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13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference

The 13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference, co-sponsored by the United States Patent Trademark Office (USPTO) and the National Inventors Hall of Fame® Foundation, will be held in Alexandria, VA at the US Patent and Trademark Office campus on August 8-9, 2008.

A pre-conference workshop (August 7, 2008 from 5pm – 7pm) is included with your registration for anyone interested in learning patent basics and how they protect inventions. This workshop is for beginners and is a good foundation for the conference.

USPTO presenters will include Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce Margaret Peterlin, Commissioner for Patents John Doll, Louis Foreman, creator and executive producer of the Everyday Edisons Show, an inductee from the National Inventors Hall of Fame® Foundation, local IP attorneys as well as Supervisory Patent Examiners.

Registration is now open for this 2-day event. The fee is $100 per person for both days. The registration fee includes all sessions and presentations, morning and afternoon refreshments, lunch for both days and a networking reception on Friday evening.

For additional information about this event you can call the Inventors Assistance Program at 571-272-8850.

» 13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference Registration

[from]

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/iip/iiconf/

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May To Live In House Made Of Lego Bricks

5:48pm UK, Saturday August 01, 2009

Thousands of people have answered Top Gear presenter James May’s call for help building a house out of Lego bricks.

James May

James May has promised to live in the Lego house

A total of 1,200 were granted free tickets to the vineyard where the two-storey building is being constructed, leaving 1,500 people to be turned away.

“Up until now, the largest thing I’ve ever built with Lego was probably a plane or a battleship, because that was all I could build with the amount I had.”

When the house, filled with Lego furniture, is completed later this month, May has promised to live in it.

[etc.]

More than three million Lego pieces have been delivered for the event, filmed for BBC series James May’s Toy Stories.

Helpers were tasked with making full-sized bricks, each one consisting of 272 Lego pieces.

Builders will then take over in laying the bricks over a six-day construction process.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Showbiz-News/James-May-Lego-House-Thousands-Of-Fans-Help-Top-Gear-Presenter-Build-House-Made-Of-Plastic-Bricks/Article/200908115351734?lpos=Showbiz_News_First_Home_Article_Teaser_Region_2&lid=ARTICLE_15351734_James_May_Lego_House%3A_Thousands_Of_Fans_Help_Top_Gear_Presenter_Build_House_Made_Of_Plastic_Bricks

15351709.jpg
James May of Top Gear with Lego House bricks being used for two-story live in Lego House

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MORE ON THIS STORY:

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My Lego House I built for Jasmine to have a playhouse –

Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel 2008 - playhouse construction of Legos

Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel 2008 - playhouse construction of Legos

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Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel - 2008 - playhouse construction Legos

Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel - 2008 - playhouse construction Legos

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Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel - 2008 - Lego playhouse construction

Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel - 2008 - Lego playhouse construction

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Cricket Diane 2008 Lego House for Jasmine Atriel to have a playhouse

Cricket Diane 2008 Lego House for Jasmine Atriel to have a playhouse

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Cricket Diane - Lego Castle 2005 that became part of the Lego playhouse for Jasmine Atriel 2008

Cricket Diane - Lego Castle 2005 that became part of the Lego playhouse for Jasmine Atriel 2008

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[from – ]

http://indepth.news.sky.com/InDepth/topic/Lego

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August 01, 2009

Help build world’s largest LEGO light bulb

1gyiu

Construction begins today (Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 11 a.m.) at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., day one of a two-day collaborative build of an 8-foot-tall light bulb.

“… the light bulb will be assembled by museum visitors together with the help of LEGO master builders.”

I can’t speak for you but me, I’d love to watch and chat with these LEGO masters.

Above and below,

2trutr

“Dan Steininger, master model builder at Lego Systems, Inc., builds a prototype of a light bulb at the Enfield [Connecticut] facility. The prototype is a model of the actual light bulb that will be eight feet tall and will be displayed at the Smithsonian,” reads the legend for these photos published in the June 21, 2009 Hartford Courant.

August 1, 2009 at 10:01 AM

http://www.bookofjoe.com/2009/08/help-build-worlds-largest-lego-light-bulb.html

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LEGO Systems and Smithsonian Institution Celebrate Children and Their Big Ideas During National Inventors Month

July 31, 2009 6:58 PM EDT

WASHINGTON, July 31 /PRNewswire/ — In honor of National Inventors’ Month, LEGO Systems Inc. today launches its LEGO(R) CLICK! Awards, an essay contest for children ages 6 to 13. In addition, the Smithsonian Institution’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation and LEGO Systems Inc. invite families to a two-day collaborative build of the world’s largest light bulb – the universal symbol of a big idea – made entirely of LEGO bricks on August 1 and 2 at the National Museum of American History.

The 8-foot-tall light bulb is being assembled by museum visitors with the help of LEGO Master Builders. Additionally, the museum’s hands-on invention space, Spark!Lab, is hosting special interactive, construction play-themed activities for children where they are able to “patent” their creations. The Lemelson Center also collaborated with LEGO Systems to develop invention-themed mini-building activities to be held at 29 LEGO Stores in the United States this weekend. All of the programs reinforce the connection between play and invention explored in the museum’s “Invention at Play” exhibition and celebrate the philosophy that anyone can have a big idea and then can bring it to life.

“Invention is the practical application of creativity, and is a core benefit of our play pattern that we are thrilled to encourage children to explore further,” said Soren Torp Laursen, president, LEGO Systems. “As children have fun building with LEGO bricks, they also engage in a trial and error process that culminates in that moment when everything clicks and their idea becomes real. In so doing, they build the confidence they need to tackle and solve problems and share ideas – qualities they can take with them into adulthood to contribute innovative ideas and solutions at work, at play or in their communities.”

Now in its third year (formerly called the LEGO Creativity Awards), the LEGO CLICK! Awards are designed to inspire and celebrate children’s creativity, innovative thinking and inventive spirit. Five winning essays submitted by children between the ages of 6 and 13 will each be awarded a $5,000 savings bond. To submit for the award, children must answer: “If you could invent anything, what would it be? Describe how to use it. How did you get the idea? What excites you about it?” before November 2, 2009. Entries will be judged by a panel of experts from the Smithsonian Institution and LEGO Systems. More information, applications and complete rules are available at www.LEGOCLICKAwards.com.

