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Between fiscal years 2002 and 2009, the United States provided
approximately $38.6 billion to support Afghanistan’s reconstruction goals,
which can often be characterized as construction (see table 1). Table 1
does not include funding provided for U.S. military operations in Afghanistan.4 According to DOD, $22 billion of the $38.6 billion has been
disbursed.

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09473sp.pdf

Table 1: U.S. Government Funding Provided in Support of Afghan Security, Stabilization, and Development, Fiscal Years
2002-2009
Fiscal Years
Dollars in millions 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009a Total
Security $147 $388 $949 $2,307 $1,989 $7,431 $2,763 $5,606 $21,580
— Afghan National Army 86 361 719 1,633 736 4,872 1,778 4,043 14,228
— Afghan National Police 24 0 160 624 1,217 2,523 964 1,512 7,024
— Other security 37 27 70 50 36 36 21 51 328
Governance, rule of law, human rights 110 97 262 244 110 286 517 824 2,450
— Democracy/Governance 103 89 233 223 80 221 391 614 1,954
— Rule of law 7 8 29 21 30 65 126 210 496
Economic and social development 650 498 1,153 1,570 1,007 1,591 2,100 2,448 11,017
— Reconstruction 124 295 855 1,240 706 1,191 1,494 1,871 7,776
— Humanitarian/Other 526 203 298 330 301 400 606 577 3,241
Counternarcotics 40 3 126 775 420 737 617 802 3,520
— Eradication 39 0 50 257 138 177 183 202 1,046
— Interdiction 1 3 76 338 137 323 248 366 1,492
— Alternative development 0 0 0 175 140 229 181 225 950
— Other counternarcotics 0 0 0 5 5 8 5 9 32
Total $947 $986 $2,490 $4,896 $3,526 $10,045 $5,997 $9,680 $38,567

Source: Departments of Defense and State.
Note: Funding provided includes assistance for Afghanistan from a variety of budget accounts, such as Afghan Security Forces Funding, Economic Support Funds, and Commander’s Emergency Response Funds, among others; State/USAID operations funding; and use of drawdown authority
contained in legislation such as the Afghan Freedom Support Act. Relevant transfers and reprogramming also are included.
a According to State, fiscal year 2009 numbers include preliminary allocations of funding received in the fiscal year 2009 Omnibus Appropriations Act, as well as preliminary funding allocations from the
fiscal year 2009 supplemental request.
4 Specific funding figures for U.S. military operations in Afghanistan do not exist because funding provided to DOD for military operations in support of the GWOT, which includes Afghanistan, is not appropriated by country or specific contingency operation. Funding for military operations covers expenses such as personnel costs of mobilized reservists; costs for housing, food, and fuel; and costs to repair and replace equipment.

[etc.]

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In 2006, the government of Afghanistan, along with the international partners, adopted the Afghanistan Compact, a political agreement outlining the international community’s commitment to provide resources and support to achieve Afghanistan’s security, governance, and reconstruction goals as set out in the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS). Subsequently, more than 70 nations pledged over $57 billion in aid toward the achievement of these goals. The United States alone provided $32 billion. United States efforts to work with NATO partners and other contributing countries present unique opportunities in Afghanistan, but also pose some challenges. In March 2009, the President announced a new U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan.

[ . . . ]

As part of a UN mandate, the United States established Provincial
Reconstruction Teams (PRT) in 2002, which were transferred to ISAF
authority in 2003. PRTs consist of military officers, diplomats, and
reconstruction subject matter experts working to support reconstruction efforts.
The PRTs’ mission is to assist the government of Afghanistan in extending its authority; facilitate the development of a stable and secure environment; and, through military presence, enable security-sector reform and reconstruction efforts. The United States leads 12 of 26 PRTs (see fig 3).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09473sp.pdf

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The security situation in Afghanistan, though cyclical in nature, has
deteriorated since 2005. Attacks on civilians as well as Afghan and
coalition forces have increased year after year. Attacks increased from
2,388 in 2005 to 5,087 in 2006, 7,058 in 2007, and 10,889 in 2008. The
majority of the violence is concentrated in the eastern and southern parts
of Afghanistan where the Taliban receives funding from the opium trade
and where U.S. forces operate. In 2008, insurgent activity increased
dramatically, including an increase in improvised explosive device attacks,
as well as attacks focused on infrastructure, development, and
construction projects.

In early 2006, there were over 36,000 U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan.
As of February 2009, there are over 65,000 troops with over 35,000 U.S. troops and over 30,000 other troops from more than 40 different countries in Afghanistan. The new administration has indicated that it intends to send up to approximately 21,000 U.S. troops to Afghanistan in 2009.
The increase in insurgent attacks, especially in the east and the south, has
impeded security and reconstruction efforts in those regions.
• State officials reported that the development of the Afghan National
Security Forces has been impeded by the security situation. For example,
despite the fact that the Afghan National Army is directly charged with
defeating the insurgency and terrorism, the Afghan National Police are
often reassigned from their training to provide immediate help with the
counterinsurgency effort, thus delaying the completion of their training.
• According to USAID, programs ranging from road reconstruction to power
generation, face significant cost increases and were delayed or abandoned
due to a lack of security.

(from the same document – April 2009)

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d09473sp.pdf

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My Note – but after spending hundreds of billions in private contracts for Iraq’s infrastructure and now in Afghanistan – plus in Chile and no telling where all else, this little note from the GAO describes what the people of the United States get –

Why GAO Did This Study
Highlights
Accountability Integrity Reliability
May 8, 2008
PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE
Challenges and Investment Options for the Nation’s Infrastructure
Highlights of GAO-08-763T, a testimony before the Committee on the Budget and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, U.S. House of Representatives
Physical infrastructure is critical to the nation’s economy and affects the daily life of virtually all Americans—from facilitating the movement of goods and people within and beyond U.S. borders to providing clean drinking water. However, this infrastructure—including aviation, highway, transit, rail, water, and dam infrastructure—is under strain. Estimates to repair, replace, or upgrade aging infrastructure as well as expand capacity to meet increased demand top hundreds of billions of dollars. Calls for increased investment in infrastructure come at a time when traditional funding for infrastructure projects is increasingly strained, and the federal government’s fiscal outlook is worse than many may understand.

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08763t.pdf

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