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Secretive spending on US intelligence disclosed
Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:00pm EDT

By Adam Entous

WASHINGTON, Sept 15 (Reuters) – Intelligence activities across the U.S. government and military cost a total of $75 billion a year, the nation’s top intelligence official disclosed on Tuesday, revealing publicly for the first time an overall number long shrouded in secrecy.

The disclosure by Dennis Blair, President Barack Obama’s director of national intelligence, put a spotlight on the sharp growth in intelligence spending as well as on the huge and long obscured role of military intelligence programs, which, based on previous disclosures, would account for roughly $25 billion to $30 billion of the $75 billion total.

In comparison, when total intelligence spending was accidentally published in a congressional document in 1994, it totaled about $26 billion, including $10 billion for military intelligence programs, according to Steven Aftergood, an expert on intelligence spending with the Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy.

Blair cited the $75 billion figure in releasing a four-year strategic blueprint for the sprawling, 200,000-person intelligence community.

In a conference call with reporters, Blair brushed aside as “no longer relevant” what he called the “traditional fault line” separating military programs from overall intelligence spending.

Blair’s national intelligence post came into being in 2005 to oversee spy agencies after they failed to prevent the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks and wrongly concluded that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction.

In an unclassified version of Blair’s blueprint, intelligence agencies singled out as threats Iran’s nuclear program, North Korea’s “erratic behavior,” and insurgencies fueled by militant groups including al Qaeda.

Blair said the “accumulation of knowledge” about al Qaeda has made the U.S. intelligence community more effective at preventing attacks.

The intelligence assessment also pointed to growing challenges from China’s military modernization and natural resource-driven diplomacy.

Blair cited Beijing’s “aggressive” push into areas that could threaten U.S. cyber-security.

‘IT’S ABOUT TIME’

The $75 billion figure incorporated spending by the nation’s 16 intelligence agencies, referred to collectively as the national intelligence program (NIP), as well as amounts spent by the Pentagon on so-called military intelligence program (MIP) activities in support of troops in the field in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere, officials said.

Under pressure from Congress and advocacy groups, the U.S. government has taken some steps in recent years to open its books on some intelligence spending.

The Bush administration, for example, disclosed the amount spent by the 16 intelligence agencies under the NIP — $47.5 billion in 2008 alone — but those figures did not incorporate the military intelligence program, officials said.

Aftergood said there was “no good reason” to keep information about those military programs secret.

“Its disclosure does not reveal any sensitive sources, methods or operations,” he said, adding that Blair’s disclosure “suggests that a more rational approach to intelligence secrecy may be around the corner. And it’s about time.” (Additional reporting by Phil Stewart and Paul Eckert; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

http://www.reuters.com/article/latestCrisis/idUSN15495618

***

Ground broken on $3.4 billion Homeland Security complex
By Mike M. Ahlers
CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) — Washington notables broke ground on the future home of the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday, symbolically starting construction on the biggest federal building project in the Washington area since the Pentagon 68 years ago.
Rendering of future Coast Guard headquarters, with green roof designed to capture and reuse water.

[etc. – includes architect rendering of one part of completed project]

* Story Highlights
* It’s biggest federal building project in D.C. area since Pentagon 68 years ago
* Complex to be on campus of historic buildings in long-neglected part of D.C.
* Project to gather more than 15,000 employees now scattered in 35 offices
* First new building: Coast Guard headquarters, costing about $435 million

[ . . . ]

Some $650 million in Department of Homeland Security and General Services Administration federal stimulus money is expediting some of the rehabilitation, the latter agency said.

The project also includes large amounts of new construction. The first building, a 1.8 million-square-foot U.S. Coast Guard headquarters, will cost about $435 million and is scheduled for completion in 2013. The building will include green roofs and landscaped courtyards to capture and reuse surface water.

Former Homeland Security Adviser Fran Townsend said the department is right to consolidate its facilities but cautioned it won’t make the huge differences some people claim it will.

For one thing, what we know is St. Elizabeths is not big enough to hold all of their headquarters components, she said. And while the department needs to be far enough away from downtown Washington to survive an attack, it suffers from not having a presence on the National Mall just like all the other major agencies, she said.

[etc.]

All About U.S. Department of Homeland Security • Washington, DC • The Pentagon

http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/09/09/homeland.security.headquarters/index.html

***

From – Federal Computer Week –

NARA digs out of digital avalanche

The National Archives is under mounting pressure to help the federal government manage its rapidly growing store of electronic records

* By Ben Bain
* Sep 11, 2009

The National Archives and Records Administration has decades of experience managing and preserving the nation’s most vital historical documents, from the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution to a vast gallery of photos from World War II.

The agency also catalogs and maintains vast warehouses of government documents, protecting the public record — a linchpin of democracy — for future generations.

Also in this report:

NARA’s top 10 management challenges

But the tools of the trade that have served NARA for so long are no longer sufficient. With much of the business of government conducted online, NARA must transform itself by developing new tools, techniques and policies for ensuring that electronic records are searchable and accessible, not just now but for years to come.

The agency’s solution is the multimillion-dollar Electronic Records Archives (ERA), a project that NARA insists is progressing well despite audits to the contrary. Meanwhile, the electronic records continue to pile up.

In an interview Aug. 21, Paul Brachfeld, NARA’s inspector general, stressed the importance of making the government’s digital records readily searchable and retrievable for analysis and litigation, which ERA promises to do. But there’s a catch.

Building the right tools: The Electronic Records Archives

A key tool in the National Archives and Records Administration’s strategy for tackling its digital challenges is the Electronic Records Archives (ERA). NARA officials say their $550 million development effort will result in archives in which electronic documents are available perpetually despite on-going changes in hardware and software. Here are the milestones for their plan.

December 2003 — Request for proposals is released.
August 2004 — Design competition contracts are awarded to Harris and Lockheed Martin.
September 2005 — Lockheed Martin is selected to develop the ERA.
2005-2008 — Ability to transfer, inspect and store electronic records is developed.
June 2008 — Initial operating capability is achieved.
2008-2009 — Rapid addition, search and retrieval of electronic records from the George W. Bush administration’s White House is achieved.
2009 to 2010 — Public access, preservation framework prototype and active backup are in development.
2010 to 2011 — Preservation capabilities and expanded access are to be implemented.
2011 to 2012 — Analysis and design of final system are to be performed.
March 2012 — Basic ERA system are to be fully operational.

Source: National Archives and Records Administration

“To me, we’re kind of setting ourselves up as the only show in town for future access and analysis of records, and if it works, great,” he said. “If it doesn’t work, we got problems.”

Other issues loom. Open-government advocates are pushing for the next archivist to take a more active role in ensuring public access to government information, fueled by President Barack Obama’s commitment to increasing transparency. And the agency must address concerns about its ability to protect sensitive documents, which was called into question by a recent revelation that an external hard drive containing sensitive and potentially classified files from the Bill Clinton administration’s White House is missing from a NARA facility.

Those challenges face NARA’s next leader, experts say. If David Ferriero, Obama’s pick to be archivist of the United States, is confirmed by the Senate, he would find himself at the epicenter of the policy and technological challenges that the proliferation of electronic data poses for the government.

The swiftness with which digital formats, technologies and architectures become obsolete is of particular concern to those charged with preserving records in perpetuity. And the longer it takes to develop the solutions, the bigger the avalanche of digital data will grow.

The archives of the future

The Government Accountability Office expects NARA’s next-generation archive to cost more than $550 million, and NARA had already spent more than $237 million by the end of fiscal 2008. NARA officials refer to the project as the archives of the future and say it won’t depend on any particular software or hardware, something that is important to accommodate changes in technology.

But in its most recent semiannual report to Congress, NARA’s Office of Inspector General listed the ERA program at the top of the management challenges that the agency faces. GAO has also raised concerns about some aspects of the project.

GAO recently reported that NARA’s spending plan for ERA didn’t have enough detail and the agency didn’t have a contingency plan for the system or a fully functional backup and restoration process. Auditors also found methodological weaknesses during a review of NARA’s fiscal 2009 spending plan for the program that could limit its ability to keep tabs on the project.

NARA’s acting archivist, Adrienne Thomas, said agency officials briefed Congress in April on specific outcomes ERA would achieve, adding that the agency would include more details in the next spending plan. She also said the agency is in the process of updating its project management tool and conducting a final review of its contingency plan for the system.

Meanwhile, even after revising its initial schedule for the system, NARA said it’s on track to achieve full operating capability when its contract with Lockheed Martin ends in March 2012. The contract is worth about $317 million.

NARA officials told reporters Sept. 2 that they had ingested 67G of data into an ERA system for federal records and 64.4T of searchable records from the George W. Bush administration. The Bush administration total of 77T is about 35 times the amount of data received from the Clinton administration, they said.

http://fcw.com/Articles/2009/09/14/NARA-ERA-dig-out-of-digital-records-avalanche.aspx

***

* Most Popular Articles
* Most Emailed Articles

Who is sending mysterious laptops to governors?
Trust, but let Google verify: Companies join government in identity authentication experiment
Aides defend presidential powers in cybersecurity bill
Facebook sets up government page
Top 10 agencies on Twitter

Who is sending mysterious laptops to governors?

FBI is probing strange gifts

* By Doug Beizer
* Sep 02, 2009

Who is sending unsolicited laptop computers to governors’ offices, and why?