LEGO Systems Inc. is the Americas division of the LEGO Group, a privately-held firm based in Billund, Denmark. The LEGO Group is committed to the development of children’s creative and imaginative abilities through high-quality, creatively educational play materials, and its employees are guided by the motto adopted in the 1930s by founder Ole Kirk Christiansen: “Only the best is good enough.” For more information, visit www.LEGO.com.

The Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation is dedicated to exploring invention in history and encouraging inventive creativity in young people. The center is supported by The Lemelson Foundation, a private philanthropy established by one of the country’s most prolific inventors, Jerome Lemelson, and his family. The Lemelson Center is located in the National Museum of American History. For more information, visit invention.smithsonian.org.

LEGO and the LEGO logo are trademarks of The LEGO Group. (C) 2009 The LEGO Group.

    MEDIA CONTACTS:
    LEGO Systems: Karen Lynch
    650.490.0608 / lynch@flashpointpr.com
    Smithsonian Institution: Kate Wiley

http://www.streetinsider.com/Press+Releases/LEGO+Systems+and+Smithsonian+Institution+Celebrate+Children+and+Their+Big+Ideas+During+National+Inventors+Month/4836454.html

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[from - ]

    202.633.3129 / wileyk@si.edu

SOURCE LEGO Systems, Inc.

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Smithsonian Networks
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Events
Night at the Museum Lights! Camera! Smithsonian!
Make a quest to find artifacts that inspired scenes in Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian
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Face the Nation moderator Bob Schieffer sets the stage for this insider’s look at Congress
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http://www.si.edu/

From Spark to Click: Celebrating National Inventor’s Month
Celebrate National Inventors’ Month by helping to build an 8-foot-tall light bulb using LEGO bricks
Sat & Sun, Aug 1 & 2, times vary

From Spark to Click: Celebrating National Inventors’ Month

When Saturday, August 1, 2009, 11 AM – 5 PM
Categories Demonstrations, Kids & Families, Workshops
Sponsor American History Museum
Venue American History Museum
Event Location 1st Floor, Center, near Constitution Ave. entrance
Cost Free
Continues Continues August 2
Related Events See related program on August 15
Related Exhibition Invention at Play
Details

(for all ages) Celebrate with the museum’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation the first annual National Inventors’ Month. Explore the connections between play and invention by helping to build a record-breaking 8-foot-tall light bulb — the universal symbol of a big idea — using LEGO bricks with the assistance of LEGO master builders. Then stop by the Spark!Lab, the Lemelson Center’s hands-on invention space, to participate in special building and engineering-related activities.

Web Site americanhistory.si.edu…

http://www.si.edu/events/calendar.htm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D84702839

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[From 2001 – ]

USPTO TO HOLD 6TH ANNUAL INDEPENDENT INVENTOR’S CONFERENCE
August 3 – 4, 2001; 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
The DoubleTree Hotel
300 Army Navy Drive
Arlington, Va.

It all begins with an idea…But where do you go from there?

The Department of Commerce’s U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and the Office of Independent Inventor Programs (OIIP) will answer this and other questions about patenting inventions and registering trademarks at the 6th Annual Independent Inventor’s Conference, “Celebrating National Inventor’s Month,” August 3 – 4, 2001 in Arlington, Va.

“Throughout history, it has been the independent inventor who was on the cutting edge of new products and technologies. So many great ideas have come from individuals, such as Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, who invented the world’s first personal computer working together in a garage,” noted Nicholas Godici, Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Acting Director of the USPTO.

The two-day conference schedule includes workshops on patent and trademark basics, patent and trademark searching techniques, interacting with patent and trademark examiners, and hands on training in USPTO’s electronic patent and trademark application filing systems. In addition to USPTO staff, workshops will be hosted by outstanding experts in product development and marketing, including Ronald Docie, inventor and author; “Furby” toy inventor Richard Levy; J. Mark Davis, inventor and marketer; Joanne Hayes-Rines, editor of the Inventor’s Digest; and Dan Lauer, CEO and founder of a successful toy company.

For more information visit USPTO’s web site at http://www.uspto.gov/go/iic2001

[from – ]

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/speeches/01-31.htm

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Deadlines: Submit essays Aug. 1-31, 2009. All entries must be postmarked by Aug. 31, 2009. – See Below –

In honor of National Inventors Month in August, Inventors Digest magazine and partners are sponsoring the 2059 Essay Contest for middle school and high school students. IPWatchdog.com is proud to be one of the sponsors for this exciting essay contest, which asks those in ages 12 to 17 to write a 500 word (or less) essay on a technology, tool, product or service will shape our lives in the year 2059. As the contest information explains: “In 1959, the internal pacemaker, the microchip, the Barbie doll and pantyhose were invented. Each was significant in its own right. But that was so 50 years ago.” Then the assignment asks: “What will the world look like in 2059?” This should be an interesting and educational opportunity for teens, which will allow them to show their imagination and creativity in envisioning the future, and perhaps even spark an interest in Science Fiction as well. As we all know, what is science fiction today becomes science fact tomorrow, as most recently evidenced by scientists transporting matter (a la Star Trek) and feverishly working on cloaking technology (a la Star Trek and Harry Potter). There are also cool prizes, such as a laptop, the winning essay being published in Inventors Digest magazine and more!

The Grand Prize includes:

  • A laptop computer
  • Your essay published in Inventors Digest
  • A year’s subscription to the magazine
  • Possible appearance on the Emmy Award-winning PBS series Everyday Edisons
  • A killer T-shirt
  • Brain-teaser games

Eligibility: All middle school and high school students ages 12-17 in the United States. Grand prizes will be awarded for best middle school and high school entries. North Carolina and South Carolina entrants also are eligible for the regional Grand Prize, an iPod, courtesy of charlotteobserver.com.

Entry rules: Download official entry and all permission forms below. All essays must be original work of the student. Only 1 (ONE) entry per student. Submit essays and forms to Inventors Digest, info@inventorsdigest.com with Essay Contest in the subject line or mail to Inventors Digest, Essay Contest, 520 Elliot St., Ste. 200, Charlotte, NC 28202 or fax to 704.333.5115. Include your birth date, school, address and phone number.

Criteria: Entries will be judged on clarity and vision of how we will use new technology or products in the year 2059. Winning essays will demonstrate imagination rooted in science and engineering principles. In other words, the best essays will show what’s possible as well as practical.

Deadlines: Submit essays Aug. 1-31, 2009. All entries must be postmarked by Aug. 31, 2009.

Winners will be notified on or by Sept. 28, 2009.

