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From the little extra water we had here in Atlanta –

Lake Lanier and Buford Dam Water Release Answers Print

Everyone with an interest in Lake Lanier and those affected by flooding around metro Atlanta have been asking the question: why does water continue to flow through Buford Dam despite the huge amounts of rain swelling the Chattahoochee and its creeks and tributaries downstream and the capacity of the lake to hold this precipitation?

Because of the virtual lockdown on communication with the Army Corps of Engineers in Georgia the only semblance of communication comes from the Corps’ Mobile, AL office.

Area fishermen and concerned citizens that have spoken with the people at the Alabama office are in disbelief that the decisions are either influenced by or coming directly from that office when they don’t even seem to understand the severity of the rain event.

The Mobile, AL office of the Corps of Engineers first explained that the two main generators have been shut off and that a smaller units that discharges 600 cubic feet per second was operating to supply power to the Dam and some small electric companies in the area. They quickly backed off that statement and said the small generator was only powering the dam itself.

So now we know that it takes 389 million gallons of water discharged per day (600 cfs) just to power the dam itself. Corps spokespeople don’t even know if it is possible to shut off the discharge completely, which means that through the additional rains expected for this weekend the already stressed creek and tributary system downstream from the dam will likely continue to back up at the Chattahoochee.

http://www.lakelanier.com/200909241260/news/release-answers/

***

Atlanta Flooding Sets New Records – USGS
Released: 9/24/2009 4:40:52 PM

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communication
119 National Center
Reston, VA 20192
Edward H. Martin 1-click interview
Phone: 770-903-9100

Brian E. McCallum 1-click interview
Phone: 770-903-9127 | FAX:


//



 

The flooding around Atlanta this week is one for the record books. According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the rivers and streams had magnitudes so great that the odds of it happening were less than 0.2 percent in any given year. In other words, there was less than a 1 in 500 chance that parts of Cobb and Douglas counties were going to be hit with such an event.

“The USGS can reliably say just how bad these floods were. They were epic!” said Brian McCallum, Assistant Director for the USGS Water Science Center in Georgia. “We have all witnessed the devastation caused by these floods, but now we can quantify it.” The data are gathered from the USGS real-time streamgaging network.

On Sept. 22, USGS crews measured the greatest flow ever recorded (28,000 cubic feet per second) on Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Ga.

Elsewhere in the Atlanta area:

  • The Yellow River streamgages in Gwinnett, DeKalb and Rockdale counties measured flows between the 1 percent chance (100-year) and 0.5 percent chance (200-year) flood magnitude.
  • Flows caused by the rain at Peachtree Creek in Atlanta were only near the 10 percent chance (10-year) flood magnitude, but the backwater effects from the Chattahoochee River pushed water levels over the 0.2 percent chance (500-year) flood at the gage location.
  • On the Chattahoochee, USGS measured a 1 percent chance exceedence (100-year) flood at Vinings and Roswell.

“Today, six USGS crews are installing and repairing the 20 gages that were destroyed because of flooding. We expect that all but one gage should be operational by the end of the day,” said McCallum. “During flooding, these gages provide critical information to many users, so fixing the gages is our priority now.”

USGS also has two crews measuring high water marks, and will continue taking these indirect measurements in earnest on Monday. Pictures taken over the past few days by USGS scientists as they work in flooded areas are available online.

In Georgia the USGS maintains a network of more than 300 stream gages that provide data in real time.  Data from these gages are used by local, state and federal officials for numerous purposes, including public safety and flood forecasting by the National Weather Service.

A map of these gages and graphs of discharge for the last seven days is available online. The USGS works in cooperation with other Federal, state, and local agencies, throughout Georgia that measure water level (stage), streamflow (discharge), and rainfall.

Users can access current flood and high flow conditions across the country at the USGS WaterWatch Web site.

More information on USGS flood-related activities is available at the USGS Surface Water Information Web site.


USGS provides science for a changing world. For more information, visit www.usgs.gov.

Subscribe to USGS News Releases via our electronic mailing list or RSS feed.

