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*****
My note –
It used to be that in Georgia, if you were homeless, the only way you could get any help was to have an address. Without an address and without a phone number, many government and charitable programs that were intended to help – couldn’t or wouldn’t help. Nearly all of them required at least one or the other despite the fact that being homeless precluded having either. And for some reason, that made sense to them. But, I’ve since realized that it may have been a way of keeping the number of homeless down in order to look better than things were. If programs weren’t being used, then I suppose that in their minds – there wasn’t a homelessness problem in Georgia, especially around the Metro Atlanta area and its nearby territories.

In some cases, the shelters required $8 a night during the 80’s here and I said, if I had that kind of money – I wouldn’t be homeless, which is the truth. Later on during the 90’s, it literally required five milk crates of paperwork to carry with me for proof that was demanded by most of the programs to show that I was unemployed and homeless, why that was, how long it had been that way and who I was in relationship to my world and theirs.

Forget getting any help without some official ID, birth certificate, marriage license, divorce papers, children’s birth certificates, social security number cards, proof of employment (which is fairly easy,) and proof of no employment (which is nearly impossible.) Along with that, they used to demand proof of previous places of residence and employment, originals of old bills from your previous address, paycheck stubs, any and all papers sent by department of children and family services concerning your children, any and all documents from doctors, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers and counselors, including vocational counselors.

And, for all that effort, filling out pages and pages of forms, coming back for appointments several times which was required, providing proof of old bills from a place where you no longer lived and everything else, it still didn’t mean that there would be any help or any place to stay out of it. Most charities wouldn’t even extend a hundred dollars to anyone, even if their rent was behind, if they were homeless or hungry, because all of their dollars for such things were going into huge funds that were supposed to then send it back out into the community for such things. What I found, is that most of those programs that were funded that way did not help either and many of the extra requirements and conditions were prohibitively obscene.

Some only helped if the homelessness had occurred over six months ago, but not before that. And, some only helped if you had no more than two children, whether they lived with you or not. Some only helped if you had a job, which was nearly impossible because getting a job also requires an address and a phone number that is valid to be checked before getting the job. And, as I said earlier – most of the programs, whether government or charitable required having a valid address and phone number even for those who were homeless that were intended to be the main recipients of the funds. I stayed one night in a shelter where the only way to get a place there was to have signed up ahead of time and then come back before six in the evening in order to get a bed. At six in the morning everyone was turned out and the doors were locked. Most of those I met whose only sin or crime or mental illness was that they married some fool that no longer wanted them and did not want to spend their money supporting their spouse or children that consequently ended up in the shelter, were decent people who had a great deal of potential if they had any chance to get on their feet.

The bus stop was about a quarter of a mile away, but it didn’t matter because no one there including me had any money to take the bus anywhere anyway. However, the shelter had a policy that no one could stay on the property, of course, and every business nearby had called the police on numerous occasions because of people crossing their property or using the outside toll phones there near the shelter, at fast food restaurants and quickie marts and gas stations. None of the homeless people had ever robbed them but they were considered a continuing nuisance so most of the businesses had the police on speed dial to run them off or more commonly, to round them up and arrest them. From this shelter, the nearest “city” center was around five miles away on foot and it was quite a journey to get there without sidewalks in overgrown littered shoulders of the roads which cut off into ditches unexpectedly or disappeared into no more than a curb for a place to walk. Cars would speed by much faster than the speed limit and invariably upon seeing someone walking, would swerve toward rather than to give more room, just in case.

Most of the people that stayed in that particular shelter regularly did not walk “to town” that I met the day after I had stayed in this shelter. They seemed to disappear somewhere into the woods around the area – we would be walking along and then they would have darted behind a service station and into the woods behind it or taken across some tall weeds and disappeared into the trees. I don’t know where they were going, maybe a shortcut but I felt at the time as if they had made a day place in amongst the many trees within a quarter mile of the shelter so they could be back in time to get a bed.

Forget eating anything, if you are homeless in Georgia. To ask for money is against the law, considered panhandling. In Georgia, it costs something to even get a drink of water, especially around the homeless shelter and anywhere in the suburbs regardless. Places like food banks require almost as much paperwork as getting food stamps. In this case, neither one was nearby and would have required a walk of a little more than seven miles to get there. The food stamps do have an “emergency” option but in the state of Georgia, the only way to apply is to first go to the department of family and children services with all the correct paperwork, fill out the forms, wait over three hours for the attendant to see you and then come back several weeks later for the actual appointment with all the same paperwork plus the other paperwork and records they tell you to bring. And then, at some point you might get some food stamps but now that they are on a card, it has to be sent to your residence and then the pin number comes separately. Without a place to live, maybe they let you come pick it up there or something. I don’t know because I didn’t have the right paperwork in the first place at that point.

My understanding is that this is the way it was set up to discourage people from getting food stamps or use the food banks to support their basic sustenance. I have found since that many of those moneys that are being given for these things are being diverted to other causes, particularly to influence policy and fund campaigns, for excessive administrative costs, sometimes being sent through places like the department of family and children services or the United Way to be distributed which often don’t distribute them in practice using the funds instead for administrative costs, pet projects, and employee workshops in nice places.

Often, apparently since the Reagan years, much of this money has been sent to underwrite conservative organizations to promote their policies, ideas, agendas, desires, press and political campaigns, and themselves while getting the lion’s share of any and all charitable moneys available. I noticed that where one foundation had given over eight hundred thousand dollars to the Heritage Foundation, for instance, they had given all of $2,000 to Meals on Wheels. That doesn’t even begin to make sense to me. There were pages and pages of huge blocks of charitable money from many different sources going to support these policy making white collar businesses that sponsored nothing of value while promoting the ideology of those supporting it. On the same lists, near the bottom in values of less than $5,000 but most commonly $2,000 or less, were the kinds of community organizations where some actual help might get to someone.

Many of the foundations that gave the most to places like and including the Heritage Foundation, gave the $1,000 or even $100 sort of donation to Meals on Wheels and none to the food banks. Many also gave tens of thousands of dollars for organizations that would support attorneys to focus their attention on promoting the “conservative or theological” dogma applied to our laws, Usually these applications are exclusionary and promote a very narrow view of the application of the law to fit their dogma specifically at the cost of all else which it was intended to do.

It is apparently these same policy makers that have deemed all poverty be served by “faith-based” and charitable organizations in the community and at the same time, robbed those funds to support their own policy making organizations and the promotion of their ideologies. So, there isn’t money in the community for those who are homeless to be helped with getting jobs, getting an apartment once they can pay for it, having a clean shelter to stay in while they are temporarily without a home, feeding the poor, the children, the families, the single mothers, the elderly or the individuals that have found themselves in difficult straits.

And, there aren’t programs in the community receiving moneys in the same proportion as those fund-raising campaigns lead anyone and everyone to believe. It looks like the only people that are really being served are those administrators and staff members that are working at the organizations with good salaries and benefits, their opportunities to attend conventions, workshops and seminars at wonderful luxurious places and the new facilities buildings where they work which always seem to have money to be updated, rebuilt, remodeled, refurnished, redecorated or built brand new one more time.

-cricketdiane, 03-18-09

***

On CNN, Wolf Blitzer, 5.40 P.m., 03-18-09 with Chris Dodd –

I think Chris Dodd just said that Baucus and others on the Senate Committee were currently constructing language that will make it impossible to “clawback” from banks across the country (meaning bonuses, perks, benefits and compensation packages, including salaries.)

Now, either that was what he meant to say, in which case someone needs to look into what they are doing to protect the interests of these executives, bankers and “financial engineers” or he mis-spoke and intended to say something else, which needs to be corrected.

The chances are very good, however, that under the circumstances, he spoke the truth about it and that Baucus and others in the Senate committees who can – are writing legislation to protect the interests of their friends.

– cricketdiane, 03-18-09

The American public are capable of changing their insurance coverage and other assets out of AIG’s hands to essentially boycott and sanction them or any other company that is engaging in the same poor choices. At some point they will do this – it is just a matter of time. Do the AIG companies have any way of isolating the financial group away from their company?

It is also easy enough to find out every last individual working for this company, if and when the Congressional members choose to do so. Both in the information publicly published about the company and government employment, social security and IRS records, as well as certain SEC records, every individual in question has a known identity, including those who have already received excessive compensation and “retention bonuses”.

Chris Dodd just mentioned that Senate member Baucus and others are constructing protection for the bankers and executives to make “clawbacks” impossible – did he speak the truth of it? – US / Global Economic Crisis

**
by the way –
doesn’t the fact that the Federal Reserve is about to print $1.5 Trillion dollars plus whatever they were already going to add into the system, (maybe around another half a trillion dollars) mean something really bad happens when it floods the marketplace over the next nine months? And, does it mean the foreign interests are not going to underwrite our new debt after all? Or what?

cricketdiane

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/

***

Dead US Companies:
http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1884100_1854539,00.html

US Unemployment:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/03/03/us/20090303_LEONHARDT.html?hp

Unemployment rate in china:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/17/AR2009021702769_pf.html

Unrelated links:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29681527/?GT1=43001
http://singularity.com/images/charts/SuperComputers.jpg

***

***
All of the members of the financial derivatives group at AIG, Lehman Brothers, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Citigroup, Merrill Lynch and others perpetrated fraud when they sold insurance against credit defaults without the necessary funds to back the possibility of default. If it had been me or you or any of the rest of us, we would be in jail – not sitting in the lap of luxury continuing to have access to compensation given to us while we perpetrated that fraud. Why is it any different for those in these companies who have created this monstrous economic disaster?

It doesn’t even matter if they have friends in high places, because sooner or later it will occur to somebody up there in Washington and in Wall Street and among the bankers, that it will never be possible for them and their friends to buy all of what we would have bought, pay all the taxes we would have paid and purchase all the cars that would have been ours to drive.

Could they even now, provide the sales of ten million cars / vehicles that give General Motors its break-even point? Could they purchase all of the Chrysler and Ford vehicles, buy all the clothing and assorted products we would have bought, pay all the sales and income taxes we could have paid, and kept entire malls, office buildings and banks in business? Nope, they can’t do it and in spite of having damn near all of the money that everyone would have made, there isn’t the ability among all of them to do with those moneys any of the things that we would have done.

Sooner or later, they are going to realize they were riding on our backs all along and without us, none of the companies are worth anything, no matter what handstands they do using financial products, investment portfolios and exotic credit derivatives. I have heard on the news everyday as the Republicans and “conservatives” have called for all of us to spend. And, each time I am reminded that they had no use for us. They said we had taken on debts for homes we couldn’t afford and deserved to be out in the street. They want to support only the interests of their friends and those that serve companies which promote their interests.

Its like one happy little party that uses the rest of us to their benefit but excludes us from any and all participation excepting where it benefits them. Let them spend our money that lines their pockets to pay the taxes we would have paid, buy the cars, homes and products we would have bought, cover the property renovations that we would have made, create the small businesses and employment opportunities and innovations we would have created and generally cover every last thing we would have done, if it weren’t for the fact that they have the money that would have been available to each of us.

It never ceases to amaze me how many “experts” and financial / economic “experts” and “advisors” come on the news in every show and on every station which say that whatever the numbers are saying, “it really doesn’t mean that.” Are they delusional or do they think we are all that stupid? How dare they try to continue to perpetrate the same fraud of the same dimensions that they have been running on us all this time. Even a year ago, it was evident to me and I don’t have a degree in this, that there were and there continue to be critical fractures in the fundamentals of our economy. For anyone to get airtime at this point saying these numbers don’t mean what is evident in them, is just plain wrong.

Last year, even after anyone with the most rudimentary understanding of the situation could tell there was a serious problem, the news casts continued to parade expert after expert claiming that there was no problem and if anything, it would all sort itself out, that the fundamentals were strong, we had already reached a bottom and it would be a slight contraction, if at all. They had to know better because I knew better and it was easy to see such that any eight year old in America also knew even in February a year ago.

The financial stability forum had already identified the problem over the course of some time but most American families actually living with both feet in this country already knew the fundamentals of our economy were in danger. But, that didn’t stop the parade of “experts” who make a ton of money each by stealing our nation’s prosperity and being paid to tell us that everything was actually fine and that it would all be fine regardless of what we might think about it. If that is not propaganda and lies, then what is it? And, then to still today, with what all we do know, to keep doing that? What is it that could possibly begin to cause that? Who in their right mind would give them airtime?

Then, for the same people to tell us that we need to be going out and spend our money so that their stock portfolios will improve? Are they ever going to see that there is a problem and when each of the rest of us in America is experiencing the severity of that problem, are they going to make up the difference? They are obviously not going to fix it because they don’t want to do that. The only thing I have seen anyone from Congress, Wall Street, banks, investment banks, investment brokerages, traders, CEOs, executives, hedge fund managers and financial derivatives manipulators do so far, is to lie to us, steal from our futures, take money that doesn’t belong to them from our tax contributions which would’ve been used for other things, propagate a game of lies, fraud, gambling and leverage, promote more lies about that and influence legislators to cover their asses while making absurd profits at our expense.

At least they are consistent. Free market capitalism works for them as long as it stays in a textbook apparently, because when it comes down to it, every one of these individuals and businesses has survived only because of our subsidies, taxbreaks and incentives to them, by our covering their operating costs and all of their liabilities while they took and continue to partake of all the profits without giving anything back to anyone or anything. That hasn’t been free market capitalism for a long time and it sure as hell isn’t close to capitalism even today. What it is clearly and completely, is subsidized gambling with other people’s money and excessive unhealthy greed, jealousy and derision for the common man and our common heritage as a free nation. The only freedom that is allowed through their application of it, exists for them and no one else while being pursued at the expense of everyone else. The only real “skin in the game” that any of these jackasses have is having to go out on a limb and decide which Armani suit to wear today.

– written by cricketdiane, 03-18-09

***

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=18

Recipients of grants from Roe Foundation

Funders and recipients who share official people with Roe Foundation
Financials*
year: 2006
asts: $ 38,553,402
rev: $ 3,482,573
exp: $ 2,043,932
grnts pd: $ 1,698,000

show 8+ years | graph | w/o assets | pastable data
year: 2005
asts: $ 35,977,443
rev: $ 2,975,732
exp: $ 1,738,859
grnts pd: $ 1,398,000

year: 2004
asts: $ 34,880,347
rev: $ 3,327,458
exp: $ 1,702,014
grnts pd: $ 1,346,000

year: 2003
asts: $ 32,725,094
rev: $ 469,624
exp: $ 1,394,127
grnts pd: $ 1,128,500

year: 2002
asts: $ 28,186,591
rev: $ 2,306,372
exp: $ 1,408,819
grnts pd: $ 1,143,000

year: 2001
asts: $ 30,536,736
rev: $ 7,551,583
exp: $ 1,221,229
grnts pd: $ 1,017,093

year: 2000
asts: $ 25,366,932
rev: $ 2,950,276
exp: $ 1,182,467
grnts pd: $ 985,000

year: 1999
asts: $ 25,819,761
rev: $ 2,802,102
exp: $ 1,188,719
grnts pd: $ 972,886

year: 1998
asts: $ 23,872,395
rev: $ 3,041,641
exp: $ 972,814
grnts pd: $ 787,950

* All from IRS 990 PF. Assets = line I; Revenue = line 12; Expenses = line 26; Grants paid = line 25.
Internal Links

FUNDER PROFILE
Roe Foundation

ein: 23-7011541

5 institutional roles for $2,000

301 N. Main Street
Greenville, SC 29601
RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Roe Foundation

301 N. Main Street
Greenville, SC 29601

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

Total contributed: $ 10,491,429
Name Total
Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund 886,700
Heritage Foundation, The 831,000
South Carolina Policy Council 661,000
State Policy Network 640,000
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 455,000
Evergreen Freedom Foundation 235,000
Mackinac Center for Public Policy 225,000
Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) 220,000
Miracle Hill Ministries 219,800
Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions 190,000
Atlas Economic Research Foundation 187,500
Cascade Policy Institute 180,000
Indiana Policy Review Foundation 171,000
James Madison Institute 170,000
Reason Foundation 165,000
John Locke Foundation 155,000
Goldwater Institute 137,500
Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs 135,000
Independence Institute 127,500
Greenville Symphony Association 120,000
Wisconsin Policy Research Institute, Inc. 116,000
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc. 115,000
Beacon Hill Institute 112,500
Christ Church Episcopal School 110,000
Center for Education Reform 108,000
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy 106,000
Texas Public Policy Foundation 97,000
Center of the American Experiment 95,000
Capital Research Center 90,000
Sutherland Institute 90,000
Virginia Institute for Public Policy 90,000
Mont Pelerin Society, The 85,000
Nevada Policy Research Institute 85,000
Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship 83,500
Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy 83,500
Thomas Jefferson Institute for Public Policy 83,000
Philadelphia Society, The 82,000
Institute for Justice 80,000
American College of Building Arts 80,000
Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives 78,000
Maryland Public Policy Institute 75,000
Yankee Institute 72,500
Competitive Enterprise Institute 60,000
Foundation Francisco Marroquin 60,000
Mississippi Center for Public Policy 55,000
Peace Center for the Performing Arts 55,000
Ethan Allen Institute 50,000
Rio Grande Foundation 50,000
America’s Future Foundation 47,500
Washington Policy Center 47,500
Georgia Public Policy Foundation 45,000
Tax Foundation 45,000
Carolina Ballet Theatre 42,500
Piedmont Women’s Center 41,000
Galen Institute, Inc. 40,000
Maine Public Policy Institute 40,000
Acton Institute For The Study of Religion and Liberty 40,000
Consumer Alert 40,000
Center for Policy Research of New Jersey 40,000
Allegheny Institute for Public Policy 39,000
Heartland Institute 39,000
Foundation for Economic Education 37,500
Cato Institute 37,500
Bluegrass Institute 35,000
Mercatus Center 35,000
North Greenville University 33,886
Washington Institute Foundation 32,500
George Mason University 32,500
Furman University 32,000
Maine Heritage Policy Center 30,000
Hidden Treasure Christian School 30,000
Americans for Tax Reform Foundation 30,000
Illinois Policy Institute 30,000
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 28,000
Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research 27,000
Greenville Literacy Association 25,000
Boys Home of the South 25,000
Donors Trust 25,000
Texas Justice Foundation 25,000
South Carolina Children’s Theatre 24,500
Cancer Society of Greenville County 24,000
Alabama Family Alliance 23,500
Institute for Policy Innovation 23,500
Philanthropy Roundtable 23,000
Flint Hills Center For Public Policy 22,500
Clemson University 22,500
Independent Women’s Forum 22,500
Calvert Institute for Policy Research 22,500
Toward Tradition 22,500
Landmark Legal Foundation 20,000
Tennessee Family Institute 20,000
Kansas Public Policy Institute 20,000
Leadership Institute 20,000
Center for Civic Renewal 20,000
Grassroot Institute of Hawaii 20,000
Institute for Humane Studies 19,500
Foundation for Teaching Economics 19,500
Alabama Policy Institute 19,000
Mississippi Family Council 19,000
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. 18,500
Greenville Council of Garden Clubs 18,250
Arkansas Policy Foundation 17,500
Great Plains Public Policy Institute 17,500
Ethics and Public Policy Center, Inc. 17,500
American Legislative Exchange Council 17,500
Tennessee Institute for Public Policy 17,500
Museum Association, Inc. 16,500
Fund For American Studies, The 16,000
Defenders of Property Rights 13,500
National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation 13,500
Constitutional Heritage Foundation 12,500
Institute of Economic Affairs 12,500
National Center for Policy Analysis 11,500
Media Research Center, Inc. 11,500
Great Plains Institute 10,000
Salvation Army of Greenville County, The 10,000
YMCA-Cleveland Street Family 10,000
Empire Center for State Policy 10,000
National Defense Council Foundation 9,000
National Taxpayers Union Foundation 9,000
U.S. ENGLISH Foundation 8,000
Freestate Center for Liberty Studies 7,500
Frontiers of Freedom Institute 7,500
Niobrara Institute 7,500
Pacific Legal Foundation 7,000
St. Croix Review 6,000
Loaves and Fishes 5,500
Freedom and Prosperity Foundation 5,000
Kansas Policy Research Institute 5,000
Bob Jones University 5,000
Sirnne 2000 5,000
Carolina Youth Symphony 5,000
Center for Market Processes, Inc 5,000
Mountain States Legal Foundation 5,000
Washington Institute for Policy Studies 5,000
Charity Ball Board of Greenville 5,000
Roe Foundation Unknown Grantee 5,000
New Mexico Independence Research Institute 5,000
George Mason University (Arlington) 5,000
Southeastern Legal Foundation, Inc. 4,500
Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) 4,000
South Carolina State Firemen’s Association 4,000
Warehouse Theatre 3,500
Centre Stage South Carolina 3,500
National Journalism Center, The 3,500
South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts 3,000
Western Journalism Center 3,000
Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, Inc. 3,000
National Center for Public Policy Research, Inc. 3,000
Center for Individual Rights 3,000
Family Research Council, Inc. 3,000
Foundation for Research on Economics 3,000
Alexis de Tocqueville Institution 3,000
Meyer Center 2,500
Greenville Women’s Club 2,500
St. John’s Academy 2,500
Salvation Army 2,500
Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute 2,500
Prosperity Institute 2,500
Henry Hazlitt Foundation 2,500
Episcopal Church Home for Children 2,500
Foundation Management Institute 2,500
Education & Research Institute 2,500
Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation 2,000
Meals on Wheels 2,000
International Foundation for Research in Experimental Economics 2,000
American Alternative Foundation, Inc. 2,000
Women’s Freedom Network 2,000
Association of Small Foundations 2,000
Governor’s School for the Arts 1,500
Rockford Institute 1,000
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 1,000
Center for Security Policy, Inc. 1,000
Center for Independent Studies 1,000
Jesse Helms Center Foundation 1,000
A Child’s Haven 1,000
Americans for Prosperity Foundation 1,000
Of the People Foundation 1,000
Pioneer Institute, Inc. 1,000
Institute for Economic Studies Europe 1,000
Liberalni Institut 1,000
Public Service Research Foundation 1,000
Meyer Center for Special Children 1,000
Public Interest Institute 1,000
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society 1,000
American Conservative Union Foundation, The 1,000
American Spectator Foundation, Inc. 1,000
Bill of Rights Institute 1,000
Judicial Watch 1,000
High Frontier 1,000
Episcopalians United 1,000
FreedomWorks Foundation 1,000
Christ Church 593
Second Presbyterian Church 100
Institute for Health Freedom 100

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=18

**
Internal Links

3,493,480 to the Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives

RECIPIENT PROFILE
Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives

3544 N. Progress Ave, Ste. 101
Harrisburg, PA 17110

Conservative state think tank.

Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives 78,000 (from Roe Foundation)

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientprofile.php?recipientID=78

***

Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives is an independent, non-profit research and educational institute based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The foundation develops and advances public policies based on the nation’s founding principles of limited constitutional government, economic freedom, and personal responsibility for one’s actions.

The Commonwealth Foundation’s research and educational efforts are firmly established on several core values that form the basis of a “civil society.” The activities of the Foundation are therefore committed to:

* Respecting and protecting the lives and property of others.
* Recognizing the inseparability of personal and economic freedom.
* Upholding personal responsibility and accountability for one’s actions.
* Challenging the general perception that government intervention is the most appropriate most efficient means of solving societal problems.
* Demonstrating the power of private institutions—both for-profit and non-profit—to create a good and civil society.
* Promoting the use of economic reasoning to understand a world of scarcity, trade-offs, and the unseen consequences of governmental solutions to societal problems.

The Commonwealth Foundation is also the sponsor of THE BOX: Inside • Outside • On, a weekly, talk-radio program.

External links

* Commonwealth Foundation
* THE BOX

Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_Foundation_for_Public_Policy_Alternatives
Categories: Think tanks | Think tanks based in the United States | Political and economic think tanks in the United States | Organizations based in Pennsylvania | Non-profit organizations based in the United States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_Foundation_for_Public_Policy_Alternatives

Commonwealth Foundation current relationships:
Sarah Scaife Foundation – donor
http://www.muckety.com/Commonwealth-Foundation/5056009.muckety

Tuesday, January 1, 2008
Board of Directors

Mr. Michael W. Gleba (Chairman)
Mr. Matthew J. Brouillette (President & CEO)
Mr. John J. Soroko (Treasurer)
Mr. Richard E. Harper (Secretary)
Mr. T. William Boxx
Hon. William W. Scranton III
Hon. Patrick J. Toomey
Mr. Frederick W. Anton III
Mr. Glen Meakem
Dr. William C. Dunkelberg

http://www.commonwealthfoundation.org/mission/board

Friends of Commonwealth Foundation

Pennsylvania Links

* The Allegheny Institute
* Center for Vision & Values | Grove City College
* Keystone Teachers Association
* The Lincoln Institute
* National Federation of Independent Business-PA Chapter
* Pennsylvania Family Institute
* Pennsylvania Free Enterprise Week
* Pennsylvanians for Right to Work
* Pennsylvania Manufacturers’ Association
* The REACH Alliance
* Young Conservatives of Pennsylvania

State Links

* Alabama Policy Institute
* Arkansas Policy Foundation
* Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions
* Cascade Policy Institute
* Center for the American Experiment
* Empire Center for New York State Policy
* Evergreen Freedom Foundation
* Flint Hills Center for Public Policy
* Georgia Public Policy Foundation
* Goldwater Institute
* Independence Institute
* Indiana Policy Review Foundation
* John Locke Foundation
* Mackinac Center for Public Policy
* Maryland Public Policy Institute
* Nevada Policy Research Institute
* Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, Inc.
* Pioneer Institute
* Rio Grande Foundation
* South Carolina Policy Council
* Texas Public Policy Foundation
* Virginia Institute for Public Policy
* Washington Policy Center
* Yankee Institute for Public Policy Studies
* State Policy Network

National/International Links

* Acton Institute for Religion and Liberty
* American Academy for Liberal Education
* American Enterprise Institute
* Americans for Tax Reform
* American Legislative Exchange Council
* Association of American Educators
* Atlas Economic Research Foundation
* Atlantic Legal Foundation
* Beacon Hill Institute for Public Policy Research
* Brookings Institution
* Cato Institute
* Club for Growth
* Education Policy Institute
* Employment Policy Foundation
* Competitive Enterprise Institute
* Thomas B. Fordham Foundation
* Foundation for Economic Education
* Foundation for Individual Rights in Education
* Milton & Rose Friedman Foundation
* Heartland Institute
* Heritage Foundation
* Home School Legal Defense Association
* Hoover Institution
* Hudson Institute
* Independent Institute
* Institute of Public Affairs
* Institute for Justice
* Landmark Legal Foundation
* Lexington Institute
* Ludwig von Mises Institute
* Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
* Mercatus Center
* National Center for Policy Analysis
* National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation
* Pacific Research Institute
* Political Economy Research Center (PERC)
* Progress and Freedom Foundation
* Public Service Research Foundation
* RAND
* Reason Public Policy Institute
* Separation of School and State Alliance
* ShowMeTheSpending.com
* SocialSecurityChoice.org

http://www.commonwealthfoundation.org/mission/friends-commonwealth-foundation

***
ALL IN ONE SEARCH RESULTS

SEARCH TERM: Koch
[permalink]
Profile of Person People

David A. Koch
Charles G. Koch
Elizabeth B. Koch
Elizabeth R. Koch
Charles C. Koch
David H. Koch
Michael Koch
Funders*

Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation
Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation
Recipients

Fred C. & Mary R. Koch Foundation
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation
Citizens for America Educational Foundation
LSB Leakey Foundation for Research Related to Man’s Origin
Educational Research Institute
Institute for Justice
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation
Cato Institute
Acton Institute For The Study of Religion and Liberty
Original MT Report Original Research

Patron saints of right wing think tanks acquire Georgia Pacific Corp
The Apparat
The Powell Manifesto
Philanthropy the Wal-Mart way
Dudley Do-Wrong of George Mason University
One year later, conservatives still cashing in on Terri Schiavo
Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Category 5 Gore bashing
Conservative Philanthropy pages

The Strategic Philanthropy of Conservative Foundations
Religious Sector Organizations
Around the Web

Sam Brownback’s Blind Ambition Tour
Paper Maker Georgia-Pacific to Be Sold to Koch
Who’s Really Addicted to Oil?
In the three days between Koch’s board approving a bid to purchase Georgia Pacific and the announcement, trading on GP increased 120 percent
Oil Price Manipulation?
The Dark Side of Texas: Corpus Christi’s Koch Industries
The Racist Roots of the Anti-Immigration Movement
Grants

Found 1 grants containing the phrase Koch
For a total of $50,000

Date Amount Purpose Recipient Funder
7-1-1992 50,000 Humane Studies Foundation
’92/’93 Charles Koch Fellowship George Mason University Foundation, Inc. Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation

http://www.mediatransparency.org/allinonesearchresults.php

***
ALL IN ONE SEARCH RESULTS

SEARCH TERM: Scaife
[permalink]
Profile of Person People

Richard M. Scaife
Margaret R. Scaife
Jennie K. Scaife
Ann Coulter
David Horowitz
Frank Luntz
Don E. Eberly
Mara Liasson
William E. Simon
Edwin J. Feulner Jr.
Joanne B. Beyer
William L. Armstrong
Allan H. Meltzer
R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr.
Michael Horowitz
Cliff Kincaid
Funders*

Scaife Family Foundation
Sarah Scaife Foundation
The Carthage Foundation
Allegheny Foundation
The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Inc.
Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation
John M. Olin Foundation, Inc.
Recipients

Center for Individual Rights
Heritage Foundation, The
National Association of Scholars, Inc.
Institute for Educational Affairs
Madison Center for Educational Affairs
Judicial Watch
Animal Rescue League of Western Pennsylvania, Inc., The
Beginning With Books, Inc.
Braille Club of Palm Beach County, Inc.
Chartiers Nature Conservancy, Inc.
Covenant Presbyterian Church
Girls Hope of Pittsburgh, Inc.
Glade Run Foundation
Gwen’s Montessori School, Inc.
Hosanna Industries, Inc.
Komen, Susan G. Foundation, Inc.
Louise Child Care Center
Magee-Women’s Health Foundation
Mountain Maternal Health League Planned Parenthood
National Center for Victims of Crime, The
North County Humane Society
North Side Christian Health Center
Orr, William and Mildred Compassionate Care Center
Paws With a Cause
Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Foundation
Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania, Inc.
Puppies Behind Bars, Inc.
Riverview Children’s Center
Women’s Shelter of Lawrence County
Institute for Justice
Center for Neighborhood Enterprise
Evergreen Freedom Foundation
Collegiate Network, Inc.
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc.
Philanthropy Roundtable
American Civil Rights Institute
David Horowitz Freedom Center
Ethics and Public Policy Center, Inc.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Maldon Institute, Inc.
American Spectator Foundation, Inc.
Of the People Foundation
Whidbey Island Films
Institute on Religion and Democracy, Inc.
Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Inc.
Heartland Institute
Original MT Report Original Research

Church & Scaife
IRD/Good News: How the right wing targets United Methodist women
Global warming ‘skeptics’ conference enabled by conservative philanthropy
Neoconning the Media
The Corporate/Think Tank Complex
Corporate captives
The Apparat
Simon Said
Failing the Perception Test
The Conservative Cabal That’s Transforming American Law
David Horowitz’s Campus Jihads
The Capital Research Center at 20
Team Schiavo’s Deep Pockets
Tom DeLay’s Right Arm
The Parents Television Council
Philanthropy the Wal-Mart way
Neocon Catholics target mainline Protestants
Santorum leads ousted Republicans’ move back to conservative philanthropy supported think tanks
Institute on Religion and Democracy slams ‘Leftist’ National Council of Churches
Neocon Catholic leaders nurtured by GOP and Conservative Philanthropy on their heels
The PBS Home Team
How The Conservative Philanthropies, C. Boyden Gray, and the Law and Economics Movement Nearly Sank the Federal Regulatory State
The Conservative Movement Moves In
The Powell Manifesto
Milwaukee Genesis
Commentary: ‘American Experiment’ gets free ride from uncritical media
At 60, the United Nations is still taking fire
Hudson Institute: Home of the indicted and the exposed
One year later, conservatives still cashing in on Terri Schiavo
Daniel Lapin: The Right’s favorite Rabbi
Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Category 5 Gore bashing
Center for the Study of Popular Culture becomes David Horowitz Freedom Center
Pacific Legal Foundation is on the wrong side of history
Ward Connerly’s anti-affirmative action jihad
Spooked by MoveOn.org, conservative movement seeks to emulate liberal powerhouse
American Enterprise Institute takes lead in agitating against Iran
Philip Anschutz: Transforming the culture one Hollywood blockbuster at a time
The Heritage Foundation at 35
Floyd Brown and David Bossie: Back in the Swift Boat captain’s chairs
Issues

Arkansas Project
Conservative Philanthropy pages

The Strategic Philanthropy of Conservative Foundations
National Think Tanks and Advocacy Groups
Media Groups
Philanthropic Institutions and Networks
Targeting the Academy
Around the Web

40 Years of Character
Potential Bombshell:
The American Spectator’s funny money
The Truth Behind The Shove It Incident: Colin McNickle is a Scaife Hatchet Man
A Party Inverted
Richard Poe’s Not-So-Secret War
The End of News?
Cliff Kincaid
The Demons of David Horowitz
Private Dick
Joe Lieberman gets Richard Mellon Scaife political contribution
When False Equivalency Distorts the News
As Clinton Runs, Some Old Foes Stay on Sideline
GOP Floating Ted Olson, Head of 1990s Anti-Clinton ‘Arkansas Project,’ for AG
Scaife-Owned Newspaper Calls for Iraq Troop Withdrawal — Questions Bush’s ‘Mental Stability’
Scaife’s Wife Gets Giant Settlement After Messy Divorce — Claims Newspaper is ‘Hobby’
Judicial Watch Suing Freedom’s Watch
Low Road to Splitsville
Scaife-funded ‘Bipartisan’ Think Tank Attacks Democrats
Far Right Political Funder Scaife Enthusiastic About Clinton
The Radical Right Assault on Mainline Protestantism and the National Council of Churches of Christ
Rev. John Thomas, President of the United Church of Christ, Denounces IRD Attacks on Churches
New IRD President Is a Schismatic Presbyterian
The Battle for the Mainline Churches
Liberal Denomination Fires Salvos at Right
Mpls Star Tribune debases itself with Republican columnist
Grants

Found 5 grants containing the phrase Scaife
For a total of $1,232,875

Date Amount Purpose Recipient Funder
1-1-1991 700,000 MEDICINE
RENOVATION OF SCAIFE HALL University of Pittsburgh Scaife Family Foundation
1-1-1990 300,000 MEDICINE
RENOVATION OF SCAIFE HALL University of Pittsburgh Scaife Family Foundation
1-1-1989 20,000 Renovation and repair of Scaife building Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Scaife Family Foundation
1-1-1989 200,000 School of Medicine
Renovation of Scaife Hall University of Pittsburgh Scaife Family Foundation
1-1-1985 12,875 Refurbishment of Scaife Gallery Lounge Carnegie Institute Scaife Family Foundation

http://www.mediatransparency.org/allinonesearchresults.php

***
ALL IN ONE SEARCH RESULTS

SEARCH TERM: Coors
[permalink]
Profile of Person People

Holland H. Coors
William K. Coors
Peter H. Coors
Jeffrey H. Coors
Melissa Coors Osborn
Cecily Coors Garnsey
Paul M. Weyrich
William L. Armstrong
Funders*

Castle Rock Foundation
Recipients

Adolph Coors Medical Research Foundation
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc.
Heritage Foundation, The
National Association of Scholars, Inc.
American Legislative Exchange Council
Leadership Institute
Consumer Alert
Heartland Institute
Original MT Report Original Research

Global warming ‘skeptics’ conference enabled by conservative philanthropy
Institute on Religion and Democracy slams ‘Leftist’ National Council of Churches
Spooked by MoveOn.org, conservative movement seeks to emulate liberal powerhouse
Neoconning the Media
The Apparat
Simon Said
The Powell Manifesto
David Horowitz’s Campus Jihads
Team Schiavo’s Deep Pockets
IRD/Good News: How the right wing targets United Methodist women
Neocon Catholics target mainline Protestants
Pacific Legal Foundation is on the wrong side of history
Tom Tancredo’s mission
Ward Connerly’s anti-affirmative action jihad
PERC receives Templeton Freedom Award for promoting ‘enviropreneurs’
Philip Anschutz: Transforming the culture one Hollywood blockbuster at a time
The Heritage Foundation at 35
Grants

Found 4 grants containing the phrase Coors
For a total of $595,000

Date Amount Purpose Recipient Funder
1-1-1997 580,000 Endowment of the Holland Coors Chair Academy Research and Development Institute Castle Rock Foundation
1-1-1997 5,000 Holly Coors 1997 membership Council for National Policy Castle Rock Foundation
1-1-1996 5,000 Holly Coors’ 1996 membership Council for National Policy Castle Rock Foundation
1-1-1995 5,000 General operating/Holly Coors’ membership Council for National Policy Castle Rock Foundation

http://www.mediatransparency.org/allinonesearchresults.php

***
Richard H. Fink
Richard H. Fink current relationships:
Americans for Prosperity Foundation – director
Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation – president & director
Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation – president & director
George Mason University – board of visitors member
Institute for Humane Studies – director
Koch Industries – EVP & director
Mercatus Center – co-founder & director

http://www.muckety.com/Richard-H-Fink/142688.muckety

***
CONSERVATIVE PHILANTHROPY
The Strategic Philanthropy of Conservative Foundations
Moving a Public Policy Agenda

From a 1997 report by the National Committee on Responsive Philanthropy

For more than three decades, conservative strategists have mounted an extraordinary effort to reshape politics and public policy priorities at the national, state and local level. Although this effort has often been described as a war of ideas, it has involved far more than scholarly debate within the halls of academe.

Indeed, waging the war of ideas has required the development of a vast and interconnected institutional apparatus. Since the 1960s, conservative forces have shaped public consciousness and influenced elite opinion, recruited and trained new leaders, mobilized core constituencies, and applied significant rightward pressure on mainstream institutions, such as Congress, state legislatures, colleges and universities, the federal judiciary and philanthropy itself.

Thirteen years ago, this apparatus was appropriately described by moderate Republican and author John Saloma as the new conservative labyrinth. At the time he wrote, Saloma was warning that this labyrinth constituted a major new presence in American politics. If left unchecked, Saloma predicted, it would continue to pull the nation’s political center sharply to the right.

His analysis was prescient. Today, the conservative labyrinth is larger, more sophisticated, and increasingly able to influence what gets on – and what stays off – the public policy agenda. From the decision to abandon the federal guarantee of cash assistance to the poor to on-going debates about the federal tax structure to growing discussion of medical savings accounts and the privatization of social security, conservative policy ideas and political rhetoric continue to dominate the nation’s political conversation, reflecting what political scientist Walter Dean Burnham has called the hegemony of market theology.

In a major research report, the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (NCRP) documented the role that conservative foundations have played in developing and sustaining America’s conservative labyrinth. It offers an aggregate accounting and detailed analysis of the 1992-1994 grantmaking of 12 core conservative foundations, the results of which confirm what has been reported in more anecdotal terms: that conservative foundations have invested sizable resources to create and sustain an infrastructure of policy, advocacy and training institutions committed to the achievement of conservative policy goals.

In just a three-year period, the 12 foundations awarded $210 million to support a wide array of conservative projects and institutions. It is not simply the volume of money being invested that merits serious attention, but the way in which these investments have helped to build the power and influence of the conservative policy movement. These 12 funders directed a majority of their grants to organizations and programs that pursue an overtly ideological agenda based on industrial and environmental deregulation, the privatization of government services, deep reductions in federal anti-poverty spending and the transfer of authority and responsibility for social welfare from the national government to the charitable sector and state and local government. Unlike many nonprofits which feel the dual pressure to demonstrate their uniqueness to funders and to downplay their ideology and public policy advocacy, conservative grantees are rewarded for their shared political vision and public policy activism. They are heavily supported to market policy ideas, cultivate public leadership, lobby policy makers, and build their constituency base.
Conservative Foundation Grants
A Summary

In a presentation at the Philanthropy Roundtable’s 1995 annual conference, Richard Fink, president of the Charles G. Koch and Claude R. Lambe charitable foundations, made good use of market metaphors to outline how foundations can exert the greatest impact on public policy. Adapting laissez-faire economist Friedreich Hayek’s model of the production process to social change grant-making, Fink argued that the translation of ideas into action requires the development of intellectual raw materials, their conversion into specific policy products, and the marketing and distribution of these products to citizen-consumers.

Grantmakers, Fink argued, would do well to invest in change along the entire production continuum, funding scholars and university programs where the intellectual framework for social transformation is developed, think tanks where scholarly ideas get translated into specific policy proposals, and implementation groups to bring these proposals into the political marketplace and eventually to consumers.

Over the past two decades, conservative foundations have broadly followed such a model, investing hundreds of millions of dollars in a cross-section of institutions dedicated to conservative political and policy change. This [web site] examines 12 of these foundations. They include:

* Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation
* Carthage Foundation
* Earhart Foundation
* Charles G.Koch, David H. Koch and Claude R. Lambe charitable foundations
* Phillip M. McKenna Foundation
* J.M. Foundation
* John M. Olin Foundation
* Henry Salvatori Foundation
* Sarah Scaife Foundation
* Smith Richardson Foundation

In 1994 these foundations controlled over $1 billion in assets [Editor’s note: By 2000, the philanthropies had given away at least $1 billion since 1985, according to the Media Transparency grants database], awarded $300 million in grants, and targeted $210 million to support conservative policy and institutional reform objectives.

The money was targeted at the following areas:

* Conservative scholarship programs, training the next generation of conservative thinkers and activists and reverse progressive curricula and policy trends on the nation’s college and university campuses.
* Build and strengthen a national infrastructure of think tanks and advocacy groups, much to institutions with a major focus on domestic policy issues, and to institutes focused on American national security interests, foreign policy and global affairs.
* Finance alternative media outlets, media watchdog groups,and public television and radio for specific, issue-oriented public affairs or news reporting.
* Assist conservative pro-market law firms and other law-related projects and organizations.
* Support a network of regional and state-based think tanks and advocacy institutions. Work to transform the social views and giving practices of the nation’s religious and philanthropic leaders.