Contact us at info@inventorsdigest.com or call 704.369.7312 ext. 219 for more information.

Official Essay Contest Rules

Permission Form (required)

Official Entry Form (required)

http://www.ipwatchdog.com/tag/national-inventors-month/
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Historic Press Releases > Time Machine

Sound files for Trademarks Put on USPTO Kids’ PagesTrademark Soundex made available in the Kids’ Pages on August 10, 2005. Eighty-five sound files for existing and pending trademarks posted to the site for the first time.
THE U.S. PATENT SYSTEM CELEBRATES 212 YEARS
President George Washington signed first patent act on April 10, 1790On April 10, 1790, President George Washington signed the bill that laid the foundation of the modern American patent system. This date marks the first time in American history that the law gave inventors rights to their creations.

The 1790 law gave the Patent Board members the power to grant a patent. Their authority was absolute and could not be appealed. The first board members included Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State, who was considered the first administrator of the American patent system and the first patent examiner; Henry Knox, Secretary of War; and Edmund Randolph, Attorney General. The Department of State had the responsibility for administering the patent laws, and fees for a patent were between $4 and $5, with the board deciding on the duration of each patent, not to exceed 14 years.

The Act of April 10, 1790 also defined the subject matter of a U.S. patent as “any useful art, manufacture, engine, machine, or device, or any improvement thereon not before known or used.” Applicants were to provide a patent specification and drawing and, if possible, a model. After examining the application, the board members would issue a patent if they deemed “the invention or discovery sufficiently useful and important.”

On July 31, 1790, Samuel Hopkins of Philadelphia, PA, received the first U.S. patent for an improvement in “the making of Pot ash and Pearl ash by a new Apparatus and Process.” President George Washington signed the patent, as did Attorney General Edmund Randolph and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson. The original document is still in existence in the collections of the Chicago Historical Society.

Patent for Safety Pin Issued April 10, 1849
A New Yorker invents a handy deviceWalter Hunt, of New York, NY, received patent #6,281 for the safety pin on April 10, 1849. Hunt’s pin was made from one piece of wire, which was coiled into a spring at one end and a separate clasp and point at the other end, allowing the point of the wire to be forced by the spring into the clasp. Walter Hunt was extremely creative, and in 1834 he built America’s first sewing machine, which also used the first eye-pointed needle. Hunt did not patent his invention because he thought it would put hand sewers out of work. Nearly 20 years later, Elias Howe reinvented and patented an eye-pointed needle sewing machine.

WOMEN HOLD PATENTS ON IMPORTANT INVENTIONS


USPTO recognizes inventive women during Women’s History Month In celebration of Women’s History Month, held each year during the month of March, the Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is recognizing some very special women whose inventions have made a great contribution in making this country the most technologically advanced nation in the world.

In 1809, Mary Dixon Kies, a native of Killingly, Conn., received the first U.S. patent awarded to a woman for a process of weaving straw with silk or thread. Unfortunately, all records of this patent were destroyed in the Patent Office fire of 1836. First Lady Dolly Madison praised Kies for helping the hat industry and boosting the economy because, at the time, the U.S. government had put an embargo on all European goods.

Mary Anderson, of Birmingham, Ala., was granted patent no. 743,801 on November 10, 1903, for a window-cleaning device, essentially windshield wipers. Before the manufacture of the Model A, Anderson noticed that streetcar drivers were forced to open their windows in rainy conditions in order to see. The invention could clean snow, rain, or sleet by using a handle inside the car improving vision during inclement weather. By 1916, these wipers were standard equipment in American cars.

Patsy O. Sherman, born in Minneapolis, along with Samuel Smith, received patent no. 3,574,791 on April 13, 1971, for their invention of block and graft copolymers containing water-solvatable polar groups and fluoroaliphatic groups, otherwise known as Scotchgard®. Sherman and Smith were employees at 3M Company when they collaborated on what became the most famous and widely used stain repellent and soil removal product. What prompted this innovative product was an accidental spill of a flurochemical rubber on a tennis shoe. The shoes showed resistance to water and oily liquids. This accident in the lab led to the Scotchgard® family of products that repel stains and also allow for the removal of oily stains from synthetic fabrics. Sherman holds 13 patents with Smith in flurochemical polymers and polymerization processes. Sherman and Smith were inducted into the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame in 2001.

Judy W. Reed, of Washington, D.C., and Sarah E. Goode, of Chicago, were the first African American women inventors to receive patents. Reed may not have been able to sign her name, but she may be the first African American woman to receive a patent. Signed with an “X,” patent no. 305,474, granted September 23, 1884, is for a dough kneader and roller. Goode’s patent for a cabinet bed, patent no. 322,177, was issued on July 14, 1885. Goode, the owner of a Chicago furniture store at the time of her invention, invented a folding bed that could be formed into a desk when not in use. It was a great space-saving idea!

Patent for Phonograph Issued February 19, 1878
One of Edison’s first great inventionsThomas A. Edison, one of the outstanding geniuses in the history of technology, received patent no. 200,521 for a phonograph on February 19, 1878. This patent is just one of the more than one thousand Edison was granted for his inventions.

Edison was exceptionally inquisitive, and while tinkering with the telegraph transmitter he discovered that when played back at high speeds, the tape sounded like spoken words. He figured out that the human voice, and other sounds, could cause a light material plate to vibrate. And, when properly placed, a needle could indent the plate, recording the vibrations, and found that yet another needle could play them back. He eventually rigged a tinfoil cylinder and a stylus with which he recorded, “Mary Had a Little Lamb.”

Edison’s inventions have been a mainstay of our economy for over 100 years. At the turn of the 20th century, Edison’s New Jersey laboratory (now a national monument), was the hub around which factories employing 5,000 people produced new products, including the mimeograph, the fluoroscope, the alkaline storage battery, dictating machines, and motion picture cameras and projectors. The electric light bulb, his most famous invention, was the foundation for today’s General Electric Company.

U.S. PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CELEBRATES VALENTINE’S DAY
Numerous patents and trademarks have a love connection E’S DAYPatents and trademarks may not be synonymous with Valentine’s Day. However, the Department of Commerce’s U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted patents and trademarks to many types of candies, flowers, and jewelry associated with the celebration.

