     Exports     Imports     Balance
January 1985     31.2     31.2     0.0
February 1985     31.8     30.4     1.4
March 1985     31.9     36.7     -4.8
April 1985     32.9     33.2     -0.3
May 1985     35.3     31.0     4.3
June 1985     28.8     39.6     -10.8
July 1985     33.3     30.2     3.1
August 1985     34.4     30.6     3.8
September 1985     29.7     27.2     2.5
October 1985     45.1     32.4     12.7
November 1985     34.7     32.0     2.7
December 1985     26.8     35.1     -8.3
TOTAL     395.9     389.6     6.3

* ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
* Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
* CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
* SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

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Additional Information

* Contact the Data Dissemination Branch of the Foreign Trade Division with any questions or for additional information.
* For information on data sources and methodology, check out the Information on the Collection and Publication of Trade Statistics.
* MORE DATA: Data for all countries are available online in a zipped Excel file. [Excel] or the letters [xls] indicate a document is in the Microsoft® Excel® Spreadsheet Format (XLS). To view the file, you will need the Microsoft® Excel® Viewer This link to a non-federal Web site does not imply endorsement of any particular product, company, or content. available for free from Microsoft®. This symbol Symbol indicating that file is external to this site. indicates a link to a non-government web site. Our linking to these sites does not constitute an endorsement of any products, services or the information found on them. Once you link to another site you are subject to the policies of the new site.

FTD Web News

Foreign Trade has GLOBAL REACH
Foreign Trade has just created and published its official blog,  Global Reach.  Visit it to discuss the Foreign Trade Regulations, Export Filing (AES), Trade Data, and other trade related topics. Posts are current and relevant to you as the filer, exporter, data user, or curious blog reader. (January 5, 2010)

FTZ: Guidelines for Submtting Statistical Data (PDF) (1.8 MB)
Guidelines and best practices for fulfilling FTZ’s statistical reporting requirements are now available.
NEW EXPORT TRAINING VIDEOS
– Training videos on topics such as the Foreign Trade Regulations, AESDirect, NAFTA, Taxes/Tariffs, Commodities, etc. now available

2009 Constant Dollar Data
– The Census Bureau identified a processing error that caused incorrect deflators to be applied to the revised data for 2009. The data have been corrected.

2009 DATA PRODUCT CHANGES
– U.S. Census Bureau will modify the structure of several data products to accommodate changing technology and user demand.

EXPORT COMPLIANCE SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS
– The export environment has dramatically changed. Come and understand what it takes to remain compliant, aware and out of trouble.

2003 AES Option 4 Moratorium
Option 4 Filing Review Process Suspended

AES Compliance Best Practices:
Best Practices for maintaining AES Compliance are now available.

Related Party Database Application:
Time series RELATED PARTY data for specific commodities and countries.

ORDER AND DOWNLOAD FOREIGN TRADE DATA PRODUCTS:
– Online Order Form
– FTD DropBox
– Merchandise Trade Downloads

NEW Schedule B Search Engine:
It’s new. It’s flexible. It has more options.

NEWEST TRADE DATA
– Get the basics
– Learn more
Get FTD Web News via e-mail

Source: FTDWebMaster, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, D.C. 20233
Location: MAIN: STATISTICS:COUNTRY DATA: TRADE BALANCE
Created: 12 January 2010
Last modified: 12 January 2010 at 08:32:14 AM
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Page Last Modified: January 12, 2010

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c2450.html

***

Foreign Trade has GLOBAL REACH
Foreign Trade has just created and published its official blog,  Global Reach.  Visit it to discuss the Foreign Trade Regulations, Export Filing (AES), Trade Data, and other trade related topics. Posts are current and relevant to you as the filer, exporter, data user, or curious blog reader. (January 5, 2010)

http://blogs.census.gov/globalreach/

***

Foreign Trade Division Directory and User Contacts
Name     Position     Phone     Notes:
William G. Bostic

Division Chief

301-763-2255
E-mail: william.g.bostic.jr@census.gov
Richard M. Preuss

Sr. Foreign Trade Advisor

301-763-2210
E-mail: richard.m.preuss@census.gov
<Vacant>

Ombudsman


E-mail:

