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That would certainly help and is a really good point but are they taking a portion of the carbon dioxide and converting it to oxygen? Wonder if those weeds and the silt around them could be packaged into something to cover areas that are growing into deserts to reclaim them? Just thinking . . . Thanks for your comment – very helpful and good insight. Definitely gets me thinking about it differently. – cricketdiane, 09-01-09 ***

cricketdiane

World Climate Conference 3 – August 31 – September 4, 2009 – Geneva, Switzerland – (Happening Right Now) – Wildfires, Climate Change, Desertification, Increasing Deserts, Water Table Depletion, Global Warming – G20 talk to them now – their meeting is September Pittsburgh

Stephen Klaber

Submitted on 2009/09/01 at 12:37pm

Climate change is not something we are helpless against. Too much attention is being focused on the Carbon cycles, and too little on the Water cycles. Worldwide, our fresh water supplies are overrun with weeds. Aquatic weeds more than quadruple evaporative losses on a body of water. They clog waterways with silt, and turn wetlands into drylands. Clearing the weeds and their silt is the way to restore health to our wetlands. Healthy wetlands are the key to healthy drylands. Human use of water supplies must be limited, but let’s share less with weeds.
Climate change is not something we are helpless against. Too much attention is being focused on the Carbon cycles, and too little on the Water cycles. Worldwide, our fresh water supplies are overrun with weeds. Aquatic weeds more than quadruple evaporative losses on a body of water. They clog waterways with silt, and turn wetlands into drylands. Clearing the weeds and their silt is the way to restore health to our wetlands. Healthy wetlands are the key to healthy drylands. Human use of water supplies must be limited, but let’s share less with weeds.

Stephen Klaber

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My Response to the Comment above –

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That would certainly help and is a really good point but are they taking a portion of the carbon dioxide and converting it to oxygen? Wonder if those weeds and the silt around them could be packaged into something to cover areas that are growing into deserts to reclaim them? Just thinking . . . Thanks for your comment – very helpful and good insight. Definitely gets me thinking about it differently. – cricketdiane, 09-01-09 ***

cricketdiane

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My Note –

Before the Beijing Olympics, there was a news story about the cleaning out of a bunch of water areas where weeds or some kind of aquatic green plant life had become overgrown. The news showed pictures of them cleaning it up for the visitors and some of the events that were to take place. It seemed to me at the time, that it was quite a waste of effort and materials since they were not using it somewhere else where it was much needed.

But, then I started thinking about that after the comment and my response (above) and realized that those aquatic weeds that are choking areas could be harvested, packaged (without removing all the water from the plant tissues), bundled in biodegradable mesh and dumped by cargo plane on the areas where erosion and desertification were increasing. That is possible and it would re-introduce some water into the area by virtue of that water being in the plant tissues and as they break down, it would be released.

There are trees that are being planted as a wind break, much as they did to reclaim the great dust bowl in the United States, but without some increase in grasslands, moisture content, soil reparations and protection of existing areas, those efforts are not going to solve the problems, especially as massive wind and sandstorms have already started.

I’ll look for that video clip from the stories surrounding the Beijing Olympics. There are also mining operations that were started west of these areas which are very likely contributing to the problem through changes in the land generally, the strip mining process, and also from diversions of water resources for other uses in the same area.

It is a man-made problem that these deserts across the world are increasing and that sandstorms in many countries are becoming life-threatening events occurring more frequently. They could be reversed, but it will take more than a barrier of trees planted and irrigation is simply depleting the existing water table / aquifer resources at alarming rates.

If aquatic weeds and silt were dredged out, packaged in something biodegradable and dropped by air over these areas – it would take a while but maybe soil could be rebuilt and nutrients re-introduced as erosion is deterred to some extent.

– cricketdiane

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green tech, eco solutions, global warming and climate change, geoengineering

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Sweet dreams are made of geoengineering

Thu Sep 3, 2009 5:00am EDT

By Gerard Wynn

LONDON (Reuters) – Farming plankton, sending solar panels into orbit, remodeling hydrogen — for the latest wave of entrepreneurs suggesting easier ways out of climate change, it’s all in a day’s pitching.

[ etc.]

Some plans seek radical alternatives to fossil fuels. Other businesses are dreaming of geoengineering — planning to tweak the earth’s climate by removing heat-trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) or reflecting sunlight into space.

Among new energy fixes presented to Reuters in recent days is U.S.-based BlackLight Power.

The company says it may have tapped the energy that cosmologists have struggled to explain, called dark matter, which fills the universe. The concept involves shifting electrons in hydrogen molecules — obtained cheaply from water — into a lower orbit, releasing energy in the process.

“It represents a boundless form of new primary energy,” Randell Mills, founder and chief executive, told Reuters in a telephone interview.

“I think it’s going to replace all forms of fuel in the world.”

