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What is required for me to ship charity goods to Haiti?

Posted by Global Reach on January 22, 2010 12:05:42 PM   0

By Omari

On Tuesday, January 12, 2010, a major earthquake struck southern Haiti. Many U.S. residents and organizations are generously donating food, water, medicines, and other supplies to aid in the relief efforts. In order to facilitate the movements of these goods, we offer the following guidance that applies to any goods not requiring a license, such as food, clothing, and medicines.

Schedule B Numbers

There are four Schedule B numbers that can be used when exporting humanitarian goods. Those numbers are found in Chapter 98 of the Schedule B book, under subheading 9802.

  • 9802.10.0000 Food products
  • 9802.20.0000 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products
  • 9802.30.0000 Wearing apparel (including footwear and headwear)
  • 9802.40.0000 Donated articles, not elsewhere specified

Any shipment valued over $2,500 per Schedule B number or that requires a license must be filed in the AES. However, if the shipment is valued less than $2,500 per Schedule B number and does not require a license, then the low value exemption (NOEEI FTR 30.37(a)) can be used. In this case, food, clothing, and medicines do not require a license; however, medical equipment and tools may require an export license.

The Export Information Code to be reported is “CH” for shipments of goods donated for relief or charity.

04 - OW
The value to be reported is the market value. If that value is not known, estimate how much you would receive if you sold the goods. The value should be consistent with the goods being exported, to avoid confusion and possible delays with U.S. Customs & Border Protection officers at the port of export.

There are different ways to file your export information. The most common is to report through the Census Bureau’s free Internet based filing system called AESDirect. We have provided training videos to help you get started with AESDirect. Another option is to file with a forwarder or agent who may be more familiar with export licensing and regulations.

Read more: What is required for me to ship charity goods to Haiti?

***

U.S. Exports to China
November Trade Data Released

Posted by Global Reach on January 12, 2010 06:02:16 AM   0
By Fay

Monthly Overview:

The Nation’s international trade deficit in goods and services increased to $36.4 billion in November from $33.2 billion (revised) in October. The increase in the deficit occurred as exports rose less than imports. The rise in exports was the seventh consecutive monthly increase.

Selected Highlight:

U.S. exports to China in November ($7.3 billion) were a record high, beating the record set last month ($6.9 billion) by $469 million. While the last two months have been record highs the year-to-date exports to China ($61.2 billion) are still down from last year ($64.6 billion). Check back next month to see if December exports manage to climb high enough to make the 2009 figures beat 2008  Below are a few commodities driving the export figures:

* Soybeans have more than accounted for the increase in exports to China for the last two months. Soybean exports to China totaled $2.0 billion this month, 27% of U.S. total exports to China. This increase is being caused in part by a shortage of soybeans in Argentina due to a drought.
* Semiconductor exports to China are down by $1.5 billion so far this year, accounting for almost half of the year-to-date decrease in exports to China. Semiconductor exports to China are still considerable totaling $4.6 billion through November; they are the second largest commodity export to China, behind soybeans with $7.5 billion. Aircraft is the third largest export to China at $4.5 billion.

* You can find more commodity by country detail our website.

U.S. Exports to China

Read more: November Trade Data Released
Welcome to Electronic Export Filing

Welcome to Export Regulations

Posted by Global Reach on January 6, 2010 05:12:54 AM   9

By Omari

In the world of exporting, it’s important to be proactive, instead of reactive. Not knowing is not an excuse  Whether you are a small business, first time exporter, or a large multinational corporation, you are in control of your company’s compliance as it pertains to exporting laws and requirements.