The FBI is investigating the unexpected deliveries that were sent to governors’ offices in at least 10 states, according to media reports. Investigators are trying to determine if the machines contain malware or programming that would allow someone remote access to secure networks.

Governors in West Virginia, Vermont, Wyoming and Washington received three to five laptops each, according to the Associated Press. Shipments to governors in six other states were intercepted, according to The Inquirer.

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin received four Compaq computers in Hewlett-Packard boxes on Aug. 5, according to a report in the Charleston Gazette. His office turned the computers over to the West Virginia State Police, who are also involved in the investigation, according to the report.

HP officials are aware of the orders and said they are linked to fraud, according to the Inquirer report.

“Our expectation is that this is not a gesture of good will,” said Kyle Schafer, West Virginia’s chief technology officer, quoted in the Inquirer. “People don’t just send you five laptops for no good reason.”

Distributing the laptops might mirror similar cyberattack attempts by criminals who distribute USB devices loaded with malware, according to an Industry Standard report.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.
Share this Page
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* Cox proposes faster funding for responders10/14/2003

Reader comments
Tue, Sep 8, 2009 Q-Baby DC

Mabye it’s like mission impossible instructions. You get the laptop, connect to your network. All the information from your network is transmitted to the enemy, then the laptop goes up in smoke.
Tue, Sep 8, 2009

I wish someone would send me 5 free laptops…
Thu, Sep 3, 2009

lol @ aol is getting desperate.
Thu, Sep 3, 2009

It was probably part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan.
Thu, Sep 3, 2009

“if one guy turns on one machine and presses one button, you get $300K” What are you talking about? Where you gettin’ those numbers?

http://fcw.com/Articles/2009/09/02/FBI-investigates-mysterious-laptops.aspx

***

eSeminar

* Igniting the social-media revolution Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons

Federal Computer Week will present Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons, emerging media coordinator for the Defense Information School, at 11 a.m., Tues., Sept. 29, where he will discuss transparency and open government. Read more

More eSeminars

***
The Mystery of the the Classified and Missing National Inventors Council (NIC) Files

By Professor Jon Cavicchi, J.D., LL.M. (I.P.)

* New York Times 1941 – Hedy Lamar Hot Inventor
* NARA FOIA Letter from Ms. Ciarlante (Update)
* NARA Accession List Showing Missing Files
* NARA Status Change RG167
* NARA Disposition Schedule
* NARA Response from Ms. Ciarlante

In March 2003 I received several calls from Patti Young at the Patent Office Search Facilities. She had been contacted by an Inventor who had submitted an idea to help the World War II war effort. He submitted the idea to the National inventors Council. Neither she nor I had heard of citizen invention disclosures and files outside the Patent Office System. She called me because the only reference on the Web she had found was http://www.ptcforum.org which indicated that the NIC had been transferred to the public sector in 1973 under the auspices of the Academy of Applied Science and the Franklin Pierce Law Center. She had assumed that the files would be located in the Pierce Law Intellectual Property Library.
I had no clue. Our senior IP Faculty had no clue. Our founder, Dr. Robert Rines, declined to answer my phone call. He indicated through his secretary that he had no idea as to the location of the invention disclosure files.

Over the following days I traced the path of these files from the Commerce Department to the National Bureau of Standards to the National Archives. What I discovered raises many questions.

I spoke with Marjorie Ciarlante at NARA. My goal was to ascertain the extent of the collection to study the feasibility of scanning and posting the invention disclosures and the files on the IP Mall Website. Through Ms. Ciarlante and documentation she sent me I found that these documents have been classified and that portions of the collection are missing.

Why are these documents classified? Where are the missing files? When will they enter the public domain? According to NARA records : “As late as 1988, the National Bureau of Standards Records Officer Bernie Hale, reiterated this position, saying that the records could not be opened to the public “until after the turn of the century.” The value of these records for research into the history of science and technology is undisputed, and these records are especially significant considering the impact of technology on WW II.” It is now beyond the turn of the century and this information is still locked down at NARA.

I spoke with an Assistant General Counsel at NARA. She is looking into this matter but assures me that the process of declassifying these files is not a quick or easy process.

History of NIC from the PTC Website

http://www.ptcforum.org

The National Inventors Council

National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science
Remote Sector reorganizing charter members of the National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science who attended the 1981 Inventors Conference (pictured in the Franklin Pierce Law Center Library). Seated (left to right) Alan A. Smith, Donald B. Sinclair, Brooks Walker, Charles Stark Draper, Richard Walton, Kenneth J. Germeshausen, and Harry Saragovitz. Standing (left to right) Draper Harvey, Hugh Brett, John Lothrop, Isaac S. Blonder, Duane Marshall, Charles W. Wyckoff, William Yates, Lamar Washington, Nelson H. Shapiro, Jason Weisman, Samuel Nakasian, Robert H. Rines, Howard S. Curtis, Kenan Sahin.
During W.W.II, the National Inventors Council (NIC) came into being due to the recognition that inventions and ideas of U.S. citizenry could play an important role in the war effort. From the noble beginnings of producing ideas, such as a small mercury dry cell battery with a two-month life for walkie-talkie use a mirror signaling device for downed pilots; a substitute for kapok life jackets, the National Inventors Council continued as the only technology transfer link between the citizenry and the military and other government agencies.

During 1973, the NIC, then at the National Bureau of Standards, was transferred to the private sector under the auspices of the Academy of Applied Science and the Franklin Pierce Law Center. The focus was shifted from trying to answer the specific needs of a special group to developing a generalized approach to investigating the realm of innovation and invention.

Since that time, the NIC’s goal has been to continue to help solve problems associated with technological creativity and transfer, particularly with those groups historically responsible for breakthrough innovations: universities and independent inventors.

In 1986, the NIC began a new phase of its continuing pursuit to assist technological innovation. Under the impetus of a new patent law program in the People’s Republic of China, the Academy was asked to assist Chinese universities and independent inventors in bringing their ideas to American businesses. This assistance would also involve an information exchange to enable Chinese inventors to better understand the markets that they were trying to enter.

This venture was developed under the aegis of a program called PACT, an acronym for Promotion of American Chinese Technology. Like its progenitor, the NIC, which has continued to expand its charter, PACT has found that its acronym can now stand for Promotion of Advanced Commercial Technologies.

PACT became a natural outgrowth of the NIC as part of its activities, particularly as it has come to aid not only Chinese universities and ministries in protecting and licensing or otherwise commercializing upon their inventions and technologies, hopefully with American companies, but also faculty and graduate students of American and United Kingdom universities, as well – and an occasional independent inventor or small company.

The History of the NIC Files from NARA

National Institute of Standards and Technology
WNRC Project
RG 167 records stored at WNRC

1. National Inventors Council Files, 1940-53 Classified Records

National Inventors Council committee files, arranged by Committee number, thereunder by a NIC numerical designation, thereunder alphabetically by name of inventor. Each Committee was responsible for evaluating submisssions for a specific area of science and technology, such as ordnance and firearms, metals and metalurgy, signals and communications, etc. The files contain explanations and evaluations of the more significant proposals received by the Council, which was established in 1940, under the Office of Technical Services, Department of Commerce, to provide a clearing house for inventions that might be useful for national defense, and to bring such inventions to the attention of the armed forces. The NIC was most active during WW II but continued to solicit inventions into the mid-1950s. When the OTS was abolished, the Department of Commerce transferred its functions to the National Bureau of Standards, which had provided both technical and administrative support to the NIC. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archives in FY 1999.

Justification: These records were appraised as permanent in an appraisal report dated March 25, 1971 (NN371-166). The appraisal report was not formally approved because of the restrictions imposed by the agency, which strongly believed in the proprietary nature of the records, precluded accessioning at that time. As late as 1988, the National Bureau of Standards Records Officer Bernie Hale, reiterated this position, saying that the records could not be opened to the public “until after the turn of the century.” The value of these records for research into the history of science and technology is undisputed, and these records are especially significant considering the impact of technology on WW II.

2. National Inventors Council Plans and Drawings

Largely oversize plans, drawings, and supporting documents arrange alphabetically by last name of inventor. Files include photostats and blueprints. The plans and drawings were removed from the incoming correspondence files. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archives in FY 1999

Justification: These plans and drawings visually, supplement the inventions files documented in item 1 above, and were part of the original inventors submissions.

Added in handwriting on the original document: “According to Donna Miller, NIST Records Officer, the first two boxes (A & B) were missing when she went to look through them. They were charged out but no employee name given (10/2/02)

3. Nations Inventors Council Chronological Files 1947-54

Chronological correspondence files (“Day Files”) of the National Inventors Council, 1950-1958, and of John C. Green, 1947-1958. Green served as Chief Engineer for the Council during WW II, and was head of the Department of Commerce’s Office of Technical Service, under which the NIC was established. Tissue copies of outgoing correspondence, including both form letters and substantive replies to inventors concerning the utilization of their submissions as well as entitlement due them. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archives in FY 1999.

Justification: These correspondence files relate to the inventions documented in item 1 above. Given the lack of an index or other finding aids to the NIC files, these correspondence files should be permanent. They also provide a useful supplement to the invention files, because they document both NIC’s post-war existence and continued interest by inventors in their submissions. Any duplicative files should be destroyed during archival processing of the records.