Roses are a huge business on Valentine’s Day. Coincidentally, the first plant patent issued by the USPTO was for a rose (PP1). Henry F. Bosenberg, of New Brunswick, N.J., received the patent for a climbing rose on August 18, 1931. Red roses are the flower most often sent on Valentine’s Day and Fred H. Howard, of Montebello, Calif., received Plant Patent No. 953, for an early hybrid tea rose, on June 20, 1950. Its flower is described as rose red, very appropriate for Valentine’s Day. A more recent patent for a red rose (plant patent no. 11,834), was granted on April 3, 2001 to J. Benjamin Williams, of Silver Spring, Md., for a climbing rose named “Scarlet Star.”

Florists’ Transworld Delivery, Inc.®, more commonly known as FTD, offers a service closely associated with Valentine’s Day flowers, and holds trademarks for its symbol depicting a flower deliverer (registration no. 0821318) and for its toll-free number, 1-800-SEND-FTD® (registration no. 1848732). According to the Greeting Card Association, one billion Valentine cards are sent each year. One famous purveyor of greeting cards is Hallmark®, who holds a trademark for its gold crown symbol (registration no. 0525798). Candy is another Valentine’s Day tradition and some well-known brands are Godiva® (registration no. 0836376), Russell Stover® (registration no. 0739454), and Sweethearts® conversation heart candy (registration no. 2172266). Jewelry is another popular Valentine gift. Zales®, a well-known jewelry store chain, markets itself specifically for Valentine’s Day with the slogan, “Zales the Diamond and Valentine Store®” (trademark registration no. 2112448).

AFRICAN AMERICANS HOLD PATENTS ON IMPORTANT INVENTIONS
USPTO recognizes African American creativity during Black History MonthBlack History Month, held each year during the month of February, celebrates African American cultures and heritage and recognizes the many contributions African Americans have made to this nation.

In conjunction with Black History Month, the Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is recognizing some very special African Americans whose inventions have made a great contribution in making this country the most technologically advanced nation in the world.

Granville T. Woods, born in Columbus, Ohio in 1856, was known as the “Black Edison.” During his lifetime he received over 30 patents and successfully fought suits brought against him by Thomas Edison for the rights to certain electrical inventions, including railway telegraphy (patent no. 388,803), which allowed dispatchers to communicate by telegraph and warn train engineers of oncoming trains. Another of Wood’s better-known inventions is the air brake (patent no. 701,981).

Ivan Yaeger, who was born and still resides in Miami, received patent no. 4,685,928 for an artificial arm and hand assembly in 1987. This revolutionary prosthetic arm is designed to move drive motors to a level that improves range, variety, and speed of motion, and allows for better toleration by the wearer.

Dr. Patricia Bath, an ophthalmologist from New York, but living in Los Angeles when she received her patent, became the first African American woman doctor to receive a patent for a medical invention. Dr. Bath’s patent (no. 4,744,360), a method for removing cataract lenses, transformed eye surgery, using a laser device making the procedure more accurate.

Dr. James West, born in 1931 in Prince Edward County, Va., received patent no. 3,118,022 in 1964 (while an employee at Bell Laboratories), along with Gerhard Sessler, for the electroacoustic transducer, an electret microphone, which offered greater reliability, higher precision, lower cost and smaller size. The electret microphone revolutionized the microphone industry, with almost one billion manufactured each year. West and Sessler were inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1999.

Patent for Play-Doh® Issued January 26, 1965
Cincinnati natives’ invention becomes a popular toyNoah W. and Joseph S. McVicker, while living in Cincinnati, received patent #3,167,440 for a soft, pliable plastic modeling composition, today better known as Play-Doh®.

Play-Doh® was originally designed as a wallpaper cleaner. Its similarity to regular modeling clay, without the toxicity or mess, makes Play-Doh® a great toy. Over 700 million pounds of Play-Doh® have been sold to date.

In 1960, the first rendition of Play-Doh® Pete, a boy with a beret, was introduced. Pete, as well as the Play-Doh® logo, have changed over the years. Registration # 1221942, one example of the famous Play-Doh® trademarks, illustrates a classic rendition of Pete with his beret. A more modern Play-Doh® Pete, looking a little older and donning a baseball cap, can be found in Registration #2504268. Woman Invented Dishwasher
Patent for first practical dish washing machine issued December 28, 1886Josephine Garis Cochran invented the first useful dishwasher in Shelbyville, Illinois and received patent # 355,139 on December 28, 1886.

Cochrane, a wealthy woman who entertained often, wanted a machine that could wash dishes faster than her servants, and without breaking them. When she couldn’t find one, she built it herself.

She measured the dishes first, then she made wire compartments, each designed to fit plates, cups, or saucers. The compartments were placed inside a wheel that lay flat within a copper boiler. A motor turned the wheel while hot soapy water squirted from the bottom of the boiler and rained down on the dishes. Her invention worked! She showed the dishwasher at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, but only restaurants and hotels showed interest in it. Cochrane founded a company to manufacture her dishwashers, which eventually became KitchenAid®. It wasn’t until the 1950s, however, that dishwashers started to become a standard household kitchen appliance.

Mark Twain Granted His First Patent on December 19, 1871
Famous author and humorist was also an inventorSamuel L. Clemens, born in Florida, Mo., received patent #121,992 on December 19, 1871 for an Improvement in Adjustable and Detachable Straps for Garments.

Clemens, better known as Mark Twain and famous for stories such as Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, also was an inventor and received a total of three patents. While living in Hartford, Conn., Twain, received his first patent for an adjustable strap that could be used to tighten shirts at the waist. This strap attached to the back of a shirt and fastened with buttons to keep it in place and was easy to remove. Twain’s invention was not only used for shirts, but for underpants and women’s corsets as well. His purpose was to do away with suspenders, which he considered uncomfortable. Twain also received patents for a self-pasting scrapbook in 1873, that was very popular and sold over 25,000 copies, and in 1885 for a history trivia game.

Twain also believed strongly in the value of the patent system. In his book, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Hank Morgan, the Connecticut Yankee, said “…the very first official thing I did in my administration-and it was on the very first day of it too-was to start a patent office; for I knew that a country without a patent office and good patent laws was just a crab and couldn’t travel anyway but sideways and backwards.”

Patent for First Synthetic Plastic Issued December 7, 1909
Baekeland’s invention was popular Bakelite
Leo Hendrick Baekeland was living in Yonkers, N.Y. when he received patent #942,699 for the first synthetic plastic, known as Bakelite, an invention that revolutionized the manufacture of everything from buttons to car parts.