While the size of these foundations’ grantmaking programs may pale in comparison to some of the nation’s largest foundations, these funders have contributed in significant ways to the rightward shift in the nation’s political conversation and public policy priorities. Several factors account for their effectiveness:

* 1) First, these foundations bring a clarity of vision and strong political intention to their grantmaking programs. The grants data themselves, as well as public information gathered on the missions and program activities of major grantees, reveal the willingness of these foundations to fund agressive and entrepreneurial organizations committed to advancing the basic tenets of modern American conservatism: uregulated markets and limited government.
* 2) Second, conservative grantmaking has focused on building strong institutionsacross almost every major strategic sector of America. The analysis of grants reveals that these foundations have provided substantial general operating rather than project-specific support to a variety of institutions. Almost half of all non-academic grant dollars to think tanks, advocacy organizations, media outlets, and other groups with a public policy or institutional reform orientation was awarded on an unrestricted basis.
* 3) Third, the foundations have recognized that federal budget priorities and policy decisions exert such significant impact on the issues and concerns at the state, local and neighborhood level that the national policy framework cannot be ignored. They thus invested substantial resources in think tanks and advocacy organizations with a major focus on national policy and the capacity to reach a broad national audience. Also, the foundations concentrated their grant resources, as just 18 percent of the grantees received over 75 percent of grant dollars awarded.
* 4) Fourth, the foundations have invested heavily in institutions and projects geared toward the marketing of conservative policy ideas Through the provision of both general operating and project-specific support, these funders have enabled policy institutions to develop aggressive marketing campaigns, media outreach efforts, and new communications tools with which to build their constituency base, mobilize public opinion and network with other organizations around a common reform agenda.
* 5) Fifth, the foundations have provided considerable support to create and cultivate public intellectuals and policy leaders with strong free market, limited government perspectives. They provided tens of millions of dollars to subsidize students’ education and place them as intems in conservative policy institutions, media outlets, advocacy organizations and law firms. They spent millions more to help established conservatives maintain public prominence and visibility through senior fellowships and residencies at prominent think tanks and research institutions.
* 6) Sixth, the foundations targeted grants across the institutional spectrum in recognition that a variety of institutions and reform strategies are required for effective transformation and policy change.
* 7) Finally, many of these foundations have engaged in similar funding efforts for as long as two decades. Their steady and generous support has anchored key conservative institutions financially, giving them a tremendous offensive capacity to influence specific policies and audiences, and also to shape the overall framework in which important fiscal, regulatory and social policy decisions are made.

Structure of the Movement:

* Academic Sector Organizations and Programs
* National Think Tanks and Advocacy Groups
* Media Groups
* Legal Organizations
* State and Regional Think Tanks and Advocacy Groups
* Religious Sector Organizations
* Philanthropic Institutions andNetworks

http://www.mediatransparency.org/conservativephilanthropy.php

***
SECTORS

* Academic Sector Organizations and Programs
* Legal Organizations
* Media Groups
* National Think Tanks and Advocacy Groups
* Philanthropic Institutions and Networks
* Religious Sector Organizations

Internal Links

Grants to:

Center for the Study of Market Processes

Profiles:

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation
American Legislative Exchange Council
Heartland Institute
Heritage Foundation
Hoover Institution on War
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy
State Policy Network
Wisconsin Policy Research Institute

CONSERVATIVE PHILANTHROPY
State and Regional Think Tanks and Advocacy Groups
From a report by the NCRP

In an era where devolution of authority from the federal to state governments remains a key philosophical element of the conservative agenda, conservative funders have been careful to build the conservative policy movement at the state level. Over $9 million was awarded (1992-1994) to policy institutions with a primary focus on state policy issues or regional concerns. The growth of state policy organizations has been extensive, with over 60 state or regionally-based conservative think tanks built over the 1980s and early 1990s to capitalize on devolutionary policies pursued by the Reagan Administration.

Top groups include the Wisconsin Policy Research Institute and the California-based Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy. Since its inception, the Institute in Wisconsin has been heavily funded by the Bradley Foundation and has been active in its efforts to shape state education and welfare policy in accordance with key conservative principles. The Pacific Institute most recently was an active proponent of California’s Proposition 209, the ballot initiative intended to eliminate affirmative action in that state.

Another grantee, the Heartland Institute, publishes Intellectual Ammunition, a glossy, 25-page news and information journal. The journal issues in condensed form the policy statements and position papers of most of the think tanks and advocacy organizations to which the 12 foundations directed grants between 1992 and 1994. The May/June 1996 issue introduced one of the Institute’s newest innovations, PolicyFax, an insert to appear regularly. In a written welcome/introduction to the first PolicyFax insert, Illinois state senator Chris Lauzen (R) described the service in the following terms:

PolicyFax is a revolutionary public policy fax-on-demand research service that enables you to receive, by fax, the full text of thousands of documents from more than one hundred of the nation’s leading think tanks, publications, and trade associations. PolicyFax is easy to use, and it’s free for elected officials and journalists [emphasis added].

The 24-hour a day, seven day a week service transmits requested documents instantaneously, with topics ranging from crime to the economy to welfare. Titles include South Carolinians Have Nothing to Worry about from Concealed Handguns, Four Steps to Reforming Superfund, Medical Savings accounts: The Right Way to Reform Health Care, Benefits of the Flat Tax and Effective Compassion.

The foundations have also provided support to two networking institutions, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and the newer State Policy Network. Both are devoted to supporting the conservative policy movement at the state level through the provision of technical assistance, the development of model legislation, communications activities and conferences.

ALEC, well-funded by private family foundations and corporate contributors, is a powerful and growing membership organization, with almost 26,000 state legislative members and 30 staff. In 1994, over one-third of the nation’s state legislators were members. The organization, which responds to approximately 700 requests for information each month, has developed more than 150 pieces of model legislation. It maintains legislative task forces on every important state policy issue, including education, health care, tax and fiscal policy, and criminal justice.

While the $9.3 million awarded to support state policy institutions represents a substantial sum of grant money, a good deal more cash goes to support state-level policy initiatives. Many of the conservative foundations’ national grantees maintain an active interest in the state policy movement.

Having pushed for devolution at the federal level, national think tanks have worked to influence state level policy decisions and/or to cultivate and support state policy groups. The heavily-funded Manhattan Institute, for example, which works to influence national policy, has also sought to influence state and local policy decisions in New York. The Center for the Study of Market Processes recently announced that it is expanding its Policymaker Education Program to the states, with pilot programs to be initiated for state legislatures in Texas and Minnesota. Both were among the top 25 grantees over the 1992-1994 period, receiving over $2 million in awards.

The Hoover Institution has also helped support the state policy movement recently, holding a conference in 1995 for leaders of state-based think tanks and policy research organizations to assist them in more effectively using information technologies. And the Heritage Foundation has played a leading role in the state policy movement, housing the American Legislative Exchange Council, organizing annual conferences for state think tanks, publishing its resource guide to public policy experts, and in general serving as a model for effective policy research and marketing activities.

http://www.mediatransparency.org/conservativephilanthropy.php?conservativePhilanthropyPageID=6

***
RELATED LINKS
Internal Links

8,994,800 to the Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy
External Links

PRI website

MORE LINKS
Profile of corporate giving to PRI by ExxonSecrets.org

RECIPIENT PROFILE
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy

755 Sansome Street, Suite 450
San Francisco, CA 94111

http://www.pacificresearch.org

A conservative think tank that challenges environmental regulations, and was former Governor Pete Wilson’s favored source of information regarding privatization and water rights.

divider

Tim Lambert
June 23, 2004
When Think Tanks Attack
Think tanks vs Open Source

The Alexis de Tocqueville Institute’s attack on Linux is just the latest in a series of attacks on Open Source by think tanks:

Sonia Arrison of PRI: Is the Penguin Contaminated?

After all, in scanning the online petition, one can’t help but be struck by the many comments such as “get your hands of my linux you damn, dirty, corpo-apes ” and worse. These words suggest we can expect defiance, not cooperation, on serious issues like intellectual property from the open-source community, at least in the near future.
Also see:

CSE, Aug 27, 2003, Wayne T. Brough: New Protectionism: Mandates for Open Source Software

Read the full report >

Conservative Philanthropy supported institutions involved in the attack on Open Source

* Competitive Enterprise Institute
* Washington Legal Foundation
* Defenders of Property Rights
* Pacific Research Institute
* Citizens for a Sound Economy
* Institute for Policy Innovation
* Alexis de Tocqueville Institute

OTHER LINKS
PRI at SourceWatch.org

Brad Friedman
Bradblog.com
January 13, 2006
Pacific Research Institute Carries Fresh Water for the Electronic Voting Machine Industry

Who is PRI? Are They the Latest Incarnation of the ACVR? And Just Who Do They Think They’re Messing with by Attacking the Pro-Democracy Movement with Easily Discredited Info-ganda?

It looks like the Rightwing may have found a replacement for the American Center for Voting Rights (ACVR), the GOP front group set up to smokescreen against true election reform and transparent democracy…now, a West Coast non-partisan conservative think-tank called Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy (PRI) may be stepping in to fill at least part of the void in the person of TechNews World columnist and PRI Director of Technology Studies, Sonia Arrison. Arrison has been op/ed’ing and releasing white papers lately rallying against voter-verified paper ballots for electronic voting machines. Her reasons for being against transparent democracy are both bizarre and seem freshly pulled out of her hind quarters (or out of those of Diebold’s).

Read the full report >

Vicky Perry
Mid-Hudson Progressive Alliance
January 12, 2006
Think Tank writer pushes for the vendor’s perspective

A conservative ultra-free market think tank (PRI) is pushing its agenda that paperless voting is the way to go. Find out who these writers are and where their money comes from.

The Pacific Research Institute , a free-market think tank, has called the paper trail requirement one of California’s top 10 policy blunders of 2005.

Read the full report >

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientprofile.php?recipientID=274

***
RECIPIENT PROFILE
Heartland Institute

19 South LaSalle Street, Suite 903
Chicago, IL 60603

http://www.heartland.org

[From Buying a Movement, PFAW]

Founded in 1984, Heartland is …a non-profit public policy research organization serving the nation’s eight thousand federal and state elected officials, journalists, Heartland members, and other opinion leaders.

The April/May 1997 issue of its bi-monthly magazine Intellectual Ammunition (whose title suggests that its activities are more oriented toward political advocacy than exploration) includes such offerings as Choking on Clean Air Regulations, Privatization: Welfare Reform Presents New Privatization Opportunities (the article issues Wisconsin) and Welfare: Wisconsin’s Welfare Miracle, a piece by Robert Rector of the Heritage Foundation. [From the Heartland website.]
…one of several arch-conservative state-based ‘think tanks’ that focus as much energy on media relations as on policy development, Heartland’s literature reaches every state legislator in Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin, as well as 1,200 media centers.

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientprofile.php?recipientID=152

***
MORE LINKS

David Edwards and Muriel Kane
Raw Story
March 3, 2008
Fox & Friends promotes global warming deniers’ conference

Fox News believes the other side of the global warming debate hasn’t received enough attention and is determined to repair the omission.

…The Business and Media Institute is a project of the Media Research Center (MRC), headed by well-known movement conservative L. Brent Bozell. MRC has received substantial funding from ExxonMobil, as has the Heartland Institute, sponsor of the conference.

Read the full report >

RELATED LINKS
Internal Links

2,960,555 to the Heartland Institute

Profiles:

Center of the American Experiment
External Links

Heartland Institute’s website

OTHER LINKS

Bill Berkowitz
Media Transparency
March 5, 2008
Global warming ‘skeptics’ conference enabled by conservative philanthropy

Heartland Institute and dozens of other sponsors of conference funded by Coors, Bradley, Walton, Scaife and DeVos foundations

Ignored, and often even censored and demonized is how the promotional materials for the Heartland Institute’s recent conference The 2008 International Conference on Climate Change, described the way distinguished scholars from the U.S. and around the world, that have had the courage to question global warming, have been treated by environmentalists and the mainstream media. In a Background piece, conference organizers claimed that They [the scholars] have been labeled ‘skeptics’ and even ‘global warming deniers,’ a mean-spirited attempt to lump them together with Holocaust deniers.

Read the full report >

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientprofile.php?recipientID=152

***
Dominionism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about the political-religious concept. For other uses, see Dominion (disambiguation).

Dominionism describes, in several distinct ways, a tendency among some conservative politically-active Christians, especially in the United States of America, to seek influence or control over secular civil government through political action—aiming either at a nation governed by Christians, or a nation governed by a conservative Christian understanding of biblical law. The use and application of this terminology is a matter of controversy.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Origin and usage of the term
o 1.1 Anthropocentrism
o 1.2 Dominion Theology
o 1.3 Dominionism as a broader movement
o 1.4 Other terminology
o 1.5 Criticism
* 2 Influences on the Christian Right
o 2.1 Abraham Kuyper and the cultural mandate
o 2.2 Francis Schaeffer
o 2.3 Rushdoony and Christian Reconstructionism
o 2.4 Reconstructionism and politics
o 2.5 Schaeffer and Rushdoony
* 3 The spectrum of dominionism
o 3.1 Soft dominionism (Christian nationalism)
o 3.2 Hard dominionism
* 4 Significant critics of dominionism
* 5 Notes and references
* 6 External Links
* 7 See also

[edit] Origin and usage of the term

Although dominionism is used in several distinct ways, the origin of most usage can be traced back to a specific passage in the King James Version of the Bible:

And God blessed [ Adam and Eve ] and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. —Genesis 1:28 (KJV)

Christians typically interpret this verse as meaning that God gave humankind responsibility over the Earth, but theologians do not all agree on the nature and extent of that dominion .

[edit] Anthropocentrism

A longstanding usage of dominionism among social scientists and legal scholars describes a Biblical argument in favor of anthropocentrism, a favoring of the rights and interests of humans in relation to environmentalism and/or animal rights.[1][2] This usage is not the primary focus of this article.

[edit] Dominion Theology

Dominion Theology is a grouping of theological systems[3] with the common belief that society should be governed exclusively by the law of God as codified in the Bible, to the exclusion of secular law, a view also known as theonomy. The most prominent modern formulation of Dominion Theology is Christian Reconstructionism, founded by R. J. Rushdoony in the 1970s. Reconstructionists themselves use the word dominionism to refer to their belief that civil government should be controlled by Christians alone and conducted according to Biblical law.[4][5] Social scientists have used the word dominionism to refer to adherence to Dominion Theology[3][6][7] as well as to the influence in the broader Christian Right of ideas inspired by Dominion Theology.[3] Although such influence (particularly of Reconstructionism) has been described by many authors,[8][9] full adherents to Reconstructionism are few and marginalized among conservative Christians.[8][10][11]

[edit] Dominionism as a broader movement

In the early 1990s, sociologist Sara Diamond[12][13] and journalist Frederick Clarkson[14][15] defined dominionism as a movement that, while including Dominion Theology and Reconstructionism as subsets, is much broader in scope, extending to much of the Christian Right.[16] In his 1992 study of Dominion Theology and its influence on the Christian Right, Bruce Barron writes,

In the context of American evangelical efforts to penetrate and transform public life, the distinguishing mark of a dominionist is a commitment to defining and carrying out an approach to building society that is self-consciously defined as exclusively Christian, and dependent specifically on the work of Christians, rather than based on a broader consensus.[3] (p. 14, emphasis in original)

According to Diamond, the defining concept of dominionism is that Christians alone are Biblically mandated to occupy all secular institutions until Christ returns . In 1989, Diamond declared that this concept has become the central unifying ideology for the Christian Right [12] (p.138, emphasis in original). In 1995, she called it prevalent on the Christian Right. [17] Journalist Chip Berlet added in 1998 that, although they represent different theological and political ideas, dominionists assert a Christian duty to take control of a sinful secular society. [18]

In 2005, Clarkson enumerated the following characteristics shared by all forms of dominionism:[19]

1. Dominionists celebrate Christian nationalism, in that they believe that the United States once was, and should once again be, a Christian nation. In this way, they deny the Enlightenment roots of American democracy.
2. Dominionists promote religious supremacy, insofar as they generally do not respect the equality of other religions, or even other versions of Christianity.
3. Dominionists endorse theocratic visions, insofar as they believe that the Ten Commandments, or biblical law, should be the foundation of American law, and that the U.S. Constitution should be seen as a vehicle for implementing Biblical principles.[19]

Other authors who stress the influence of Dominionist ideas on the Christian Right include Michelle Goldberg[20] and Kevin Phillips[21][22]

Essayist Katherine Yurica began using the term dominionism in her articles in 2004, beginning with The Despoiling of America, (February 11, 2004),[23][24][25] Yurica has been followed in this usage by authors including journalist Chris Hedges [26][27][28] Marion Maddox,[29] James Rudin,[30] Sam Harris,[31] and the group TheocracyWatch.[32] This group of authors has applied the term to a broader spectrum of people than have Diamond, Clarkson, and Berlet.

[edit] Other terminology

Some authors have used the terms Christianism or Christianist in place of dominionism. By alluding to the term Islamist, this usage is intended to evoke the spectre of theocracy and even terrorism (citing, for example, the notorious bomber Eric Rudolph).[33] Commentator Andrew Sullivan advocated Christianist as a label for the Christian Right in a 2006 column in Time.[34]

[edit] Criticism

The terms dominionist and dominionism are rarely used for self-description, and their usage has been attacked from several quarters. Journalist Anthony Williams charged that its purpose is to smear the Republican Party as the party of domestic Theocracy, facts be damned. [35] Journalist Stanley Kurtz labeled it conspiratorial nonsense, political paranoia, and guilt by association, [36] and decried Hedges’ vague characterizations that allow him to paint a highly questionable picture of a virtually faceless and nameless ‘Dominionist’ Christian mass. [37] Kurtz also complained about a perceived link between average Christian evangelicals and extremism such as Christian Reconstructionism:

The notion that conservative Christians want to reinstitute slavery and rule by genocide is not just crazy, it’s downright dangerous. The most disturbing part of the Harper’s cover story (the one by Chris Hedges) was the attempt to link Christian conservatives with Hitler and fascism. Once we acknowledge the similarity between conservative Christians and fascists, Hedges appears to suggest, we can confront Christian evil by setting aside ‘the old polite rules of democracy.’ So wild conspiracy theories and visions of genocide are really excuses for the Left to disregard the rules of democracy and defeat conservative Christians — by any means necessary.[36]

Other criticism has focused on the proper use of the term. Berlet wrote that some critics of the Christian Right have stretched the term dominionism past its breaking point, [38] and argued that, rather than labeling conservatives as extremists, it would be better to talk to these people and engage them. [39] Sara Diamond wrote that [l]iberals’ writing about the Christian Right’s take-over plans has generally taken the form of conspiracy theory, and argued that instead one should analyze the subtle ways that ideas like Dominionism take hold within movements and why. [17]

[edit] Influences on the Christian Right

[edit] Abraham Kuyper and the cultural mandate

A common view among evangelical Christians is that the granting of dominion in Genesis 1:28 includes a cultural mandate to influence all aspects of the world with Christian principles.[40][41][42][43] Contrary to the theocratic vision of Dominion Theology, this view calls for Christians simply to honor God as they promote truth and mercy and apply scriptural principles to the affairs of life. [41](p.252) As formulated by the Dutch Reformed theologian (called the father of Neo-Calvinism) and prime minister Abraham Kuyper (1837-1920), the cultural mandate view teaches that all human endeavor, whether ostensibly sacred or secular, is part of building God’s kingdom. Kuyper energetically applied Christian principles to the secular problems of his day, seeing his efforts as extending common grace to all people. However, Kuyper firmly rejected the idea that dominion could be taken to mean domination of Christians over others.[44] Kuyper was a founding father of the Christian Democratic movement, which remains an important political influence in parts of Europe and Latin America and elsewhere.

[edit] Francis Schaeffer

The work of Christian philosopher Francis Schaeffer (1912-1984) provided an important underpinning for the rise of the modern Religious Right. Schaeffer, a follower of Kuyper’s system of Neo-Calvinism, had founded L’Abri, a Christian community and study center in Switzerland, in 1955. There he received evangelical Christians and others from many parts of the world, encouraging them that it was not only good but important for Christians to intellectually engage with and benefit from the Western cultural tradition (secular though it may be) of art, literature, philosophy, and the like.[45][46][47]

In the 1970s, Schaeffer began to travel more often to his native United States, where he saw a need to warn against what he saw as the cultural decay of American society.[8] His book, film and lecture series, Whatever Happened to the Human Race?,[48] co-authored with C. Everett Koop, toured Christian colleges and churches in the early 1980s. Panels of ethicists and scholars presented the films, fielding questions from audiences and raising the alarm that, through Christian inattention, Western Civilization had slipped its Judeo-Christian moorings, drifting into a post-Christian era , under the sway of a secular civil religion that Schaeffer called secular humanism . The landmark 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade served as Schaeffer’s iconic portrait of the radical cheapening of human life which he predicted must accompany this cultural shift, producing a culture increasingly bent on self-destruction. In his tract A Christian Manifesto,[49] he called upon Christians to directly resist these influences in the public sphere, by means including civil disobedience.

Though Schaeffer’s interests were primarily cultural and philosophical, his doctrine of engagement with the public sphere influenced a diverse spectrum of theological conservatives, including Jerry Falwell, Timothy LaHaye, John W. Whitehead, and others. Some of these founded political and legal organizations that ignited what has come to be called the culture war.

[edit] Rushdoony and Christian Reconstructionism
Main article: Christian Reconstructionism

Rousas John Rushdoony (1916-2001) was the intellectual founder of Christian Reconstructionism, a postmillennial form of Theocratic Dominion Theology. Most mainstream Christians reject Rushdoony’s views and other forms of Dominion theology as quite radical.[8]

According to Rushdoony and other Reconstructionists including Gary North and Greg Bahnsen, the idea of dominion drawn from Genesis 1:28 implied a theonomy ( rule of the law of God ), in which observation of their own strict form of Christianity would be required of all citizens, and moral sins ranging from blasphemy to homosexuality would be punishable by death. Rushdoony wrote that [m]an is summoned to create the society God requires, [50] bringing all things under the dominion of Christ the King. [51] A significant influence on Rushdoony and the theonomists came from Calvinist philosophers and theologians, including the presuppositionalism of Cornelius Van Til (1895-1987), though Van Til himself disavowed any entanglement of his work with political movements.