4. National Inventors Council Incoming Correspondence

Incoming correspondence files of the National Inventors Council, 1940-1953, largely inventors submissions and inquiries, arranged alphabetically by inventor’s last name. All that remains of this is mid-T through rest having been destroyed. The bulk of this file had been permanently withdrawn by the age and returned under a different accession number. That accession was destroyed under N1-40-90-2, the disposal authority for patented invention case files of the Office of Chief Counsel for Technology, Department of Commerce, which appears to have been inappropriate for these records. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archive FY 1999.

^ page top ^

Pierce Law IP Mall – http://www.ipmall.info

2 White Street, Concord, NH 03301
v: 603.228.1541 f: 603.228.2322 w: ipmall.info w: piercelaw.edu e: ipmall@piercelaw.edu
Prof. Jon Cavicchi, Site Director
Prof. Jon Cavicchi, Site Director

http://ipmall.info/hosted_resources/nic.asp

***

nic_photo1.jpg

National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science
Remote Sector reorganizing charter members of the National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science who attended the 1981 Inventors Conference (pictured in the Franklin Pierce Law Center Library). Seated (left to right) Alan A. Smith, Donald B. Sinclair, Brooks Walker, Charles Stark Draper, Richard Walton, Kenneth J. Germeshausen, and Harry Saragovitz. Standing (left to right) Draper Harvey, Hugh Brett, John Lothrop, Isaac S. Blonder, Duane Marshall, Charles W. Wyckoff, William Yates, Lamar Washington, Nelson H. Shapiro, Jason Weisman, Samuel Nakasian, Robert H. Rines, Howard S. Curtis, Kenan Sahin.

***

National Archives and Records Administration
Search All NARA Web Pages … 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001. Telephone: 1-86-NARA-NARA or 1-866-272-6272. The National Archives Experience …
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***

NARA digs out of digital avalanche? – 26 minutes ago
But the tools of the trade that have served NARA for so long are no longer sufficient. With much of the business of government conducted online, NARA must …
FCW.com – 4 related articles »

***

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Microeconomics for MBAs: the economic way of thinking for managers – Google Books Result
by Richard B. McKenzie, Dwight R. Lee – 2006 – Business & Economics – 689 pages
Therefore firms have a demand for the right to avoid pollution abatement costs. … who will buy those rights, and what will the cost of the program be? …
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Book overview

This is the first textbook in microeconomics written exclusively for MBA students. McKenzie/Lee minimizes attention to mathematics and maximizes attention to intuitive economic thinking. The text is structured clearly and accessibly: Part I of each chapter outlines the basic theory and Part II applies this basic theory to management issues. ‘Perspective’ sections in each chapter provide a new line of argument or different take on a business or policy issue, and carefully chosen topics and review questions are designed to spark lively and instructive debates. The accompanying DVD contains modules of Professor McKenzie talking informally with students, and elucidates complex lines of argument as well as acting as a revision aid. Throughout the book, McKenzie and Lee aim to infuse students with the economic way of thinking in the context of a host of problems that MBA students, as future managers of real-world firms, will find relevant to their career goals.
Limited preview – 2006 – 689 pages – Business & Economics

Microeconomics for MBAs: the economic way of thinking for managers‎ – Page 201

by Richard B. McKenzie, Dwight R. Lee – Business & Economics – 2006 – 689 pages

Therefore firms have a demand for the right to avoid pollution abatement costs.
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Limited previewAbout this book Add to my library

Incentives: motivation and the economics of information‎ – Page 146

by Donald Edward Campbell – Technology & Engineering – 2006 – 591 pages

Therefore, only the low-cost firms will, on their own initiative, modify their
price of pollution rights will result in target pollution abatement being

Water resources research‎ – Page 395

by American Geophysical Union – Nature – 1975

Second, if the firms can change the form of the cost of abatement function, and
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Guide to sustainable development and environmental policy‎ – Page 187

by Natalii︠a︡ Sergeevna Mirovit︠s︡kai︠a︡, William Ascher – Business & Economics – 2001 – 391 pages

Therefore, it is assumed that abatement costs are higher in developed countries.
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Economics and the global environment‎ – Page 63

by Charles S. Pearson – Business & Economics – 2000 – 583 pages

property and two firms, A and B, engage in extraction. His demand for road
use services is D, his marginal costs of road use (gas, oil, tires,
Limited previewAbout this book Add to my library

The Porter hypothesis and the economic consequences of environmental regulation‎ – Page 6

by Thomas Roediger-Schluga – Law – 2004 – 349 pages

costs of pollution abatement which are a function of the current and future
state of technology. Therefore, it will have to be examined how firms

Microeconomics Study Guide‎

by Timothy D. Tregarthen, John Brock, Dale Deboer – Business & Economics – 1999 – 400 pages

For example, did Spur Industries have the right to run the feed- lot or did
this firm could most efficiently generate additional pollution abatement.

The European Union: economics and policies‎ – Page 293

by A. M. El-Agraa – Political Science – 2004 – 566 pages

In Figure 17.2, the pollution is measured explicitly. For convenience, we have
drawn the diagram with the abscissa measuring pollution abatement from the iD

Journal of environmental economics and management‎ – Page 71

1976

Therefore, unless all polluting firms are price takers, or just happen to have
the same elasticity of demand at their equilibriums, imposing the same

Principles of environmental and resource economics: a guide for students and …‎ – Page 34

by Henk Folmer, H. Landis Gabel, Johannes Baptist Opschoor – Business & Economics – 1995 – 484 pages

The establishment of new firms, shutdowns, and technological progress all of
the demand curve for permits (or more generally the marginal abatement cost
Snippet viewAbout this book Add to my library

http://books.google.com/books?q=Therefore+firms+have+a+demand+for+the+right+to+avoid+pollution+abatement+costs&btnG=Search+Books

***

My Note – so the point is, that as long as business schools and the business communities have the attitude and teach the attitude of “getting out of paying for polluting” and “sidestepping regulations abating pollution” and “how to avoid climate change responsibility and facts,” – then nothing can be done about any of it.

– cricketdiane

***

Browse by Topic: Human Rights
$1000 – Will buy a brick at Jericho’s Veterans Residences … Kenya Human Rights. The project equips local leaders with adequate information to enable them …
http://www.globalgiving.com/dy/…/themes.html?…Human%20Rights – Cached – Similar –

There Will Be Water
Jun 12, 2008 … Pickens has also bought up the rights to a considerable amount of water that … “There are people who will buy the water when they need it. …
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/…/b4089040017753.htm – Cached – Similar –

***

NPC International will buy 51 Pizza Hut units in St. Louis for …
For those units, NPC will buy from Pizza Hut the employees, equipment and franchise rights. NPC said that it expects to finance the purchase using its $75 …
http://www.bizjournals.com/kansascity/stories/2009/…/daily37.html – Cached – Similar –

Liability Rights As Contingent Claims
understand the injurer’s strategy will buy liability rights in anticipation of a rise in their price. The rise in the price of liability rights increases …
works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1067&context… – Similar –
by R Cooter – Cited by 6 – Related articles – All 4 versions

SB 777 spreads fear among extreme right wing. Afraid California …
Oct 15, 2007 … The Student Civil Rights Act (Senate Bill 777) is making ripples with social conservatives – who … It’s a shame some people will buy it. …
http://www.proudparenting.com/node/878 – Cached – Similar –

Audi President Calls The Volt “A Car For Idiots”
Sep 3, 2009 … The Volt is right on target. If it were going to destroy G.M., …. Audi: you’re just jealous because no one will buy your $40k corolla …
http://www.businessinsider.com/audi-president-calls-the-volt-a-car-for-idiots-2009-9 – Cached – Similar –

$30000 Will Buy Your Name on a Surveillance Camera | Threat Level …
Jul 31, 2008 … $30000 Will Buy Your Name on a Surveillance Camera …. All rights reserved. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, …
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2008/07/30000-will-buy/ – Cached – Similar –

Letters on the corn laws, and on the rights of the working … – Google Books Result
by James Deacon Hume – 1835 – 80 pages
But if you ask him twenty-six per cent., he will leave them, and will buy gold at twenty-five per cent, instead. In this way the value of the local paper …
books.google.com/books?id=0XYBAAAAQAAJ… –

Sales tax cash will keep forest wild | International Falls Daily …
Jun 29, 2009 … With that and $9 million from two private foundations, the Department of Natural Resources will buy rights known as conservation easements …
http://www.ifallsdailyjournal.com/…/sales-tax-cash-will-keep-forest-wild-106 – Cached – Similar –

Fundamentals of the securities industry – Google Books Result
by William A. Rini – 2003 – Business & Economics – 256 pages
Since she owns 10% of the old stock, she will receive rights enabling her to buy 10% of the new issue. If she exercises (uses) her rights, she will buy 10 …
books.google.com/books?isbn=0071403183… –

Natural Resource Partners Will Buy Coal Reserve | Metals and …
Sep 10, 2009 … The company said it will buy the reserves from Colt LLC, … All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, …
http://www.thestreet.com/…/natural-resource-partners-will-buy-coal-reserve.html – 22 hours ago – Similar –

Aguanomics: All-in Auctions
The human rights component is likely to be less than cities current rights, i.e., cities will “buy back” that water. The auctions would be run every so …
aguanomics.com/2008/07/all-in-auctions.html – Cached – Similar –

Journal Newspapers Online: $100000 will buy naming rights to …
Feb 1, 2007 … Publisher of eight weekly newspapers in western Wayne County, Michigan. Your voice in Canton, Northville, Plymouth, Wayne, Westland, …
http://www.journalgroup.com/…/100000-will-buy-naming-rights-to-chamber-building – Cached – Similar –