As the Trade Ombudsman for the U.S. Census Bureau, I travel the nation and work with all types of companies involved in the exporting process. I offer advice and clarifications on the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), solutions to problems regarding the Automated Export System (AES) and assist with a wide range of other topics. However, one of the most important messages I convey is that the Foreign Trade Division (FTD) of the U.S. Census Bureau is available to assist you with your exporting questions and concerns. Our goal is to provide you with tools and resources to maintain export compliance. We reach out to the trade community through various methods to provide a better understanding of your roles and responsibilities in the export transaction. Our outreach efforts include, but are not limited to:

Read more: Welcome to Export Regulations

« Global Reach Main Page

* Foreign Trade Web Site
* About Global Reach
* Blogger Biographies
* Comment Policy

http://blogs.census.gov/globalreach/

***

***

Foreign Trade Division Directory and User Contacts
Name     Position     Phone     Notes:
William G. Bostic

Division Chief

301-763-2255
E-mail: william.g.bostic.jr@census.gov
Richard M. Preuss

Sr. Foreign Trade Advisor

301-763-2210
E-mail: richard.m.preuss@census.gov
<Vacant>

Ombudsman


E-mail:

Trade Analysis and Dissemination

Name     Position     Phone     Notes
Nick Orsini

Asst. Div. Chief

301-763-6959
E-mail: nick.orsini@census.gov
Commodity Analysis Branch
Paul Herrick

Branch Chief

800-549-0595
(Menu Option 2)

Classification Systems, Schedule B changes; Data analysis and review; Obtaining Harmonized Commodity Code for Imports and Exports: Non-Durable Goods (Food, animals, wood, chemicals,plastic articles, textiles and wearing apparel, linens and minerals) or Durable Goods: (Metals, machinery, vehicles, measuring and testing equipment, furniture and miscellaneous manufactured articles)

E-mail: paul.e.herrick@census.gov

** PLEASE include your full telephone number (area code, country code, etc.) with your message ***

Special Projects Branch
Glenn Barresse

Branch
Chief

301-763-3629

State data; Profile of U.S. exporters

E-mail: glenn.a.barresse@census.gov
Methodology Research & Quality AssuranceBranch
Debra Coaxum

Branch
Chief

301-763-7036
E-mail: debra.l.coaxum@census.gov
Process Coordination Staff
Matthew Pryzbocki

Branch
Chief

301-763-3148
E-mail: Matthew.J.Przybocki@census.gov

All staff members not listed:
Any staff member not specifically listed above can be located using the U.S. Census Bureau’s staff search.

E-mailing contacts: The link on each of the contact names is set up to open your browser’s e-mail program, open a new message and address that message. If you click on that link and nothing happens (i.e. no blank message opens), manually open your e-mail program and use the e-mail address listed under NOTES.
(from – )


http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/contacts/whowho.html#data_dissemination

***

Introduction

The goods data are compiled from the documents collected by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection and reflect the movement of goods between foreign countries and the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and U.S. Foreign Trade Zones. They include government and non-government shipments of goods, and exclude shipments between the United States and its territories and possessions, transactions with U.S. military, diplomatic and consular installations abroad, U.S. goods returned to the United States by its Armed Forces, personal and household effects of travelers, and in-transit shipments. The General Imports value reflects the total arrival of merchandise from foreign countries that immediately enters consumption channels, warehouses, or Foreign Trade Zones. Imports for Consumption measure the total of merchandise that has physically cleared through Customs either entering consumption channels immediately or entering after withdrawal for consumption from bonded warehouses under Customs custody or from Foreign Trade Zones.

For imports, the value reported is the U.S. Customs and Border Protection appraised value of merchandise; generally, the price paid for merchandise for export to the United States. Import duties, freight, insurance, and other charges incurred in bringing merchandise to the United States are excluded.

Exports are valued at the free alongside ship (f.a.s) value of merchandise at the U.S. port of export, based on the transaction price including inland freight, insurance and other charges incurred in placing the merchandise alongside the carrier at the U.S. port of exportation.

Monthly data include actual month’s transactions as well as a small number of transactions for previous months. SITC and country detail data are not revised monthly. These data are revised annually to eliminate  carry-over  (that portion of the monthly statistics that arrives too late for inclusion in the transaction month) and to include errata (corrections to the published monthly data).

