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My Note –

I had started out with a question about why statistics and their analysis had such incredibly different outcomes in the hands and decision-making of businesses and economists involved in business and monetary things.

This first post happened because I had started the search and then decided to post it as I went along where it might make open and available what I do to get information and understanding / learning on the internet and through a variety of sources. After making this post, I started again with a bit more narrative approach which follows in the next three posts. (It is a lot of information but not as much as I usually use and it was harder to find it and post it than it takes to just do it.)

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/2009/04/03/

**

How I research and learn –

My note –

How I do it – First, I was wondering about how statistical data and analysis was being conducted by the economics and business management branches of things where it concerns business –

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/2009/04/04/how-i-research-and-learn/

**

How I learn – (cont.)

How I research and learn –

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/2009/04/04/how-i-learn-cont/

**

A little more about how I learn – (cont. across last two posts plus this one)

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/2009/04/04/a-little-more-about-how-i-learn-cont-across-last-two-posts-plus-this-one/

answer that I derived from the information that is contained in my searches and study –

[My note – maybe relative displacement would make a better choice of equations for business statistics. But, I have noticed in the stat analysis info – chapt.s 9 or lecture 12, chapt. 10 – that in some data arrays,, there are common conventions of leaving out or deleting certain results or categories of data whether because the values are too low or for constraints of other reasons. Maybe that explains a lot of the differences in handling the data and analysis for business / monetary information compared to science, physics or materials science / mathematics, in that incremental specificity is important and deemed to be critically necessary in science / math apps.]

***

****

My note –

With a bit of thought about the things I had found online, read and considered – this is what has occurred to me as the basic answer to my original question:

“In business and money matters, they have adopted certain conventions that create contrivances in the numbers, their results upon analysis and in the decisions that result from them.”

– cricketdiane, 04-04-09

****

Vive la crise, mère de toutes les inventions !
03.04.09 | 10h51

Salon international des inventions de Genève, dont la 37e édition témoigne de la vitalité du secteur

http://www.lemonde.fr/web/depeches/0,14-0,39-38918064@7-37,0.html

Son fondateur et président, Jean-Luc Vincent, reconnaît avoir perdu quelques exposants institutionnels frappés par la crise. Mais il note “un afflux d’inventeurs stimulés par l’urgence de trouver des solutions, en particulier dans le domaine de l’environnement, l’économie et la santé.”

****

http://www.inventions-geneva.ch/

– very nifty –

Lookup for more information – Geneva

***

{and this caught my interest, too – }

[From]

Topic: Organizational design

http://www.primisonline.com/cgi-bin/POL_casesByTopic.cgi?topic=Organizational%20design

10 Rules for Strategic Innovators: From Idea to Execution

Add     View     43 pp.     Case
Author(s): Dewar, Robert D.
Publication Date: 01/01/2006
Product Type: Case (Field)
HBS Number: KEL145
Geographic Setting: United States Industry Setting: Consumer products; retail industry
Subjects: Brands; Competitive strategy; Corporate culture; Customer service; Human resources management; Organizational design
Academic Discipline: Competitive strategy
Product Description: Describes the winning formula at Neiman Marcus that has made it the No. 1 luxury retailer in the United States in terms of sales per square foot and profitability. Highlights Neiman Marcus’ efforts to define who its customers are and are not and to achieve superior focus on its customers by aligning location, price, service, and merchandise to fulfill these customers‘ every need. Describes ways in which Neiman Marcus prevents typical silo behavior between merchandising and selling and how it ensures that the right merchandise gets to the right customer, despite the challenge of doing this in 36 micromarkets. Learning Objective: To show how a company integrates two strong high-performance functions—merchandising and sales—to get the right merchandise to each customer in more than 30 diverse selling locations while consistently providing exceptional customer service.