I will buy Crysis……and then let it sit on my shelf for months
40 posts – 27 authors – Last post: Nov 16, 2007
I will buy Crysis……and then let it sit on my shelf for months : That’s right, I am going to buy Crysis when it is released ( I already …
http://www.tomshardware.com/…/246208-33-crysis-shelf-months – Cached – Similar –

How To Make More Money Than Your Competition Using Reprint Rights …
Oct 15, 2007 … Marketers who have made lots of money using reprint rights are usually the first … Not all who visit your webpage will buy the first time. …
http://www.selfseo.com/story-19585.php – Cached – Similar –

Private Label Rights Articles | PLR article and ebooks
You heard right. I will buy back your membership if the articles don’t make you income and help you gain notoriety. And just for taking my Monthly Articles …
http://www.monthlyarticlestogo.com/ – Cached – Similar –

Fifteen Percent of U.S. Households Will Buy PC in ’96 – CNET News
Fifteen Percent of U.S. Households Will Buy PC in ’96. By CNET News.com Staff … Inside CNET News. Scroll Left Scroll Right. Business Tech …
news.cnet.com/…Will-Buy…/2100-1023_3-278100.html – Cached – Similar –

SOUTHLAND FIRM TO BUY RENOWNED TOY CHAIN RIGHT START INC. TO GET …
retailer will buy the venerable Manhattan-based FAO FAO, …. Calabasas-based The Right Start is acquiring the toy chain FAO Schwarz. Source: Hoovers Online …
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/SOUTHLAND+FIRM+TO+BUY+RENOWNED+TOY+CHAIN+RIGHT+START+INC.+TO+GET+FAO…-a08… – Cached – Similar –

Ebook Resale Rights Exposed
Master ebook resale right leaves you with two categories of customers, one who will buy the ebook from you for personal use and some who will buy to resell …
http://www.resalerightsexposed.com/ – Cached – Similar –

[PDF]
Jaguar Acquisition will buy Chinese cable-TV company …
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – View
Jaguar Acquisition will buy Chinese cable-TV company – Philadelphia Business … of this site © American City Business Journals Inc. All rights reserved. …
http://www.katalyst.com/Jaguar%20Acquisition%20will%20buy%20Chinese%20cable-… –

CampusProgress.org | Know Your Right-Wing Speakers: David Horowitz
“Horowitz will peddle crazy to just about anyone who will buy it” and “Horowitz has as much of a right to speak his mind as the rest of us, no matter how …
http://www.campusprogress.org/…/know-your-right-wing-speakers-david-horowitz

Private Label Rights | Private Label Resale Rights – Secrets To …
Discover How To Make Big Money With Private Label Resale-Rights. … like complete amateurs and they are left wondering why nobody will buy their products. …
http://www.privaterights.com/ – Cached – Similar –

If They Buy Cars, They Will Buy Beef – eXtension News
Aug 5, 2009 … If they will buy more cars, then surely they will also be willing to buy more beef,” said Chris … 2009 eXtension. All rights reserved. …
http://www.extension.org/…/If_They_Buy_Cars,_They_Will_Buy_Beef – Cached – Similar –

The price is right, but who will buy? Depressed share prices and …
The price is right, but who will buy? Depressed share prices and market stress affect potential buyers and sellers. Look for a foreign invasion.
http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-173677187.html – Cached – Similar –

Rights: a critical introduction – Google Books Result
by Tom Campbell – 2006 – Philosophy – 229 pages
Nozick follows this through for all rights so that it is wrong to look, for instance, … people will buy what they want at the lowest available price. …
books.google.com/books?isbn=0415281156… –

Warren Buffett: Distressed Assets a Great Investment | Mint.com
In the end $700000000 is a lot of money, and it will buy a lot of distressed property and if you buy them at the right price you might be buying two …
http://www.mint.com/…/warren-buffett-distressed-assets-a-great-investment/ – Cached – Similar –

Blog U.: 5 Reasons Microsoft Will Buy Blackboard – Technology and …
Sep 11, 2009 … Is Microsoft the right company to purchase Blackboard? … 5 Reasons Facebook will Buy BlackBoard; Posted by Steve Cooper , Founder at Tech …
http://www.insidehighered.com/…/5_reasons_microsoft_will_buy_blackboard – 11 hours ago – Cached – Similar –

Private rights in public resources: equity and property allocation … – Google Books Result
by Leigh Stafford Raymond – 2003 – Political Science – 253 pages
Others have debated the degree to which any such emissions right should be tradable, noting the concern of some that developed nations will buy …
books.google.com/books?isbn=1891853686… –

Paul McCartney denies Michael Jackson Beatles rights rumor | EW.com
Jul 8, 2009 … just like mj bought the rights, Paul can buy them (he is rich as we …. If I were Michael Jackson, I would do the same, I will buy Paul …
news-briefs.ew.com/…/paul-mccartney-michael-jackson-rights/ – Cached – Similar –

****

I Will Buy Rights to Resell Your Software | Freelance Jobs in …
Hi, I want to buy the rights to resell your have ALREADY CREATED. Show me software that will appeal to business owners online.
freelancejoblist.com/…/i-will-buy-rights-resell-your-software-usagraphicpr0 – Cached – Similar –

***

We buy used cell phones! Collect old cell phones for fundraisers!
… Corporation will pay you for cell phone recycling. We buy used phones and provide fast payment. © 2009 PaceButler Corporation – All Rights Reserved.
http://www.pacebutler.com/ – Cached – Similar –

The Future of Reading (A Play in Six Acts) [dive into mark]
Nov 19, 2007 … When someone buys a book, they are also buying the right to resell that book, … I’m not saying I like it, or that I will buy Kindle, …
diveintomark.org/archives/2007/11/19/the-future-of-reading – Cached – Similar –

I Will Buy Rights to Resell Your Software Project at Datashare …
Project: I Will Buy Rights to Resell Your Software … Description, Hi, I want to buy the rights to resell your have ALREADY CREATED. …
http://www.datashare.com.ar/…/I-Will-Buy-Rights-to-Resell-Your-Software-196850.html – Cached – Similar –

***

[My Note – Kasha idea that we need books to look like book formats visually which are physical representations that work – but placed into a digital / digitized / digitally scanned format which keeps the original spacings, margins, text to graphics, sectioning, line spacing, etc. from 2 wks ago – need to work on that]

***

Will buy income/apartment property! Cash today!.. :: Wisconsin …
Will buy income/apartment property! Cash today! 608-219-1212 … Terms of Service  Privacy Policy. © Copyright 2009 Capital Newspapers. All rights reserved.
wiscdeals.kaango.com/feViewAd/15200129 – Cached – Similar –

[Check some of these for “finders’ fees” to locate property for them – do that this weekend]

(((

Predicting the Future: How to Know What Your Customers Will Buy …
Aug 28, 2008 … Predicting the Future: How to Know What Your Customers Will Buy Before They Do … All Rights Reserved SEMPO.org. Powered by Kavi.
http://www.sempo.org/learning_center/webinars/08-28-08/ – Cached – Similar –

[PDF]
How to Start Your Own Business
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat – View
Choosing a product customers will buy. The right product will provide the cash flow to build the infrastructure needed to establish your business. …
http://www.incubic.com/for_entrepreneurs/pdfs/product.pdf – Similar –

***

The handbook of international financial terms – Google Books Result
by Peter Moles, Nicholas Terry – 1997 – Business & Economics – 605 pages
… will buy a currency against the base currency. … (ii) The liabilities side of a balance sheet. rights issue, rights offer, or rights offering …
books.google.com/books?isbn=0198288859… –

**

Tight Advertising Budget? $360 Will Buy You Tons of Exposure If …
Mar 10, 2009 … Limited marketing budget in recession means that you just have to use some creativity in order to get the most out of your money – same as …
profy.com/…/tight-advertising-budget-360-will-buy-tons-of-exposure-if-used-right/ – Cached – Similar –

Who Will Buy It? – TIME
Who Will Buy It? By Unmesh Kher Wednesday, Mar. 09, 2005 …. 2009 Time Inc. All rights reserved | Privacy Policy | RSS | Newsletter | TIME For Kids | LIFE. …
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1034713-4,00.html – Similar –

***

tecosystems » Network Offering: If You Build It, I Will Buy It …
Sep 20, 2006 … Network Offering: If You Build It, I Will Buy It (And Some Other Folks …. Am I right or have I missed the mark? Not that I’m offering, …
redmonk.com/…/network-offering-if-you-build-it-i-will-buy-it-and-some-other-folks-might-too/ – Cached – Similar –

***

#
Right Business to Buy Articles from ArticlesBase.com
Searching for the Right Business Financing … more creatively. These options work well for short term financing, that will “buy” you some time to plan your …
http://www.articlesbase.com/article-tags/right-business-to-buy – Cached – Similar –
#
Reprint rights to this copyrighted material
Dec 19, 2008 … and hopefully, when my book comes out they will buy a copy. … If you want reprint rights, I need to know the following, …
http://www.amazingribs.com/meathead/reprint_rights.html – Cached – Similar –

Principles of Microeconomics – Google Books Result
by N. Gregory Mankiw – 2008 – Business & Economics – 519 pages
… and firms that can reduce pollution only at a high cost will buy whatever permits they need. As long as there is a free market for the pollution rights, …
books.google.com/books?isbn=0324589980… –