**** http://www.usgs.gov ****

Links and contacts within this release are valid at the time of publication.

 

http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=2316&from=rss_home

 

***

Posted: Friday, September 25th 2009 at 7:04am

Corps defends flood management operations

By Ken Stanford Editor

<!–

–>

click to enlarge

Buford Dam

MOBILE, Ala. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is defending its management of Lake Lanier during this week’s floods.

Questions have been raised about continuing to send water through Buford Dam even as flooding was occurring downstream. But spokeswoman Lisa Coghlan says some water has to flow through in order to produce electricity. And, that curtailed releases have kept 37 billion gallons of flood water in Lanier.

And, no, she says, there is no danger of “overfilling” the lake. “We have 14 feet of flood storage capacity at Lake Lanier.”

Last Saturday, the Corps implemented its Flood Control Operations at the dam… reducing the amount of water sent downstream.

The level of Lanier increased another .08 foot in the past 24 hours and was at 1068.03 early Friday… within three feet of full pool since before the start of the prolonged drought that ended earlier this year. Full pool is 1071 and the corps expects continued runoff from this week’s heavy rains to send the level to 1068.5 this weekend.

Even more heavy rains are forecast through Saturday and a Flash Flood Watch has been issued for most of north Georgia. (See separate posting.)

(The Georgia News Network contributed to this story.)

(The Georgia News Network contributed to this story.)

Associated Categories: Homepage, Local/State News

http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=223514

 

***

Posted: Saturday, September 26th 2009 at 6:39pm

Rain continues to drench Ga.; flood losses now put at $500M

ATLANTA – Heavy rains drenched northwest Georgia Saturday and then moved into metro Atlanta, dumping several inches and causing flooding in some areas, but forecasters said the end of the rain was in sight. And, the state Insurance Commissioner updated the estimated losses from flooding earlier in the week, putting it at half-a-billion dollars.

[ . . . ]

Georgia Insurance Commissioner John Oxendine on Saturday raised the estimated cost of damage caused by heavy flooding in parts of north Georgia to $500 million. The new figure was twice as much as Tuesday’s initial damage estimate of $250 million.

“I think it could quite possibly go up,” Oxendine said, adding that the estimate of half a billion dollars was conservative.

Oxendine said 20,000 homes and other structures suffered major damage, mainly in the area north and west of Atlanta.

A federal disaster declaration has been issued to provide individual assistance for recovery efforts to residents in 14 Georgia counties that were hardest hit. The declaration covers Carroll, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cherokee, Cobb, DeKalb, Douglas, Fulton, Gwinnett, Newton, Paulding, Rockdale, Stephens and Walker counties.

http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=223447&c=1

***

And where is our Governor with a bunch of Georgia under flood waters?

Perdue visits Panama Canal project

Atlanta Business Chronicle – by Dave Williams Staff Writer

Gov. Sonny Perdue got a first-hand look Thursday at the widening of the Panama Canal, a project that is vital to the planned deepening of the harbor at the Port of Savannah.

The Panama Canal Authority took over operation of the canal when the United States turned it over to the Panamanian government at the end of the last decade.

“These people have their act together,” said Perdue, after touring both the construction work and operating locks. “It’s a well-run enterprise.”

The governor and Ken Stewart, commissioner of the Georgia Department of Economic Development, led a state delegation that traveled to Panama this week to check on the $5.2 billion project’s progress.

[ . . . ]

Georgia officials are seeking federal funding for the harbor deepening. But Congress won’t act until the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signs off on the project.

[etc.]

(we’re paying for him to go see the Panama Canal with his buddies, of course)

http://atlanta.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2009/09/21/daily88.html

 

***

Supreme Court won’t hear Georgia water appeal

Jacksonville Business Journal – by Dave Williams Staff Writer

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday declined to hear Georgia’s appeal of a lower court ruling in the long-running tri-state water wars.

The high court denied a request to review a decision handed down nearly a year ago by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington invalidating a 2003 agreement to let metro Atlanta water utilities increase withdrawals from Lake Lanier from about 13 percent of the lake’s capacity to about 22 percent.