Baekeland, a successful innovator, used money from the sale of his first invention to Eastman Kodak, photographic paper, to develop phenolic resin or Bakelite, a non-flammable plastic that was less expensive and more versatile than other plastics of the day. It was first used to make electrical and automobile insulators, but is now best known for beautifully colored novelty and jewelry items, first popular during the Depression era and highly collectible today.

Baekeland was inducted into the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame in 1978.

CAT Scan Patent Issued November 25, 1975
X-ray system saves lives by early detection of illness and injury
Robert S. Ledley, born in 1926 in New York City, received patent # 3,922,552 on November 25, 1975 for the diagnostic X-ray system, also known as the CAT (Computed Axial Tomography) scan.

Ledley’s invention, the ACTA (Automatic Computerized Transverse Axial) diagnostic X-ray scanner, was the first whole-body computerized tomography (CT) machine, and provided views of the body and brain not seen with traditional X-rays. This was achieved using computers to generate three-dimensional images from flat X-ray pictures of cross-sections of the body, called slices. Ledley’s technology allowed early diagnoses of illness and disease, thus saving lives.

Ledley also used computerized tomography in radiation therapy and in the diagnosis of bone disease. He was inducted into the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame in 1990.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Joins in the Celebration of Thanksgiving
Recognizes patents and trademarks related to ThanksgivingThe Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office joins in the celebration of Thanksgiving by recognizing some patents and trademarks associated with this festive holiday.

Food often takes center stage at Thanksgiving, and there are many well-known Thanksgiving-related products protected by patents and trademarks. One way to spend more time with family and less in the kitchen cleaning up is by using a disposable cooking pan (patent #5,628,427) or a cooking jacket (patent #4,942,809) for the turkey, ham or roast. One non-traditional, but increasingly popular, way to cook a turkey is deep-frying, and one type of equipment used in this preparation is protected by patent # 5,758,569.

Some well-known trademarks associated with turkey and dressing, must-haves at many Thanksgiving tables, are Butterball (registration #1151836) for turkey products and Stove Top (registration #0949459) for stuffing. What holiday feast would be complete without cranberry sauce such as Ocean Spray (registration #2150919)? Desserts are always the final complement to a Thanksgiving feast. For those that do not bake their own, Sara Lee’s slogan for its pies and cakes, “Nobody Doesn’t Like Sara Lee,” is protected by trademark registration #1885156.

Traffic signal patent issued November 20, 1923
Son of former slaves recognized for public safety inventions Garrett Morgan, the son of former slaves, was born in Paris, Kentucky, and was living in Cleveland, Ohio when he received patent # 1,475,024 on November 20, 1923 for the three-way traffic signal. Dependence on the automobile grew rapidly after World War I, and Morgan saw that existing mechanical “stop” and “go” signals were dangerous because they had no caution indicator to buffer traffic flow. So he patented a three-armed signal mounted on a T-shaped pole that indicated “stop” and “go” for traffic in two directions, and also had another signal for stopping traffic in all directions before the stop and go signals changed — the forerunner of today’s yellow light.

General Electric bought Morgan’s patent for $40,000, and his traffic management device was used throughout North America until it was replaced by the red, yellow and green-light traffic signals currently used around the world.

Garrett Morgan received wide recognition for his outstanding contributions to public safety. The gas mask he invented in 1912 (U.S. 1,113,675 issued in 1914) was used during World War I to protect soldiers from chlorine gas fumes. In 1916, Morgan wore his own mask design to rescue men trapped by a gas explosion in a tunnel being constructed under Lake Erie. The City of Cleveland, Ohio honored Garrett Morgan with a gold medal for his heroic efforts in 1916.

Patent for Safety Razor Issued November 15, 1904
Gillette’s invention initiated line of world-famous grooming productsKing C. Gillette was born in Fon du Lac,Wisconsin, and while residing in Boston, received patent #775,134 for the disposable safety razor on November 15, 1904. Prior to the disposable razor, shaving was done with a straight-edge razor which had a thick, sharp blade, making it dangerous. The blade also needed continuous sharpening, making it expensive because the blade soon became worn and could no longer be used. Gillette wanted to create a razor blade that would not need sharpening and could be disposed of once it became dull. He invented a razor blade made out of very thin sheet-steel that was placed in a holder to secure the blade for shaving. Once the blade became dull, it was discarded and replaced by a new one, using the same holder.

In 1901, Gillette formed the American Safety Razor Company (soon thereafter renamed for Gillette himself). For the first time, using his portrait and signature on the packaging (trademark registration #0056921), razor blades were sold in multiples, with the razor handle a one-time purchase. The Gillette Safety Razor Company has thrived for 100 years, and over the decades expanded its line to such well-known products as Foamy® shaving cream (trademark registration #1015038), Right Guard® antiperspirant (trademark registration #0692546), and Duracell batteries (trademark registration #0793273). Today, Gillette has over $10 billion in sales, in over 200 countries.

Patent For Preserving Blood Issued November 10, 1942
Washingtonian’s invention made blood bank possibleDr. Charles Drew, who was born in Washington, D.C., received patent #2,301,710 on November 10, 1942 for a method of preserving human blood. Prior to Dr. Drew’s invention, transfusions required a nearly simultaneous exchange of blood from the donor to the patient before the blood became tainted. Dr. Drew discovered that plasma, which has a longer shelf life than blood and is less prone to contamination, could be separated from whole blood and used in transfusions, thus paving the way for the blood bank.

The pioneering blood work done by Dr. Drew saved the lives of thousands of allied service men and women during the Second World War. After the war, Dr. Drew became the founding medical director of the Red Cross Blood Bank in the United States, and was head of blood collection for the U.S. Army and Navy.

IN REMEMBRANCE OF OUR NATION’S HEROES
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Recognizes Trademarks Related to Veterans DayThe Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office joins in the commemoration of Veterans Day by recognizing some patriotic trademarks.

Veterans Day has its roots in a 1921 ceremony first held at Arlington National Cemetery to honor an unnamed soldier, “known but to God.” Patriotic symbolism abounds on Veterans Day and many of these symbols have trademark registrations.

The American flag, for example, is closely associated with Veterans Day. The flag has taken on added significance for Americans since the terrorist attacks of September 11, reminding us of the original story behind our national anthem. Francis Scott Key was inspired to write, “The Star Spangled Banner,” during the British attack on Baltimore’s Fort McHenry. The flag that inspired Key is now at the Smithsonian Institution, and the group working to preserve it has registered its name, the “Star Spangled Preservation Project” as a trademark (#2450336).