Eleanor Roosevelt and The Right to Food – World Food Day USA
Eleanor Roosevelt is recognized everywhere as a champion of human rights. …. but there is always the chance that some kind person will buy for one or that …
http://www.worldfooddayusa.org/CMS/2952/17831.aspx – Cached – Similar –

#
Who Will Buy Your Construction Firm and at What Price …
Who Will Buy Your Construction Firm and at What Price? … firm as some people have worked in that firm until their death and that’s their right. …
http://www.allbusiness.com/construction/4354149-1.html – Cached – Similar –
#
France’s NicOx to buy back eye drug rights from Pfizer | Reuters …
PARIS (Reuters) – French biotech firm NicOx will buy back the rights to develop and market a drug that seeks to treat eye disease glaucoma from US …
http://www.24x7mag.com/reuters_article.asp?id…html – Cached – Similar –

***

Macquarie Airports to buy management rights -paper | Reuters
Jul 23, 2009 … AX) will buy back management rights from Macquarie Group (MQG.AX) for around A$300 million ($244 million), the Australian Financial Review …
www.reuters.com/article/…/idUSSYD3511120090723

us Armed Forces Will Buy Your Invention
us Armed Forces Will Buy Your Invention (Jan, 1951) … was some time before the Council convinced him that only by tying up the patent rights himself could …
blog.modernmechanix.com/…/us-armed-forces-will-buy-your-invention/ –

***

U.S. Armed Forces Will Buy Your Invention (from World War II)

Once again the National Inventors Council is calling for military gadgets. Here’s your chance to make a fortune as well as help your country.

By Ralph Coniston

AMERICAN inventors are on the verge of handing Russia a major defeat on the propaganda front. The Soviets have been jamming our Voice of America broadcasts and for the past year the nation’s top electronics scientists have been working on a method to counter the Red’s activities, at the suggestion of the National Inventors Council. And now officials report that success is near.

What is the National Inventors Council and how is it that the suggestion came from them? Well, the Council acts as an open door to inventors who want to submit ideas to the armed forces. Its job is to acquaint you with the problems confronting the military services and refer potentially valuable ideas to the appropriate agencies. Periodically, it issues lists of needed inventions.

The Council was organized just before World War II and evaluated 250,000 ideas during the war. The Armed Forces recognized its peacetime value, too, and it has continued as a division of the Department of Commerce. At present, ideas are being received at the rate of 8,000 a year—but the Korean war has caused an enormous spurt in submissions.

While the National Inventors Council must be most concerned with problems of the moment, it manages to look ahead, too. Take the case of Robert C. Harris, an inventor from Fort Wayne, Ind. Back in 1940 Harris sent in a device he had perfected— a small magneto operated by the closing of a hand. It didn’t provide a continuous current—only a spark. The Council agreed that Harris’ invention was ingenious, but what could the spark be used for? Neither Harris, the Inventor’s Council nor the armed services could figure that out so it was shelved.

Several years passed and the army discovered that the bazooka’s original ignition system was unreliable. What was the solution? They asked the National Inventors Council and the board remembered Harris’ whatzit. His “useless” invention saved the day and brought Harris a fortune.

Perhaps you have some little gadget kicking around which you think is of no importance now. It may prove to be tremendously valuable to you and your country. During the last war, Dr. Borris Berkman, civilian scientist, suggested to the Council that milkweed floss should be substituted for kapok because supplies of this material had been cut off by the Japanese. As a result, Dr. Berkman got a government contract, set up the Milkweed Floss Corporation of America and formed an army of boy scouts to gather the floss and help win the war.

Another invention which did not sound at all military was Harry N. Peavey’s plastic carburetor. But the army eventually found it useful in teaching mechanics the principles of repairing and maintaining carburetors.

Scoutmaster Charles Learned devised a signaling mirror which he regarded as little more than a plaything, good for occupying the minds of his scouts. Then early in the war the nation was stirred by the story of Captain Eddie Rickenbacker’s ordeal while adrift for 23 days on a raft in the South Pacific. Search planes had passed overhead without sighting the party despite the desperate efforts of Rickenbacker and his companions to draw attention.

The armed forces were anxious to find some simple signaling device to attract fliers on similar search missions. A mirror seemed the obvious solution but sunlight reflected from a mirror cannot be seen unless the beam is focused’ directly on the searching plane, something difficult to accomplish with an ordinary mirror. Learned’s signaling mirror seemed to do the trick and the Inventor’s Council passed it on to the proper authorities. Learned refused to take money for his invention and it was some time before the Council convinced him that only by tying up the patent rights himself could he be sure that some greedy stranger would not be able to sting the Government.

Members of the Council, which screens all incoming ideas, are outstanding American inventors, scientists and industrial re- search ^men together with the U. S. Commissioner of Patents and representatives of all the armed forces. Chairman is Dr. Charles F. Kettering of General Motors and secretary is Lawrence Langner, one of the country’s top patent attorneys.

If you present an idea to the Council, it first attempts to determine whether it is scientifically practical and whether it has advantages over existing devices serving the same purpose. For this it often asks the aid of the Bureau of Standards, the Patent Office and other Government agencies. If your idea is believed to be sound, the Council then approaches the proper authorities in the armed forces to discover whether they feel that the new invention would be useful to them. A battery, for example, might be called to the attention of the Signal Corps, the Navy and the Air Force. Certain types of guns would be presented to the Navy while others might be shown to Army Ordnance. Once the armed forces show interest, the Inventors Council’s job is done. Arrangements for actual development and manufacture are taken care of by the armed forces and your payment will come from them.

If you want to propose an invention, here is the way to go about it: Write to the National Inventors Council, Department of Commerce, Washington 25, D. C. No special forms are needed for submitting ideas— just submit each suggestion as a separate document. Typewrite if possible and be sure to give your name and address. State the title of your invention, give a brief statement of its general nature and specific uses, explain the particular point of novelty or superiority of your invention in comparison with existing devices serving the same purpose.

Give a brief outline of any tests which have been made of the invention and include a summary of its patent status and what steps have previously been taken to develop it or bring it to the attention of the armed services or other government agencies. Give a complete description of your invention including any necessary sketches, drawings or photographs. Incomplete information may not be enough to allow the Council to judge the suggestion properly.

Do not send models unless the Council informs you that a working model is needed for testing. In one case an inventor sent the Council a package containing models of two types of bomb. The outside of the package gave no indication of its contents but fortunately there was a warning notice inside. There was considerable alarm until Maj. Gen. W. H. Tschappat, a member of the Council and former chief of Army Ordnance, personally took charge. Another inventor suggested an anti-personnel bomb loaded with itching powder made from a weed and sent samples which almost completely disrupted the workings of the staff.

The Council tries to discourage inventors from going to Washington until the armed forces actually want them there to discuss development and manufacture of their inventions. One inventor made the long trip to Washington from Oregon, only to learn that his invention could not be used by the armed services. He was stranded in Washington without money for return fare.

Because of the official nature of the National Inventors Council and the high standing of its members you can be sure you will not be cheated. However, the highly secret nature of developing inventions for war has occasionally caused misunderstandings. In one case an invention was turned down without explanation only to be used later. The reason was that another inventor had proposed it earlier and consequently had the rights to it. However, the second inventor could not be told this because of security reasons.

Exactly how much the armed services have paid inventors for ideas submitted through the National Inventors Council is not known. However, estimates place this figure in the millions.

Lawrence Langner, secretary of the Council, in speaking of the royalties inventors received from the Government, says, “It’s pretty plain that they were all well satisfied. If they hadn’t been, they could have filed suit in the Court of Claims and I can’t remember a single instance of that having been done.”

Certainly Charles A. Hedden has no com- plaints. Probably as much credit for the Allied victories in North Africa belongs to him as to any other single man. Hedden is no highly trained scientist but rather an ordinary American whose education was received in a country grade school in Florida. In 1934 Hedden, who owned a small radio repair shop, was approached by two strangers who had a map supposedly showing where Gasparilla, the famous pirate, had buried his treasure. They had searched the site near Charlotte Harbor, Fla., but their map had not been accurate enough to locate the exact spot where the treasure lay. Could Hedden figure out a gadget which would show the presence of buried metal?

Hedden could and did. He devised a delicately balanced electrical circuit which would be disrupted by the presence of metal nearby. With this contraption the treasure hunters prowled Charlotte Harbor for months. The gadget proved to be a whiz at locating buried metal. It found old anchors, discarded auto crankshafts, rusted stove lids—but no gold.

However, it later proved to be a treasure in itself. For when the war came along, Hedden offered the invention to the U. S. Government through the National Inventors Council and eventually it became the standard mine detector used by the Allied Forces. It played an essential part in clearing out Axis mine fields to open the way for Allied victory.

Hedden received $50,000 from the government for his invention. But he has also adapted it for other purposes such as screening metal out of materials like tobacco and rubber.

But the great success of Hedden’s invention has created still another problem—how to detect the non-metallic mines which other nation’s have been forced to develop when their metallic models became ineffective.

That problem has not yet been solved and it remains high on the needed list of the National Inventors Council. Solve it—or any other of the difficult military problems listed on page 60—and you’ll make yourself a fortune. And at the same time you’ll be helping your country in a time of great crisis.