The agreement between Georgia and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was challenged by Florida and Alabama, which lie downstream of Lanier in the Chattahoochee River system.

In a prepared statement, Gov. Charlie Crist applauded the decision.

“This action will allow Florida to continue our efforts to help protect the adequate flow of freshwater in the Apalachicola River,” Crist said. “After nearly 20 years of legal discussions, today’s decision should provide the framework needed for resolution of this matter.

In opposing Georgia’s efforts to take more water out of Lake Lanier to meet rapidly growing customer demand in metro Atlanta, Florida and Alabama argued that the reservoir was built in the 1950s primarily to provide hydropower and that water supply was not its authorized purpose.

 

http://atlanta.bizjournals.com/jacksonville/stories/2009/01/12/daily11.html?q=Corps%20of%20Engineers%20Georgia

 

***

 

Georgia begins cleaning up $250 million in flood damage

Gov. Sonny Perdue seeks $16.35 million in federal aid to help recover from storms that left nine dead. Crews work on an Atlanta water-treatment plant that added to Chattahoochee River flooding.

Reporting from Atlanta – With floodwaters finally receding, Georgians began the unglamorous task of cleaning up Wednesday, while taking stock of the destruction from an unprecedented autumn deluge that has claimed nine lives and caused an estimated $250 million in damage.

Across the state, roads reopened and residents returned to view the damage to their homes. In the early hours Wednesday, work crews managed to fix much of the damage to a city of Atlanta water-treatment plant that spilled millions of gallons of water into the Chattahoochee River.

[ etc. ]

In Greater Atlanta, the local river system had been a sort of famous afterthought. Atlanta earned its initial fortunes in the 19th century as a railroad hub, and for many Atlantans, the Chattahoochee, which runs southwestward through the metro region, has typically been out of sight — and out of mind.

“People usually see the river from a car window when they’re rushing over a freeway,” said Sally Bethea, head of Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, a nonprofit environmental group. “And usually, [the water] stays in place. So I think it’s pretty stunning for people to see the river widen to a half a mile, and the creeks widen, and all of this raging water.”

Bethea blamed the flooding in part on rampant development and paving that prevent the earth from soaking up rain, instead sending it shooting into river basins.

[ . . . ]

The rains have helped in one respect: by adding water to Lake Lanier, the source of much of the region’s drinking water. During a three-year drought that was declared over in March, lake levels reached record lows. The recent rains added more than 3 feet to the water level of the 38,000-acre lake, said Robert G. Holland, spokesman for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

[ . . . ]

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-atlanta-flooding24-2009sep24,0,7167655.story

(has video clip of first person account, also)

***

Biden to GA Flood Victims: We Don’t Want Another Katrina-like Government Response

September 25, 2009 2:12 PM

ABC News’ Karen Travers and Jordyn Phelps report:

Vice President Biden surveyed flood damage in the Atlanta area this morning and promised an effective and timely government response, in contrast to the Bush Administration’s handling of Hurricane Katrina.

“This is not going to happen overnight. It is not going to happen tomorrow, but it is going to happen,” Biden said.

[etc.]

“Look, we don’t want anything like the past happening again,” Biden said. “This is hands on stuff, but it’s going to take time. We’re going to get other federal agencies in now. We’re are going to get HUD in and others who are going to be able to take care of hopefully your real needs.”

The floods have killed 9 people in Georgia. Eight counties have been declared federal disaster areas and will qualify for federal funding.

The vice president took an aerial tour of the flood damage in a helicopter with FEMA Director Craig Fugate. They were joined in a second helicopter by Georgia Sens. Johnny Isakson and Saxby Chambliss, Rep. David Scott and Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano.

Biden stopped by a shelter set up the Cobb County Civic Center to meet with people whose homes were damaged and destroyed in the flooding. The shelter is housing 277 flood victims who will be able to stay there as long as necessary.