Trade Analysis and Dissemination

Name     Position     Phone     Notes
Nick Orsini

Asst. Div. Chief

301-763-6959
E-mail: nick.orsini@census.gov
Commodity Analysis Branch
Paul Herrick

Branch Chief

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Classification Systems, Schedule B changes; Data analysis and review; Obtaining Harmonized Commodity Code for Imports and Exports: Non-Durable Goods (Food, animals, wood, chemicals,plastic articles, textiles and wearing apparel, linens and minerals) or Durable Goods: (Metals, machinery, vehicles, measuring and testing equipment, furniture and miscellaneous manufactured articles)

E-mail: paul.e.herrick@census.gov

** PLEASE include your full telephone number (area code, country code, etc.) with your message ***

Carol Aristone

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Foods Chapters 1-24 & 44-49
Textiles Chapters 41-43 & 50-67

E-mail: carol.ann.aristone@census.gov
Kristen Nespoli

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Chemicals Chapters 28-40
Minerals Chapters 25-27 & 68-71

E-mail: kristen.nespoli@census.gov
Katie Nelson

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Metals Chapters 72-83
Machinery Chapters 84-85

E-mail: kathryn.l.nelson@census.gov

Tracy Burns

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Transportation Chapters 86-89
Sundries Chapters 90-98

E-mail:
tracy.r.burns@census.gov
Carol Aristone

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Classification Systems

E-mail:
carol.ann.aristone@census.gov

Earle Patrick

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Technical Area

E-mail: earle.patrick@census.gov
Data Dissemination Branch
E-mail: ftd.data.dissemination@census.gov
Maria Iseman

Branch Chief

301-763-2311
E-mail: maria.a.iseman@census.gov
Joe Kafchinski

301-763-2311

Customized special reports and services

E-mail: joseph.e.kafchinski@census.gov
Reba Higbee

301-763-2227

Subscriptions for the FT900 Press Release and other monthly reports

E-mail: reba.h.higbee@census.gov
Barbara Sparks

301-763-2239

Selected commodity service subscriptions (a.k.a. DropBox subscriptions, IM145, IM146, EM545)

E-mail: barbara.l.sparks@census.gov

Data Systems

Name     Position     Phone     Notes
Diane Oberg

Acting
Asst. Div. Chief

301-763-2223
E-mail: diane.c.oberg@census.gov
Current Systems Programming Branch
Rachel Hall

Branch Chief

301-763-2214
E-mail: rachel.jacqueline.hall@census.gov
Cindy Kelton

301-763-2214

Data product orders

E-mail: cindy.m.kelton@census.gov
Customs Systems Programming Branch
Don Koller

Branch Chief

301-763-3003
E-mail: donald.koller@census.gov
Security Liason Staff
Clifford A. Jordan

Branch Chief

301-763-2318
E-mail: clifford.a.jordan@census.gov
System Design and Support Branch

Blake Sanders

Branch Chief

301-763-2234

E-mail: blake.r.sanders@census.gov
Lori Dickerson

301-763-2234

Web site design and maintenance

E-mail: ftdwebmaster@census.gov

Data Collection

Name     Position     Phone     Notes
Dale Kelly

Asst.
Div.
Chief

301-763-6937
E-mail: dale.c.kelly@census.gov
Data Collection Coordination Branch
Kelly Phou

Branch
Chief

301-763-2775
E-mail: kelly.s.phou@census.gov
Customs Systems Requirements Branch

Steve Bulman

Branch
Chief

301-763-2207

E-mail: steven.d.bulman@census.gov
Regulations, Outreach and Education Branch
Joe Cortez

Branch
Chief

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 3)
E-mail: joe.a.cortez@census.gov
AES Branch
Wendy Peebles

Branch
Chief

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 1)

E-mail: wendy.d.peebles@census.gov

Methodology, Coordination and Special Studies

Name     Position     Phone     Notes
David Dickerson

Asst.
Div.
Chief

301-763-7037
E-mail: david.m.dickerson@census.gov
Special Projects Branch
Glenn Barresse

Branch
Chief

301-763-3629

State data; Profile of U.S. exporters

E-mail: glenn.a.barresse@census.gov
Methodology Research & Quality AssuranceBranch
Debra Coaxum

Branch
Chief

301-763-7036
E-mail: debra.l.coaxum@census.gov
Process Coordination Staff
Matthew Pryzbocki

Branch
Chief

301-763-3148
E-mail: Matthew.J.Przybocki@census.gov

All staff members not listed:
Any staff member not specifically listed above can be located using the U.S. Census Bureau’s staff search.