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2009/01/29/us-armed-forces-will-buy-your-invention/

(Article from World War II era)

7 Comments »

***

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http://fcw.com/Articles/2009/09/02/FBI-investigates-mysterious-laptops.aspx

***

My Note –

I found a report which indicated that the inventions and concepts submitted to the National Inventors’ Council listed in the article above were actually sold off to a private company in the 1980’s and a huge number of them were either lost, destroyed or unaccounted for. I’m going to go back and find that report. There was an article a few days ago about the NARA – National Archives which is responsible for everything being put on a digital database, and they are overwhelmed in the process of making them searchable and easily accessed any time soon. Apparently, that is a massive project beyond anything imaginable but they’ve been well underway for a number of years.

I’ll find that report / article also and post it here later today.

(posted below – at end of post)

– cricketdiane, 09-17-09

***

Pirates ‘guided by sat-phone spies in U.K.’

Published: Sept. 14, 2009 at 11:45 AM

LONDON, Sept. 14 (UPI) — The Somali pirates preying on shipping in the Gulf of Aden and more recently the Indian Ocean are zeroed in on their targets by well-placed informers in London, a world center for shipbroking and insurance, using satellite phones, according to a European military intelligence report.

The document, which was obtained by Cadena SER, a Spanish radio station, says the consultants in London help the pirates select their targets, providing data on the ships’ cargoes and courses.

An international armada of some 27 warships from 16 countries patrols the seas off Somalia, but the modern-day buccaneers are still able to strike.

The attacks have eased off over the last few months because of the annual monsoon season. But that is coming to an end, and the shipping industry is bracing for a new surge of pirate attacks.

The U.N. International Maritime Bureau reported this month that there had been a dramatic surge in piracy in the waters of the Horn of Africa — 138 pirate attacks so far this year, with 33 vessels hijacked. Last year the pirates attacked more than 100 ships.

The report was compiled by European military intelligence agencies and circulated to those countries involved in the European Union’s naval Operation Atalanta to protect merchant vessels plying the maritime lanes off Somalia used by some 20,000 ships a year.

In some cases, the report noted, the pirates had trained to attack specific ships well before the vessels reached the marauders’ hunting grounds off Somalia.

The ships are tracked en route to the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean by the consultants operating in the close-knit ship brokerage and insurance markets in London.

Once the vessels are in the pirates’ operational zones, the marauders track them with Global Positioning Systems and radar and then pounce.

The ships are held for ransom that, according to international security firms such as Control Risks in London or ASI Global in Houston, is usually delivered by airdrop in large floating plastic containers at pre-arranged spots at sea where the pirates pick it up when the coast is clear.

Ransom payments are generally at least $2 million for a container ship or oil tanker.

The money is then split up between the pirate crews, their controllers and the crooked shipping industry insiders in London, Dubai — the financial hub of the Middle East — and elsewhere who provide the intelligence, according to the private security companies that handle such cases.

The crews of several hijacked merchant vessels have reported after they were released that the pirates knew everything about the layout of their ships, their cargoes and even the ports they had called at before they were overwhelmed.

Andrew Mwangura of the East African Seafarers’ Assistance Program in Mombasa, Kenya, who monitors the pirates’ operations, noted that in many cases the negotiations involve people in London.

Ahmedou Ould-Abdallah, a U.N. special envoy to strife-torn Somalia, reported in July that Somalis living in the United Arab Emirates are suspected of aiding the pirates. This is big money, he said.

By conservative estimates, the pirate gangs were believed to have collected $30 million in ransom money in 2008, although some estimates go as high as $80 million.

http://www.upi.com/Emerging_Threats/2009/09/14/Pirates-guided-by-sat-phone-spies-in-UK/UPI-87471252943119/

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New Web Tool for Physicists, called AIP UniPHY, Promises to Enhance Collaboration, Speed Science

Melville, NY, September 9, 2009 — A physicist created the World Wide Web in 1989 as a tool for helping far-flung scientific collaborators share data, and in the two decades since its invention, the Web has changed the world. Now a new Web-based tool for the physics community, called AIP UniPHY, promises to help physicists change the world again.

Announced today by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and Collexis Holdings, Inc., AIP UniPHY is a scientific networking site for physical scientists. It allows them to search for collaborators, see what competitors are up to, communicate with colleagues, and exhibit their own latest work.

“Worldwide collaborations between scientists certainly enable more rapid advances toward the development and implementation of many of the modern technologies we often take for granted,” says National Science Board member Louis Lanzerotti, who is chair of AIP’s governing board.

“This new site should help scientists collaborate as never before — and immediately so,” says AIP Executive Director and CEO H. Frederick Dylla, who will announce the launch of AIP UniPHY on Thursday, September 10 at the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers meeting in the United Kingdom. “This new service will help level the playing field when it comes to worldwide physics by bringing scientists and their latest findings closer than ever, faster than ever.”

“AIPUniPHY.org further demonstrates how the Collexis proprietary Fingerprinting technology can be applied in any scientific discipline,” states Bill Kirkland, CEO of Collexis. “We are looking forward to working with AIP on the expansion of the AIP UniPHY network as well as working with their affiliated publisher partners so that they too will be able to provide their respective communities with this very innovative professional network platform.”

Unlike Facebook and other social networking sites that rely upon outside users to join and populate their databases with a galaxy of linked information, AIP UniPHY comes pre-populated with the profiles of hundreds of thousands of scientists from more than 100 countries, all interconnected by virtue of their publication histories.

Any scientist who has published at least three articles over the past ten years in one of the more than 100 journals in the Searchable Physics Information Notices (SPIN) database (http://scitation.aip.org/jhtml/scitation/spincodens.jsp) has a profile on AIP UniPHY. Each profile is connected to a network of other profiles that belong to a person’s co-authors on any paper. And each profile is also connected to all the co-authors of any co-authors — whether that profile belongs to a graduate student, post-doc, professor, Nobel laureate, or the U.S. Secretary of Energy.

On the existing site, users can look at other authors’ publishing records, view lists of co-authors, and browse for collaborations by research category. The site will evolve over the coming months to include many additional collaborative features, data sources, and social networking functions.

The new networking site can be viewed at http://www.aipuniphy.org The site is meant for working scientists, but anyone can set up an account and view the networks.

The American Institute of Physics is a federation of 10 physical science societies representing more than 135,000 scientists, engineers, and educators and is one of the world’s largest publishers of scientific information in the physical sciences. AIP is a leader in the field of electronic publishing of scholarly journals. It publishes 12 journals (some of which are the most highly cited in their respective fields), two magazines, including its flagship publication Physics Today; and the AIP Conference Proceedings series. Its online publishing platform Scitation hosts nearly two million articles from more than 185 scholarly journals and other publications of 28 learned society publishers.

About Collexis Holdings, Inc.
Collexis Holdings, Inc., a leading developer of semantic technology and knowledge discovery software is headquartered in Columbia, South Carolina (USA) with operations in Cincinnati, Ohio, Cologne, Germany and Valparaiso, Chile. Collexis now offers the world’s first pre-populated scientific social network for life science researchers, www.biomedexperts.com Collexis’ proprietary technology builds conceptual profiles of text, called Fingerprints, from documents, Websites, emails and other digitized content and matches them with a comprehensive list of pre-defined “fingerprinted” concepts to make research results more relevant and efficient. This matching of concepts eliminates the ambiguity and lack of priority associated with word searches. The results are often described as “finding needles in many haystacks.” Through this novel approach, Collexis can build unique applications to search, index and aggregate information as well as prioritize, trend and predict data based on sources in multiple industries without the limitations of language or dialect. Collexis’ current clients in the public, private and academic sectors include the Mayo Clinic; Johns Hopkins University; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the University of South Carolina; Erasmus University Library; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Lockheed Martin; the World Health Organization; Wellcome Trust; the National Institutes of Health; and the U.S. Department of Defense. Shares of Collexis common stock are traded under the symbol CLXS on the OTC Bulletin Board (OTC BB). For more information, visit www.collexis.com

For more information, please contact:
Jason Socrates Bardi,
American Institute of Physics,
jbardi@aip.org

Darrell W. Gunter
Collexis Holdings, Inc.
gunter@collexis.com

http://www.aip.org/press_release/uniphy.html

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Japan scientists create 3-D images you can touch

Wed Sep 16, 2009 5:25am EDT

By Chris Meyers

TOKYO (Reuters Life!) – Imagine a light switch or a book that appears only when you need it — Japanese scientists are one step closer to making the stuff of sci-fi films into reality after creating a hologram that can also be felt.

“Up until now, holography has been for the eyes only, and if you’d try to touch it, your hand would go right through,” Hiroyuki Shinoda, professor at Tokyo university and one of the developers of the technology, told Reuters.

“But now we have a technology that also adds the sensation of touch to holograms.”

Holograms — three-dimensional images — are commonly found on credit cards, DVDs and CDs to prevent forgery, and larger scale holograms have been used in entertainment.

By using ultrasonic waves, the scientists have developed software that creates pressure when a user’s hand “touches” a hologram that is projected.

In order to track a user’s hand, the researchers use control sticks from Nintendo’s popular Wii gaming system that are mounted above the hologram display area.

The technology has so far been tested with relatively simple objects, although the researchers have more practical plans, including virtual switches at hospitals, for example, and other places where contamination by touch is an issue.

Shinoda also said the technology could be used to replace other physical objects, making it economical and environmentally friendly.