Methods of Classification

*
Schedule B

The export statistics are initially collected and compiled in terms of commodity classifications in the Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Domestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United States. Schedule B is a U.S. Bureau of the Census publication and is based on the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (Harmonized System).
*
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated for Statistical Reporting Purposes (HTSUSA)

The import statistics are initially collected and compiled in terms of commodity classifications in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States Annotated for Statistical Reporting Purposes (HTSUSA) [Not a Census web site], an official publication of the U.S. International Trade Commission. The HTSUSA is the U.S. import version of the Harmonized System.

*
Standard International Trade Classification (SITC)

The SITC is a statistical classification of commodities designed by the United Nations. It is designed to provide the commodity aggregations needed for purposes of economic analysis and to facilitate the international comparison of trade by commodity. The Harmonized System and SITC Revision 3 are interrelated. For more details, see  What is the SITC classification system?  at: http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/sec2.html#sitc.
*
End-Use Classification

The HTSUSA and Schedule B classifications are summarized into six principal  end-use  categories and further subdivided into about 140 broad commodity groupings. These categories are used in developing seasonally adjusted and constant dollar totals. The concept of end-use demand was developed for balance of payments purposes by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Steel 201 Remedy in Effect

To facilitate positive adjustment to competition from imports of certain steel products, in March 2002 the President signed into law a relief program for the domestic steel industry. This program has come to be known as  Steel 201  named after Section 201 of the Trade Act of 1974. For more information on Section 201 Steel Products, see the United States Trade Representative (USTR) steel section at: http://www.ustr.gov/sectors/industry/steel201/background.htm [Not a Census web site].
U.S./Canada Data Exchange and Substitution

The data for U.S. exports to Canada are derived from import data compiled by Canada. The use of Canada’s import data to produce U.S. export data requires several alignments in order to compare the two series.

* Coverage — Canadian imports are based on country of origin. U.S. goods shipped from a third country are included. U.S. exports exclude these foreign shipments and excludes certain Canadian postal shipments.

* Valuation — Canadian imports are valued at point of origin in the United States. However, U.S. exports are valued at the port of exit in the United States and include inland freight charges, making the U.S. export value slightly larger. Canada requires inland freight to be reported.

* Reexports — U.S. exports include reexports of foreign goods. Again, the aggregate U. S. export figure is slightly larger.

* Exchange Rate — Average monthly exchange rates are applied to convert the published data to U.S. currency.

* Other — There are other minor differences which are statistically insignificant, such as rounding error.

Canadian Estimates

Effective with January 2001 statistics, the current month data for exports to Canada contain an estimate for late arrivals and corrections. The following month, this estimate will be replaced, in the press release tables only, with the actual value of late receipts and corrections. This estimate will improve the current month data for exports to Canada and treat late receipts for exports to Canada in a manner more consistent with the treatment of late receipts for exports to other countries.

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/reference/guides/tradestatsinfo.html#intro

***

Trade with Haiti : 2009

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 2009 47.5 20.9 26.6
February 2009 70.9 40.7 30.2
March 2009 82.2 44.5 37.7
April 2009 66.8 43.6 23.2
May 2009 77.7 51.5 26.2
June 2009 57.7 56.5 1.2
July 2009 72.9 54.9 17.9
August 2009 64.3 50.8 13.5
September 2009 60.1 49.5 10.6
October 2009 63.4 44.5 18.9
November 2009 66.7 46.0 20.7
TOTAL 730.2 503.4 226.8
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

Trade with Haiti : 2008

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 2008 49.6 19.0 30.6
February 2008 67.4 28.1 39.3
March 2008 74.3 33.1 41.1
April 2008 63.1 37.9 25.2
May 2008 71.4 41.6 29.9
June 2008 68.9 41.8 27.1
July 2008 85.1 50.4 34.8
August 2008 93.6 36.6 57.0
September 2008 120.8 46.3 74.5
October 2008 95.6 45.4 50.2
November 2008 84.3 32.3 52.0
December 2008 69.9 37.7 32.2
TOTAL 944.0 450.1 493.9
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