E-mailing contacts: The link on each of the contact names is set up to open your browser’s e-mail program, open a new message and address that message. If you click on that link and nothing happens (i.e. no blank message opens), manually open your e-mail program and use the e-mail address listed under NOTES.

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/contacts/whowho.html#data_dissemination

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Introduction

The goods data are compiled from the documents collected by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and reflect the movement of goods between foreign countries and the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and U.S. Foreign Trade Zones. They include government and non-government shipments of goods, and exclude shipments between the United States and its territories and possessions, transactions with U.S. military, diplomatic and consular installations abroad, U.S. goods returned to the United States by its Armed Forces, personal and household effects of travelers, and in-transit shipments. The General Imports value reflects the total arrival of merchandise from foreign countries that immediately enters consumption channels, warehouses, or Foreign Trade Zones. Imports for Consumption measure the total of merchandise that has physically cleared through Customs either entering consumption channels immediately or entering after withdrawal for consumption from bonded warehouses under Customs custody or from Foreign Trade Zones.

For imports, the value reported is the U.S. Customs and Border Protection appraised value of merchandise; generally, the price paid for merchandise for export to the United States. Import duties, freight, insurance, and other charges incurred in bringing merchandise to the United States are excluded.
Exports are valued at the free alongside ship (f.a.s) value of merchandise at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of exportation.

Monthly data include actual month’s transactions as well as a small number of transactions for previous months. SITC and country detail data are not revised monthly. These data are revised annually to eliminate  carry-over  (that portion of the monthly statistics that arrives too late for inclusion in the transaction month) and to include errata (corrections to the published monthly data).

Methods of Classification

*
Schedule B

The export statistics are initially collected and compiled in terms of commodity classifications in the Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Domestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United States. Schedule B is a U.S. Bureau of the Census publication and is based on the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (Harmonized System).
*
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated for Statistical Reporting Purposes (HTSUSA)

The import statistics are initially collected and compiled in terms of commodity classifications in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated for Statistical Reporting Purposes (HTSUSA) [Not a Census web site], an official publication of the U.S. International Trade Commission. The HTSUSA is the U.S. import version of the Harmonized System.

*
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC)

The SITC is a statistical classification of commodities designed by the United Nations. It is designed to provide the commodity aggregations needed for purposes of economic analysis and to facilitate the international comparison of trade by commodity. The Harmonized System and SITC Revision 3 are interrelated. For more details, see  What is the SITC classification system?  at: http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/sec2.html#sitc.
*
End-Use Classification

The HTSUSA and Schedule B classifications are summarized into six principal  end-use  categories and further subdivided into about 140 broad commodity groupings. These categories are used in developing seasonally adjusted and constant dollar totals. The concept of end-use demand was developed for balance of payments purposes by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Steel 201 Remedy in Effect

To facilitate positive adjustment to competition from imports of certain steel products, in March 2002 the President signed into law a relief program for the domestic steel industry. This program has come to be known as  Steel 201  named after Section 201 of the Trade Act of 1974. For more information on Section 201 Steel Products, see the United States Trade Representative (USTR) steel section at: http://www.ustr.gov/sectors/industry/steel201/background.htm [Not a Census web site].
U.S./Canada Data Exchange and Substitution

The data for U.S. exports to Canada are derived from import data compiled by Canada. The use of Canada’s import data to produce U.S. export data requires several alignments in order to compare the two series.

* Coverage — Canadian imports are based on country of origin. U.S. goods shipped from a third country are included. U.S. exports exclude these foreign shipments and excludes certain Canadian postal shipments.

* Valuation — Canadian imports are valued at point of origin in the United States. However, U.S. exports are valued at the port of exit in the United States and include inland freight charges, making the U.S. export value slightly larger. Canada requires inland freight to be reported.

* Reexports — U.S. exports include reexports of foreign goods. Again, the aggregate U. S. export figure is slightly larger.

* Exchange Rate — Average monthly exchange rates are applied to convert the published data to U.S. currency.