In regard to the influence of Reconstructionism upon the broader Christian Right, sociologist and professor of religion William Martin wrote,

It is difficult to assess the influence of Reconstructionist thought with any accuracy. Because it is so genuinely radical, most leaders of the Religious Right are careful to distance themselves from it. At the same time, it clearly holds some appeal for many of them. One undoubtedly spoke for others when he confessed, ‘Though we hide their books under the bed, we read them just the same.’ In addition, several key leaders have acknowledged an intellectual debt to the theonomists. Jerry Falwell and D. James Kennedy have endorsed Reconstructionist books. Rushdoony has appeared on Kennedy’s television program and the 700 Club several times. Pat Robertson makes frequent use of ‘dominion’ language; his book, The Secret Kingdom, has often been cited for its theonomy elements; and pluralists were made uncomfortable when, during his presidential campaign, he said he ‘would only bring Christians and Jews into the government,’ as well as when he later wrote, ‘There will never be world peace until God’s house and God’s people are given their rightful place of leadership at the top of the world.’ And Jay Grimstead, who leads the Coalition on Revival, which brings Reconstructionists together with more mainstream evangelicals, has said, ‘I don’t call myself [a Reconstructionist],’ but ‘A lot of us are coming to realize that the Bible is God’s standard of morality . . . in all points of history . . . and for all societies, Christian and non-Christian alike. . . . It so happens that Rushdoony, Bahnsen, and North understood that sooner.’ He added, ‘There are a lot of us floating around in Christian leadership James Kennedy is one of them-who don’t go all the way with the theonomy thing, but who want to rebuild America based on the Bible.'[8](p. 354)

[edit] Reconstructionism and politics

Rushdoony’s Chalcedon Foundation, the flagship organization of Reconstructionism, rejects the claim that they are orchestrators of a clandestine, politically motivated conspiracy:

Our critics sometimes imply or state outright that we are engaged in a subtle, covert attempt to capture conservative, right-wing politics in order to gain political power, which we will then use to spring Biblical law on our nation. This is flatly false. We do not believe that politics or the state are a chief sphere of dominion.[52]

Critics note that politics seems like the chief sphere in which Reconstructionism’s influence is perceived, and consequently feel justified in characterizing it as primarily political in fact, even if not in ideal theory. Critics such as Clarkson identify it as totalitarian, comparable to other right-wing and political movements inspired by religious fundamentalism. Proponents of Reconstructionism claim that, on the contrary, they stand in opposition to tyranny:

The great problem with modern politics is that it is used as an instrument of social change. We at Chalcedon passionately oppose this. The role of the state is in essence to defend and protect, in the words of the early American Republic, life, liberty, and property. It is to reward the externally obedient by protecting them from the externally disobedient (Romans 13:1-7). Its role is not to make men virtuous; we have a name for civil governments that attempt to create a virtuous society: totalitarian.[52]

However, George Grant, a Reconstructionist[53][54] who also served at one time as executive director of Coral Ridge Ministries, has stated the movement’s aims in this way:

Christians have an obligation, a mandate, a commission, a holy responsibility to reclaim the land for Jesus Christ — to have dominion in civil structures, just as in every other aspect of life and godliness. But it is dominion we are after. Not just a voice. It is dominion we are after. Not just influence. It is dominion we are after. Not just equal time. It is dominion we are after. World conquest. That’s what Christ has commissioned us to accomplish. We must win the world with the power of the Gospel. And we must never settle for anything less… Thus, Christian politics has as its primary intent the conquest of the land — of men, families, institutions, bureaucracies, courts, and governments for the Kingdom of Christ. [55]

[edit] Schaeffer and Rushdoony

Several writers refer to Francis Schaeffer as a dominionist, and argue that his mid-1970s move towards greater political activism was influenced by the work of Rushdoony.[13][14][17][56]

Irving Hexham, the Canadian sociologist of religion, questions whether scholars have adequately distinguished Schaeffer’s views from theonomy, in describing both as dominionism .[57]. Schaeffer never described himself as a theonomist, and explicitly rejected theocracy in A Christian Manifesto, writing that [t]here is no New Testament basis for a linking of church and state until Christ, the King returns. [49]

In a dialogue with Jeff Sharlet (who had called Schaeffer Rushdoony’s most influential student [56] and proceeded to link others influenced by Schaeffer — including LaHaye, Charles Colson, and Randall Terry — to Rushdoony in that way), Alan Jacobs noted that Schaeffer’s career significantly pre-dates Rushdoony’s, and that Schaeffer is chiefly significant for his cultural reflections, which have nothing to do with Dominion Theology.[58] Jacobs also argued that Schaeffer could only be called Rushdoony’s student in the weak sense that he read his works very late in his career and agreed with some of his ideas (particularly in Schaeffer’s A Christian Manifesto), and that their disagreements over fundamental issues far outweighed their synergy.[59]

[edit] The spectrum of dominionism

Writers including Chip Berlet[60] and Frederick Clarkson[19] distinguish between what they term hard and soft dominionism. Soft dominionists are defined as those who believe that America is a Christian nation. Hard dominionists are defined as those who advocate the establishment of a theocracy.

[edit] Soft dominionism (Christian nationalism)

The term soft dominionism is applied to various Christian Right social and political movements that claim that America is a Christian nation. Soft Dominionists also disclaim the existence of the wall of separation between church and state. In her book Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism, Michelle Goldberg called this tendency Christian Nationalism. [20] Berlet and Clarkson have agreed that [s]oft Dominionists are Christian nationalists. [60]

Unlike dominionism , Christian nation is language that is commonly found in the writings of Christian Right leaders themselves. Proponents of this idea (such as David Barton and D. James Kennedy) argue that the Founding Fathers of the United States were overwhelmingly Christian, that founding documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are based on Christian principles, and that a Christian character is fundamental to American culture.[61][62][63] They cite, for example, the U.S. Supreme Court’s comment in 1892 that this [the United States] is a Christian nation ,[64] after citing numerous historical and legal arguments in support of that statement.[65][66]

Critics[67] argue the claim that the United States is a Christian nation is of questionable historic validity (often pointing out the deist beliefs of some of the founding fathers — Thomas Jefferson’s[68] in particular), is ethnocentric, and reduces secularists and members of other religions (such as Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism) to second-class status. Other critics cite the Treaty with Tripoli (1796) passed by the United States Senate, which assured the ruler of that Muslim state that the United States government is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion, [69] and George Washington’s letter to Moses Seixas, in which Washington defended religious freedom for Jews ( For happily, the government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance [70])[71][72]

[edit] Hard dominionism
Main article: Dominion Theology

The term hard dominionism is used to describe forms of dominionism which evidently envision, and work toward, a future (prior to the Second Coming of Christ) in which all the institutions of society will be governed by the principles of their form of Christian faith. This definition certainly fits Christian Reconstructionists and other adherents to Dominion Theology. Some apply it also to the more strident elements within the mainstream Christian Right.

[edit] Significant critics of dominionism

Chip Berlet and Political Research Associates have written extensively and critically about dominionism, defining it (as discussed above) as a theocratically-inclined faction within the Christian Right.[9][18][38][60] Chris Hedges, Joan Bokaer, Katherine Yurica, and TheocracyWatch define dominionism more broadly.[26][27][28][23][32] Randall Balmer criticizes dominionism primarily with the meaning of anthropocentrism.[73]

Dave Hunt,[74] Hal Lindsey,[75] and Thomas Ice[76] are Christian critics specifically of Christian Reconstructionism, disagreeing on theological grounds with its theocratic elements as well as its Calvinism and postmillenialism. J. Ligon Duncan,[77] Sherman Isbell,[78] Vern Poythress,[79] Robert Godfrey,[80] and Sinclair Ferguson[81] are conservative Calvinist critics specifically of Reconstructionism, primarily giving a theological critique of its theocratic elements.

[edit] Notes and references

1. ^ Tannenbaum, J. and A.N. Rowan 1985. Rethinking the Morality of Animal Research, The Hastings Center Report 15 (5), 32-43.
2. ^ Elmendorf, Christopher S., 2003. Ideas, incentives, gifts, and governance: Toward conservation stewardship of private land, in cultural and psychological perspective , University of Illinois Law Review, 2003 (2), 423-506.
3. ^ a b c d Barron, Bruce. 1992. Heaven on Earth? The Social & Political Agendas of Dominion Theology. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan. ISBN 0-310-53611-1.
4. ^ Sandlin, Andrew. The Creed of Christian Reconstructionism . Retrieved 23 September 2007.
5. ^ Sandlin, Andrew, 1998. A Reconstructionist Manifesto . Retrieved 23 September 2007.
6. ^ Davis, Derek H. and Hankins, Barry, 2003. New Religious Movements and Religious Liberty in America, Baylor University Press.
7. ^ Davidson, Carl and Harris, Jerry, 2006. Globalisation, theocracy and the new fascism: the US Right’s rise to power , Race and Class 47 (3), 47-67.
8. ^ a b c d e Martin, William. 1996. With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America. New York: Broadway Books.
9. ^ a b Berlet, Chip and Matthew N. Lyons. 2000. Right-Wing Populism in America: Too Close for Comfort. New York: Guilford Press.
10. ^ Diamond, Sara, 1998. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right, New York: Guilford Press, p.213.
11. ^ Ortiz, Chris 2007. Gary North on D. James Kennedy , Chalcedon Blog, 6 September 2007.
12. ^ a b Diamond, Sara. 1989. Spiritual Warfare: The Politics of the Christian Right. Boston: South End Press.
13. ^ a b Diamond, Sara. 1995. Roads to Dominion: Right-Wing Movements and Political Power in the United States. New York: Guilford Press. ISBN 0-89862-864-4.
14. ^ a b Clarkson, Frederick, 1994. Christian Reconstructionism: Theocratic Dominionism Gains Influence , The Public Eye 8, Nos. 1 & 2, March/June 1994.
15. ^ Clarkson, Frederick. 1997. Eternal Hostility: The Struggle Between Theocracy and Democracy. Monroe, Maine: Common Courage. ISBN 1-56751-088-4
16. ^ In her early work, Diamond sometimes used the term dominion theology to refer to this broader movement, rather than to the specific theological system of Reconstructionism.
17. ^ a b c Diamond, Sara. 1995. Dominion Theology. Z Magazine, February 1995
18. ^ a b Chip Berlet, Following the Threads, in Ansell, Amy E. Unraveling the Right: The New Conservatism in American Thought and Politics, pp. 24, Westview Press, 1998, ISBN 0-813-33147-1
19. ^ a b c Clarkson, Frederick. 2005. The Rise of Dominionism: Remaking America as a Christian Nation. The Public Eye magazine, Vol. 19, No. 3, (Winter)
20. ^ a b Goldberg, Michelle 2006. Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism. New York: W. W. Norton. ISBN 0-393-06094-2 (10). ISBN 978-0393-06094-2 (13).
21. ^ Phillips, Kevin 2006. American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21st Century ISBN 0-670-03486-X
22. ^ McCarraher, Eugene 2006. Empire Falls , Commonweal 133(9), 5 May 2006.
23. ^ a b Yurica, Katherine 2004. The Despoiling of America published February 11, 2004. Retrieved 3 October 2007. And also published in Toward a New Political Humanism, Edited by Barry F. Seidman and Neil J. Murphy, Prometheus Books, New York, 2004.
24. ^ Yurica, Katherine 2004. http://www.yuricareport.com/Religion/TheBloodGuiltyChurches.html Blood Guilty Churches], 19 January 2005. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
25. ^ Yurica, Katherine 2005. Yurica Responds to Stanley Kurtz Attack, 23 May 2005. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
26. ^ a b The Christian Right and the Rise of American Fascism By Chris Hedges, TheocracyWatch.
27. ^ a b Hedges, Chris (May 2005). Feeling the hate with the National Religious Broadcasters . Harper’s. http://www.harpers.org/archive/2005/05/0080541. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
28. ^ a b Hedges, Chris, American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America, Free Press, 2006.</ref.
29. ^ Maddox, Marion 2005. God under Howard: The Rise of the Religious Right in Australian Politics, Allen & Unwin.
30. ^ Rudin, James 2006. The Baptizing of America: The Religious Right’s Plans for the Rest of Us, New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press.
31. ^ Harris, Sam 2007. God’s dupes , Los Angeles Times, 15 March 2007. Retrieved 8 October 2007.
32. ^ a b The Rise of the Religious Right in the Republican Party , TheocracyWatch, Last updated: December 2005; URL accessed May 8, 2006.
33. ^ Walker, Ruth 2005. Onward, Christianist Soldiers? , Christian Science Monitor, 20 May 2005. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
34. ^ Sullivan, Andrew 2006. My Problem with Christianism , Time, 15 May 2006. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
35. ^ Anthony Williams (2005-05-04). Dominionist Fantasies . FrontPage Magazine. http://www.frontpagemagazine.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=17957. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
36. ^ a b Stanley Kurtz (2005-05-02). Dominionist Domination: The Left runs with a wild theory . National Review Online. http://www.nationalreview.com/kurtz/kurtz200505020944.asp. Retrieved on 2007-10-06.
37. ^ Stanley Kurtz (2005-04-28). Scary Stuff . National Review Online. http://www.nationalreview.com/kurtz/kurtz200504280758.asp. Retrieved on 2007-10-06.
38. ^ a b Berlet, Chip, 2005. The Christian Right, Dominionism, and Theocracy. Retrieved 25 September 2007.
39. ^ Ellis Henican, A spiritual olive branch for the far-right faithful, Newsday, May 1, 2005. Reposted at YuricaReport.com. Retrieved 23 September 2006
40. ^ K. Myers (1989), All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes: Christians and Popular Culture. Crossway Books. ISBN 0891075380.
41. ^ a b Evangelical Dictionary of World Missions, A.S. Moreau, ed. Baker Academic. ISBN 0801020743
42. ^ N. Pearcey (2004), Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity. Crossway Books. ISBN 1581344589
43. ^ C. Colson (2004). Reclaiming Occupied Territory . Breakpoint Commentary. Retrieved 12 November 2007.
44. ^ Kuyper, Abraham 1898. Lectures on Calvinism ( The Stone Lectures ). Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1931.
45. ^ Schaeffer, Francis 1968. The God Who Is There. InterVarsity Press.
46. ^ Schaeffer, Francis 1972. Art and the Bible. InterVarsity Press.
47. ^ Schaeffer, Francis 1976. How Should We Then Live?: The Rise and Decline of Western Thought and Culture. Crossway Books
48. ^ Schaeffer, Francis and C. Everett Koop 1979. Whatever Happened to the Human Race? F.H. Revell
49. ^ a b Schaeffer, Francis 1982. A Christian Manifesto. Crossway Books.
50. ^ The Institutes of Biblical Law, p. 3-4.
51. ^ Foreword to Greg Bahnsen’s Theonomy in Christian Ethics, 3rd edition, xii.
52. ^ a b What Chalcedon Believes . http://www.chalcedon.edu/credo.php. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
53. ^ Olson, Walter 1998. Invitation to a Stoning . Reposted at yuricaReport.com. Retrieved 15 December 2007.
54. ^ A Mighty Army , Southern Poverty Law Center. Retrieved 15 December 2007.
55. ^ The Changing of the Guard, George Grant, 1987, as quoted in American Theocracy: Who is Trying to Turn America into a Theocracy?
56. ^ a b Jeff Sharlet, Through a glass, darkly: How the Christian right is reimagining U.S. history , Harper’s Magazine, December 2006. Retrieved 7 September 2007.
57. ^ Hexham, Irving, The Evangelical Response to the New Age, in Perspectives on the New Age, edited by James R. Lewis & J. Gordon Melton, State University of New York Press, Albany, New York, 1992, pp. 152-163, especially p. 322 Note 16.
58. ^ Alan Jacobs, The Know-Nothing Party , Books & Culture, posted 5 February 2007. Retrieved 7 September 2007.
59. ^ Jeff Sharlet and Alan Jacobs, Some Fanged Enemy of Christendom: An Exchange , Books & Culture, posted 12 February 2007. Retrieved 7 September 2007.
60. ^ a b c Chip BerletThe Christian Right, Dominionism, and Theocracy – Part Two
61. ^ Barton, David 1993. America’s Godly Heritage. WallBuilder Press.
62. ^ Kennedy, D. James and Jim Nelson Black 1994. Character and Destiny: A Nation in Search of Its Soul. Zondervan Publishing.
63. ^ Kennedy, D. James and Jerry Newcombe 2003. What If America Were a Christian Nation Again? Thomas Nelson.
64. ^ Holy Trinity Church v. U.S., 143 U.S. 457, 12 S.Ct. 511, 36 L.Ed. 226, 29 February 1892
65. ^ Christian Roots of America
66. ^ God: Nowhere prohibited, everywhere present, Dr. D. James Kennedy, September 29, 2007
67. ^ John Lofton Interviews Roy Moore Ed Brayton. Dispatches from the Culture Wars, July 24, 2006.
68. ^ Bowman, Rebecca. Jefferson’s Religious Beliefs. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
69. ^ The Barbary Treaties. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
70. ^ To Bigotry No Sanction . Retrieved 6 October 2007.
71. ^ Jon Meacham, A Nation of Christians Is Not a Christian Nation, New York Times, October 7, 2007
72. ^ Frederick Clarkson, History is Powerful: Why the Christian Right Distorts History and Why it Matters, The Public Eye Magazine, Spring 2007.
73. ^ Balmer, Randall 2006. Thy Kingdom Come: How the Religious Right Distorts the Faith and Threatens America: An Evangelical’s Lament. Basic Books.
74. ^ Hunt, Dave 1988. Whatever Happened to Heaven? Harvest House.
75. ^ Lindsey, Hal 1990. The Road to Holocaust, Bantam
76. ^ Ice, Thomas, and H. Wayne House 1988. Dominion Theology: Blessing or Curse?, Multnomah Pub (ISBN 0-88070-261-3)
77. ^ Duncan, J. Ligon 2003. The Westminster Confession of Faith: A Theonomic Document? , 13 August 2003. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
78. ^ Isbell, Sherman 1997. “The Divine Law of Political Israel Expired: Part II and Part III”. Retrieved 6 October 2007.
79. ^ Poythress, Vern S. 1991. The Shadow of Christ in the Law of Moses. Brentwood TN: Wolgemuth & Hyatt Publishers Inc.
80. ^ Godfrey, W. Robert 1990, Calvin and Theonomy, in Theonomy: A Reformed Critique, William S. Barker and W. Robert Godfrey eds., 299-312, (Grand Rapids, MI: Academie Books, 1990).
81. ^ Ferguson, Sinclair 1990. An Assembly of Theonomists? in Theonomy: A Reformed Critique, William S. Barker and W. Robert Godfrey eds., 315-349, Grand Rapids, MI: Academie Books, 1990.

[edit] External Links

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Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominionism
Categories: Christians by ideology | Christian fundamentalism | Christian law | Dominionism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominionism

***
# Constitution Restoration Act: a bill promoted during the 2005 Confronting the Judicial War on Faith conference that sought to authorize Congress to impeach judges who fail to acknowledge God as the sovereign source of law, liberty, or government and to limit the power of the federal judiciary to rule in religious liberty cases.[23]

Kennedy was a co-signer of the Land Letter sent to President George W. Bush in October 2002 which outlined a just war rationale for the military invasion of Iraq.[40]

D. James Kennedy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_Ridge_Ministries

***
In politics, right-wing, rightist and the Right are terms applied to conservative and traditionalist positions. Originally, during the French Revolution, right-wing referred to seating arrangements in parliament; those who sat on the right supported the monarchy and aristocratic privilege.[1][2][3]

Today, the term right is used to describe groups who stress culture, fundamentalism and/or nationalism. A second usage is to describe groups who favor laissez-faire capitalism and free markets and oppose socialism and communism.[4]In a particular instance, it is often difficult to tell which meaning of the expression is intended.

Since then, the right wing has come to be associated with preserving the status quo in the form of institutions and traditions also preferring free market economies with strong private property rights.[citation needed] Modern Western conservatism was influenced by the works of figures like Edmund Burke. Burke argued against the idea of abstract, metaphysical rights of men and instead advocated national tradition: He put forward that We fear God, we look up with awe to kings; with affection to parliaments; with duty to magistrates; with reverence to priests; and with respect to nobility. Why? Because when such ideas are brought before our minds, it is natural to be so affected .[5] Burke defended prejudice on the grounds that it is the general bank and capital of nations, and of ages and superior to individual reason, which is small in comparison. Prejudice , Burke claimed, is of ready application in the emergency; it previously engages the mind in a steady course of wisdom and virtue, and does not leave the man hesitating in the moment of decision, sceptical, puzzled, and unresolved. Prejudice renders a man’s virtue his habit .[6] Burke criticised social contract theory by claiming that society is indeed a contract, but a partnership not only between those who are living, but between those who are living, those who are dead, and those who are to be born .[7]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right-wing_politics

***
http://www.investinginbonds.com/assets/files/LehmanExoticCredDerivs.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Credit_derivative

***
CONSERVATIVE FUNDERS

View all funders organized by the total assets or grants paid.

Allegheny Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

$ 51,520,996 total assets at end of 2006
$ 2,211,800 grants paid
$ 5,143,784 total revenue
$ 2,724,133 total expenses
Armstrong Foundation

$ 18,020,705 total assets at end of 2005
$ 781,750 grants paid
$ 1,329,886 total revenue
$ 1,059,897 total expenses
Ave Maria Foundation

The Ave Maria Foundation is the tax-exempt funding vehicle of Tom Monaghan, the Dominos Pizza magnate who is one of the most influential members of the Catholic Right. An advocate of laissiez-faire economics as well as an ultra-orthodox brand of faith, he has advanced those twin agendas by both his actions and his financial muscle.

The Ave Maria Foundation reported net assets of $153 million in 2004. That same year it made over $91 million in grants, more than double the previous year’s giving of $41.9 million. In 2004 the AMF gave $73 million in start-up costs and construction for its new Ave Maria University in Florida.

$ 121,385,829 total assets at end of 2005
$ 33,140,817 grants paid
$ 26,054,430 total revenue
$ 37,203,918 total expenses
Barre Seid Foundation

$ 3,524,626 total assets at end of 2006
$ 5,033,916 grants paid
$ 2,436,930 total revenue
$ 5,066,481 total expenses
Bill and Berniece Grewcock Foundation

$ 5,053,397 total assets at end of 2006
$ 474,000 grants paid
$ 263,255 total revenue
$ 493,618 total expenses
Brady Education Foundation, Inc.