Trade with Haiti : 2002

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 2002 34.3 13.9 20.4
February 2002 38.0 16.3 21.7
March 2002 43.8 21.8 22.0
April 2002 49.8 20.3 29.5
May 2002 57.0 26.0 31.0
June 2002 44.6 20.7 23.9
July 2002 52.4 23.5 28.9
August 2002 42.9 21.6 21.3
September 2002 40.6 24.4 16.2
October 2002 54.5 22.5 32.0
November 2002 58.3 18.2 40.1
December 2002 57.0 26.0 31.0
TOTAL 573.2 255.2 318.0
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

MY Note –

See all of these tables for each year through 2009 from 1985  on the link below the charts. There is no real trade imbalance until the H.O.P.E. tariff incentives and a variety of economic development funds poured into Haiti from the United States and International communities.

– cricketdiane

**

Trade with Haiti : 1994

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1994 14.9 7.0 7.9
February 1994 13.5 8.2 5.3
March 1994 18.1 10.8 7.3
April 1994 14.3 8.2 6.1
May 1994 8.4 12.6 -4.2
June 1994 7.0 1.7 5.3
July 1994 4.2 0.1 4.1
August 1994 2.7 0.2 2.5
September 1994 5.0 0.0 5.0
October 1994 20.9 0.9 20.0
November 1994 45.3 4.2 41.1
December 1994 50.1 4.8 45.3
TOTAL 204.4 58.7 145.7
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1993

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1993 15.2 7.0 8.2
February 1993 17.4 11.1 6.3
March 1993 17.8 13.3 4.5
April 1993 25.2 13.7 11.5
May 1993 22.0 13.2 8.8
June 1993 21.2 17.4 3.8
July 1993 14.7 14.0 0.7
August 1993 19.3 14.2 5.1
September 1993 31.0 14.8 16.2
October 1993 24.2 10.8 13.4
November 1993 7.6 12.1 -4.5
December 1993 13.0 12.5 0.5
TOTAL 228.6 154.1 74.5
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1992

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1992 11.7 0.5 11.2
February 1992 13.9 1.5 12.4
March 1992 13.9 7.5 6.4
April 1992 13.5 10.3 3.2
May 1992 19.2 10.5 8.7
June 1992 17.2 11.0 6.2
July 1992 17.5 11.5 6.0
August 1992 20.0 9.8 10.2
September 1992 19.5 11.6 7.9
October 1992 23.6 10.8 12.8
November 1992 19.5 10.3 9.2
December 1992 19.8 11.7 8.1
TOTAL 209.3 107.0 102.3
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1991

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1991 34.2 15.0 19.2
February 1991 29.9 22.2 7.7
March 1991 39.5 29.6 9.9
April 1991 43.0 27.3 15.7
May 1991 41.1 29.4 11.7
June 1991 39.8 28.0 11.8
July 1991 39.2 26.7 12.5
August 1991 43.3 27.9 15.4
September 1991 40.1 29.0 11.1
October 1991 26.9 21.5 5.4
November 1991 15.1 16.7 -1.6
December 1991 3.1 10.9 -7.8
TOTAL 395.2 284.2 111.0
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1990

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1990 43.1 26.1 17.0
February 1990 34.8 30.6 4.2
March 1990 37.6 31.0 6.6
April 1990 35.1 29.0 6.1
May 1990 45.3 32.1 13.2
June 1990 39.6 27.6 12.0
July 1990 40.4 29.0 11.4
August 1990 41.6 28.8 12.8
September 1990 36.8 28.7 8.1
October 1990 45.6 28.6 17.0
November 1990 43.5 27.8 15.7
December 1990 33.1 23.7 9.4
TOTAL 476.5 343.0 133.5
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1989