(Editing by Miral Fahmy)

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSTRE58F1KP20090916

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U.S. water polluters rarely punished

Published: Sept. 13, 2009 at 11:23 AM

WASHINGTON, Sept. 13 (UPI) — Polluters are admitting dumping more toxic substances into U.S. drinking water supplies but they are rarely punished by regulators, records indicate.

Even though chemical factories, manufacturing plants and other workplaces have self-reported more than 500,000 instances of violating the Clean Water Act in the last five years, state agencies and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have often failed to act, The New York Times reported Sunday.

Regulators admitted to the newspaper that enforcement actions are unacceptably rare. New EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson said state regulators struggle with insufficient resources and vowed to make clean tap water her agency’s top priority.

The Times, after obtaining hundreds of thousands of water pollution records through the Freedom of Information Act, found that an estimated one in 10 Americans have been exposed to drinking water that holds hazardous chemicals or that doesn’t meet safety standards in other ways.

Researchers told the newspaper that because most polluted water has no scent or taste, people don’t realize it they’ve been exposed until they contract cancer or other illnesses.

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2009/09/13/US-water-polluters-rarely-punished/UPI-84941252855426/?pvn=1

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My Note – The same people who have let polluters, manufacturers, states, local governments, counties, industries, businesses and chamber of commerce members fill our drinking water with crap, want us to stop smoking, not eat sugar and be taxed for drinking softdrinks. The US government and their lobbyists driving them want us to be prohibited from doing any of those things, which are all apparently safer than what they’ve done to us through toxic dumping of chemicals into the water supply and into the air and into the soils where our children play.

There Will Be Water
Jun 12, 2008 … Pickens has also bought up the rights to a considerable amount of water that … There are people who will buy the water when they need it. …
www.businessweek.com/magazine/…/b4089040017753.htm

My Note – and these people are already trying to find a way to help businesses and industries keep from changing any way they are doing anything which pollutes the air, water and environment . . . Our business schools are probably teaching that same mentality about it. (see below) – I’m going to have to look that up, because I would bet that is exactly what they are already doing.

– cricketdiane

**

Microeconomics for MBAs: the economic way of thinking for managers – Google Books Result
by Richard B. McKenzie, Dwight R. Lee – 2006 – Business & Economics – 689 pages
Therefore firms have a demand for the right to avoid pollution abatement costs. … who will buy those rights, and what will the cost of the program be? …
books.google.com/books?isbn=0521859816…

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The Mystery of the the Classified and Missing National Inventors Council (NIC) Files

By Professor Jon Cavicchi, J.D., LL.M. (I.P.)

* New York Times 1941 – Hedy Lamar Hot Inventor
* NARA FOIA Letter from Ms. Ciarlante (Update)
* NARA Accession List Showing Missing Files
* NARA Status Change RG167
* NARA Disposition Schedule
* NARA Response from Ms. Ciarlante

In March 2003 I received several calls from Patti Young at the Patent Office Search Facilities. She had been contacted by an Inventor who had submitted an idea to help the World War II war effort. He submitted the idea to the National inventors Council. Neither she nor I had heard of citizen invention disclosures and files outside the Patent Office System. She called me because the only reference on the Web she had found was http://www.ptcforum.org which indicated that the NIC had been transferred to the public sector in 1973 under the auspices of the Academy of Applied Science and the Franklin Pierce Law Center. She had assumed that the files would be located in the Pierce Law Intellectual Property Library.
I had no clue. Our senior IP Faculty had no clue. Our founder, Dr. Robert Rines, declined to answer my phone call. He indicated through his secretary that he had no idea as to the location of the invention disclosure files.

Over the following days I traced the path of these files from the Commerce Department to the National Bureau of Standards to the National Archives. What I discovered raises many questions.

I spoke with Marjorie Ciarlante at NARA. My goal was to ascertain the extent of the collection to study the feasibility of scanning and posting the invention disclosures and the files on the IP Mall Website. Through Ms. Ciarlante and documentation she sent me I found that these documents have been classified and that portions of the collection are missing.

Why are these documents classified? Where are the missing files? When will they enter the public domain? According to NARA records : As late as 1988, the National Bureau of Standards Records Officer Bernie Hale, reiterated this position, saying that the records could not be opened to the public until after the turn of the century. The value of these records for research into the history of science and technology is undisputed, and these records are especially significant considering the impact of technology on WW II. It is now beyond the turn of the century and this information is still locked down at NARA.

I spoke with an Assistant General Counsel at NARA. She is looking into this matter but assures me that the process of declassifying these files is not a quick or easy process.

History of NIC from the PTC Website

http://www.ptcforum.org
The National Inventors Council

National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science
Remote Sector reorganizing charter members of the National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science who attended the 1981 Inventors Conference (pictured in the Franklin Pierce Law Center Library). Seated (left to right) Alan A. Smith, Donald B. Sinclair, Brooks Walker, Charles Stark Draper, Richard Walton, Kenneth J. Germeshausen, and Harry Saragovitz. Standing (left to right) Draper Harvey, Hugh Brett, John Lothrop, Isaac S. Blonder, Duane Marshall, Charles W. Wyckoff, William Yates, Lamar Washington, Nelson H. Shapiro, Jason Weisman, Samuel Nakasian, Robert H. Rines, Howard S. Curtis, Kenan Sahin.
During W.W.II, the National Inventors Council (NIC) came into being due to the recognition that inventions and ideas of U.S. citizenry could play an important role in the war effort. From the noble beginnings of producing ideas, such as a small mercury dry cell battery with a two-month life for walkie-talkie use a mirror signaling device for downed pilots; a substitute for kapok life jackets, the National Inventors Council continued as the only technology transfer link between the citizenry and the military and other government agencies.

During 1973, the NIC, then at the National Bureau of Standards, was transferred to the private sector under the auspices of the Academy of Applied Science and the Franklin Pierce Law Center. The focus was shifted from trying to answer the specific needs of a special group to developing a generalized approach to investigating the realm of innovation and invention.

Since that time, the NIC’s goal has been to continue to help solve problems associated with technological creativity and transfer, particularly with those groups historically responsible for breakthrough innovations: universities and independent inventors.

In 1986, the NIC began a new phase of its continuing pursuit to assist technological innovation. Under the impetus of a new patent law program in the People’s Republic of China, the Academy was asked to assist Chinese universities and independent inventors in bringing their ideas to American businesses. This assistance would also involve an information exchange to enable Chinese inventors to better understand the markets that they were trying to enter.

This venture was developed under the aegis of a program called PACT, an acronym for Promotion of American Chinese Technology. Like its progenitor, the NIC, which has continued to expand its charter, PACT has found that its acronym can now stand for Promotion of Advanced Commercial Technologies.

PACT became a natural outgrowth of the NIC as part of its activities, particularly as it has come to aid not only Chinese universities and ministries in protecting and licensing or otherwise commercializing upon their inventions and technologies, hopefully with American companies, but also faculty and graduate students of American and United Kingdom universities, as well – and an occasional independent inventor or small company.

The History of the NIC Files from NARA
National Institute of Standards and Technology
WNRC Project
RG 167 records stored at WNRC

1. National Inventors Council Files, 1940-53 Classified Records

National Inventors Council committee files, arranged by Committee number, thereunder by a NIC numerical designation, thereunder alphabetically by name of inventor. Each Committee was responsible for evaluating submisssions for a specific area of science and technology, such as ordnance and firearms, metals and metalurgy, signals and communications, etc. The files contain explanations and evaluations of the more significant proposals received by the Council, which was established in 1940, under the Office of Technical Services, Department of Commerce, to provide a clearing house for inventions that might be useful for national defense, and to bring such inventions to the attention of the armed forces. The NIC was most active during WW II but continued to solicit inventions into the mid-1950s. When the OTS was abolished, the Department of Commerce transferred its functions to the National Bureau of Standards, which had provided both technical and administrative support to the NIC. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archives in FY 1999.

Justification: These records were appraised as permanent in an appraisal report dated March 25, 1971 (NN371-166). The appraisal report was not formally approved because of the restrictions imposed by the agency, which strongly believed in the proprietary nature of the records, precluded accessioning at that time. As late as 1988, the National Bureau of Standards Records Officer Bernie Hale, reiterated this position, saying that the records could not be opened to the public until after the turn of the century. The value of these records for research into the history of science and technology is undisputed, and these records are especially significant considering the impact of technology on WW II.

2. National Inventors Council Plans and Drawings

Largely oversize plans, drawings, and supporting documents arrange alphabetically by last name of inventor. Files include photostats and blueprints. The plans and drawings were removed from the incoming correspondence files. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archives in FY 1999

Justification: These plans and drawings visually, supplement the inventions files documented in item 1 above, and were part of the original inventors submissions.

Added in handwriting on the original document: According to Donna Miller, NIST Records Officer, the first two boxes (A & B) were missing when she went to look through them. They were charged out but no employee name given (10/2/02)

3. Nations Inventors Council Chronological Files 1947-54

Chronological correspondence files ( Day Files ) of the National Inventors Council, 1950-1958, and of John C. Green, 1947-1958. Green served as Chief Engineer for the Council during WW II, and was head of the Department of Commerce’s Office of Technical Service, under which the NIC was established. Tissue copies of outgoing correspondence, including both form letters and substantive replies to inventors concerning the utilization of their submissions as well as entitlement due them. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archives in FY 1999.