Britain’s top science academy, the Royal Society, this week urged more funds be channeled into research on geoengineering, but for some climate commentators the unproven, technical solutions smack of society’s craving for pain-free get-outs.

They note politicians may prefer to feed that habit rather than face tough choices in redressing global warming.

[ . . . ]

In another energy fix, California-based Solaren wants to launch solar panels into orbit to send back radio waves which can generate electricity back on Earth — and benefit from the sun shining 24 hours a day in space.

“It’s not like a laser or a bug zapper or anything like that,” said Founder and Chief Executive Gary Spirnak. “I think this could be like any other large power source, 20-25 percent of the world’s electricity, 30 or 40 years out.”

Solaren aims to produce electricity from a 200 megawatt prototype by 2016 at a cost of several billions of dollars per plant: “It’s a little expensive for a 200 megawatt plant. We’ll do a bit better than break even.”

Spirnak said his company has raised “the equivalent of $20-30 million from financial groups and private investors,” and signed a power-purchase agreement with Californian utility PG&E, whose Web site shows a request for approval for power generated in this way from California’s Public Utilities Commission.

“The bottom line is, it’s safe,” said Spirnak. “If you’re out in the sun for a few minutes at noon time you’d receive at least five times the intensity as you would at the very peak of our pilot beam.”

[ etc.]

In case the world can’t contain its carbon emissions, among geoengineering fixes Dan Whaley, founder and chief executive of California-based Climos, hopes tiny plankton that live on the ocean surface can be used to absorb CO2 as they grow.

“These are not silver bullet solutions, but things that might take the edge off,” he told Reuters. “What is the risk of doing nothing? We think it’s so extraordinary it’s apocalyptic. These geoengineering projects, the research into this, is an exercise to reduce future risk.”

Global plankton deployment across 40 percent of the world’s oceans for 50-100 years could remove 1-8 billion tons of CO2 per year from the air, he said. That compares with annual manmade emissions now of about 32 billion tons.

[etc.]

Soil Carbon is a company urging changes in farm livestock management, to rotate grazing across wider tracts of shared land rather than cooping animals in a handful of fields.

The idea is focused on seasonally dry areas, to imitate the grazing of wild herbivores such as wildebeest in Africa.

By grazing cattle intensively but briefly in fields or paddocks rotated across a larger area, the grass would be fertilized with dung and grow back after grazing and trampling.

“I reckon you could have billions of tons (of CO2) pulled out of the atmosphere really quickly,” said founder Tony Lovell. Grass absorbs CO2 as it grows and deposits it in the soil.

Seasonally dry pastures account for 40 percent of the Earth’s land area, or 5 billion hectares, and only remnants are managed in balance at present, he said.

[ . . . ]

[from -]

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSTRE58202P20090903?pageNumber=3&virtualBrandChannel=10522

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My Note –

I was watching Tony Blair and Jet Li in one of the specials created about a project village in China that is working on fully self-sustainable energy sources throughout the entire village. It occurred to me that Tony Blair and his powerful cohorts in his “circles” do not understand that many, many people across the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe and around the World have been desiring sustainable energy systems for their homes and lives for many years.

The leadership players continue to think that none want to adopt the technologies. When are they going to make them possible for all of us to have – it could’ve already been done if they hadn’t been funding crude oil based technologies to the exclusion of all else. There is an assumption that the populations in countries around the world will not adopt these things or do not understand them or will not accept them or do not understand the need for them . . . That’s a bunch a hogwilly doodle.

Even when my Dad was in college during the 1950’s, there was a thrust for self-sustaining alternatives in energy and living environments, wind power, a desire for solar power, and high energy tech solutions, such as miniaturized fusion reactions harnessed for their power. Studies have been ongoing since fission processes were engineered to harness steam power from their thermal radiation capacities.

I don’t know that water generated power started anytime close to my lifetime, but its continued progress of breakthroughs and new understandings was certainly decimated while I’ve been alive. It is inexcusable when the need for it has been known across academia, the scientific communities and most of the population, as well.

As with many things, those funds for research and the applications of technologies from that research have been diverted through many political choices of the last fifty years. The choices have influenced academics, scientists and leaders of today, to believe that people won’t accept or adopt something different than we have already or that our populations will refuse to understand the need for these things. Electricity and petroleum based transportation and industries wouldn’t be available reasonable today, if we hadn’t subsidized them and their research and their infrastructures with money and efforts from all of us. They simply aren’t the final answer after all.

And, by the way – sequestering c02 (carbon dioxide) by pumping it into the ground would be like placing a syringe in a coke bottle to pump in the soda. – Think it through – doesn’t that create a potentially lethal, life-altering problem later on down the road? The killer lakes – the co2 in quantity that kills and can explode – known facts – what are they thinking when their plan is to pump the co2 into underground chambers or introduced into places where it had never naturally occurred?

– cricketdiane, 09-03-09

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