* Other — There are other minor differences which are statistically insignificant, such as rounding error.

Canadian Estimates

Effective with January 2001 statistics, the current month data for exports to Canada contain an estimate for late arrivals and corrections. The following month, this estimate will be replaced, in the press release tables only, with the actual value of late receipts and corrections. This estimate will improve the current month data for exports to Canada and treat late receipts for exports to Canada in a manner more consistent with the treatment of late receipts for exports to other countries.
http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/reference/guides/tradestatsinfo.html#intro

***

U.S. law helps mend Haiti’s torn economy.
Chicago Tribune (Chicago, IL) | June 1, 2007 | COPYRIGHT 2007 Chicago Tribune. This material is published under license from the publisher through the Gale Group, Farmington Hills, Michigan.  All inquiries regarding rights should be directed to the Gale Group. (Hide copyright information) Copyright

Byline: Gary Marx

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti _ Six months after closing his garment factory and laying off 800 workers, Georges Sassine is preparing to reopen the plant thanks to a recent U.S. law allowing more Haitian-made apparel into the American market duty-free.

The law, the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership Encouragement Act, or HOPE, could create 50,000 jobs in Haiti in the next few years and provide a boost to the hemisphere’s most impoverished nation, diplomats and industry leaders say. The law went into effect in March.

http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-164320966.html

***

False H.O.P.E. for Haiti
PostDateIcon Fri, 12/01/2006 – 6:25pm | PostAuthorIcon tomr

Tom Ricker, Quixote Center

Amidst a crowded lame duck calendar, a few members of Congress are marketing H.O.P.E. for Haiti â “ the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity through Partnership Encouragement Act. HOPE will bring desperately needed apparel jobs to Haiti, it is argued. Indeed, according to a Washington Post editorial on Monday, November 27, 2006: â œAfter 15 years of political turmoil, violent unrest and economic mismanagement, this looks like a rare opportunity to consolidate tentative progress in Haiti. Congress shouldn’t miss it.â

I disagree. Right now Congress has many opportunities to make a sustainable contribution to progress in Haiti, but the HOPE act is not one of them. The bill may create a few low-paying and precarious sweatshop jobs, but it will also reinforce a flawed model of development that has been failing Haitians for two decades. If Congress really wants to provide hope to the majority of Haitians who are desperately poor, it will forego the quick fix of a rushed lame duck session, in favor of a thoughtful and holistic program that would respond sustainably to Haiti’s economic development needs.

HOPE Background

The HOPE act would provide tariff-free access to the United States market for apparel made in Haiti. This is not a completely new program. For years Haiti has been part of the Caribbean Basin Initiative, and under these rules has had tariff-free access to the U.S. market for apparel since 2000. The caveat is that the fabric has to be made in the United States. Prior to CBI expansion, the U.S. government provided tariff reductions for apparel made with U.S. fabrics under special provisions of the customs code. These rules facilitated the expansion of apparel assembly in Haiti, a sector that employed over 100,000 workers by the mid-1980s.

The new, and more controversial part of HOPE is the extension of tariff free access to apparel made in Haiti, even if the fabric is not from the United States. There are limits – preferences are primarily extended to fabric from countries that have free trade agreements with the United States. Manufacturers in Haiti would be allowed to use fabric from other sources as well, but there are caps on the volume of this fabric, and the way the bill is written, these caps are reduced over the five-year life span of the bill.

Apparel is an important export sector for Haiti, and over the recent past Haiti has become even more dependent on it. Since 1990 the share of Haiti’s exports to the United States represented by apparel has increased from 45% to 90%. In value terms, apparel exports have nearly double since 2001. However, employment has lagged in this sector as companies have shifted production contracts elsewhere and political conflict has scared some investors off. A recent increase in apparel exports has been driven by producers from the Dominican Republic shifting production to Haiti, especially Grupo M, to take advantage of the proximity of lower wages, and weaker unions. Yet, despite these recent trends employment in this sector is still below 20,000 today.

The HOPE Act may come up for a vote during the final week of the lame duck session that begins on December 4. If this were the case, it would be bundled with other preference programs that are due to expire on December 31, such as market preference programs with the Andean region, countries in southern Africa and the General System of Preferences. The Congress Trade Daily from November 30, however, reports that HOPE may be dropped from this package and taken up in the next session of Congress. This would ease the way for the less contentious preference programs to get through.