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1989 39.0 19.6 19.4
February 1989 34.4 30.3 4.1
March 1989 42.4 37.0 5.4
April 1989 38.6 26.3 12.3
May 1989 44.6 34.6 10.0
June 1989 39.2 33.3 5.9
July 1989 34.8 33.0 1.8
August 1989 45.1 32.8 12.3
September 1989 44.9 33.8 11.1
October 1989 41.7 34.0 7.7
November 1989 31.1 28.4 2.7
December 1989 35.7 31.2 4.5
TOTAL 471.5 374.3 97.2
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1988

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1988 29.5 25.8 3.7
February 1988 33.3 30.1 3.2
March 1988 42.6 39.5 3.1
April 1988 39.3 30.6 8.7
May 1988 42.4 34.5 7.9
June 1988 40.9 34.1 6.8
July 1988 41.0 34.3 6.7
August 1988 43.0 32.8 10.2
September 1988 37.1 31.9 5.2
October 1988 40.8 30.0 10.8
November 1988 42.1 28.4 13.7
December 1988 43.0 30.5 12.5
TOTAL 475.0 382.5 92.5
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1987

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1987 28.8 23.4 5.4
February 1987 34.5 36.7 -2.2
March 1987 42.5 36.5 6.0
April 1987 38.9 31.8 7.1
May 1987 48.8 33.7 15.1
June 1987 39.8 32.9 6.9
July 1987 32.2 28.5 3.7
August 1987 38.0 35.7 2.3
September 1987 41.6 36.6 5.0
October 1987 40.8 37.3 3.5
November 1987 42.5 30.4 12.1
December 1987 30.5 31.2 -0.7
TOTAL 458.9 394.7 64.2
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1986

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1986 21.8 29.9 -8.1
February 1986 25.9 24.6 1.3
March 1986 32.6 33.3 -0.7
April 1986 29.7 28.6 1.1
May 1986 38.3 39.7 -1.4
June 1986 31.3 33.5 -2.2
July 1986 32.3 34.1 -1.8
August 1986 38.3 33.7 4.6
September 1986 34.6 29.2 5.4
October 1986 36.9 27.2 9.7
November 1986 36.1 34.6 1.5
December 1986 29.5 26.9 2.6
TOTAL 387.3 375.3 12.0
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233
[To top of page]

Trade with Haiti : 1985

NOTE: All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars, and not seasonally adjusted unless otherwise specified.

Month Exports Imports Balance
January 1985 31.2 31.2 0.0
February 1985 31.8 30.4 1.4
March 1985 31.9 36.7 -4.8
April 1985 32.9 33.2 -0.3
May 1985 35.3 31.0 4.3
June 1985 28.8 39.6 -10.8
July 1985 33.3 30.2 3.1
August 1985 34.4 30.6 3.8
September 1985 29.7 27.2 2.5
October 1985 45.1 32.4 12.7
November 1985 34.7 32.0 2.7
December 1985 26.8 35.1 -8.3
TOTAL 395.9 389.6 6.3
  • ‘TOTAL’ may not add due to rounding.
  • Table reflects only those months for which there was trade.
  • CONTACT: Data Dissemination Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, (301) 763-2311
  • SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, Data Dissemination Branch, Washington, D.C. 20233

(From – )

Additional Information

  • Contact the Data Dissemination Branch of the Foreign Trade Division with any questions or for additional information.
  • For information on data sources and methodology, check out the Information on the Collection and Publication of Trade Statistics.
  • MORE DATA: Data for all countries are available online in a zipped Excel file. [Excel] or the letters [xls] indicate a document is in the Microsoft® Excel® Spreadsheet Format (XLS). To view the file, you will need the Microsoft® Excel® Viewer This link to a non-federal Web site does not imply endorsement of any particular product, company, or content. available for free from Microsoft®. This symbol Symbol indicating that file is external to this site. indicates a link to a non-government web site. Our linking to these sites does not constitute an endorsement of any products, services or the information found on them. Once you link to another site you are subject to the policies of the new site.