Changed its name from the W.H. Brady Foundation in 2003.

$ 13,092,719 total assets at end of 2005
$ 60,000 grants paid
$ 728,280 total revenue
$ 141,282 total expenses
Castle Rock Foundation

In 1975, the Adolph Coors Foundation was created as a private family foundation and initially was supported financially by the Adolph Coors Jr. Trust. In 1993, the Castle Rock Foundation was created from the [Adolph Coors Foundation’s] unrestricted funds, receiving a $36,596,253 endowment. Now, the Adolph Coors Foundation focuses almost exclusively on projects and organizations within Colorado, while the Castle Rock Foundation provides grants to public policy and other organizations nationwide.

$ 59,547,290 total assets at end of 2006
$ 2,473,000 grants paid
$ 1,241,808 total revenue
$ 2,662,009 total expenses
Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation

David and Charles Koch, sons of the ultraconservative founder of Koch Industries, Fred Koch, direct the three Koch family foundations: the Charles G. Koch Foundation, the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation, and the Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation. David and Charles control Koch Industries, the second-largest privately owned company and the largest privately owned energy company in the nation; they have a combined net worth of approximately $4 billion, placing them among the top 50 wealthiest individuals in the country and among the top 100 wealthiest individuals in the world in 2003, according to Forbes.

Following in the footsteps of their father, a member of the John Birch Society, the Kochs clearly have a conservative bent. Charles Koch founded the Cato Institute, and David Koch co-founded Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) [now FreedomWorks], where he serves as chairman of the board of directors. David also serves on the board of the Cato Institute. The Koch foundations make substantial annual contributions to these organizations (more than $12 million to each between 1985 and 2002) as well as to other influential conservative think tanks, advocacy groups, media organizations, academic institutes and legal organizations, thus participating in every level of the policy process.

$ 76,012,934 total assets at end of 2005
$ 2,625,951 grants paid
$ 30,617,936 total revenue
$ 3,611,046 total expenses
Charlotte and Walter Kohler Charitable Trust
$ 4,709,775 total assets at end of 2006
$ 653,542 grants paid
$ 400,514 total revenue
$ 706,143 total expenses
Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation

For information on the Claude Lambe Charitable Foundation, along with the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation see the Koch Foundations page

$ 18,872,126 total assets at end of 2005
$ 3,551,020 grants paid
$ 346,874 total revenue
$ 3,869,727 total expenses
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation

For information on the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation, along with the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the Claude Lambe Charitable Foundation see the Koch Foundations Page

$ 3,704,661 total assets at end of 2006
$ 4,340,000 grants paid
$ 3,047,936 total revenue
$ 4,351,123 total expenses
Dick and Betsy Devos Foundation

One of the DeVos Family Foundations.

$ 33,672,375 total assets at end of 2005
$ 7,014,464 grants paid
$ 14,523,047 total revenue
$ 7,481,362 total expenses
Earhart Foundation

$ 61,971,515 total assets at end of 2005
$ 11,441,524 grants paid
$ 8,763,530 total revenue
$ 12,735,116 total expenses
F.M. Kirby Foundation

$ 484,579,224 total assets at end of 2005
$ 22,563,450 grants paid
$ 42,089,654 total revenue
$ 25,756,354 total expenses
Gilder Foundation
$ 33,159,986 total assets at end of 2005
$ 20,141,077 grants paid
$ 26,725,403 total revenue
$ 20,602,722 total expenses
Gordon and Mary Cain Foundation

$ 123,364,899 total assets at end of 2005
$ 5,632,754 grants paid
$ 4,014,924 total revenue
$ 6,835,290 total expenses
Hickory Foundation

$ 19,679,840 total assets at end of 2005
$ 1,028,500 grants paid
$ 2,409,252 total revenue
$ 1,080,869 total expenses
Jaquelin Hume Foundation

$ 16,773,578 total assets at end of 2005
$ 6,168,385 grants paid
$ 4,270,042 total revenue
$ 6,432,039 total expenses
JM Foundation

$ 25,865,369 total assets at end of 2005
$ 1,396,873 grants paid
$ 1,980,486 total revenue
$ 2,096,033 total expenses
John M. Olin Foundation, Inc.

[Editor’s note: The John M .Olin Foundation will be closing its doors in November 2005.]

The New York-based John M. Olin Foundation, which grew out of a family manufacturing business (chemical and munitions), funds right-wing think tanks like the American Enterprise Institute, the Heritage Foundation, the Manhattan Institute for Public Policy Research, and the Hoover Institute of War, Revolution and Peace. It also gives large sums of money to promote conservative programs in the country’s most prestigious colleges and universities. After Michael Joyce left to take charge of the Bradley Foundation, William Simon continued as president at Olin…(Editor’s note: William Simon passed away in 2000).

$ 20,037,650 total assets at end of 2005
$ 9,020,275 grants paid
$ 483,180 total revenue
$ 10,689,275 total expenses
John Templeton Foundation
$ 947,837,251 total assets at end of 2004
$ 29,432,136 grants paid
$ 552,934,433 total revenue
$ 39,752,609 total expenses
Orville D. and Ruth A. Merillat Foundation

$ 91,859,178 total assets at end of 2005
$ 5,105,902 grants paid
$ 18,441,957 total revenue
$ 6,284,259 total expenses
Philip M. McKenna Foundation, Inc.

$ 15,449,446 total assets at end of 2005
$ 946,525 grants paid
$ 1,542,300 total revenue
$ 1,186,837 total expenses
Randolph Foundation

In 2003 a confusing deal, described in The Randolph Foundation’s 2003 IRS 990, was made by The Randolph Foundation and The Smith Richardson Foundation (SRF). The deal created a new The Randolph Foundation with a new EIN (47-0892971), transferred all of the old The Randolph Foundation’s assets – $49 million – to the new entity, renamed the old The Randolph Foundation to the H. Smith Richardson Charitable Trust (HSRCT), and transferred $48 million from the Smith Richardson Foundation to HSRCT (essentially replacing the money given to the new The Randolph Foundation). The agreement setup a deal whereby the HSRCT gave money to the Smith Richardson Foundation each year that the SRF would then disburse – and which would report the grants in its IRS 990. For that reason we will not be including HSRCT grants in our database.

Questions about the curious arrangement were not answered by people either at the new HSRCT or the Smith Richardson Foundation. For example, why would the SRF give $48 million to HSRCT, only to have HSRCT give it back to SRF, year by year, to dispurse as SRF sees fit?

$ 69,027,869 total assets at end of 2005
$ 3,080,933 grants paid
$ 3,730,656 total revenue
$ 4,812,655 total expenses
Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation

The Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation, incorporated in 1970, ranked ninth in total assets ($97,049,407) among the top 20 conservative foundations studied and third in total grants ($26,574,754) in 2001. The foundation’s grantmaking has grown dramatically in the past decade, from only $4 million in 1990 to more than $25 million in 2001. The foundation is the oldest and wealthiest of the DeVos family foundations, which also include the Dick and Betsy DeVos Foundation (1990), the Daniel and Pamela DeVos Foundation (1992), and the Douglas and Maria DeVos Foundation (1992). Richard DeVos is co-founder of Amway Corporation and owner of the Orlando Magic (2004), and served as the finance chairman of the Republican National Committee.

$ 51,535,870 total assets at end of 2005
$ 45,391,219 grants paid
$ 50,087,013 total revenue
$ 54,546,854 total expenses
Rodney Fund

$ 8,555,580 total assets at end of 2005
$ 631,281 grants paid
$ 1,657,802 total revenue
$ 667,894 total expenses
Roe Foundation

$ 38,553,402 total assets at end of 2006
$ 1,698,000 grants paid
$ 3,482,573 total revenue
$ 2,043,932 total expenses
Ruth and Lovett Peters Foundation

$ 2,589,658 total assets at end of 2005
$ 1,329,750 grants paid
$ 585,515 total revenue
$ 1,617,507 total expenses
Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation

Though the Noble Foundation gave away more than $63 million in 2005, it only paid $6.8 million in actual grants. Most of its money is given to three operating divisions involved in plant and agricultural research. In 2005 its Agricultural Division spent $14.6 million; the Forage Improvement Division spent $16.3 million, and the Plant Biology Division spent $23 million.

$ 1,269,572,071 total assets at end of 2005
$ 7,911,353 grants paid
$ 136,545,808 total revenue
$ 52,418,537 total expenses
Sarah Scaife Foundation

Financed by the Mellon industrial, oil and banking fortune. At one time its largest single holding was stock in the Gulf Oil Corporation. Became active in funding conservative causes in 1973, when Richard Mellon Scaife became chairman of the foundation. In the 1960s, Richard had inherited an estimated $200 million from his mother, Sarah. Forbes magazine has estimated his personal net worth at $800 million, making him the 138th richest person in the U.S. He controls the Scaife, Carthage and Allegheny foundations. In 1993, Scaife and Carthage reportedly gave more than $17.6 million to 150 conservative think tanks. As of December 31, 1992, Scaife assets were $212,232,888 and Carthage assets were $11,937,862.

$ 289,533,932 total assets at end of 2005
$ 13,871,000 grants paid
$ 14,998,082 total revenue
$ 16,197,272 total expenses
Scaife Family Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

Note: The Scaife Family Foundation seems to have broken off from Richard Mellon Scaife’s control. It moved to Palm Beach, and is no longer listed at the Scaife Foundations’ website.

$ 87,465,105 total assets at end of 2006
$ 3,301,777 grants paid
$ 9,332,335 total revenue
$ 4,165,614 total expenses
Shelby Cullom Davis Foundation

$ 111,311,064 total assets at end of 2005
$ 4,321,614 grants paid
$ 5,619,823 total revenue
$ 5,198,603 total expenses
Smith Richardson Foundation

Financed by the Vicks Vaporub fortune, this foundation is estimated to have assets of about $250 million. Became active in supporting conservative caues in 1973 when R. Randolph Richardson became president. Funded the early supply-side books of Jude Wanniski and George Gilder. The Richardsons are estimated by Forbes to have a net worth of $870 million, making them one of the country’s richest families.

$ 498,683,646 total assets at end of 2005
$ 17,249,786 grants paid
$ 42,739,224 total revenue
$ 21,943,515 total expenses
The Carthage Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

$ 30,108,877 total assets at end of 2006
$ 4,227,500 grants paid
$ 5,631,853 total revenue
$ 5,025,690 total expenses
The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Inc.

With $706 million in assets (2005), the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation of Milwaukee, Wisconsin is the country’s largest and most influential right-wing foundation. As of the end of 2005, it was giving away more than $34 million a year [The Bradley Foundation 2005 IRS 990 PF].

$ 706,076,838 total assets at end of 2005
$ 34,829,501 grants paid
$ 116,204,016 total revenue
$ 49,187,087 total expenses
Thomas B. Fordham Foundation

Sister organization to the Thomas B. Fordham Institute

$ 45,288,846 total assets at end of 2005
$ 440,770 grants paid
$ 3,542,364 total revenue
$ 1,991,257 total expenses
Walton Family Foundation

$ 1,328,793,250 total assets at end of 2005
$ 157,989,927 grants paid
$ 442,936,246 total revenue
$ 161,327,512 total expenses
William E. Simon Foundation

Also see MT’s William E. Simon profile.

$ 146,823,188 total assets at end of 2005
$ 8,340,212 grants paid
$ 8,916,766 total revenue
$ 9,758,031 total expenses
William H. Donner Foundation

$ 128,803,437 total assets at end of 2005
$ 4,990,933 grants paid
$ 12,365,062 total revenue
$ 7,233,028 total expenses

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funders.php

***
Corporatism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Corporatism (Italian: corporativismo) is a political culture in which adherents believe that the basic unit of the society is some corporate group, rather than the individual. Political cultures which hold the individual as the basic unit are called individualistic cultures. The basic unit of the society is what people in the culture consider to be the proper concern of the government.

Historically, corporatism refers to a political or economic system in which power is held by civic assemblies that represent economic, industrial, agrarian, social, cultural, and/or professional groups. These civic assemblies are known as corporations (not the same as the legally incorporated business entities known as corporations, though some are such). Corporations are unelected bodies with an internal hierarchy; their purpose is to exert control over the social and economic life of their respective areas. Thus, for example, a steel corporation would be a cartel composed of all the business leaders in the steel industry, coming together to discuss a common policy on prices and wages. When the political and economic power of a country rests in the hands of such groups, then a corporatist system is in place.

The word corporatism is derived from the Latin word for body, corpus. This meaning was not connected with the specific notion of a business corporation, but rather a general reference to anything collected as a body. Its usage reflects medieval European concepts of a whole society in which the various components – e.g., guilds, universities, monasteries, the various estates, etc. – each play a part in the life of the society, just as the various parts of the body serve specific roles in the life of a body.

Political scientists may also use the term corporatism to describe a practice whereby a state, through the process of licensing and regulating officially-incorporated social, religious, economic, or popular organizations, effectively co-opts their leadership or circumscribes their ability to challenge state authority by establishing the state as the source of their legitimacy, as well as sometimes running them, either directly or indirectly through corporations. This usage is particularly common in the area of East Asian studies, and is sometimes also referred to as state corporatism. Some analysts have applied the term neocorporatism to certain practices in Western European countries, such the Proporz system in Austria.[1] At a popular level in recent years corporatism has been used to mean the promotion of the interests of private corporations in government over the interests of the public.

In popular usage

Contemporary popular (as opposed to social science) usage of the term is more pejorative, emphasizing the role of business corporations in government decision-making at the expense of the public. The power of business to affect government legislation through lobbying and other avenues of influence in order to promote their interests is usually seen as detrimental to those of the public. In this respect, corporatism may be characterized as an extreme form of regulatory capture, and is also termed corporatocracy, a form of plutocracy. If there is substantial military-corporate collaboration it is often called militarism or the military-industrial complex.

[edit] Criticism of corporatism

Corporatism or neo-corporatism is often used popularly as a pejorative term in reference to perceived tendencies in politics for legislators and administrations to be influenced or dominated by the interests of business enterprises, employers’ organizations, and industry trade groups. The influence of other types of corporations, such as labor unions, is perceived to be relatively minor. In this view, government decisions are seen as being influenced strongly by which sorts of policies will lead to greater profits for favored companies.

Corporatism is also used to describe a condition of corporate-dominated globalization. Points enumerated by users of the term in this sense include the prevalence of very large, multinational corporations that freely move operations around the world in response to corporate, rather than public, needs; the push by the corporate world to introduce legislation and treaties which would restrict the abilities of individual nations to restrict corporate activity; and similar measures to allow corporations to sue nations over restrictive policies, such as a nation’s environmental regulations that would restrict corporate activities.

In the United States, corporations representing many different sectors are involved in attempts to influence legislation through lobbying including many non-business groups, unions, membership organizations, and non-profits. While these groups have no official membership in any legislative body, they can often wield considerable power over law-makers. In recent times, the profusion of lobby groups and the increase in campaign contributions has led to widespread controversy and the McCain-Feingold Act.

**
Franklin D. Roosevelt in an April 29, 1938 message to Congress warned that the growth of private power could lead to fascism:

The first truth is that the liberty of a democracy is not safe if the people tolerate the growth of private power to a point where it becomes stronger than their democratic state itself. That, in its essence, is fascism—ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power.[29][30][31]

From the same message:

The Growing Concentration of Economic Power. Statistics of the Bureau of Internal Revenue reveal the following amazing figures for 1935: Ownership of corporate assets: Of all corporations reporting from every part of the Nation, one-tenth of 1 percent of them owned 52 percent of the assets of all of them. [29][31]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporatism

***
RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Ave Maria Foundation

PO Box 373
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-0373

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Total contributed: $ 235,930,179
Name Total
Ave Maria University, Inc. 116,869,641
Ave Maria School of Law 45,314,959
Ave Maria College 22,590,368
Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist 14,140,552
Spiritus Sanctus Academy 6,742,053
Roman Catholic Diocese of Lansing Michigan 4,100,000
Thomas More Law Center 4,099,712
Ave Maria University 4,084,665
Huron Valley School 3,413,266
Gabriel Richard High School 2,518,546
Legatus 1,742,092
Ave Maria Institute 1,581,932
Ave Maria University Press Inc. 1,570,000
John Paul II Cultural Center 1,023,100
Ave Maria Communications 1,020,841
Catholic Church in Honduras 896,196
Thomas More Center for Law & Justice 809,809
Shepherd Montessori International 542,388
Pater Noster 523,636
Christ the King 312,951
Franciscan University of Steubenville 198,892
Benedictine Sisters 177,119
WDEO Radio 175,000
NAPCIS 174,931
St. Mary Student Parish 152,000
Agnus Dei Academy 139,909
Archdiocese of New York 126,450
Catholic Schools Textbook 120,000
Right to Life of Michigan Educational Fund 100,000
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 100,000
Papal Foundation 89,400
Servants of God’s Love 66,734
Easter Seals 50,000
Focus 42,575
Catholic Campaign for America 40,000
Trinity Grammar and Prep School 25,100
Generous Giving 25,000
Care Net 20,010
Ave Maria School of Law Foundation 20,000
Archdiocese of Kampala 20,000
Morley Publishing Group, Inc. 15,000
Renewal Ministries 14,000
Catholic University of America 12,750
Archdiocese of Denver 10,000
Holy Spirit Catholic Church 10,000
Archdiocese of Chicago 10,000
Cardinal Newman Society for the Preservation of Catholic Higher Education 10,000
Catholic Men’s Movement 9,000
Apostulate for Eucharistic Life, The 9,000
Congregation for Catholic Education 5,000
Northeast Hispanic Catholic Center 5,000
Our Lady of Guadalupe 5,000
Universite Interdisciplinaire de Paris 5,000
Culture of Life Foundation, Inc. 5,000
Alma Redemptoris Mater 5,000
Church of Our Saviour 5,000
National Right to Life Educational Trust Fund 3,200
Catholic Relief Services 2,248
College of St. Thomas More 2,000
Catholic Medical Association 2,000
Ministry Potential Discerner 2,000
Good Counsel 2,000
Ave Maria Missions 1,560
Ave Maria University Founders Club 1,516
Institute for Religious Life 1,160
Cross International 1,121
Capuchin Poor Clare Sisters 1,000
Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla 1,000
Diocese of Fort Portal 1,000
Magdalen College 1,000
St. John the Evangelist 1,000
Mary’s Children 1,000
Priests for Life 1,000
Catholic Men’s Ministry 1,000
Diocese of Lansing 1,000
Patrons of the Arts in the Vatican Museums 1,000
Nurturing Network, Inc. 1,000
Child Abuse and Neglect Center of Oakland Co. 1,000
Christendom College 1,000
Missionaries of Charity 596
St. Vincent de Paul Society 576
Association of Baptists for World Evangelism, Inc. 500
Problem Pregnancy Help Inc. 500
Northfield Township 500
Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem, Knights and Ladies of the 400
Pro-Life Action League 300
St. Patrick’s Church (Ann Arbor, MI) 200
St. Nicholas Light Display 125
Meals on Wheels-Ypsilanti, MI 100

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=37

***
FUNDER PROFILE
Ave Maria Foundation

ein: 38-2514364

54 institutional roles for $3,300,930

PO Box 373
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-0373

http://www.avemariafoundation.org/

The Oratory at Ave Maria University The Ave Maria Foundation is the tax-exempt funding vehicle of Tom Monaghan, the Dominos Pizza magnate who is one of the most influential members of the Catholic Right. An advocate of laissiez-faire economics as well as an ultra-orthodox brand of faith, he has advanced those twin agendas by both his actions and his financial muscle.

The Ave Maria Foundation reported net assets of $153 million in 2004. That same year it made over $91 million in grants, more than double the previous year’s giving of $41.9 million. In 2004 the AMF gave $73 million in start-up costs and construction for its new Ave Maria University in Florida, where a church will have a 60-foot high bleeding Jesus in stained glass.
In 2004 Thomas Monaghan personally gave $53 million to the foundation. No one else gave more than $15,000, according to the foundation’s IRS 990.