False HOPE

As currently constructed the HOPE Act would have a marginal impact on employment in Haiti, and what â œsuccessâ   it would have is ultimately based on more effectively exploiting Haiti’s poverty. The apparel industry is in a global transformation amidst changes in international quota systems, and the explosion of assembly manufacturing in Asia. Keeping Haiti competitive in this environment means keeping wages low and workers un-organized, and even then there are no guarantees that the jobs will stay long. A temporary expansion of tariff-free access for third country fabric does not solve the underlying problem. Indeed, by placing so much emphasis on apparel HOPE actually deepens economic insecurity in Haiti, instead of alleviating it.

Groups supporting Haitian workers and Haiti’s poor should welcome the likely delay in the HOPE Act. A new Congress will be able to take up the bill early in the session, and with new leadership craft a bill that provides sustainable economic opportunities for Haiti’s poor. A real HOPE bill would help create jobs beyond Haiti’s sweatshops, especially in the agricultural sector, and would strengthen the Haitian government’s ability to develop the economy and provide basic government services to its citizens.

A Better HOPE

The single greatest generator of unemployment in Haiti over the past twenty years has been the destruction of the rural economy. The loss of economic opportunity in the countryside has translated into a wholly unsustainable urban migration. Urban communities in Port-au-Prince, Gonaives, Port de Paix and elsewhere are straining unsuccessfully to absorb dislocated peasants and their families into the blossoming slums, that lack the housing, water, schools and jobs the migrants need.

The current HOPE Act does nothing to address this fundamental problem, but other measures within Congress’ grasp would. A real HOPE Act would provide Haiti’s government the flexibility to adjust tariff levels to protect its agricultural producers, just as the U.S. does. Although support for Haitian agriculture would not reverse the destruction already wrought by years of lowest tariffs in the Caribbean, it could give families still trying to scrape out a living in the rural economy a fighting chance would help stabilize employment far more than creating sweatshops.

Another approach a new HOPE could take would be to shift funds for development away from project based grants and loans, delivered primarily through the non-governmental sector, to direct support for government ministries in Haiti.

Haiti has the lowest public sector employment in the region, less than 0.7 percent. Not coincidentally, it has the worst public education and health systems in the Americas.. Most education and health care is currently provided by non-governmental organizations, including networks of church based programs. These programs often fill in important gaps, but over time ultimately further undermine the public sector’s capacity. In the long run, rebuilding the existing public infrastructure in health and education has to happen if Haiti has any chance to break the cycle of underdevelopment it is currently trapped in.

Encouraging private sector employment through tariff preferences, as in the current HOPE Act could also be pursued, but not in a vacuum. Worker rights need to be protected, and not with boilerplate labor clauses that go un-enforced. This should not take place through unilateral mandates issued by the U.S. Congress, essentially blackmailing the government to comply or loose benefits. Enforcement should evolve through dialogue, and direct support for the ministries that would be responsible. Further there must be an absolute insistence on protecting workers rights to organize and collectively bargain. The best guarantor of worker rights is an organized work force.

Finally, an alternative HOPE could flourish if Congress will take what steps it can to insist that Haiti’s debts be cancelled immediately and unconditionally. The Inter-American Development Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank have already agreed to cancel a large portion of Haiti’s debt. But the current program requires that Haiti wait at least two years (more likely three) meet a host of invasive policy conditions, and then face continued indebtedness anyway because the debt â œreliefâ   targets will still leave Haiti with a debt burden. Canceling Haiti’s debt outright today would free up $50-70 million a year, and provide the government many opportunities to engage in the public investment mentioned above.

http://quixote.org/false-hope-haiti

***

COMMITTEE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS

Limitation of Duty-free Imports of Apparel Articles Assembled in Haiti under the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership for Encouragement Act (HOPE)
December 14, 2009.

AGENCY: Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA).

ACTION: Notification of Annual Quantitative Limit on Certain Apparel under HOPE.