Source: Harvard
Daimler Chrysler Commercial Vehicles Division

Add     View     26 pp.     Case
Author(s): Hannan, Michael; Podolny, Joel; Roberts, John
Publication Date: 09/01/1999 Revision Date: 06/01/2007
Product Type: Case (Field)
Publisher: Stanford University
HBS Number: IB27
Industry Setting: Automotive industry Number of Employees: 416,501 Gross Revenues: $152,446 million revenues
Event Year Start: 1998 Event Year End: 1998
Subjects: Globalization; Market structure; Operations management; Organizational design; Product management; Reorganization
Academic Discipline: Competitive strategy
Product Description: On Monday, November 16, 1998, the day before Daimler-Benz would officially merge with Chrysler, Dr. Kurt Lauk, head of Daimler-Benz’ commercial vehicles division (CVD) reflected on the organizational changes he had directed over the course of the previous two years to make CVD more competitive in an era of industry-wide globalization. To unite an extremely decentralized organizational structure at Daimler, Lauk initiated a worldwide reorganization and the integration of the company‘s manufacturing operations. He encouraged individual units within CVD to look for collaborative opportunities that would enable the division to realize global scale economies. Although Lauk promoted a global perspective within CVD, he believed that the business units could compete effectively only if they were allowed considerable autonomy to respond to their own unique market conditions. Lauk was proud of the achievements resulting from these directives. However, pressing concerns overshadowed his satisfaction. Although the CVD was profitable overall, its Power Train Unit continued to lose money. In addition, Lauk was concerned about Daimler’s progress in building adequate distribution channels in the Asian region. Finally, Lauk considered the impact of the merger with Chrysler on CVD and the general uncertainty concerning how a more centralized or
Source: Harvard

&&&** [Which is this – ]

Add View 43 pp. Case
Author(s): Dewar, Robert D.
Publication Date: 01/01/2006
Product Type: Case (Field)
HBS Number: KEL145
Geographic Setting: United States Industry Setting: Consumer products; retail industry
Subjects: Brands; Competitive strategy; Corporate culture; Customer service; Human resources management; Organizational design
Academic Discipline: Competitive strategy
Product Description: Describes the winning formula at Neiman Marcus that has made it the No. 1 luxury retailer in the United States in terms of sales per square foot and profitability. Highlights Neiman Marcus’ efforts to define who its customers are and are not and to achieve superior focus on its customers by aligning location, price, service, and merchandise to fulfill these customers‘ every need. Describes ways in which Neiman Marcus prevents typical silo behavior between merchandising and selling and how it ensures that the right merchandise gets to the right customer, despite the challenge of doing this in 36 micromarkets. Learning Objective: To show how a company integrates two strong high-performance functions—merchandising and sales—to get the right merchandise to each customer in more than 30 diverse selling locations while consistently providing exceptional customer service.

Source: Harvard
Daimler Chrysler Commercial Vehicles Division
Add View 26 pp. Case
Author(s): Hannan, Michael; Podolny, Joel; Roberts, John
Publication Date: 09/01/1999 Revision Date: 06/01/2007
Product Type: Case (Field)
Publisher: Stanford University
HBS Number: IB27
Industry Setting: Automotive industry Number of Employees: 416,501 Gross Revenues: $152,446 million revenues
Event Year Start: 1998 Event Year End: 1998
Subjects: Globalization; Market structure; Operations management; Organizational design; Product management; Reorganization
Academic Discipline: Competitive strategy
Product Description: On Monday, November 16, 1998, the day before Daimler-Benz would officially merge with Chrysler, Dr. Kurt Lauk, head of Daimler-Benz’ commercial vehicles division (CVD) reflected on the organizational changes he had directed over the course of the previous two years to make CVD more competitive in an era of industry-wide globalization. To unite an extremely decentralized organizational structure at Daimler, Lauk initiated a worldwide reorganization and the integration of the company‘s manufacturing operations. He encouraged individual units within CVD to look for collaborative opportunities that would enable the division to realize global scale economies. Although Lauk promoted a global perspective within CVD, he believed that the business units could compete effectively only if they were allowed considerable autonomy to respond to their own unique market conditions. Lauk was proud of the achievements resulting from these directives. However, pressing concerns overshadowed his satisfaction. Although the CVD was profitable overall, its Power Train Unit continued to lose money. In addition, Lauk was concerned about Daimler’s progress in building adequate distribution channels in the Asian region. Finally, Lauk considered the impact of the merger with Chrysler on CVD and the general uncertainty concerning how a more centralized or

Source: Harvard
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