[ . . . ]

http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalpunch/2009/09/biden-to-ga-flood-victims-we-dont-want-another-katrinalike-government-response.html


Some of the comments on the article above about Lake Lanier and the Corps of Engineers sending the agreed upon water through despite the flooding –

I am disgusted with the US Atmy Corps of Engineers Mobile AL HQ. These bureaucrats during the recent flooding released water (although a mimimum amount)from Lake Lanier into the swollen waters. Lake Lanier was 6+ feet from full lake elevation and 20+ feet from flood level and there was no good reason for releasing any water from Lake Lanier. I am not happy.

Posted by: Robert G Sorbet | Sep 26, 2009 7:07:04 AM

 


I also feel we need someone to watch the corp of engineers. They have constantaly released more water than they should have over the past two summers and dried up some surrounding lakes which were on some people’s property after saying they would only take some of the water…they left nothing….Who moniters them? I think an investigation should be made as to who is watching and supervising them.

Posted by: talmag | Sep 26, 2009 12:41:44 PM


@Alyson I do not believe that the COE directed water release from Lake Lanier killed anyone or exacerbated the flooding situation to any great extent, what I do know is that there has been hard feelings for many years between Georgians and the Corps, and what prompted my anger was a Press Release issued by the Corps Mobile AL HQ which I can no longer access or it has been taken down for some good or bad reason.

Posted by: Robert G Sorbet | Sep 26, 2009 12:08:42 PM


I do have a problem with the Corps of Engineers releasing water from a flood control lake into swollen waters during a flash flood. My nephew lost a lifelong friend in these floods. I live in Douglas County Georgia and my heart goes out to all of the victims.

***

I’m so very, very sorry for your nephew’s loss, and I hope you and your family and friends are all okay. Please hang in there. I have read that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
is getting a lot of criticism from Georgians right now for mismanagement of the water at Lake Lanier– though I confess I’m a little confused as to what they did, why, and so on.

Posted by: Alyson | Sep 26, 2009 10:22:25 AM


@Alyson You make great sense. I have no problem with FEMA, Obama, or Biden; but I do have a problem with the Corps of Engineers releasing water from a flood control lake into swollen waters during a flash flood. My nephew lost a lifelong friend in these floods. I live in Douglas County Georgia and my heart goes out to all of the victims.

Posted by: Robert G Sorbet | Sep 26, 2009 9:49:31 AM


Just a little context cuz some of these comments seem bizarre to me. First of all, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has said that the floods are a “once in 500 years flood,”… the odds of such a thing happening are less “than 0.2 percent in any given year.” The floods have affected 20 counties, caused the deaths of least nine people, and created about $250 million in damages. Two very conservative Republican senators, Johnny Isakson and Saxby Chambliss, have commended “the White House’s quick response.” Acutally, Chambliss said the admin’s response was “magnificent” and “quick. Isakson said he had spent last night on the phone with local officials, all of whom reported FEMA workers on the ground–yep that FEMA, which three years was described as being in shambles. I’m glad to hear that FEMA is back on track, and was happy to see the VP there.

Posted by: Alyson | Sep 26, 2009 9:25:02 AM


Jason…. I wonder WHO paved “the road to hell” in the prior DECADES….It had to take longer than 9 months to “pave a road to hell”, isn’t that rational?

***

 

Lake Allatoona Water Levels Soar Past Full Pool

Written by Steve Burge

The deluge of recent rains in North Georgia have sent the Lake Allatoona water levels soaring past full pool. The lake rose rose more than 8 feet in the past 24 hours.

Currently the lake is 11 feet above full pool and still rising. The high water levels have caused Allatoona to spread over its banks into parks, campgrounds and parking lots on shore.

The Corps of Engineers which is in controls the lake, has shut down all boat ramps on the lake except for Stamp Creek and Galts Ferry.

Photos of the Lake Allatoona Flooding

These are photos taken on Tuesday morning of the ramps and roads around Allatoona. Despite the high water, fishermen are still out on the lake between fish from Bartow Carver to the Dam. Thanks to Robert Edison from First Bite Guide Services for these photos.