EFFECTIVE DATE: December 17, 2009

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Dybczak, International Trade Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of Commerce, (202) 482-3651.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
Authority: The Caribbean Basin Recovery Act ( CBERA ), as amended by the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership for Encouragement Act of 2006 (collectively,  HOPE ), Title V of the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 and the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 ( HOPE II ); and Presidential Proclamation No. 8114, 72 Fed. Reg. 13655, 13659 (March 22, 2007) ( Proclamation ).

HOPE provides for duty-free treatment for certain apparel articles imported directly from Haiti. Section 213A (b)(1)(B) of HOPE outlines the requirements for certain apparel articles to qualify for duty-free treatment under a  value-added  program. In order to qualify for duty-free treatment, apparel articles must be wholly assembled, or knit-to-shape, in Haiti from any combination of fabrics, fabric components, components knit-to-shape, and yarns, as long as the sum of the cost or value of materials produced in Haiti or one or more countries, as described in HOPE, or any combination thereof, plus the direct costs of processing operations performed in Haiti or one or more countries, as described in HOPE, or any combination thereof, is not less than an applicable percentage of the declared customs value of such apparel articles. For the period December 20, 2009 through December 19, 2010, the applicable percentage is 55 percent.

For every twelve month period following the effective date of HOPE, duty-free treatment under the value-added program is subject to a quantitative limitation. HOPE provides that the quantitative limitation will be recalculated for each subsequent 12-month period. Section 213A (b)(1)(C) of HOPE, as amended by HOPE II, requires that, for the twelve-month period beginning on December 20, 2009, the quantitative limitation for qualifying apparel imported from Haiti under the value-added program will be an amount equivalent to 1.25 percent of the aggregate square meter equivalent of all apparel articles imported into the United States in the most recent 12-month period for which data are available.

For purposes of this notice, the most recent 12-month period for which data are available as of December 20, 2009 is the 12-month period ending on October 31, 2009. Therefore, for the one-year period beginning on December 20, 2009 and extending through December 19, 2010, the quantity of imports eligible for preferential treatment under the value-added program is 284,904,116 square meters equivalent. Apparel articles entered in excess of these quantities will be subject to otherwise applicable tariffs.

These quantities are calculated using the aggregate square meters equivalent of all apparel articles imported into the United States, derived from the set of Harmonized System lines listed in the Annex to the World Trade Organization Agreement on Textiles and Clothing ( ATC ), and the conversion factors for units of measure into square meter equivalents used by the United States in implementing the ATC.

Kimberly Glas,
Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements.

[FR Doc.09-0000 Filed 0-00-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DS

http://otexa.ita.doc.gov/fr2008/haitihope1%2812-09%29.htm

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_____________________________________
___________                             |                                     |                               January 7, 2010
|           |                            |        MAJOR SHIPPERS REPORT        |
|  HAITI    |                            |              By Country             |
|___________|                            | Data through 11/2009 in Million SME |
|_____________________________________|

Calendar Years       Year-to-Date                 Year-Endings                             YE 11/2009
Ctrl, Cat, Product        2007      2008    11/2008   11/2009  % Change   11/2008    9/2009   10/2009   11/2009  % Change % Share

Aggregations:
0 Total           247.114   222.441   203.301   217.068      6.77   220.967   234.187   231.623   236.207     6.90    0.51
1 Apparel         247.100   222.379   203.283   217.037      6.77   220.949   234.132   231.567   236.133     6.87    1.11
2 Non-Apparel       0.014     0.062     0.018     0.031     71.10     0.018     0.055     0.055     0.074   315.47    0.00
11 Yarns             0.000     0.001     0.001     0.000   -100.00     0.001     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00
12 Fabrics           0.000     0.042     0.000     0.007       *       0.000     0.044     0.044     0.049      *      0.00
14 Made Ups / Misc   0.014     0.019     0.017     0.024     37.29     0.017     0.012     0.012     0.025    44.86    0.00
30 Cotton Products 151.307   181.438   164.632   182.478     10.84   177.002   200.460   196.341   199.284    12.59    1.02
31 Cotton Apparel  151.294   181.437   164.631   182.476     10.84   177.001   200.457   196.337   199.282    12.59    1.59
32 Cot Non-Apparel   0.013     0.001     0.001     0.003     81.89     0.001     0.003     0.003     0.003    81.89    0.00
40 Wool Products     0.011     0.169     0.162     0.891    449.99     0.163     0.630     0.744     0.898   449.96    0.31
41 Wool Apparel      0.011     0.169     0.162     0.891    450.21     0.163     0.630     0.744     0.898   450.18    0.39
42 Wool Non-Appare   0.000     0.000     0.000     0.000   -100.00     0.000     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00
60 MMF Products     95.794    40.831    38.504    33.690    -12.50    43.798    33.088    34.530    36.017   -17.77    0.14
61 MMF Apparel      95.794    40.773    38.490    33.662    -12.54    43.784    33.036    34.478    35.945   -17.90    0.44
62 MMF Non-Apparel   0.000     0.058     0.014     0.028     99.43     0.014     0.052     0.052     0.072   411.26    0.00
80 S and V Product   0.001     0.003     0.003     0.009    168.24     0.003     0.009     0.009     0.009   168.24    0.00
81 S and V Apparel   0.000     0.001     0.001     0.009    835.75     0.001     0.009     0.009     0.009   835.75    0.00
82 S and V Non-App   0.001     0.002     0.002     0.000   -100.00     0.002     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00