Justification: These correspondence files relate to the inventions documented in item 1 above. Given the lack of an index or other finding aids to the NIC files, these correspondence files should be permanent. They also provide a useful supplement to the invention files, because they document both NIC’s post-war existence and continued interest by inventors in their submissions. Any duplicative files should be destroyed during archival processing of the records.

4. National Inventors Council Incoming Correspondence

Incoming correspondence files of the National Inventors Council, 1940-1953, largely inventors submissions and inquiries, arranged alphabetically by inventor’s last name. All that remains of this is mid-T through rest having been destroyed. The bulk of this file had been permanently withdrawn by the age and returned under a different accession number. That accession was destroyed under N1-40-90-2, the disposal authority for patented invention case files of the Office of Chief Counsel for Technology, Department of Commerce, which appears to have been inappropriate for these records. AUTHORIZED DISPOSITION: PERMANENT. Transfer to the National Archive FY 1999.

^ page top ^

Pierce Law IP Mall – http://www.ipmall.info

2 White Street, Concord, NH 03301
v: 603.228.1541 f: 603.228.2322 w: ipmall.info w: piercelaw.edu e: ipmall@piercelaw.edu
Prof. Jon Cavicchi, Site Director
Prof. Jon Cavicchi, Site Director

http://ipmall.info/hosted_resources/nic.asp

***

nic_photo1.jpg

National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science
Remote Sector reorganizing charter members of the National Inventors’ Council and the Academy of Applied Science who attended the 1981 Inventors Conference (pictured in the Franklin Pierce Law Center Library). Seated (left to right) Alan A. Smith, Donald B. Sinclair, Brooks Walker, Charles Stark Draper, Richard Walton, Kenneth J. Germeshausen, and Harry Saragovitz. Standing (left to right) Draper Harvey, Hugh Brett, John Lothrop, Isaac S. Blonder, Duane Marshall, Charles W. Wyckoff, William Yates, Lamar Washington, Nelson H. Shapiro, Jason Weisman, Samuel Nakasian, Robert H. Rines, Howard S. Curtis, Kenan Sahin.

***

National Archives and Records Administration
Search All NARA Web Pages … 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001. Telephone: 1-86-NARA-NARA or 1-866-272-6272. The National Archives Experience …
http://www.archives.gov/ – Cached – Similar –
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NARA digs out of digital avalanche? – 26 minutes ago
But the tools of the trade that have served NARA for so long are no longer sufficient. With much of the business of government conducted online, NARA must …
FCW.com – 4 related articles »

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From – Federal Computer Week –

NARA digs out of digital avalanche

The National Archives is under mounting pressure to help the federal government manage its rapidly growing store of electronic records

* By Ben Bain
* Sep 11, 2009

The National Archives and Records Administration has decades of experience managing and preserving the nation’s most vital historical documents, from the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution to a vast gallery of photos from World War II.

The agency also catalogs and maintains vast warehouses of government documents, protecting the public record — a linchpin of democracy — for future generations.

Also in this report:

NARA’s top 10 management challenges

But the tools of the trade that have served NARA for so long are no longer sufficient. With much of the business of government conducted online, NARA must transform itself by developing new tools, techniques and policies for ensuring that electronic records are searchable and accessible, not just now but for years to come.

The agency’s solution is the multimillion-dollar Electronic Records Archives (ERA), a project that NARA insists is progressing well despite audits to the contrary. Meanwhile, the electronic records continue to pile up.

In an interview Aug. 21, Paul Brachfeld, NARA’s inspector general, stressed the importance of making the government’s digital records readily searchable and retrievable for analysis and litigation, which ERA promises to do. But there’s a catch.

Building the right tools: The Electronic Records Archives

A key tool in the National Archives and Records Administration’s strategy for tackling its digital challenges is the Electronic Records Archives (ERA). NARA officials say their $550 million development effort will result in archives in which electronic documents are available perpetually despite on-going changes in hardware and software. Here are the milestones for their plan.

December 2003 — Request for proposals is released.
August 2004 — Design competition contracts are awarded to Harris and Lockheed Martin.
September 2005 — Lockheed Martin is selected to develop the ERA.
2005-2008 — Ability to transfer, inspect and store electronic records is developed.
June 2008 — Initial operating capability is achieved.
2008-2009 — Rapid addition, search and retrieval of electronic records from the George W. Bush administration’s White House is achieved.
2009 to 2010 — Public access, preservation framework prototype and active backup are in development.
2010 to 2011 — Preservation capabilities and expanded access are to be implemented.
2011 to 2012 — Analysis and design of final system are to be performed.
March 2012 — Basic ERA system are to be fully operational.

Source: National Archives and Records Administration

“To me, we’re kind of setting ourselves up as the only show in town for future access and analysis of records, and if it works, great,” he said. “If it doesn’t work, we got problems.”

Other issues loom. Open-government advocates are pushing for the next archivist to take a more active role in ensuring public access to government information, fueled by President Barack Obama’s commitment to increasing transparency. And the agency must address concerns about its ability to protect sensitive documents, which was called into question by a recent revelation that an external hard drive containing sensitive and potentially classified files from the Bill Clinton administration’s White House is missing from a NARA facility.

Those challenges face NARA’s next leader, experts say. If David Ferriero, Obama’s pick to be archivist of the United States, is confirmed by the Senate, he would find himself at the epicenter of the policy and technological challenges that the proliferation of electronic data poses for the government.

The swiftness with which digital formats, technologies and architectures become obsolete is of particular concern to those charged with preserving records in perpetuity. And the longer it takes to develop the solutions, the bigger the avalanche of digital data will grow.

The archives of the future

The Government Accountability Office expects NARA’s next-generation archive to cost more than $550 million, and NARA had already spent more than $237 million by the end of fiscal 2008. NARA officials refer to the project as the archives of the future and say it won’t depend on any particular software or hardware, something that is important to accommodate changes in technology.

But in its most recent semiannual report to Congress, NARA’s Office of Inspector General listed the ERA program at the top of the management challenges that the agency faces. GAO has also raised concerns about some aspects of the project.

GAO recently reported that NARA’s spending plan for ERA didn’t have enough detail and the agency didn’t have a contingency plan for the system or a fully functional backup and restoration process. Auditors also found methodological weaknesses during a review of NARA’s fiscal 2009 spending plan for the program that could limit its ability to keep tabs on the project.

NARA’s acting archivist, Adrienne Thomas, said agency officials briefed Congress in April on specific outcomes ERA would achieve, adding that the agency would include more details in the next spending plan. She also said the agency is in the process of updating its project management tool and conducting a final review of its contingency plan for the system.

Meanwhile, even after revising its initial schedule for the system, NARA said it’s on track to achieve full operating capability when its contract with Lockheed Martin ends in March 2012. The contract is worth about $317 million.

NARA officials told reporters Sept. 2 that they had ingested 67G of data into an ERA system for federal records and 64.4T of searchable records from the George W. Bush administration. The Bush administration total of 77T is about 35 times the amount of data received from the Clinton administration, they said.

http://fcw.com/Articles/2009/09/14/NARA-ERA-dig-out-of-digital-records-avalanche.aspx

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* Most Popular Articles
* Most Emailed Articles

Who is sending mysterious laptops to governors?
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Who is sending mysterious laptops to governors?

FBI is probing strange gifts

* By Doug Beizer
* Sep 02, 2009

Who is sending unsolicited laptop computers to governors’ offices, and why?

The FBI is investigating the unexpected deliveries that were sent to governors’ offices in at least 10 states, according to media reports. Investigators are trying to determine if the machines contain malware or programming that would allow someone remote access to secure networks.

Governors in West Virginia, Vermont, Wyoming and Washington received three to five laptops each, according to the Associated Press. Shipments to governors in six other states were intercepted, according to The Inquirer.

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin received four Compaq computers in Hewlett-Packard boxes on Aug. 5, according to a report in the Charleston Gazette. His office turned the computers over to the West Virginia State Police, who are also involved in the investigation, according to the report.

HP officials are aware of the orders and said they are linked to fraud, according to the Inquirer report.

Our expectation is that this is not a gesture of good will, said Kyle Schafer, West Virginia’s chief technology officer, quoted in the Inquirer. People don’t just send you five laptops for no good reason.

Distributing the laptops might mirror similar cyberattack attempts by criminals who distribute USB devices loaded with malware, according to an Industry Standard report.

About the Author

Doug Beizer is a staff writer for Federal Computer Week.

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Reader comments
Tue, Sep 8, 2009 Q-Baby DC

Mabye it’s like mission impossible instructions. You get the laptop, connect to your network. All the information from your network is transmitted to the enemy, then the laptop goes up in smoke.
Tue, Sep 8, 2009

I wish someone would send me 5 free laptops…
Thu, Sep 3, 2009

lol @ aol is getting desperate.
Thu, Sep 3, 2009

It was probably part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan.
Thu, Sep 3, 2009

if one guy turns on one machine and presses one button, you get $300K What are you talking about? Where you gettin’ those numbers?

http://fcw.com/Articles/2009/09/02/FBI-investigates-mysterious-laptops.aspx

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eSeminar

* Igniting the social-media revolution Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons

Federal Computer Week will present Staff Sgt. Joshua Salmons, emerging media coordinator for the Defense Information School, at 11 a.m., Tues., Sept. 29, where he will discuss transparency and open government. Read more

More eSeminars

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