(lots of great photos of Lake Allatoona – my note)

http://www.lakeallatoona.com/20090922360/news/water-levels/lake-allatoona-water-levels-soar-past-full-pool.htm

 

***

 

***

Recovery Act Funds Will Upgrade Earthquake Monitoring
Released: 9/24/2009 4:19:44 PM

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communication
119 National Center
Reston, VA 20192
Dr. William  Leith 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-6786

Clarice Nassif Ransom 1-click interview
Phone: 703-648-4299



//



 

USGS will Grant Universities $5 Million to Beef Up Public Safety

Grants totaling $5 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act are being awarded to 13 universities nationwide to upgrade critical earthquake monitoring networks and increase public safety.

“These stimulus grants will save lives as well as create jobs,” Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said today. “More than 75 million Americans in 39 states face the risk of earthquakes. Through the modernization of seismic networks and data processing centers, scientists will be able to provide emergency responders with more reliable, robust information to save lives and reduce economic losses.”

Grants are awarded by the U.S. Geological Survey, and monitoring is a key component of the USGS Advanced National Seismic System. ANSS is a national network of sophisticating shaking monitors placed both on the ground and in buildings in urban areas. The ANSS “strong motion” instruments give emergency response personnel real-time maps of severe ground shaking and provide engineers with information to create stronger and sounder structures for homes, bridges, buildings, and utility and communication networks.

“These investments under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will provide jobs for the manufacturers of the equipment, the geophysical contractors who perform installations, and the colleges and universities that run regional earthquake networks and are training the next generation of earthquake scientists in partnership with USGS,” Salazar noted.

In California and other high-hazard regions, some parts of the current system include 40-year-old technology, and even the systems most recently upgraded date back to 1997. Think about what a 12-year-old computer looks like. Stimulus funding will replace old instruments with state-of-the-art, robust systems across the highest earthquake hazard areas in California, the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, the Intermountain West, and the central and eastern United States.

The new monitoring systems will be more energy-efficient than the ones they replace and will make solar power the primary power source in remote locations. Engaging students in the siting and installation will provide a unique educational experience and help to train the next generation of earthquake scientists.

Because the investments will modernize aging equipment at existing stations, they do not represent out-year commitments and the new equipment should lower future maintenance costs. The investments in earthquake monitoring meet the stated Recovery Act criteria of being “temporary, targeted and timely” – spending that will flow directly into the economy.

Universities receiving funding include: Montana Tech of the University of Montana; California Institute of Technology; University of Oregon; University of Utah; University of California, San Diego; University of Washington; Saint Louis University; University of Memphis; Boston College, University of Nevada, Reno; University of California, Berkeley; Columbia University; and the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

For more information, visit the Department of the Interior Recovery Investments Web site.


USGS provides science for a changing world. For more information, visit www.usgs.gov.

[ From – ]

http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=2314&from=news_side

 

***

Thu

24

Sep

2009

Lake Lanier and Buford Dam Water Release Answers Print

Everyone with an interest in Lake Lanier and those affected by flooding around metro Atlanta have been asking the question: why does water continue to flow through Buford Dam despite the huge amounts of rain swelling the Chattahoochee and its creeks and tributaries downstream and the capacity of the lake to hold this precipitation?

Because of the virtual lockdown on communication with the Army Corps of Engineers in Georgia the only semblance of communication comes from the Corps’ Mobile, AL office. Area fishermen and concerned citizens that have spoken with the people at the Alabama office are in disbelief that the decisions are either influenced by or coming directly from that office when they don’t even seem to understand the severity of the rain event.

The Mobile, AL office of the Corps of Engineers first explained that the two main generators have been shut off and that a smaller units that discharges 600 cubic feet per second was operating to supply power to the Dam and some small electric companies in the area. They quickly backed off that statement and said the small generator was only powering the dam itself.

So now we know that it takes 389 million gallons of water discharged per day (600 cfs) just to power the dam itself. Corps spokespeople don’t even know if it is possible to shut off the discharge completely, which means that through the additional rains expected for this weekend the already stressed creek and tributary system downstream from the dam will likely continue to back up at the Chattahoochee.