FTD Web News


What is required for me to ship charity goods to Haiti?
From GLOBAL REACH: “In order to facilitate the movements of these goods, we offer the following guidance that applies to any goods not requiring a license, such as food, clothing, and medicines.” (January 22, 2010)

NEW EXPORT TRAINING VIDEOS!!!
– Training videos on topics such as the Foreign Trade Regulations, AESDirect, NAFTA, Taxes/Tariffs, Commodities, etc. now available!

ORDER AND DOWNLOAD FOREIGN TRADE DATA PRODUCTS:
Online Order Form
FTD DropBox
Merchandise Trade Downloads

NEWEST TRADE DATA!
Get the basics!
Learn more! <!– See what’s been released! –>

<!– AES Public Meetings: Learn when and where!

–> <!– AES Compliance Seminars: See the full schedule!

–>


Source: FTDWebMaster, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, D.C. 20233
Location: MAIN: STATISTICS:COUNTRY DATA: TRADE BALANCE
Created: 12 January 2010
Last modified: 12 January 2010 at 08:32:14 AM

Related Party Database Application:
Time series RELATED PARTY data for specific commodities and countries.

http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c2450.html

***

                                           _____________________________________
  ___________                             |                                     |                               January 7, 2010
 |           |                            |        MAJOR SHIPPERS REPORT        |
 |  HAITI    |                            |              By Country             |
 |___________|                            | Data through 11/2009 in Million SME |
                                          |_____________________________________|

                           Calendar Years       Year-to-Date                 Year-Endings                             YE 11/2009
 Ctrl, Cat, Product        2007      2008    11/2008   11/2009  % Change   11/2008    9/2009   10/2009   11/2009  % Change % Share

Aggregations:
       0 Total           247.114   222.441   203.301   217.068      6.77   220.967   234.187   231.623   236.207     6.90    0.51
       1 Apparel         247.100   222.379   203.283   217.037      6.77   220.949   234.132   231.567   236.133     6.87    1.11
       2 Non-Apparel       0.014     0.062     0.018     0.031     71.10     0.018     0.055     0.055     0.074   315.47    0.00
      11 Yarns             0.000     0.001     0.001     0.000   -100.00     0.001     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00
      12 Fabrics           0.000     0.042     0.000     0.007       *       0.000     0.044     0.044     0.049      *      0.00
      14 Made Ups / Misc   0.014     0.019     0.017     0.024     37.29     0.017     0.012     0.012     0.025    44.86    0.00
      30 Cotton Products 151.307   181.438   164.632   182.478     10.84   177.002   200.460   196.341   199.284    12.59    1.02
      31 Cotton Apparel  151.294   181.437   164.631   182.476     10.84   177.001   200.457   196.337   199.282    12.59    1.59
      32 Cot Non-Apparel   0.013     0.001     0.001     0.003     81.89     0.001     0.003     0.003     0.003    81.89    0.00
      40 Wool Products     0.011     0.169     0.162     0.891    449.99     0.163     0.630     0.744     0.898   449.96    0.31
      41 Wool Apparel      0.011     0.169     0.162     0.891    450.21     0.163     0.630     0.744     0.898   450.18    0.39
      42 Wool Non-Appare   0.000     0.000     0.000     0.000   -100.00     0.000     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00
      60 MMF Products     95.794    40.831    38.504    33.690    -12.50    43.798    33.088    34.530    36.017   -17.77    0.14
      61 MMF Apparel      95.794    40.773    38.490    33.662    -12.54    43.784    33.036    34.478    35.945   -17.90    0.44
      62 MMF Non-Apparel   0.000     0.058     0.014     0.028     99.43     0.014     0.052     0.052     0.072   411.26    0.00
      80 S and V Product   0.001     0.003     0.003     0.009    168.24     0.003     0.009     0.009     0.009   168.24    0.00
      81 S and V Apparel   0.000     0.001     0.001     0.009    835.75     0.001     0.009     0.009     0.009   835.75    0.00
      82 S and V Non-App   0.001     0.002     0.002     0.000   -100.00     0.002     0.000     0.000     0.000  -100.00    0.00