Veterans Day 2001 gives us the opportunity to offer renewed appreciation for the men and women of the United States armed forces, particularly those associated with Operation Enduring Freedom. Our armed forces have many trademarks associated with their mottos and symbols. One well-known mark is the Army’s motto, “Be All You Can Be” (registration# 2063499). The nation’s oldest major veteran’s organization, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), was established in 1899 and has been a major voice for our nation’s veterans. “VFW” a symbol of volunteerism and community service, is a registered trademark (#1686881).

TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME
Patents and Trademarks related to America’s Favorite PastimeThe Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office joins in the celebration of this year’s World Series by recognizing some patents and trademarks relative to baseball.

Baseball is America’s pastime. The thousands of patented inventions associated with the sport are testament to that. Most recently patents have been issued on a way to improve a batter’s swing (patent #6,306,050); a swing speed indicator (patent #6,173,610) that measures the batter’s swing using a digital readout that can be slipped onto any bat; a baseball trainer, which helps pitchers practice by indicating a “strike” or “ball” as well as the speed of the pitch by using a microcomputer (patent # 5,566,964); and a glove (patent #5,113,530) with inflatable chambers which softens the impact of an incoming baseball or softball. There are also numerous patents for softball and t-ball. Design patent # 418,569 is for a t-ball matt, which helps children position themselves to hit the ball. Patent #4,993,708 covers a batting tee. Design patent #402,414 is for a helmet that can be used for a player to pull their ponytail through while playing softball, t-ball or little league baseball.

Trademarks also play an important role in baseball and are seen on and off the field. Most professional team logos, equipment and even mascots, have trademark registrations. The New York Yankees, which have won the most World Series Championships, have a very well known and recognized logo, which has trademark registration #1898998 for use on baseball shirts. The Arizona Diamondbacks, a relatively new team, has several trademark applications pending, including serial #76161641 for baseball uniforms and other sport-related clothing. Trademarks for baseball equipment include Rawlings (registration #1149932) and Wilson (registration #1553005) for sporting good equipment such as baseballs, gloves, and bases.

High Octane Gasoline Patent Issued October 19, 1948
Invention supported American air dominance in World War II and today is used to produce over half of the world’s gasolineDonald Campbell, Homer Martin, Charles Tyson and Eger Murphree, four inventors working for Exxon, revolutionized the petroleum industry when they created the first efficient and continuous way to refine crude oil. Their invention, known as fluid cat cracking, was granted patent #2,451,804, and came on the heels of America’s entry into World War II, meeting the military’s need to increase the yield of high-octane aviation fuel. This invention is considered one of the most important chemical engineering achievements of the 20th century. In addition to producing gasoline, their invention is used to manufacture heating oil, propane, butane, and chemicals that are instrumental in products such as plastics and synthetic rubbers.

Campbell, from Clinton, Iowa, had patents on 30 inventions. Martin, who came from Chicago, Illinois, was one of Exxon’s most prolific inventors with 82 patents. Murphree, who was from Bayonne, New Jersey, went on to become President of Standard Oil of New Jersey, and Tyson, also from Chicago, Illinois, held over 50 patents, mainly in the petroleum processing area.

Patent for Bread-Toaster Issued October 18, 1921
The automatic (pop-up) toaster becomes a standard in American householdsCharles P. Strite, born in Minneapolis, MN, received patent #1,394,450 on October 18, 1921 for the bread-toaster. During World War I, Strite worked in a manufacturing plant in Stillwater, MN, where he became frustrated with the burned toast served in the cafeteria. Strite, determined to find a way of toasting bread that did not depend on human attention, invented the pop-up toaster with a variable timer. In 1925, using a redesigned version of Strite’s toaster, the Toastmaster Company began to market the first household toaster that could brown bread on both sides simultaneously, set the heating element on a timer, and eject the toast when finished. By 1926, Charles Strite’s Toastmaster was available to the public and was a huge success.

Kodak Film Patent Issued October 14, 1884
First commercial film made “snap shot” possibleGeorge Eastman, who was born in Waterville, New York, received patent #306,594 on October 14, 1884 for photographic film. Eastman’s invention revolutionized photography by using coated paper and rollers, rather than heavy glass dry plates, to reproduce images. Eastman began looking for ways to “make the camera as convenient as the pencil,” after amassing the heavy, complicated, and expensive equipment he needed to keep a picture record of his vacation. This invention allowed him to mass produce a small hand-held box camera filled with rolls of film with 100 exposures. Millions of Americans recorded the first snap shots of their everyday lives using the Kodak camera, which was introduced in 1888. In 1977, George Eastman was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

In addition to an inventive spirit, Eastman also had a strong belief in the power of advertising. He first registered “KODAK®,” a term he created, as a trademark in 1888. Today the word “Kodak,” and the Eastman Kodak Company’s distinctive yellow trade dress, are well-known around the world.

Patent for Xerox Technology Issued October 6, 1942
Electrophotography was precursor of the first office copierChester F. Carlson, considered the father of xerographic printing, received patent #2,297,691 on October 6, 1942 for electrophotography. Carlson’s invention, the first method of making images by dry copying, evolved from his desire to eliminate hand reproduction of patent specifications and drawings at the electronics firm where he worked as a physicist. In 1947, he assigned the commercial rights to his invention to the Haloid Company, later renamed the Xerox Corporation. Carlson, who was born in Seattle, Washington, was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 1981.

Cardiac pacemaker patent issued October 9, 1962
Patent covered the first cardiac pacemaker implantOn October 9, 1962, Wilson Greatbatch received patent #3,057,356 for the cardiac pacemaker. Born in Buffalo, New York, Greatbatch’s innovation was selected in 1983 by the National Society of Professional Engineers as one of the two major engineering contributions to society during the previous 50 years. Greatbatch established a series of companies to manufacture or license his inventions, including Greatbach Enterprises, which produces most of the world’s pacemaker batteries. In 1986, Greatbatch was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

HISPANIC AMERICANS HOLD PATENTS ON IMPORTANT INVENTIONS
USPTO recognizes Hispanic American creativity during Hispanic Heritage MonthNational Hispanic Heritage Month, held each year from September 15 – October 15, celebrates Hispanic cultures and heritage and recognizes the many contributions Hispanic Americans have made to this nation.

In conjunction with Hispanic Heritage Month, the Department of Commerce’s United States Patent and Trademark Office is recognizing some very special Hispanic Americans whose inventions contributed a great deal to making this country the most technologically advanced nation in the world.