Comments (12)add comment

On September 24, 2009, Chuck said:

0
Why would the American people want to enlist the federal government to run the health care system in this country when apparently they are not able to even grasp the basic concept that when water is released into a river it contributes to its level. The primary purpose of this and most other Corps lakes is to provide flood control. Where is the common sense leadership in this situation? Why wasn’t our commander in chief of the military ensuring that his military staff at the Corps office in Mobile was doing the right thing during an emergency situation? Obvious incompetence and lack of common sense. My tax dollars at work:

On September 24, 2009, lakeman said:

lakeman
Concur completely. Unbelievable. I can’t believe there is water still being released.

On September 25, 2009, lakeman said:

lakeman
Corps says releases equaled 1 inch, 30 miles down stream. Wait a minute. 670 cfs is what flows the hooch thru ATL in the middle of a drought. Big Cover Your Bu t going on!

http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/article/23957/

On September 25, 2009, Jim said:

0
Last night the corp let out almost 500 MILLION gallons or 668 cubic feet per second from the Buford Dam . Here is the link to their data that shows the release records. http://tinymicros.com/lanier/

During the peak of the flooding they continue to release 600+ cubic feet per second according to these records, and for only 1 day they backed it down to just under 400. The corp did contribute to the flooding and they should be held accountable. Even one drop of water being let out while homes were being destroyed is negligent and illustrates their lack of responsibility inability to manage our resources.

On September 25, 2009, Aaron said:

0
389 million gallons per day just to power the dam? Who are you kidding here? Those inefficient generators and turbines will get you every time. Also you have to understand the dam was built for flood control. What does that mean? The flood level was not high enough so they opened the dam to make sure more places were flooded there by controlling the flood. Had they closed the dam completely then they would not be in control. This way they are not sitting by and doing nothing. West Point Lake is screaming, with the flood gates wide open and generating full blast so next week they can ask Lanier for more water. But I think I have it figured out now. When water runs into Lake Lanier it becomes “Federal” water. This “Federal” water is then released and allowed to mingle with other water down stream making this water become “Federalized” as well and now must be allocated properly. As for the flooding, samples were taken and this is how they are able to tell that their water had no effect what so ever on any flooding taking place down stream, but I guess what’s a third of a billion gallons or so when your house is already 20 feet under water. Say what you will about inefficiency, but nobody can do it better than our government. I’m sure glad someone who knows what is going on is in charge.

On September 26, 2009, lakeman said:

lakeman
Ya’ll will not beleive what I just read in the Times online edition.

http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/article/23957/

This absolute moron “Jeremy” says:

In this case, the dead fish will cause plenty of problems for the humans. But that does require rational thought. I am not a tree hugger in any sense. You DO NOT completely stop the flow of the river, PERIOD. If the dam is damaged because of the lack of flow then you create a big problem. Most of the deaths were from stupidity.

What planet did this guy wiz in on?

On September 26, 2009, lakeman said:

lakeman
This was sent to 1071 Coalition:

So now that the lake is at a “normal level” for the 1st time in 4 years, the Corps is going to increase withdrawals????

Is 550 cubic feet per second NOT enough for water quality? It always has been in the past. Why is there a need NOW to increase that amount for water quality?

Increases in Hydro power production? Why? Is there some big power demand somewhere? Are the lower lakes not producing enough power? My goodness, I would think the generators on the lower lakes have been red hot for 10 days now. Is Lake Lanier serving as a “profit center” for the Corps to sell power? I understand the :power contracts”, but is this really necessary or is the Corps simply profiting by draining the Lake? To the detriment to all of us?

Are there construction contracts between the Corps and local governments,with which the Corps is obligated to keep the lake BELOW a certain level during a certain time frame? Gwinnett County? Lake Lanier Islands ? Forsyth County? Hall County? The Cities of Cumming and Gainesville? Are there ANY contracts with the Corps requiring a maintained lake elevation? If the public was made aware of these contractual obligations, maybe, just maybe we’d understand why the lake levels must stay down. And guess what? If we all knew ahead of time that Lake Lanier would be held down artificially, for a specified period of time, for a specified reason, we could all plan our business interests with Lake Lanier accordingly!