Cotton or Man-Made Fiber:
     237 Playsuit,Sunsui   0.007     0.163     0.163     0.000   -100.00     0.163     0.050     0.002     0.000  -100.00    0.00

Cotton:
     338 Knit Shirts,MB   85.520    99.187    88.783    98.576     11.03    96.995   112.778   108.559   108.980    12.36   10.88
     339 W/G Knit Blouse   4.504     2.722     2.567     3.201     24.71     2.811     3.329     3.241     3.356    19.38    0.26
     347 Cot.M/B Trouser   5.173     6.651     6.333     7.162     13.10     6.853     7.054     7.124     7.481     9.16    0.72
     348 W/G Slacks, etc   0.125     1.025     0.897     3.505    290.77     0.897     2.481     3.063     3.633   305.11    0.23
     352 Cotton Underwea  54.879    71.052    65.303    68.908      5.52    68.649    73.672    73.246    74.657     8.75    4.26

Wool:
     433 Suit-Typ Ct,MB    0.000     0.006     0.006     0.270   4689.30     0.006     0.173     0.215     0.270  4703.21    1.65
     434 Oth. Coats, M/B   0.000     0.146     0.142     0.295    106.97     0.142     0.207     0.239     0.299   109.59    1.52
     443 Wool Suits,M/B    0.000     0.000     0.000     0.124       *       0.000     0.115     0.119     0.124      *      0.68
     447 Wool Trousers,M   0.000     0.005     0.004     0.144   3773.68     0.004     0.100     0.120     0.145  3820.24    0.98

Man-Made Fiber:
     634 Other Coats, MB   2.730     1.008     1.007     0.032    -96.81     1.227     0.050     0.031     0.033   -97.27    0.01
     635 Coats, W/G        0.791     1.421     1.415     0.099    -92.98     1.647     0.215     0.090     0.105   -93.62    0.02
     638 Knit Shirts, MB  81.619    27.928    26.502    14.405    -45.65    30.562    16.293    16.317    15.831   -48.20    2.94
     639 Knit Blouses,WG   0.009     0.001     0.001     0.671  46546.96     0.001     0.201     0.606     0.671 46546.96    0.11
     640 N-K Shirts, MB    2.272     2.456     2.262     2.818     24.56     2.456     2.743     2.800     3.012    22.63    2.51
     641 N-K Blouses, WG   0.013     0.210     0.177     1.016    474.63     0.177     0.911     0.976     1.049   493.40    0.63
     647 Trousers,etc MB   5.747     5.836     5.581     3.462    -37.96     6.059     3.543     3.438     3.718   -38.64    0.87
     648 Slacks,etc. WG    0.508     0.688     0.554     2.729    392.51     0.613     2.462     2.630     2.864   366.97    0.86
     651 Nightwear/PJs     0.783     0.287     0.204     0.821    303.16     0.221     0.875     0.889     0.904   309.33    0.15
     652 M-MF Underwear    0.258     0.365     0.330     2.336    608.14     0.340     1.697     2.065     2.371   597.16    0.45
     659 Oth. MMF App.     0.989     0.462     0.352     4.886   1287.81     0.372     3.655     4.240     4.996  1244.70    0.25

http://otexa.ita.doc.gov/msrcty/a2450.htm

***

My Note – there are some obvious disparities in the numbers between raw materials shipped in and completed metric tons shipped out of Haiti. (That disparity is irreconcilable in its numbers among other things including the amount of money sent by the United States Departments of Commerce and Foreign Trade offices through economic development programs and funding grants along with those from the UN and international community for the same purpose. Obviously, the final target of improving the infrastructure, education, adult education, hospitals, roads, schools and general quality of and safety of life for Haitians was abrogated, diverted for private interests or something . . . I’m not sure what, but I do know there is precedent for clawbacks on that money through US treaties and International law. This includes going to the Grand Cayman and Swiss banks, the hedge funds and investment brokerage groups to relieve them of manipulating the previous windfalls of economic and charitable money for Haiti and to insure that it isn’t diverted or hijacked for profiteering and embezzlement this time.