Cotton or Man-Made Fiber:
237 Playsuit,Sunsui   0.007     0.163     0.163     0.000   -100.00     0.163     0.050     0.002     0.000  -100.00    0.00

Cotton:
338 Knit Shirts,MB   85.520    99.187    88.783    98.576     11.03    96.995   112.778   108.559   108.980    12.36   10.88
339 W/G Knit Blouse   4.504     2.722     2.567     3.201     24.71     2.811     3.329     3.241     3.356    19.38    0.26
347 Cot.M/B Trouser   5.173     6.651     6.333     7.162     13.10     6.853     7.054     7.124     7.481     9.16    0.72
348 W/G Slacks, etc   0.125     1.025     0.897     3.505    290.77     0.897     2.481     3.063     3.633   305.11    0.23
352 Cotton Underwea  54.879    71.052    65.303    68.908      5.52    68.649    73.672    73.246    74.657     8.75    4.26

Wool:
433 Suit-Typ Ct,MB    0.000     0.006     0.006     0.270   4689.30     0.006     0.173     0.215     0.270  4703.21    1.65
434 Oth. Coats, M/B   0.000     0.146     0.142     0.295    106.97     0.142     0.207     0.239     0.299   109.59    1.52
443 Wool Suits,M/B    0.000     0.000     0.000     0.124       *       0.000     0.115     0.119     0.124      *      0.68
447 Wool Trousers,M   0.000     0.005     0.004     0.144   3773.68     0.004     0.100     0.120     0.145  3820.24    0.98

Man-Made Fiber:
634 Other Coats, MB   2.730     1.008     1.007     0.032    -96.81     1.227     0.050     0.031     0.033   -97.27    0.01
635 Coats, W/G        0.791     1.421     1.415     0.099    -92.98     1.647     0.215     0.090     0.105   -93.62    0.02
638 Knit Shirts, MB  81.619    27.928    26.502    14.405    -45.65    30.562    16.293    16.317    15.831   -48.20    2.94
639 Knit Blouses,WG   0.009     0.001     0.001     0.671  46546.96     0.001     0.201     0.606     0.671 46546.96    0.11
640 N-K Shirts, MB    2.272     2.456     2.262     2.818     24.56     2.456     2.743     2.800     3.012    22.63    2.51
641 N-K Blouses, WG   0.013     0.210     0.177     1.016    474.63     0.177     0.911     0.976     1.049   493.40    0.63
647 Trousers,etc MB   5.747     5.836     5.581     3.462    -37.96     6.059     3.543     3.438     3.718   -38.64    0.87
648 Slacks,etc. WG    0.508     0.688     0.554     2.729    392.51     0.613     2.462     2.630     2.864   366.97    0.86
651 Nightwear/PJs     0.783     0.287     0.204     0.821    303.16     0.221     0.875     0.889     0.904   309.33    0.15
652 M-MF Underwear    0.258     0.365     0.330     2.336    608.14     0.340     1.697     2.065     2.371   597.16    0.45
659 Oth. MMF App.     0.989     0.462     0.352     4.886   1287.81     0.372     3.655     4.240     4.996  1244.70    0.25

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http://otexa.ita.doc.gov/msrcty/a2450.htm

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