Case in point: Duke Power on Lake Keowee sends out a yearly lake level outlook and drawdown schedule. Duke explains with its stakeholders, the needs for these drawdowns, the timeframe for these drawdowns, and a list of things the stakeholders can accomplish while the lake is down. Dock and seawall repairs, etc. Duke Power works WITH their stakeholders by being transparent, honest, and up front. Yes, I understand that Duke is a privately held corporation with shareholders etc., but the point is, they care about the folks that care the most for the lake. They work TOGETHER.

I know for a fact that NO ONE is happy to read your email regarding increased discharges. I think your group needs to demand a little (actually a lot) transparency from the Corps regarding these contracts and what EXACTLY is required by the Corps. If these contracts cause harm to the public and un necessary degradation to the lake levels, then something needs to be done about it. When are these contracts up for renewal? Why in the world would we release water simply to produce hydro power? Incredibly inefficient form of power production at the expense of this Lake level. Someone needs to get copies of these contracts and read them, understand them, find out when they are up for renewal, study the demands and requirements, and lastly, find out where these contract obligations need to be corrected.

Lake Lanier has NOT been full 8 out of the last 11 years. 8 out of the last 11 years below full pool. The lake has reached full pool only 3 out of the last 11 years. That’s a 28% score. I don’t know ANY business represented by your group that would be in business if they “got it right” 28% of the time. This is reflective of one main thing: Poor Management. Poor Management at a time when Georgia is facing unprecedented hurdles with this Lake. There is no excuse, drought or otherwise, for this lake to have a 28% record over 11 years. None.

Everyone would like answers to these questions. We are all tired of the “surprises” by the Corps. No one that I know of has a good feeling about the Corps. Why? Because of the surprises and seemingly super inefficient methods of management of this lake. Their methods simply do not make sense. We need honest answers, honest transparency, and honest management of the lake from the Corps. Maybe then we would understand the Corps methodology for the madness that we see. The public is NOT HAPPY; as a matter of fact, everyone I come in contact with, is understandably upset with the Corps’ management of this Lake. Something has got to change. Your group is a group of business interests which in one way or another obviously profits by the existence of Lake Lanier. These businesses would probably see increases in profits with a better, more efficient management of this Lake.

Please demand some changes.

On September 26, 2009, Jim said:

0
A true TEST of the Corps willingness to show interest in Lake Lanier will be if they allow the lake to have a surplus of 1 to 2 feet like they have proposed in the past to act as a buffer going into the summer months. To my knowledge, this is the first time the lake has been this close to full pool at the end of the summer. Sept and Oct are usually are most driest months.

The lake refills during the winter months. Now would be the time to take action to plan for the future by allowing a small surplus.

On September 26, 2009, SkiOutsideTheWake said:

SkiOutsideTheWake
Hi Jim. Makes complete sense but the Corps has an itchy trigger finger to press that buttom which lets out water…check out the 5 week forecast on the Corps website below. It was just released 4 days ago. Lisa Coghlan of the Corps was all excited about the lakes potential to reach 1068.5 in one article this week but the 5 week forecast shows the Corps letting out most of the gains from this week. I’m sure they are just following their 50 year old Operating Manual and preparing for the winter and spring rains but the Manual never had common sense written in to it. Has anyone ever run a red light when you new the light was broken and skipping your turn or did you sit there waiting for the traffic light repair person to show up and give you a green light? The Corps is going to stick to their 50 year old manual and wait another 1-2 years for their new and improved operating manual. I wonder if the drones down in Mobile will add some common sense language into their Pulitzer document?

http://water.sam.usace.army.mil/acfframe.htm

On September 26, 2009, SkiOutsideTheWake said:

SkiOutsideTheWake
“button”…cant find my reading glasses ;-)

On September 26, 2009, SkiOutsideTheWake said:

SkiOutsideTheWake
Here’s more. Great point by Henry Rowe in this article:

“I think the corps will say that the water was released only to provide power for internal operations. This is unacceptable. In flood conditions, they should pay for power off the grid to operate and not release any water to reduce the flood as much as possible.”