***
RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Castle Rock Foundation

4100 East Mississippi Ave
Suite 1850
Denver, CO 80246

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

Total contributed: $ 29,731,113
Name Total
Heritage Foundation, The 2,748,760
Hillsdale College 2,595,520
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc. 1,075,000
Johnson & Wales University 1,000,000
Adolph Coors Medical Research Foundation 1,000,000
Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts 1,000,000
John Wayne Cancer Institute 800,000
Mountain States Legal Foundation 775,000
Institute for Justice 690,000
Pacific Legal Foundation 610,000
Academy Research and Development Institute 580,000
Saint James School 550,000
Independence Institute 515,000
Boy Scouts of America/Denver Area Council 512,656
American Legislative Exchange Council 500,000
Leadership Institute 480,000
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research 465,000
Landmark Legal Foundation 460,000
American Battle Monuments Commission 400,000
National Association of Scholars, Inc. 390,000
A Christian Ministry in the National Parks 310,000
Center for Individual Rights 310,000
Independent Women’s Forum 300,000
David Horowitz Freedom Center 300,000
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 285,000
Southeastern Legal Foundation, Inc. 285,000
Institute for American Values 275,000
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 275,000
Becket Fund, Inc., The 250,000
Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union 250,000
Historic RittenhouseTown 250,000
Air Force Memorial Foundation 250,000
Cornell University 250,000
Children’s Hospital of Boston 250,000
American Indian College Fund 241,000
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy 225,000
Media Research Center, Inc. 225,000
Cato Institute 225,000
Foundation for Teaching Economics 221,000
College Fund/UNCF 220,000
Congressional Medal of Honor Society of the USA 212,867
Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) 200,000
Denver Foundation 200,000
Proprietors of the Boston Athenaeum 200,000
Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) 182,000
Ethics and Public Policy Center, Inc. 170,000
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 165,000
Competitive Enterprise Institute 165,000
United Negro College Fund, Inc.-WI 150,000
Common Good 150,000
National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship 150,000
Marshall Area Community Center Inc. 150,000
Children’s Educational Opportunity (CEO) Foundation America 150,000
American Indian College Fund (Denver) 132,000
George Mason University (Arlington) 130,000
Statistical Assessment Service 125,000
Fisher House Foundation 125,000
National Center for Policy Analysis 120,000
United Negro College Fund, Inc.-Fairfax, VA 120,000
Hudson Institute, Inc. 115,000
Cascade Policy Institute 110,000
Institute on Religion and Democracy, Inc. 110,000
Defenders of Property Rights 110,000
National Center for Public Policy Research, Inc. 110,000
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. 105,000
Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries 100,000
Reason Foundation 100,000
National Catholic Bioethics Center 100,000
Western Journalism Center 98,500
Education & Research Institute 95,000
Mind/Body Medical Institute 90,000
Tax Foundation 90,000
Freedom’s Foundation at Valley Forge 80,000
Young America’s Foundation 75,000
Center for Equal Opportunity 75,000
Nevada Policy Research Institute 75,000
Bill of Rights Institute 75,000
George Mason University Foundation, Inc. 75,000
Independent Institute 75,000
Evergreen Freedom Foundation 75,000
National Museum of Women in the Arts 75,000
Institute on Religion and Public Life, Inc. 70,000
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 65,000
Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, Inc. 55,000
American Studies Center, The 50,000
Words Can Heal 50,000
American Council of Trustees and Alumni 50,000
Joseph Richey Hospice 50,000
Promise Keepers 50,000
Fund For American Studies, The 50,000
National Constitution Center 50,000
Global Futures 50,000
Radio America 50,000
University of Denver 50,000
Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation 50,000
Mackinac Center for Public Policy 50,000
Denver Health and Hospitals Foundation 50,000
State Policy Network 50,000
Goldwater Institute 50,000
National Fatherhood Initiative 50,000
National Institute for Science, Law and Public Policy 50,000
Harvard University, President and Fellows of 50,000
Council for National Policy 45,000
Atlantic Legal Foundation 40,000
Center for the Community Interest 40,000
American Academy for Liberal Education 40,000
Philanthropy Roundtable 40,000
Heartland Institute 40,000
Center for Science, Technology and Political Thought 37,000
Friends of Montpelier 35,000
Center for the New West 35,000
National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation 35,000
National Alumni Forum 35,000
Madison Center for Educational Affairs 35,000
Ashiwi Awan Museum and Heritage Center 30,000
Investment Fund for Foundations 30,000
Institute of World Politics 25,000
George Washington University 25,000
Palm Springs Desert Museum 25,000
Institute for Responsible Citizenship 25,000
Washington Family Council 25,000
Greater Educational Opportunities Foundation 25,000
Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace 25,000
Acton Institute For The Study of Religion and Liberty 25,000
Mineral Information Institute 25,000
Texas Public Policy Foundation 25,000
Young America’s Foundation-Santa Barbara 25,000
Historical Society (Boston, MA) 25,000
Beacon Hill Institute 20,000
Washington Policy Center 20,000
Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education 20,000
Center for The Community Interest, The 20,000
National Fund for the United States Botanic Garden 20,000
New England Legal Foundation 20,000
Defense Forum Foundation, Inc. 20,000
Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship 20,000
Cornerstone Community Partnerships 20,000
Sutherland Institute 20,000
Jack Swigert Memorial Commission 20,000
Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation, Inc. 17,475
National Flag Foundation 15,000
Students in Free Enterprise 15,000
Young American Broadcasters Program 15,000
Enough is Enough 15,000
American Academy of Achievement 15,000
Educational Research Analysts 15,000
Columbine High School Project 14,924
Buckeye Center for Public Policy Solutions 14,600
Colorado Outward Bound School 12,656
Student Leadership Institute 12,655
Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund 10,000
Camp Saint Augustine, Inc. 10,000
Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute 10,000
Executive Leadership Foundation 10,000
Youth Development Foundation 10,000
Virginia Institute for Public Policy 10,000
Arkansas Policy Foundation 7,500
Westmoreland Scholar Foundation 5,000
Maryland Public Policy Institute 5,000
Colorado Public Expenditure Council 5,000
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 5,000

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=14

***
FUNDER PROFILE
Castle Rock Foundation

ein: 84-1243301

76 institutional roles

4100 East Mississippi Ave
Suite 1850
Denver, CO 80246

From Axis of Ideology, NCRP 2004

Adolph Coors Sr. founded the Coors Brewing Co. in 1873 in Golden, Colorado. Just over a century later, in 1975, the Adolph Coors Foundation was created as a private family foundation and initially was supported financially by the Adolph Coors Jr. Trust. Three further donations were made to the foundation from family members Gertrude Steele Coors and Janet Coors. While the trust money was designated for use within Colorado, the other assets were available for grantmaking outside of the state. In 1993, the Castle Rock Foundation was created from the unrestricted funds, receiving a $36,596,253 endowment. Now, the Adolph Coors Foundation focuses almost exclusively on projects and organizations within Colorado, while the Castle Rock Foundation provides grants to public policy and other organizations nationwide.

The Coors family is well known for its conservative ideology and for its financial contributions to advance this ideology, both individually and through its company and foundations. In 1973, Joseph Coors backed Paul Weyrich, a champion of right-wing causes and later co-creator of the Moral Majority, when he decided to create a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C., that eventually became the Heritage Foundation. Joseph Coors provided $250,000 in start-up funds.

Later, when Weyrich left Heritage, Joseph Coors worked with him to create the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress, a PAC supporting conservative candidates that later developed into the Free Congress Foundation (FCF). The Adolph Coors Foundation heavily funded the Heritage Foundation from its inception through the 1980s. The Castle Rock Foundation continues to provide substantial funding to the Heritage Foundation and the Free Congress Foundation, contributing $1,948,760 and $1,050,000 respectively, between 1995 and 2002.187 Joseph Coors sat on the board of the Heritage Foundation until his death in March 2003, and Holland Coors has served on the board since 1998. Jeffrey Coors sits on the board of FCF, where he was chairman of the board for a number of years. Weyrich has referred to him as one of the finest, most principled God-fearing people I have ever known. 188

Joseph Coors also financially assisted Phyllis Schlafly’s STOP ERA campaign and Bob Simonds’ National Association of Christian Educators/Citizens for Excellence in Education, which has worked with Christians and conservatives to restore academic excellence and traditional moral values to the public schools. 189 Coors also backed Regent University (started by Pat Robertson), the Rutherford Institute, Morality in Media, the John Birch Society and the Nicaraguan contras.

The Coors name was tarnished during a 10-year boycott instigated by the AFL-CIO in 1977. Since that time, the family and corporation have received condemnation from a variety of minority, gay and women’s rights groups, environmental activists and student associations for their support of conservative organizations and their often overtly racist and homophobic comments. In response to the boycott and severe criticism, Coors began funding a variety of African-American and Latino organizations and even became the one of the first large companies to provide health benefits to domestic partners of gay employees in 1995.

However, critics claim that these actions allowed the company to pose as progressive while the family and its foundation continued to fund conservative, often anti-gay, organizations and initiatives: This strategy masked an ongoing funding pattern by the Coors family and foundation directly hostile to minorities, women and labor. The engine of that anti-minority effort is the free flow of cash to the establishment and maintenance of the Heritage Foundation, the Free Congress Foundation, the Council for National Policy, and a variety of other Religious Right and far-right organizations. 190 Russ Reliant and Chip Berlet quote Dr. Jean Hardisty of Political Research Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts: The pattern of Coors family funding and activism stands in stark contrast to the mainstream image projected by the Coors Brewing Co., whose advertising and funding reach out to the African-American, women’s and gay communities. 191
In fact, many argue that the establishment of the Castle Rock Foundation and its subsequent responsibility for the primary grantmaking to conservative organizations like Heritage and FCF, while the Coors Foundation (blatantly affiliated with the family) began funding less controversial projects, indicates a clear facade being created by the family. The two foundations have the same executive director and board of trustees, which is composed entirely of Coors family members. The family claims that the foundations and the Coors Brewing Co. are separate entities. It appears to many, however, that the family, the company and the foundations are one and the same and that the Castle Rock Foundation is an attempt to separate the Coors name from the family’s support of the radical right. 192 Bruce Mirken quotes Jerry Sloan of Project Tocsin: It is a snow job to remove the Coors name directly from grants to radical causes, smoke and mirrors. 193

The mission of the Castle Rock Foundation is to promote a better understanding of the free-enterprise system, preserve the principles upon which our democracy was founded to help ensure a limited role for government and the protection of individual rights as provided for in the Constitution, encourage personal responsibility, and leadership, and uphold traditional American values. 194 Lou Kilzer (1998) calls Castle Rock the Coors empire’s chief public policy outreach. Along with Heritage and FCF, Hillsdale College receives substantial funding from the Castle Rock Foundation ($1,525,750 between 1995 and 2002).195 Jeffrey Coors sits on the board of Hillsdale College.

The foundation also pays membership fees to the Council for National Policy, where seven Coors family members, including Holly, Jeffrey, Carin and Darden, all attend meetings or are members, according to Jerry Sloan. Sloan also claims that the executive director of both family foundations, Linda Tafoya, as well as the directors of many of the foundations’ grantees, are members of the secretive organization.196 Russ Bellant and Chip Berlet claim that the Coors family is highly influential in shaping the activities of three organizational pillars of the New Right-the Heritage Foundation, the Free Congress Foundation and the Council for National Policy-that constitute an influential force in Washington, D.C. Involvement with these key groups provides the Coors family with a conservative political base. From this base, the family is connected to prominent activists in other New Right organizations, to groups on the Religious Right, and to allies in governmental agencies and in Congress. 196

Other conservative policy organizations that have received considerable funding (i.e., $100,000 or more between 1995 and 2002) from the Castle Rock Foundation include many of those that receive funding from the other large conservative foundations. Conservative academic institutes and educational organizations funded include the National Association of Scholars, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute and the Leadership Institute. Legal organizations that receive funding include the Institute for justice, the Federalist Society and the Center for Individual Rights.

The foundation also provides financial assistance to the Mountain States Legal Foundation, the Pacific Legal Foundation and the Landmark Legal Foundation, legal organizations that fight to safeguard individual liberties, free enterprise and property rights from government regulation and control. Conservative think tanks and advocacy institutes that receive assistance from the Castle Rock Foundation include the Center for the Study of Popular Culture, the American Enterprise Snstitute, FREE and the Pacific Research Institute.

The foundation also funds the Independence Institute, the Political Economy Research Center, the Institute for American Values and Defenders of Property Rights. The Independence Institute addresses a broad variety of public policy issues from a free-market, pro-freedom perspective 198 and works to devise private and community-based alternatives to government intervention. The institute publicizes its recommendations in papers and editorials and on television and holds conferences, seminars and forums for policymakers and the public. Jeffrey Coors sits on the board of the Independence Institute. The Political Economy Research Center uses free-market rules to address environmental issues. The Institute for American Values is devoted to contributing intellectually to the renewal of marriage and family life and the sources of competence, character and citizenship. 199 Finally, through litigation, education and legislation, Defenders of Property Rights seeks to protect individual property rights from infringement by the government. A number of these organizations have been criticized by environmental and gay rights groups as hostile to their causes. The foundation also funds the Media Research Center and the American Legislative Exchange Council.

The Castle Rock Foundation was founded in 1993 with an endowment of $36,596,253 from the Adolph Coors Foundation. 1999 Assets are $67 million. Total giving in 1999 was $3 million.

Financials*
year: 2006
asts: $ 59,547,290
rev: $ 1,241,808
exp: $ 2,662,009
grnts pd: $ 2,473,000

Officers, Directors
[see page link below]

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=14

***
year: 2005
asts: $ 54,235,113
rev: $ 948,683
exp: $ 2,586,987
grnts pd: $ 2,441,285

year: 2004
asts: $ 51,778,679
rev: $ 542,758
exp: $ 2,306,872
grnts pd: $ 2,184,135

year: 2003
asts: $ 47,100,918
rev: $ 176,545
exp: $ 2,264,055
grnts pd: $ 2,145,850

year: 2002
asts: $ 40,978,334
rev: $ -452,894
exp: $ 2,733,395
grnts pd: $ 2,630,800

year: 2001
asts: $ 50,862,306
rev: $ 2,510,386
exp: $ 3,523,472
grnts pd: $ 3,397,000

year: 2000
asts: $ 60,523,616
rev: $ 1,148,925
exp: $ 3,085,754
grnts pd: $ 2,789,259

year: 1999
asts: $ 67,295,880
rev: $ 15,323,820
exp: $ 3,494,524
grnts pd: $ 2,983,424

year: 1998
asts: $ 58,514,209
rev: $ 1,599,359
exp: $ 3,257,934
grnts pd: $ 2,768,760

year: 1997
asts: $ 67,614,693
rev: $ 13,436,924
exp: $ 3,500,834
grnts pd: $ 2,640,500

year: 1996
asts: $ 58,379,551
rev: $ 4,883,179
exp: $ 1,574,457
grnts pd: $ 1,089,000

year: 1995
asts: $ 50,298,157
rev: $ 6,409,666
exp: $ 2,804,629
grnts pd: $ 2,218,100

* All from IRS 990 PF. Assets = line I; Revenue = line 12; Expenses = line 26; Grants paid = line 25.
Internal Links

Profiles:

Profile of Person Paul Weyrich
American Enterprise Institute
American Legislative Exchange Council
Center for Individual Rights
Center for the Study of Popular Culture
Defenders of Property Rights
Federalist Society
Free Congress Foundation
Heritage Foundation
Independence Institute
Institute for American Values
Institute for Justice
Intercollegiate Studies Institute
Landmark Legal Foundation
Leadership Institute
Media Research Center
Mountain States Legal Fouindation
National Association of Scholars
Pacific Legal Foundation
Political Economy Research Center (PERC)

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=14

Paul M. Weyrich (October 7, 1942 – December 18, 2008[1][2][3][4]) was an American conservative political activist and commentator, most notable for co-founding the Heritage Foundation[5], a conservative think tank and the Free Congress Foundation, another conservative think tank. He was an ordained protodeacon in the Melkite Greek Catholic Church.

Conservative activism

Born in Racine, Wisconsin, Weyrich became involved in politics while a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was active in the Racine County Young Republicans from 1961 to 1963 and in Barry Goldwater’s 1964 presidential campaign. He spent his early career in journalism as political reporter for the Milwaukee Sentinel newspaper, as political reporter and weekend anchor for WISN-TV, in Milwaukee,[6] and in radio, as a reporter for WAXO-FM, in Kenosha, WLIP AM and as news director of KQXI, in Denver.

In 1966[5], he became press secretary[citation needed] to Republican U.S. Senator Gordon L. Allott of Colorado[5]. While serving in this capacity, he met Jack Wilson, an aide of Joseph Coors, patriarch of the Coors brewing family. Frustrated with the state of public policy research, they founded Analysis and Research Inc., in 1971, but this organization failed to gain traction.

[edit] Founding the Heritage Foundation

In 1973, persuading Coors to put the money in, Weyrich and Ed Feulner founded the Heritage Foundation as a think tank[5] to counter liberal views on taxation and regulation, which they considered to be anti-business. While the organization was at first only minimally influential, it has grown into one of the world’s largest public policy research institutes and has been hugely influential in advancing conservative policies.

The following year, again with support from Coors, Weyrich founded the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress (CSFC)[5], an organization that trained and mobilized conservative activists, recruited conservative candidates, and raised funds for conservative causes.

Under Weyrich, the CSFC proved highly innovative. It was among the first grassroots organizations to raise funds extensively through direct mail campaigns. It also was one of the first organizations to tap into evangelical Christian churches as places to recruit and cultivate activists and support for social conservative causes. Indeed, they proved such a wellspring that, in 1977, Weyrich co-founded Christian Voice with Robert Grant and two years later founded with Jerry Falwell the Moral Majority. Weyrich coined the phrase Moral Majority. [7]

Over the next two decades, Weyrich founded, co-founded, or held prominent roles in a number of other notable conservative organizations. Among them, he was founder of the American Legislative Exchange Council, an organization of state legislators; a co-founder of the Council for National Policy, a strategy-formulating organization for social conservatives; co-publisher of the magazine Conservative Digest; and national chairman of Coalitions for America, an association of conservative activist organizations. The CSFC, reorganized into the Free Congress Foundation (FCF), also remained active.

Under the auspices of the FCF, he founded the Washington, D.C.-based satellite television station National Empowerment Television (NET), later relaunched as the for-profit channel America’s Voice in 1997. In 1997 Weyrich was forced out of the NET television network he had founded when the network’s head persuaded its board to force out Weyrich in a hostile takeover. Chip Berlet of Political Research Associates says this was apparently for his divisive behavior in attacking GOP pragmatists. [8]

From 1989 to 1996, he was also president of the Krieble Institute, a unit of the FCF that trained activists to support democracy movements and establish small businesses in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Frustrated with public indifference to the Lewinsky scandal, Weyrich wrote a letter in February 1999 stating that he believed conservatives had lost the culture war, urging a separatist strategy where conservatives ought to live apart from corrupted mainstream society and form their own parallel institutions:

I believe that we probably have lost the culture war. That doesn’t mean the war is not going to continue, and that it isn’t going to be fought on other fronts. But in terms of society in general, we have lost. This is why, even when we win in politics, our victories fail to translate into the kind of policies we believe are important. Therefore, what seems to me a legitimate strategy for us to follow is to look at ways to separate ourselves from the institutions that have been captured by the ideology of Political Correctness, or by other enemies of our traditional culture. What I mean by separation is, for example, what the homeschoolers have done. Faced with public school systems that no longer educate but instead ‘condition’ students with the attitudes demanded by Political Correctness, they have seceded. They have separated themselves from public schools and have created new institutions, new schools, in their homes. I think that we have to look at a whole series of possibilities for bypassing the institutions that are controlled by the enemy. If we expend our energies on fighting on the turf they already control, we will probably not accomplish what we hope, and we may spend ourselves to the point of exhaustion. — Paul Weyrich Letter to Conservatives by Paul M. Weyrich, February 1999[9]

This was widely interpreted as Weyrich calling for a retreat from politics, but he almost immediately issued a clarification stating this was not his intent. In the evangelical magazine World he wrote:

. . .when critics say in supposed response to me that ‘before striking our colors in the culture wars, Christians should at least put up a fight,’ I am puzzled. Of course they should. That is exactly what I am urging them to do. The question is not whether we should fight, but how. . . .in essence, I said that we need to change our strategy. Instead of relying on politics to retake the culturally and morally decadent institutions of contemporary America, I said that we should separate from those institutions and build our own. — Paul Weyrich [8]

By 2004 Weyrich was reportedly more hopeful, given trends in public opinion and the reelection of President George W. Bush. In spite of his initial support for Bush, he often disagreed with Bush administration policies. Examples of their disagreement included the Iraq War, immigration, Harriet Miers and fiscal policy.[10]

By 1997, the Heritage Foundation and the Free Congress Foundation were two of the top five biggest and best funded conservative think tanks.[5]

In response to a 1999 controversy covered by the press concerning a group of Wiccans in the United States military who were holding religious rituals and services on the grounds of the bases they were assigned to, Weyrich sought to exempt Wiccans from the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment[14][broken citation] and bar them from serving the military altogether. Weyrich, as president of the Free Congress Foundation, led a coalition of ten religious right organizations that attempted a Christian boycott on joining the military until all Wiccans were removed from the services, saying:

Until the Army withdraws all official support and approval from witchcraft, no Christian should enlist or re-enlist in the Army, and Christian parents should not allow their children to join the Army … An Army that sponsors satanic rituals is unworthy of representing the United States of America … The official approval of satanism and witchcraft by the Army is a direct assault on the Christian faith that generations of American soldiers have fought and died for … If the Army wants witches and satanists in its ranks, then it can do it without Christians in those ranks. It’s time for the Christians in this country to put a stop to this kind of nonsense. A Christian recruiting strike will compel the Army to think seriously about what it is doing. — Paul Weyrich ‘Satanic’ Army Unworthy of Representing United States, Free Congress Foundation press release, June 9, 1999.[14][broken citation]

According to anti-Dominionism activists TheocracyWatch, and the Anti-Defamation League, both Weyrich and his Free Congress Foundation were closely associated with Dominionism.[15][16] TheocracyWatch listed both as leading examples of dominionism in action, citing a manifesto from Paul Weyrich’s Free Congress Foundation, The Integration of Theory and Practice: A Program for the New Traditionalist Movement[17], illuminates the tactics of the dominionist movement. [15] TheocracyWatch, which calls it Paul Weyrich’s Training Manual, and others consider this manifesto a virtual playbook for how the theocratic right in American politics can get and keep power.[18] The Anti-Defamation League identified Weyrich and the Free Congress Foundation as part of an alliance of more than 50 of the most prominent conservative Christian leaders and organizations that threaten the separation of church and state. [16] Weyrich continued to reject allegations that he advocated theocracy, saying, This statement is breathtaking in its bigotry [19] and dismissed the claim that the Christian right wished to transform America into a theocracy.[20] Katherine Yurica has written that Weyrich guided Eric Heubeck in writing The Integration of Theory and Practice, the Free Congress Foundation’s strategic plan published in 2001 by the foundation,[21] which she says calls for the use of deception, misinformation and divisiveness to allow conservative evangelical Christian Republicans to gain and keep control of seats of power in the government of the United States.