Luis Alvarez received patent #2,480,208 in 1949 for a radio distance and direction indicator, essentially radar systems used during World War II to locate and land aircraft. He also developed, with others, the hydrogen bubble chamber, which was used to detect subatomic particles. This resulted in a major rethinking of nuclear theories. Alvarez was born in San Francisco and was living in Santa Fe when he received his patent. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1968, and in 1978 was inducted into the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame.

Victor Ochoa, was born in 1850 in Ojinaga, Mexico and resided in El Paso, Texas, New York and Peekskill, N.Y. when he received several patents, including two for adjustable wrenches (patents #1,417,196 and #1,454,333); others for the rail magnetic brake for street cars (patent #873,587) which he sold to the American Brake Company; the reversible motor (patent #718,508); and an improvement for the windmill that was to be constructed cylindrically (patent #1,319,174). Ochoa also received numerous patents from other countries.

Ellen Ochoa, who became the first Hispanic female astronaut in 1990, was a co-inventor on three patents in the field of optical information processing, using an optical system or laser light to extract information from an image rather than using an electronic or computer system. Her patents are for an optical inspection system (patent #4,674,824) in 1987, an optical object recognition method (patent# 4,838,644) in 1989, as well as a method for noise removal in images (patent #4,949,389) in 1990. Ochoa was born in Los Angeles in 1958 and listed her residences on her patents as Stanford and Pleasanton, Calif.

A number of well-known U.S. trademarks protect products and services with roots in the Hispanic culture. Trademark registration #2444627, for example, protects the word Selena when used to sell dolls named after Selena, the late Tejano singing sensation. Registration #1980712 ensures that the term MSM/Miami Sound Machine is protected for the use in compact discs, videotapes and records for the group founded by Gloria and Emilio Estefan. The word Goya is synonymous with Latin American food products and its use in association with such items as Vienna sausage, canned fruit juices, soups, and spices, among others, is protected by registration #0962193. Corona and Tecate, two Mexican beers popular in the U.S., are protected by registration #1727969 and registration #1666892.

TELEVISION PATENT ISSUED AUGUST 26, 1930 On August 26, 1930, Philo Taylor Farnsworth received patent #1,773,980 for the first television system. Farnsworth, who was born in Beaver, Utah, produced the first all-electric television image at the age of 20. Farnsworth’s television patents covered scanning, focusing, synchronizing, contrast, control, and power. Farnsworth also invented the first cold cathode ray tubes and the first simple electronic microscope. In 1984, Farnsworth was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

FIRST U.S. PATENT ISSUED TODAY IN 1790
July 31, 1790

On July 31, 1790 Samuel Hopkins was issued the first patent for a process of making potash, an ingredient used in fertilizer. The patent was signed by President George Washington. Hopkins was born in Vermont, but was living in Philadelphia, PA when the patent was granted.

The first patent, as well as the more than 6 million patents issued since then, can be seen on the Department of Commerce’s U.S. Patent and Trademark Office website at http://www.uspto.gov. The original document is in the collections of the Chicago Historical Society.

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Some Well-Known U.S. Trademarks Celebrate One Hundred Years
Cream of Wheat logo and GE medallion among 100-year-old trademarksNot much has spanned the last century. Less has lasted the past 100 years without change. That is why the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is proud to announce that 15 trademarks are celebrating their centennials this year.

The picture of a chef holding a bowl of hot cereal, Nabisco’s CREAM OF WHEAT logo, and General Electric’s “GE medallion” are two widely identifiable registered trademarks that have been part of the American culture for the past 100 years. Other well-known registrations celebrating 100 years in 2000 are Carnation Brand condensed milk and Pabst Milwaukee Blue Ribbon Beer.

Since the first trademark was registered in 1870, words, phrases, symbols, designs, shapes, and colors have established the identities of countless sources of goods and services for consumers worldwide. Nearly 1 million registered trademarks are in use today, including the oldest U.S. trademark still in use, SAMSON, with the design of a man and a lion, registered on May 27, 1884, for use on cords, line and rope.

PTO ANNOUNCES FIRST PATENT AND TRADEMARK OF NEW MILLENNIUM
–SPORTS ENTHUSIASTS TO BENEFIT FROM NEW MILLENNIUM’S FIRST PATENT–

The first patent and trademark issued in the year 2000 reflect dramatic differences from those awarded at the beginning of the last century, the Commerce Department’s Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) announced today.

The first patent for the new millennium was issued on January 4, 2000, to Leonard Siprut from San Diego for a multiple component headgear system. Patent No. 6,009,555 is a sun visor/eye shield for surfers, kayakers, bikers, and athletes in other extreme sports. In contrast, the first patent issued in 1900 was to Louis Allard, of Utah, for an early version of the washing machine.

The first trademark for 2000 (No. 2,305,025) was also registered on January 4 to Origins Natural Resources Inc., a cosmetics company, and its design. The first trademark issued in 1900 that is still in use is for Cream of Wheat and its design, registered January 23, 1900.

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Cricket Diane Lego Battlement 2006 - - Tabletop Fortress built of Legos and Space Laser Cannons
Cricket Diane Lego Battlement 2006 – – Tabletop Fortress built of Legos and Space Laser Cannons
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Cricket Diane Lego Battlemnt 2006 - Tabletop Fortress built with Legos and Space Laser Cannons - (taken apart to build playhouse life-size of Legos for two-year old Jasmine Atriel)
Cricket Diane Lego Battlemnt 2006 – Tabletop Fortress built with Legos and Space Laser Cannons – (taken apart to build playhouse life-size of Legos for two-year old Jasmine Atriel)
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Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel 2008 - a living room playhouse of Legos big enough to actually play in it with animal friends
Cricket Diane Lego House for Jasmine Atriel 2008 – a living room playhouse of Legos big enough to actually play in it with animal friends
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CricketDiane Lego PlayHouse for Baby J built Christmas 2008 - looking from the window of one part to the other - there are little cubbyholes and shelves built inside for hiding things - a good place to play made from Legos and Legos and Legos
CricketDiane Lego PlayHouse for Baby J built Christmas 2008 – looking from the window of one part to the other – there are little cubbyholes and shelves built inside for hiding things – a good place to play made from Legos and Legos and Legos
Pictures of My Legos building projects (some of them) – Lego Houses that a grandbaby can actually play inside and castles and fortresses for action figures with their own laser cannons that pivot for Terminators and Soldiers.
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Note: RealPlayer version 10 or later required to view video with caption.