http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/article/23984/

On September 26, 2009, moose said:

moose
Adding to flood conditions by discharges to operate the dam is incomprehensible! Also I read that “minimum” discharges have to be maintained for “the trout in the river”. Trout will find their way without dam water. Who depends on catching these trout for their daily substinence? They need to find a job and go to Publix. What irritates me most is the absolute wall between the COE and the public regarding communications. But they are government aren’t they? I think as a group we need to express our concerns to our 2 local so called advocates. Coalition 1071 and the Lake Lanier Association . Instead of having cocktail meetings at Legacy Lodge with a featured speaker, it needs to turn into something more aggressive. We’ve all seen the effect that constituents have had with the Town Hall meetings regarding health care, etc; this is the kind of local response that is needed here. Polite and organized but firm. The LLA seems to be very quiet as well and needs to pick up the action. All of you can email or write or call both of these groups, let’s start now!

 

http://www.lakelanier.com/200909241260/news/release-answers/

 

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http://water.sam.usace.army.mil/acfframe.htm

 

Flood Control - when they only use it to insure water for oyster beds in Alabama - why does the corps of engineers support Alabama's wants when Georgian's tax dollars have paid for these projects/ dams / resevoirs / drinking water / facilities / hydropower plants / and upkeep

Flood Control - when they only use it to insure water for oyster beds in Alabama - why does the corps of engineers support Alabama's wants when Georgian's tax dollars have paid for these projects/ dams / resevoirs / drinking water / facilities / hydropower plants / and upkeep

 

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Click here for lake level forecast in tabular form.



ACF River Level Forecasts

Fri., September 25, 2009 1:28pm (EDT)

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More Rain Puts Georgia At Risk For More Flooding
By Melissa Stiers
Updated: 10 hours ago

More rain expected this evening and this weekend has all of north Georgia including metro Atlanta and Athens under a flash flood watch effective 4 p.m. today until early Sunday morning.

More rain in the forecast for North Georgia. (photo by Judy Baxter)

Meteorologists at the National Weather Service in Peachtree City predict rain and thunderstorms will be moving through the state over night and Saturday, which puts Georgia at risk for more flooding.

“Unfortunately, we’ve had to put north Georgia into flash flood watch because of this potential of one to two inches of rain and could have isolated higher amounts possible,” said Weather Service hydrologist Kent Frantz, “which could cause additional flooding, either in areas that have already had flooding and new areas in the urbanized metro area and up in the north Georgia mountains.”

Frantz says the rain may move through slowly at first, and the greatest chance of heavy rain is Saturday.

Meanwhile, the Army Corps of Engineers has a close watch on Lake Allatoona, just north of metro Atlanta and West Point Lake near Columbus because both lakes are already well above full pool.

http://www.gpb.org/news/2009/09/25/more-rain-puts-georgia-at-risk-for-more-flooding

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Fri., July 10, 2009 1:10pm (EDT)

80 Georgia Counties “Abnormally Dry” This Week
By Susanna Capelouto
Updated: 2 months ago

Dry conditions returned to some 80 Georgia Counties this week. That’s according to the U.S. Drought Monitor map. The drought map is issued by the National Drought Mitigation Center. The July 7 posting shows that the soil in much of north and east Georgia is “abnormally dry.” That’s the first step on a scale that measures the severity of drought conditions. Kent Frantz is a hydrologist for the National Weather Service in Peachtree City. He says just after state officials declared an end to the three year drought, it got hot and dry in Georgia for 30 days. “The state drought committee, I think, officially declared the drought over on about June 12 and just seems like it shut off the next day,” Frantz says. He adds that since July 7, Georgia has gone back to it’s normal summer pattern of afternoon thunderstorms. Frantz says he expects normal soil conditions to return by fall.

(yeah, right – its fall – it flooded – what is normal about any of it?

– my note)

http://www.gpb.org/news/2009/07/10/80-georgia-counties-abnormally-dry-this-week

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Georgia State – drought, floods, Lake Lanier, Corps of Engineers from hell, Atlanta drinking water, Georgia dams, climate change, global warming, bizarre weather events

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