Weyrich publicly rejected accusations that he wanted America to become a theocracy:
Some political observers may see the presence of religious conservatives in the Republican Party as a threat. My former friend Kevin Phillips [author of American Theocracy], who in the early days of the New Right was so helpful, now acts as if a theocracy governs the nation. Phillips was the architect of President Richard M. Nixon’s Southern strategy, which worked brilliantly until Nixon did himself in. Now that the South does have the upper hand in the Republican Party Phillips is bitter about it. I see no theocracy here. As someone who has helped the religious right transition to the political process, I would have nothing to do with something akin to Iran translated into Americanize. — Paul Weyrich The Values Summit series – legislative opportunities. RenewAmerica.us, July 6, 2006. [20]

He also often made an issue out of what he claimed were his fellow conservatives’ behavior and abuse of power, and he encouraged a grassroots movement in conservatism he called the next conservatism which he said should work to restore America from the bottom up. Illustrating his point, Weyrich drew a comparison between how the Christian church grew amidst a decaying Roman Empire and how the next conservatism can restore an American republic as a falling America Empire collapses around us. [22]

Weyrich advocated a revival of the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, with the aim of identifying and removing communists from the media, which he contended still harbors infiltrators from the former Soviet Union:

From what Igor Gaidar told me, we needed to have revived these committees with a focus not so much on Hollywood but on the media itself. We know that one New York Times reporter, who always portrayed Stalin as Good Old Uncle Joe, was in fact a Communist and operated for decades on the Times staff. Were there any more? How about the Washington Post? . . . Why not reconstitute these two committees and let them work hand in glove with the FBI. That is what happened before 1965. J. Edgar Hoover would often suggest good targets to be investigated. — Paul Weyrich Townhall.com, September 7, 2006.[23]

…the New York Times Magazine quoted Paul Weyrich, who started the Heritage Foundation, they [think tanks] have 1,500 conservative radio talk show hosts [2]

Weyrich once wrote on his website before Easter that the Jewish people killed Jesus. This unleashed a storm of protest, especially from Jewish organizations accusing him of Antisemitism. David Horowitz defended Weyrich against the charges.[25] Weyrich later apologized.

Quotes

* I don’t want everybody to vote. Elections are not won by a majority of the people. They never have been from the beginning of our country and they are not now. As a matter of fact, our leverage in the elections quite candidly goes up as the voting populace goes down. [28]
* We are different from previous generations of conservatives…We are no longer working to preserve the status quo. We are radicals, working to overturn the present power structure of this country. -Soloma, John. Ominous Politics: The New Conservative Labyrinth, 1984, Hill and Wang, New York.
* The real enemy is the secular humanist mindset which seeks to destroy everything that is good in this society. – The Rights and Wrongs of the Religious Right, Freedom Writer, Institute for First Amendment Studies, October 1995.
* Christ was crucified by the Jews…. He was not what the Jews had expected so they considered Him a threat. Thus He was put to death. , Indeed, He is Risen , April 13, 2001[29]

# We have to stop the movement of all our manufacturing to China and other foreign countries. If that requires tariffs, starting with tariffs to protect industries of strategic importance, so be it. [30]
# If we want to stop or at least reduce outsourcing of jobs to foreign countries, we should tax outsourcing. In my view, that would be a good new tax. [31]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Weyrich

Paul Weyrich’s Training Manual

To read the original training manual from the Free Congress Foundation called The Integration of Theory and Practice: A Program for the New Traditionalist Movement, click here.

The following has been copied from the Yurica Report:
Conquering by Stealth and Deception
How the Dominionists Are Succeeding in Their Quest for National Control and World Power

By Katherine Yurica

September 14, 2004

Americans and the main-stream media have been very slow in catching on to the fact that we are in a war-a war that is cultural, religious and political. One document not mentioned in The Despoiling of America is the closeted manual that reveals how the right wing in American politics can get and keep power. It was created under the tutelage of Paul Weyrich , the man who founded the Free Congress Foundation. Conservative leaders consider Weyrich to be the most powerful man in American politics today. There is no question of his immense influence in conservative circles. He is also considered the founder of the Heritage Foundation , a conservative think tank made possible with funding from Joseph Coors and Richard Mellon-Scaife. Weyrich served as the Founding President from 1973-1974.

To get a sense of how revolutionary the political fight for power in the U.S. is, we need to look at a few quotes from what has been dubbed, Paul Weyrich’s Teaching Manual, the Free Congress Foundation’s strategic plan on how to gain control of the government of the U.S. Written by Eric Heubeck, and titled, The Integration of Theory and Practice: A Program for the New Traditionalist Movement, the document is no longer available at the Free Congress Foundation’s website for obvious reasons. But excerpts are published at the Yurica Report . The excerpts explain why the Dominionists are winning; the tactics they endorse are sheer Machiavellian:

I have paraphrased the four immoral principles of the Dominionist movement as the following:

1) Falsehoods are not only acceptable, they are a necessity. The corollary is: The masses will accept any lie if it is spoken with vigor, energy and dedication.

2) It is necessary to be cast under the cloak of goodness whereas all opponents and their ideas must be cast as evil.

3) Complete destruction of every opponent must be accomplished through unrelenting personal attacks.

4) The creation of the appearance of overwhelming power and brutality is necessary in order to destroy the will of opponents to launch opposition of any kind.

According to Jeffry Sharlet, Hitler’s Mein Kampf and William L. Shirer’s The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich are studied as textbooks in a particular leadership training group he wrote about in Harper’s magazine.

Eric Heubeck, the author of Mr. Weyrich’s manual, does not mince words. Here is a sample of the most immoral political program ever adopted by a political movement in this country. Notice that the manual begins with the adoption of the fundamental fact of Machiavellianism:

This essay is based on the belief that the truth of an idea is not the primary reason for its acceptance. Far more important is the energy and dedication of the idea’s promoters-in other words, the individuals composing a social or political movement.

We must, as Mr. Weyrich has suggested, develop a network of parallel cultural institutions existing side-by-side with the dominant leftist cultural institutions. The building and promotion of these institutions will require the development of a movement that will not merely reform the existing post-war conservative movement, but will in fact be forced to supersede it-if it is to succeed at all-because it will pursue a very different strategy and be premised on a very different view of its role in society..

There will be three main stages in the unfolding of this movement. The first stage will be devoted to the development of a highly motivated elite able to coordinate future activities. The second stage will be devoted to the development of institutions designed to make an impact on the wider elite and a relatively small minority of the masses. The third stage will involve changing the overall character of American popular culture..

Our movement will be entirely destructive, and entirely constructive. We will not try to reform the existing institutions. We only intend to weaken them, and eventually destroy them. We will endeavor to knock our opponents off-balance and unsettle them at every opportunity. All of our constructive energies will be dedicated to the creation of our own institutions..

We will maintain a constant barrage of criticism against the Left. We will attack the very legitimacy of the Left. We will not give them a moment’s rest. We will endeavor to prove that the Left does not deserve to hold sway over the heart and mind of a single American. We will offer constant reminders that there is an alternative, there is a better way. When people have had enough of the sickness and decay of today’s American culture, they will be embraced by and welcomed into the New Traditionalist movement. The rejection of the existing society by the people will thus be accomplished by pushing them and pulling them simultaneously.

We will use guerrilla tactics to undermine the legitimacy of the dominant regime.

We must create a countervailing force that is just as adept as the Left at intimidating people and institutions that are used as tools of left-wing activism but are not ideologically committed, such as Hollywood celebrities, multinational corporations, and university administrators. We must be feared, so that they will think twice before opening their mouths.

We will be results-oriented rather than good intentions-oriented. Making a good-faith effort and being ideologically sound will be less important than advancing the goals of the movement.

We need more people with fire in the belly, and we need a message that attracts those kinds of people.. We must reframe this struggle as a moral struggle, as a transcendent struggle, as a struggle between good and evil. And we must be prepared to explain why this is so. We must provide the evidence needed to prove this using images and simple terms..

In actuality, the concept that dominionist minded conservatives should establish parallel or dual institutions is a new form of segregation. This is especially apparent when a conservative institution offers the same services or products as the liberal oriented institutions. In other words, if it is not possible for dominionists to takeover or grab power in every institution-they create a parallel world so that the left is to be separated and segregated from the right and conservatives are urged to purchase from the conservative institutions.

The fact that Weyrich’s plan has actually been instituted is all around us. The Council on Foreign Relations is mimicked by the secretive dominionist Council for National Policy. [2] The so called liberal press is countered with Fox News and Sun Myung Moon’s Washington Times , and dominionist talk show hosts spew their right wing political views and venom from coast to coast. Public schools are countered with private home and chartered schools. And in the last few months a move has been made within the churches to break-up and divide denominations along the lines of conservative beliefs in certain social issues so that two sets of churches will be created: one that practices right wing politics and one that is liberal

It almost mimics what Jesus said he would do in the Bible: those on the Lord’s left will be cast into outer darkness, those on the Lord’s right will be the chosen elect, the over-comers of God’s people. This biblical imagery appears to be a powerful biblical affirmation for church-goers who desire to be on the Lord’s right politically as well-until one realizes that when the two groups of people stand facing the Lord-the mirror image is reversed: those on his right will be those facing him on the left; those on the Lord’s left will be those facing him on the Lord’s right It’s just an aside, but it suggests to me that justice will actually be done, when the Lord says, I never knew you to those who loudly proclaim their hypocritical religious devotion to him, while ignoring his command to feed the poor and cloth the naked.

The biblical passage goes on to say that those about to be cast out ask, When did we fail to feed the poor and cloth the naked? The answer is: In as much as you did it unto the least of these my children-you did it unto me. When dominionists seek to privatize medicare and social security, and deregulate corporate controls on whole industries, so that the poor and needy become poorer and needier, they have done it to the Lord.

To read more from Katherine Yurica on this manual click here. Last updated: February-2005

http://www.theocracywatch.org/yurica_weyrich_manual.htm

***
PERSON PROFILE
Weyrich, Paul M.

12 institutional roles for $2,617,045

Paul Weyrich at Tom Delay Tribute Dinner May 12, 2005 According to Political Research Associates (PRA), a think tank based in Cambridge, Mass. that tracks right-wing politics, Paul Weyrich is a key strategist for the secular and religious right. One of Weyrich’s positions is that the U.S. government should formally declare a war on drugs, so that suspected drug offenders could be treated as prisoners of war, with no right to habeas corpus or trial, and could be held indefinitely, until the war is over. One of Weyrich’s advisors on eastern Europe, according to PRA, is a fellow named Laslo Pasztor, who …served a prison term for his role as a functionary in a Hungarian pro-Nazi party, the Arrow Cross. [From an article by Scott Kerr, Shepherd Express, 5/19/94.]

Paul Weyrich at Salute to Senator Jesse Helms September 20, 2005 Weyrich is also a strong proponent of school choice. In 1993, according to PRA, he arranged for Milwaukee mayor John Norquist to give a speech entitled School Choice: Education’s Future before a St. Louis meeting of the Council for National Policy, an organization that includes such right-wing luminaries as former Nixon Justice Department head Edwin Meese III, anti-E.R.A. leader Phyllis Schafly, Oliver North of Contragate fame and the conservative direct mail guru Richard Viguerie.

Weyrich, by the way, is a local boy from Kenosha (WI).

–The Feeding Trough

Runs the Free Congress Foundation (FCF). Weyrich is a strategist of the New Right. FCF evolved from the Committee for the Survival of a Free Congress and Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, and was founded by Colorado beer magnate Joe Coors. Other groups affiliated with FCF include Free Congress Political Action Committee. Publishes Empowerment See also Coalitions for America.

–From Political Research Associates

Paul Weyrich is a central figure in conservative circles who, as of May, 1994, had received more than $3 million in Bradley Foundation money.

In 1973, Weyrich, along with right-wing brewery magnate Joseph Coors, established the Heritage Foundation, the country’s preeminent conservative think tank, responsible for the policy papers that became the blueprint for such Reagan Administration policies as the Star Wars Defense Strategy, massive budget cuts and trickle-down economic theory.

—The Feeding Trough

divider
12 institutional roles for $2,617,045
Year Role Hrs/wk Pay Src 990 src
Recipients
Council for National Policy
4 roles; show | hide | all | profile
2005 Secretary / Treasurer 990 Part V
2004 Secretary / Treasurer 990 Part V
2001 Director 990 Part V
1999 Director 990 Part V
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc.
8 roles; show | hide | all | profile
2005 CEO / Founder 40 $ 380,597 990 Part V
2004 CEO / Founder 40 $ 379,741 990 Part V
2003 CEO / Founder 40 $ 330,196 990 Part V
2002 President 40 $ 343,596 990 Part V
2000 President 40 $ 315,240 990 Part V
1999 President 40 $ 298,881 990 Part V
1998 President 40 $ 285,414 990 Part V
1997 President 40 $ 283,380 990 Part V

http://www.mediatransparency.org/personprofile.php?personID=34

***
Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation

David and Charles Koch, sons of the ultraconservative founder of Koch Industries, Fred Koch, direct the three Koch family foundations: the Charles G. Koch Foundation, the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation, and the Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation. David and Charles control Koch Industries, the second-largest privately owned company and the largest privately owned energy company in the nation; they have a combined net worth of approximately $4 billion, placing them among the top 50 wealthiest individuals in the country and among the top 100 wealthiest individuals in the world in 2003, according to Forbes.

Following in the footsteps of their father, a member of the John Birch Society, the Kochs clearly have a conservative bent. Charles Koch founded the Cato Institute, and David Koch co-founded Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) [now FreedomWorks], where he serves as chairman of the board of directors. David also serves on the board of the Cato Institute. The Koch foundations make substantial annual contributions to these organizations (more than $12 million to each between 1985 and 2002) as well as to other influential conservative think tanks, advocacy groups, media organizations, academic institutes and legal organizations, thus participating in every level of the policy process.

$ 76,012,934 total assets at end of 2005
$ 2,625,951 grants paid
$ 30,617,936 total revenue
$ 3,611,046 total expenses

Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation

For information on the Claude Lambe Charitable Foundation, along with the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation see the Koch Foundations page

$ 18,872,126 total assets at end of 2005
$ 3,551,020 grants paid
$ 346,874 total revenue
$ 3,869,727 total expenses
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation

For information on the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation, along with the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the Claude Lambe Charitable Foundation see the Koch Foundations Page

$ 3,704,661 total assets at end of 2006
$ 4,340,000 grants paid
$ 3,047,936 total revenue
$ 4,351,123 total expenses

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funders.php

RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation

PO Box 2256
Wichita, KS 67201-2256

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Total contributed: $ 39,636,322
Name Total
George Mason University Foundation, Inc. 17,872,250
Wichita Collegiate School 3,343,347
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation 2,000,000
Bill of Rights Institute 1,567,000
Fred C. & Mary R. Koch Foundation 1,557,000
Youth Entrepreneurs of Kansas 1,476,117
Mercatus Center 1,442,000
National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship 1,341,386
George Mason University 1,042,605
Kansas Cultural Trust 982,860
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 674,484
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 633,200
Institute for Humane Studies 556,457
International Foundation for Research in Experimental Economics 440,000
Steadman Sports Medicine Foundation 410,000
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy 375,000
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 281,250
American Legislative Exchange Council 273,000
Institute for Justice 265,000
Environmental Literacy Council 187,516
Harvard University 125,000
Acton Institute For The Study of Religion and Liberty 122,500
Phillips Foundation, Inc. 107,500
Tax Foundation 100,000
Acton Business School 100,000
National Salvation Army, The 100,000
Rand Corporation, The 100,000
Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) 95,500
Philanthropy Roundtable 94,500
Resources for the Future 90,000
Foundation for Teaching Economics 80,000
Heritage Foundation, The 78,000
American Prosecutors Research Institute 67,000
Fund For American Studies, The 60,000
Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) 59,500
Reason Foundation 57,000
Independence Institute 56,661
Smithsonian Institution 55,000
JFK School of Government 55,000
Texas Public Policy Foundation 52,016
Thoreau Institute, The 50,000
Educational Research Institute 50,000
San Jose State University Foundation 50,000
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research 50,000
National Tax Limitation Foundation 50,000
Goldwater Institute 48,220
Sand County Foundation, Inc. 46,750
Atlas Economic Research Foundation 40,000
Heartland Institute 37,578
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 35,000
Philadelphia Society, The 32,600
Center for Independent Thought 32,500
Libertarian Review Foundation 25,000
National Results Council, The 25,000
Kansas State University Foundation 25,000
Institute for Responsible Citizenship 25,000
Reason Public Policy Institute 25,000
Foundation for Economic Education 22,500
Fox-Wolfe Watershed Alliance, Inc. 20,000
New England Deaconess Hospital 20,000
Russell E. Windsor Research Foundation 20,000
Harding University 20,000
University of Texas at Dallas 20,000
Media Institute 20,000
Fraser Institute, The 18,221
Center for Excellence in Education 17,500
John Locke Foundation 17,000
Gallatin Writers, Inc. 15,000
Bartley Institute, The 15,000
Foundation for Research on Economics 15,000
Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation 15,000
Capital Research Center 15,000
Competitive Enterprise Institute 15,000
Wildlife Habitat Council 15,000
Granville Academy 15,000
Clemson University 15,000
Palmer R. Chitester Fund 12,500
Leadership Institute 12,000
Institute for Political Economy 12,000
Young America’s Foundation 10,000
Alliance for School Choice, Inc. 10,000
New York University 10,000
Mackinac Center for Public Policy 10,000
Wichita State University 10,000
Future of Freedom Foundation, The 10,000
Woodrow Wilson Center, The 8,500
Institute of Spontaneous Order Economics 7,500
National Center for Policy Analysis 7,000
Texas A&M University 6,500
Cato Institute 6,000
Groundswell USA 5,000
Landmark Legal Foundation 5,000
Encounter for Culture and Education, Inc. 5,000
Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace 5,000
University of Kansas 5,000
Results Educational Fund, Inc. 5,000
Foundation for Human Development 5,000
University of Houston 5,000
Social Philosophy and Policy Foundation 5,000
Liliana Ivascu 4,057
Otto Giesenfeld 3,939
Laeeth Is’Harc 3,597
Timothy W. Doyle 3,329
John S. Tottie 3,312
Robert J. Dole Federal Building 3,036
Carolina Critic 3,000
Washington University 3,000
Fairfax Court-Appointed Special Advocates 2,500
Carl Menger Institute 2,500
Washington Legal Foundation 2,500
Advocates for Self-Government, Inc. 2,500
Institute for Independent Education 2,500
Employment Policy Foundation 2,500
John Peter Frantz 2,317
Christopher Dunn 2,302
Max D. Isaacson 2,288
Stephen F. Swain 2,287
Marilyn C. Ho 2,287
Robin A. Hulsey 2,227
Jill E. Patterson 2,205
Eric A. Kleiin 2,191
Karen E. Manfield 2,191
Yen Trac 2,191
Thomas F. Harris 2,187
Jennifer R. Avery 2,108
Michael A. Bast 2,057
Rebecca M. Boggs 2,047
Konrad S. Godleske 2,032
Institute for Energy Research 2,000
Institute for Objectivist Studies 2,000
Saint Vincent College 2,000
Shellie A. Yule 1,961
Konstantine Kyros 1,959
Lewis Saideman 1,941
David E. Foster 1,911
Mathew R. Eastabrook 1,906
Stephen S. Jamison 1,905
Rajesh Yerasi 1,879
George S. Wang 1,868
Mathew H. Taylor 1,851
Todd R. Kice 1,611
Adam Smith Institute 1,000
Mont Pelerin Society, The 1,000
Arkansas Policy Foundation 1,000
Loyola University 1,000
Media Research Center, Inc. 975
Jimmy Heuga Center 500
Urban League of Wichita, Inc. 350

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=9

***
OTHER LINKS
Charles G. Koch foundation at Guidestar

Pete Maiden
Rolling Stone
March 14, 2007
The Dark Side of Texas: Pete Maiden Reports on Corpus Christi’s Koch Industries

Bobi Miller needs only to open the door of her home in Corpus Christi, Texas, to see the effects of toxic waste from the Koch West oil refinery. Miller’s back yard and car is covered in a thick black sludge, and across the street is the school where she used to teach before a lawsuit revealed that the Koch refinery had released ninety tons of benzene, a highly toxic chemical. Miller and other teachers were often forced to implement a safety procedure called shelter in place, keeping students inside with the air conditioner off on days when Koch was pumping waste into the air. Today the school’s playground is completely deserted: The company bought the property, and children no longer play in the yard.

Read the full report >

Dave Johnson
Seeing the Forest
January 27, 2007
Oil Price Manipulation?

Koch Supply and Trading get contract to supply oil to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

David H Koch is one of the prime funders of the whole right-wing movement. … Koch played a role in founding the Cato Institute, which pumps out anti-government Libertarian propaganda. The Koch family had given Cato $21 million as of 1999. He was also involved in founding Citizens for a Sound Economy, another anti-government propaganda outlet. Contributions, again as of 1999, totaled $10 million. Koch also is a major funder of the Reason Foundation, yet another outlet for right-wing anti-government propaganda.

… This isn’t just a quid pro quo. This government money will be pumped straight back into the Republican machine.

Read the full report

Gretchen Morgenson
NY Times
August 27, 2006
In the three days between Koch’s board approving a bid to purchase Georgia Pacific and the announcement, trading on GP increased 120 percent

Investors who bought in that period realized a 40 percent gain in three days

…Merger talks [between Koch and GP ] continued through October and into November. Both sides conducted corporate analyses — known as due diligence — from Nov. 8-11. Koch Industries’ board voted to approve a bid on Nov. 10.