– cricketdiane, 01-23-10

But there’s more –

***

eHam.net – Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) Community

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
from CQ / WorldRadio Online Newsroom on January 12, 2010
View comments about this article

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:

All radio amateurs are requested to keep 7045 kHz and 3720 kHz clear for possible emergency traffic related to today’s major earthquake in Haiti.

International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region II Area C Emergency Coordinator Arnie Coro, CO2KK, reports that as of 0245 UTC on January 13, nothing had been heard from radio amateurs in Haiti, but that the above frequencies were being kept active in case any Haitian hams manage to get on the air, and in case of other related events in surrounding areas, including aftershocks and a possible tsunami.

The following is from an e-mail from CO2KK:

A few minutes after the earthquake was felt in eastern Cuba’s cities, the Cuban Federation of Radio Amateurs Emergency Net was activated, with net control stations CO8WM and CO8RP located in the city of Santiago de Cuba, and in permanent contact with the National Seismology Center of Cuba located in that city.

Stations in the city of Baracoa, in Guantanamo province, were also activated immediately as the earth movements were felt even stronger there, due to its proximity to Haiti. CO8AZ and CO8AW went on the air immediately , with CM8WAL following. At the early phase of the emergency, the population of the city of Baracoa was evacuated far away from the coast, as there was a primary alert of a possible tsunami event or of a heavy wave trains sequence impacting the coast line at the city’s sea wall …

Baracoa could not contact Santiago de Cuba stations on 40 meters due to long skip after 5 PM local time, so several stations in western Cuba and one in the US State of Florida provided relays. CO2KK, as IARU Region II Area C Emergency Coordinator, helped to organize the nets , on 7045 kHz and also on 3720 kHz, while local nets in Santiago de Cuba and Baracoa operated on 2 meters.

As late as 9,45 PM local time 0245 UTC we have not been able to contact any amateur or emergency services stations in Haiti.

Amateurs from the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Venezuela were monitoring the 40 meter band frequency, that I notified to the IARU Region II executive Ramon Santoyo XE1KK as in use for the emergency, requesting that 7045 kHz be kept as clear as possible …

We are still keeping watch on 7045 kHz hoping that someone in Haiti may have access to a transceiver and at least a car battery to run it.

All information that has so far come from the Cuban seismologists tell us of a very intense earthquake, and also of the possibility of other events following.

Following the advice of the geophysicists, we are keeping the 7045 and 3720 kiloHertz frequencies active until further notice.

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
by N2KI on January 13, 2010     Mail this to a friend
Does anyone in the affected area know to be transmitting on the target frequencies?

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
by W8VZM on January 13, 2010     Mail this to a friend
Any stateside organizations handling health and welfare inquiries into Hati? I have a friend who is unable to get through on phone of course. I have recently relocated and do not have HF up at this time.

Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
by WA2FDU on January 13, 2010     Mail this to a friend
SALVATION ARMY TEAM EMERGENCY RADIO NETWORK

SATERN

North American Command
Chicago

Full Alert Level DELTA III for Haiti Earthquake Emergency. All nets active. 14.265 MHz Primary Daytime. 7265 and 3977.7 KHz evening and night

RE: Earthquake Net Frequencies — 7045, 3720 kHz:
by KB3HOG on January 13, 2010     Mail this to a friend
LETS GET OFF OUR CHAIRS, OPEN OUR POCKETS AND OUR HEARTS AND HELP THESE POOR PEOPLE IN HATI.

http://www.eham.net/articles/23140

Low-Tech Radios Connect Some Haitians:
DX News — ARRL DX Bulletin #3:
K4TWJ Update:
This Week on the Radio:
Dominican Hams Attempt to Install Repeaters in Haiti:

Radio Team Locked in on Haiti:

(from above site)

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NOTES:

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