Suction Tires

National Campaign to Inspire Young Inventors

Three PSAs from the USPTO’s Advertising Council campaign, “Inspiring Invention”

http://www.uspto.gov/video/index.htm

US Patent and Trademark Office – video streams

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http://www.uspto.gov/

Announcing beta.uspto.gov

>> USPTO Beta Version
The USPTO is pleased to announce the beta test release of its new Web site will remain open for an additional period of about six weeks. The new site has been redesigned to improve the look and feel, as well as to enhance the user experience with improved navigation. The USPTO’s goal is to make the Web site technologically up-to-date, user-friendly, and responsive to customer feedback.

>> Click here for full Story


USPTO Takes Another Step Closer to Full Electronic Patent Application Processing

e-Office Action provides faster, more efficient notification to patent applicant

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has announced the implementation of the e-Office Action program following a successful pilot project. Under the program, patent applicants receive an e-mail notification of office communications instead of paper mailings. Click here for more information.


Exhibit of Michael Jackson’s Patent and Trademarks

USPTO Opens Exhibit of Michael Jackson’s Patent and Trademarks

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and the National Inventors Hall of Fame and Museum are presenting a special exhibit featuring material from Michael Jackson’s patent and trademark applications. The exhibit is free and open to the public starting Wednesday, July 15 and runs through Labor Day.

>> Click here for full story

USPTO Alexandria,VA Promoting Innovation – Today’s USPTO

This video features a 27 minute history and tour of the USPTO.

Video | Video with Caption
>> Download ZIP file of Video [ ZIP/70.4MB]
(2006NOV01)
NOTE: This is a large video, please allow a few minutes for it to download
Protecting Geographical Indications graphic

Protecting Geographical Indications

This video explains the United States government’s position regarding geographical indications (GIs), a type of intellectual property that indicates the origin of goods or services in a particular geographic area with particular characteristics. Some examples are Parma Ham, Roquefort Cheese, Florida Oranges and Idaho Potatoes.

(2005SEP23)

http://www.uspto.gov/video/index.htm

US Patent and Trademark Office – video streams

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Inventors > 13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference


REGISTRATIONTOPICSSPEAKERSDIRECTIONSLODGINGAGENDA

13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference

The 13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference, co-sponsored by the United States Patent Trademark Office (USPTO) and the National Inventors Hall of Fame® Foundation, will be held in Alexandria, VA at the US Patent and Trademark Office campus on August 8-9, 2008.

A pre-conference workshop (August 7, 2008 from 5pm – 7pm) is included with your registration for anyone interested in learning patent basics and how they protect inventions. This workshop is for beginners and is a good foundation for the conference.

USPTO presenters will include Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce Margaret Peterlin, Commissioner for Patents John Doll, Louis Foreman, creator and executive producer of the Everyday Edisons Show, an inductee from the National Inventors Hall of Fame® Foundation, local IP attorneys as well as Supervisory Patent Examiners.

Registration is now open for this 2-day event. The fee is $100 per person for both days. The registration fee includes all sessions and presentations, morning and afternoon refreshments, lunch for both days and a networking reception on Friday evening.

For additional information about this event you can call the Inventors Assistance Program at 571-272-8850.

» 13th Annual Independent Inventors Conference Registration

[from]

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/iip/iiconf/

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Inventor Resources Homepage Background Image Top of this section.
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What free assistance is available from USPTO?


Free basic information on the patent and trademark system, forms, fees, products and services of the USPTO is available by calling the USPTO’s toll-free line, 800-PTO-9199 or by calling 571-272-1000. An automated message system is available 7 days a week, 24 hours a day providing informational responses to frequently asked questions and the ability to order certain free documents. Customer service representatives are available to answer questions, send free materials or connect you with other offices of the USPTO from 8:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. ET, Monday-Friday excluding federal holidays. The customer service representatives can transfer your call to the Inventors Assistance Center or the Trademark Electronic Business Center for responses to practice and procedure questions. Much of this information is alsoavailable at the General Information section of the USPTO Web site.

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Welcome to IFIA

International Federation of Inventors’ Associations

The world-wide organization of the inventors and the innovators

Founded in 1968

Last Update
NEW! July
28, 2009

INVENTORS – INVENTIONS – INNOVATION – PROSPERITY !

NEWS

NEW! Invitation and information about GENIUS-EUROPE International Invention Fair – Budapest (September 9-13). International Forum of Graduates will be organized connected to GENIUS > > > application here (Graduates will receive free hotel accommodation and travel cost compensation.)

NEW! Reports about Al Bassel Fair (July 15-20, Damascus) > > > here

Two new members: Yemen Inventors Federation and South African Inventors Association > > > Self introducing. Yemen is 87th and South Africa is 88th IFIA country!

IFIA anti-crisis activity

In the background of the present global economy crisis there is a social-ethical crisis, confusion about the basic values in the economy. This confusion is about the separation of financial and real economic processes, a deficit in the democratic character of the economy (the oppression of “smalls”), and the problem of invention and innovation.
One characteristic factor of the latter is the devaluation of inventions: neglecting the process of creating new solutions.

IFIA’s main anti-crisis activity is thus about stressing the importance of inventions in general, and presenting new inventions, specifically. The IFIA would like to deliberate its motto:

“Inventors – Inventions – Innovation – Prosperity”.

For this reason IFIA organizes the following series of events.

The IFIA official events in the second part of year 2009: lFIA Official events Warning: Event in Romania is postponed!

I would like to call your attention the importance of broad participation of IFIA members on the IFIA official events.

I ask IFIA members to send information about the decision concerning your participations on the IFIA official events. This information is essential for the coordination work and for the offering of your special discounts.

András VEDRES IFIA President

International Order of Merit of the Inventors > > > info

Short film on former WIPO Director General, Árpád Bogsch > > > here on the WIPO website

The copyright of the video film “Property of Intellect – Portrait of Árpád BOGSCH” belongs to the International Federation of Inventors’ Associations (IFIA).

IFIA (General information; in English)

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IFIA Office > > > Activity reports in 2009 and documents

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Inventions for commercialization by IFIA

IFIA Invention Shows in 2009 > > > lFIA Official events

1000inventions.com: IFIA Website with 1100+ inventions for sale/licensing from 100+ countries New applications are not accepted

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IFIA Website with 1000+ inventions for sale/licensing from 100+ countries! > > > www.1000inventions.com

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