That day, volume in Georgia-Pacific shares jumped 37 percent…and the number of trades in the stock rose significantly as well…On Friday, Nov. 11, volume increased yet 66 percent more from the previous day’s high level. Georgia-Pacific shares rose 5.5 percent over the period. The company made no announcements either day…

On Sunday, Nov. 13, Koch Industries announced that it would pay $21 billion for Georgia-Pacific, or $48 a share, a 39 percent premium to the closing price the previous Friday. Anyone who bought Georgia-Pacific shares on either Nov. 10 or Nov. 11 stood to gain 40 percent in just a few days. A spokeswoman for Koch Industries did not return phone calls seeking comment.

Read the full report >

Max Blumenthal
January 31, 2006
Who’s Really Addicted to Oil?

The GOP is addicted to the oil industry’s money. According to the Center for Public Integrity, the GOP has accepted 73% of the whopping $67 million the oil industry made in political contributions between 2000 and 2004. Bush himself is the oil industry’s largest recipient, having taking over $1.7 million from the oil industry from 1998-2004. The wheels of the conservative movement, meanwhile, are lubricated by Koch Industries, the largest privately held oil company in the US. The anti-government think tank, the Cato Institute, was created by the Koch brothers, who remain its largest funders.

Read the full report >

ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
New York Times
November 14, 2005
Paper Maker Georgia-Pacific to Be Sold to Koch

Georgia-Pacific, the paper giant that makes Dixie cups and Brawny paper towels, agreed to be sold yesterday for $13.2 billion to Koch Industries, a family-controlled conglomerate that will become the nation’s largest privately held company.

The deal may transform Koch, which owns dozens of companies with few recognizable brands, into a consumer and retail powerhouse…Koch, based in Wichita, Kan., brings in more than $60 billion in sales each year from a diverse range of businesses including petroleum and chemicals, ranching, commodities, financial services and paper. With the addition of Georgia-Pacific, which will become a unit of Koch, the company’s revenue will exceed $80 billion, and it will have more than 80,000 employees around the world.

…The company is owned by Charles and David Koch, two of four Koch brothers, as well as other family members and associates. The largest private company in terms of sales had been Cargill, the agricultural conglomerate, which had revenue of $62 billion last year.

Read the full report >

Max Blumenthal
The Nation
June 20, 2005
Sam Brownback’s Blind Ambition Tour

In June 1996…Triad Management Services, a shady, for-profit corporation run by a veteran Republican fundraiser…funneled cash to Brownback’s campaign through its scores of clients…Triad’s finance director even accompanied Brownback to Republican headquarters to dial for dollars. Under federal election law, corporations are not allowed to make direct contributions or provide free services (like fundraising help) to politicians…Triad steered $410,000 to a front group, Citizens for the Republic Education Fund, that ran a single attack ad against Docking [Brownback’s opponent] repeatedly throughout a two-week period, propelling Brownback to victory. Democratic Senate investigators believe this money came almost entirely from the Wichita-based Koch Industries, America’s largest privately owned energy company, which had already contributed more than $30,000 to Brownback’s campaign.

Read the full report >

Read the September, 2000 97-count Indictment of Koch Industries for Environmental Crimes .

David Sirota
Sirotablog
May 12, 2005
Judge Who Let Cheney Off Linked to Major Oil Companies

Federal Judge A. Raymond Randolph yesterday ruled in favor of Vice President Dick Cheney in Cheney’s efforts to keep his energy task force records secret. Cheney has already been cited by the GAO for allowing energy companies to write much of the task force’s documents. So why would the judge make this ruling? Could it have anything to do with a sympathy for energy companies brought on by his close proximity to some of America’s biggest oil companies?

Check out the details. Randolph serves on the Judicial Advisory board of George Mason’s Law & Economics Center (he has apparently served there for at least a few years, and may still currently). This is the same Law & Economics Center famous for taking judges on training junkets and for being financed with huge amounts of cash from oil industry giants like Exxon. Randolph is also an adjunct law professor at George Mason University, a place that has taken millions from Koch Industries – another major oil company (for more on Koch’s multi-million dollar ties to George Mason, see Media Transparency’s special site).

For more, see this original post at Citizens for Legitimate Government.

Read the full report >

WaterTechOnline
March 3, 2000
Koch formally sentenced for violations

Koch Petroleum Group LP was fined $6 million at a formal sentencing after pleading guilty to violating the Oil Pollution Act and the Clean Water Act by negligently discharging oil and wastewater at its Rosemount [MN] refiner
Also, The Koch Pipeline Co., LP, another subsidiary of Koch Industries, had agreed to pay some $35 million in fines and penalties for violations of the Clean Water Act, as part of a settlement agreement with the US Justice Department and the Texas Attorney General’s Office. The civil penalty is the largest ever assessed against a single company under the provisions of the act.

Read the full report >

Center for Public Integrity
July 15, 2004
Koch’s Low Profile Belies Political Power

Private oil company does both business and politics with the shades drawn

Koch Industries could be the biggest oil company you have never heard of — unless, that is, you hang around the halls of government in Washington

Read the full report >

Marc Morano
CNSNews.com
September 23, 2002
Major GOP Donor Receives Federal Oil Contract

The U.S. Department of Energy’s selection of Koch Supply & Trading, LP, to supply oil to the nation’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), is drawing fire from groups who accuse the administration of rewarding one of the Republican Party’s largest donors with a plum government contract.

Koch Industries and one of the company’s senior officers have made hundreds of thousands of dollars in political contributions since 1999 and before, with federal election records showing the bulk of those contributions going to Republicans.

Read the full report >

Russell Mokhiber
Ari & I
May 3, 2001
White House Press Briefing with Ari Fleischer

May 3, 2001: Ari, yesterday, I asked you about Koch Industries, which last month pled guilty to a felony environmental crime…

Read the full report >

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=9


RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation

PO Box 2256
Wichita, KS 67201-2256

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Total contributed: $ 37,672,290
Name Total
Cato Institute 9,200,000
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 6,025,375
Heritage Foundation, The 2,339,000
George Mason University 2,311,149
George Mason University Foundation, Inc. 2,074,893
Allen-Lambe House Foundation 1,652,351
Brookings Institution 1,229,400
Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) 1,210,000
Institute for Justice 1,000,000
Americans for Prosperity Foundation 1,000,000
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 804,000
Washington Legal Foundation 750,000
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. 725,000
Reason Foundation 717,000
Capital Research Center 590,000
Kansas Cultural Trust 460,247
Institute for Humane Studies 455,000
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy 385,000
Competitive Enterprise Institute 336,420
National Center for Policy Analysis 275,000
University of Kansas 250,000
Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, Inc. 250,000
Center for Equal Opportunity 240,000
Stanford University 200,000
Ethics and Public Policy Center, Inc. 190,000
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 175,000
Citizens for Congressional Reform Foundation 175,000
Tax Foundation 150,000
American Legislative Exchange Council 120,000
Acton Institute For The Study of Religion and Liberty 115,000
Texas Public Policy Foundation 104,500
Friends University 90,288
Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) 90,000
National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Legal Foundation 88,000
Institute for Energy Research 85,000
John Locke Foundation 80,000
Independent Women’s Forum 70,000
Leadership Institute 65,000
Carbon Dioxide & Global Change Center 60,000
Media Institute 60,000
National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship 60,000
University of Chicago 59,000
Defenders of Property Rights 55,000
Pope Center for Higher Education 50,000
North Carolina Institute for Constitutional Law 50,000
University of Kansas Endowment Assocation 50,000
Frontiers of Freedom 50,000
American Council on Science and Health 45,000
University of Virginia Center for Politics 45,000
Wichita Center for the Arts 45,000
Philanthropy Roundtable 44,200
Texas Justice Foundation 40,000
Heartland Institute 40,000
Center for Individual Rights 40,000
Americans for Tax Reform Foundation 35,000
Institute for Policy Innovation 35,000
American Council for Capital Formation 35,000
Center of the American Experiment 31,500
George C. Marshall Institute 30,000
Free Enterprise Education Institute 30,000
Atlas Economic Research Foundation 28,500
National Taxpayers Union Foundation 27,500
Young America’s Foundation 25,000
International Policy Network 25,000
Tech Central Science Foundation 25,000
Wichita Park Alliance 25,000
Alliance for School Choice, Inc. 25,000
Henry Hazlitt Foundation 25,000
Frontiers of Freedom Institute 25,000
State Policy Network 24,000
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc. 20,000
Families Against Mandatory Minimums 20,000
Atlantic Legal Foundation 20,000
Independence Institute 16,000
Montreal Economic Institute 15,000
Free Enterprise Institute 15,000
Hudson Institute, Inc. 12,650
Alexis de Tocqueville Institution 12,500
National Environmental Policy Institute 12,500
Washington University 11,500
Buckeye Institute for Public Policy Solutions 10,000
Kennesaw State College Foundation 10,000
Consumer Alert 10,000
Pacific Legal Foundation 10,000
Wichita State University 8,000
Institute for Political Economy 8,000
Wichita Symphony Society, Inc. 6,000
Institute for Objectivist Studies 5,000
South Carolina Policy Council 5,000
Science & Environmental Policy Project 5,000
Music Theatre for Young People, Inc. 5,000
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 5,000
Mackinac Center for Public Policy 5,000
Fraser Institute, The 5,000
Roger Bate 4,080
Magnus Nilsson 3,870
Sandeep S. Mangalmurti 3,330
Daniel A. Laguttuta 3,180
Roberto Helquera 3,179
Lance C. Arney 3,167
D. Glenn Whitman 3,153
Rhonda D. Smith 3,149
Grant Thompson 3,093
Erica E. Gum 3,071
Kristian M. Dahl 3,023
Mathew S. Kaye 2,996
Christine Caldwell 2,972
Christopher J. Nelson 2,933
Adam Mackler 2,905
Michelle Boardman 2,829
John L. Berlau 2,805
Gene Healy 2,799
Thomas D. Walls 2,797
Melissa L. English 2,697
William Lauber 2,694
Kristen Krash 2,648
Robert L. Pollock 2,648
Colene Lind 2,642
Michael P. Cole 2,634
Sean P. Costello 2,632
Michael R. Katchmark 2,555
Peter M. Lee 2,553
Christian I. Whitten 2,523
Employment Policy Foundation 2,500
Derek M. Rose 2,372
American Conservative Union Foundation, The 2,000
Dartmouth College 1,742
Daniel F. Mcinnis 1,619
Jim Carty 1,027
Regent University 1,000

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=8

FUNDER PROFILE
Claude R. Lambe Charitable Foundation

ein: 48-0935563

64 institutional roles

PO Box 2256
Wichita, KS 67201-2256

For information on the Claude Lambe Charitable Foundation, along with the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation see the Koch Foundations page

divider
64 institutional roles

(show all | hide all)
Year Role Hrs/week Pay Source 990 src
Beehler, Alex A.
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (2) | profile
2003 Vice President 13 990 Part V
Fink, Richard H.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (35) | profile
2005 President / Director 1 990 Part VIII-1
2004 President / Director 1 990 Part V
2003 President / Director 1 990 Part V
2002 President / Director 1 990 Part V
2001 President / Director 1 990 Part V
2000 Director 1 990 Part V
1998 President / Director 1 990 Part V
1997 President / Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 President / Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
Gable, Wayne
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (3) | profile
2000 President 1 990 Part V
Gentry, Kevin L.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (19) | profile
2005 Vice President 7 990 Part VIII-1
2004 Vice President 17 990 Part V
2003 Vice President 20 990 Part V
Koch, Charles G.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (36) | profile
2005 Director 1 990 Part VIII-1
2004 Director 1 990 Part V
2003 Director 1 990 Part V
2002 Director 1 990 Part V
2001 Director 1 990 Part V
2000 Director 1 990 Part V
1998 Trustee / Director 990 Part V
1997 Trustee / Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Trustee / Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
Koch, Elizabeth R.
4 roles; show | hide | all roles (9) | profile
2005 Director 1 990 Part VIII-1
2004 Director 1 990 Part V
2003 Director 1 990 Part V
2002 Director 1 990 Part V
Koch, Elizabeth B.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (20) | profile
2005 Director 1 990 Part VIII-1
2004 Director 1 990 Part V
2003 Director 1 990 Part V
2002 Director 1 990 Part V
2001 Director 1 990 Part V
2000 Vice President / Director 1 990 Part V
1998 Vice President / Director 1 990 Part V
1997 Vice President / Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Vice President / Director 990

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=8

***

RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation
4111 E. 37th St. N.
Wichita, KS 67220-3203

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2006

Total contributed: $ 54,563,739
Name Total
CaP CURE 6,867,000
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 6,206,853
Cato Institute 4,043,240
Ballet Theatre Foundation 3,301,041
American Museum of Natural History 3,050,000
Deerfield Academy, Trustees of 2,926,941
Metropolitan Museum of Art 2,625,000
Rockefeller University 2,205,000
Institute for Humane Studies 2,100,000
Institute for the Study of Human Origins 2,035,912
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center 1,950,000
Reason Foundation 1,522,212
George Mason University 1,400,000
Institute for Justice 1,350,000
Aspen Institute, Inc., The 1,115,000
National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship 1,080,400
New York Hospital 1,030,000
WGBH Educational Foundation 802,022
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 800,000
Library of Congress, The 640,000
House Ear Institute 625,000
Ancient Egypt Research Associates, Inc. 529,000
Children’s Hospital Boston 500,000
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Association 450,000
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy 400,800
George Mason University Foundation, Inc. 350,000
Earthwatch Expeditions 320,000
Competitive Enterprise Institute 315,000
Society of the New York Hospital Fund, Inc. 315,000
Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research 300,000
African Wildlife Foundation 271,000
National Center for Policy Analysis 260,000
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 200,000
Cambridge College 172,000
Independent Institute 160,000
New York City Ballet, Inc. 150,000
New York University 150,000
WNET/Thirteen Educational Broadcasting Network 140,000
Sail America Foundation for International Understanding 110,000
Business Executives for National Security 108,000
Partnership for Americas Cup Technology Foundation 100,000
National Prostate Cancer Coalition 100,000
Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital 100,000
Whitehead Institute 100,000
Bill of Rights Institute 100,000
Kids Stuff Foundation 100,000
Explorers Club, The 81,000
Southampton Hospital 65,000
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. 50,000
Young America’s Foundation 50,000
Brooklyn Museum 50,000
University of Minnesota 50,000
Independence Institute 50,000
Dance Theatre of Harlem 40,000
Libertarian Review Foundation 35,000
Little Star, Inc. 35,000
Interfaith Center of New York 35,000
Families Against Mandatory Minimums 31,000
Citizens for America Educational Foundation 30,000
Alzheimer’s Association 30,000
American Research Center in Egypt, Inc. 26,318
Armitage Foundation, The 25,000
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 25,000
Economic Security 2000 25,000
Rogosin Institute 25,000
Aspen Valley Medical Foundation 21,000
Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, Inc. 20,000
Hudson Institute, Inc. 20,000
New York City Mission Society 12,000
Nancy Davis Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis 10,000
Social Philosophy and Policy Foundation 10,000
Stanford University 10,000
Salk Institute for Biological Studies 10,000
Performing Artservices, Inc. 10,000
God’s Love We Deliver 10,000
Prevent Blindness America, NYC Division 10,000
Orangutan Foundation International 10,000
New York Public Library 10,000
Henry Street Settlement 10,000
Hospital for Special Surgery 10,000
Cathedral of St. John the Divine 10,000
Boys Club of New York 10,000
Graham-Windham 10,000
Cancer Research Institute 10,000
U.S. Rugby Football Foundation 10,000
Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Foundation, The 10,000
Nature Conservancy 10,000
Children’s Advocacy Center of Manhattan 6,000
United Cerebral Palsy Research and Educational Foundation, Inc. 6,000
American Council on Science and Health 6,000
Brooklyn Academy of Music 5,000
American Cancer Society 5,000
Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association 5,000
LSB Leakey Foundation for Research Related to Man’s Origin 5,000
Blood Cancer Foundation 5,000
American Repertory Ballet 5,000
Long Island University 3,000
Rogers Memorial Library 3,000
New York School for Circus Arts, Big Apple Circus 3,000
Globe Missionary Evangelism 2,000
Bronx Council of the Arts 2,000
Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Foundation 2,000
Harvard University 1,000
California, University of, Berkeley 1,000
Museum of Television and Radio 1,000
Institute for Visual Services, Inc. 1,000
Daring Project, Inc. 1,000
Smithsonian Institution 1,000
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Fund 1,000
Community Service Society of NY 1,000
Family of Believers Church, Inc. 1,000
United States Biathlon Association, Inc. 1,000
Shelburne Children’s Center 1,000
Parrish Art Museum 1,000
Southampton Fresh Air Home for Crippled Children 1,000

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=10

FUNDER PROFILE
David H. Koch Charitable Foundation

ein: 48-0926946

39 institutional roles
4111 E. 37th St. N.
Wichita, KS 67220-3203

For information on the David H. Koch Charitable Foundation, along with the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation and the Claude Lambe Charitable Foundation see the Koch Foundations Page

Telephone: (316) 828-5552

Vonda Holliman – Treas.
From the David H. Koch Foundation IRS Form 990 for the year 2000:

Revenues: $4.9 million
$2.9 million from David Koch
(address: New York, NY);
$2 million from the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation
(Wichita, KS).

Total qualifying distributions (how much it gave away): $4.8 million

divider
39 institutional roles

Koch, David H.
12 roles; show | hide | all roles (20) | profile
2006 President/Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 President/Director 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 President/Director 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 President/Director 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 President /Director 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 President /Director 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 President 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 President 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 President 990-PF Part VIII-1
1997 President 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 President 990-PF Part VIII-1
1995 President 990-PF Part VIII-1

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=10

***

Sarah Scaife Foundation

Financed by the Mellon industrial, oil and banking fortune. At one time its largest single holding was stock in the Gulf Oil Corporation. Became active in funding conservative causes in 1973, when Richard Mellon Scaife became chairman of the foundation. In the 1960s, Richard had inherited an estimated $200 million from his mother, Sarah. Forbes magazine has estimated his personal net worth at $800 million, making him the 138th richest person in the U.S. He controls the Scaife, Carthage and Allegheny foundations. In 1993, Scaife and Carthage reportedly gave more than $17.6 million to 150 conservative think tanks. As of December 31, 1992, Scaife assets were $212,232,888 and Carthage assets were $11,937,862.

$ 289,533,932 total assets at end of 2005
$ 13,871,000 grants paid
$ 14,998,082 total revenue
$ 16,197,272 total expenses
Scaife Family Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

Note: The Scaife Family Foundation seems to have broken off from Richard Mellon Scaife’s control. It moved to Palm Beach, and is no longer listed at the Scaife Foundations’ website.

$ 87,465,105 total assets at end of 2006
$ 3,301,777 grants paid
$ 9,332,335 total revenue
$ 4,165,614 total expenses

Allegheny Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

$ 51,520,996 total assets at end of 2006
$ 2,211,800 grants paid
$ 5,143,784 total revenue
$ 2,724,133 total expenses

The Carthage Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

$ 30,108,877 total assets at end of 2006
$ 4,227,500 grants paid
$ 5,631,853 total revenue
$ 5,025,690 total expenses

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funders.php

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=3

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=3

RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Sarah Scaife Foundation

301 Grant Street
One Oxford Centre
Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Total contributed: $ 264,560,000
Name Total
Heritage Foundation, The 19,635,000
Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, Inc. 9,698,000
Center for Strategic and International Studies 8,628,000
Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace 8,545,500
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc. 5,708,000
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 5,625,000
Social Philosophy and Policy Foundation 5,350,000
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research 5,286,000
National Association of Scholars, Inc. 4,756,000
Tufts University 4,650,000
University of Chicago 4,335,800
David Horowitz Freedom Center 4,100,000
Landmark Legal Foundation 3,875,000
Judicial Watch 3,840,000
Capital Research Center 3,775,000
University of Virginia Law School Foundation 3,745,000
Foundation for Cultural Review, Inc. 3,595,000
Center for Security Policy, Inc. 3,476,000
George Mason University Foundation, Inc. 3,350,000
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. 3,335,000
Carnegie Mellon University 3,112,000
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 3,030,000
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc. 3,000,000
Phipps Conservatory, Inc. 2,971,000
Pacific Legal Foundation 2,930,000
Ethics and Public Policy Center, Inc. 2,830,000
Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy 2,672,000
Accuracy in Media, Inc. 2,640,000
National Gallery of Art 2,500,000
Hudson Institute, Inc. 2,483,000
George C. Marshall Institute 2,475,000
Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship 2,475,000
National Strategy Information Center, Inc. 2,323,000
Boston University (Boston) 2,245,500
American Bar Association Fund for Justice and Education 2,180,000
American Spectator Foundation, Inc. 2,175,000
Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) 2,017,000
Media Research Center, Inc. 1,992,000
Bowling Green State University 1,960,000
Cato Institute 1,937,500
Pepperdine University 1,925,000
University of Virginia 1,830,000
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 1,810,000
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 1,780,000
Competitive Enterprise Institute 1,690,000
Independent Women’s Forum 1,675,000
George Mason University 1,656,000
Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives 1,647,000
Atlantic Legal Foundation 1,630,000
Collegiate Network, Inc. 1,595,000
Smith College 1,550,000
Reason Foundation 1,541,000
Atlas Economic Research Foundation 1,520,000
National Center for Policy Analysis 1,510,000
National Institute for Public Policy 1,450,000
Allegheny Institute for Public Policy 1,427,500
California University of Pennsylvania 1,385,000
New York University 1,381,000
Freedom House, Inc. 1,360,000
Southeastern Legal Foundation, Inc. 1,350,000
Jamestown Foundation 1,345,000
Southwest Missouri State University 1,334,000
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh 1,327,500
Foundation for California University of Pennsylvania 1,260,000
Institute for Contemporary Studies 1,255,000
Foundation for American Communications 1,240,000
Institute on Religion and Public Life, Inc. 1,225,000
Institute on Religion and Democracy, Inc. 1,225,000
Institute for Justice 1,145,000
Foreign Policy Research Institute 1,120,000
National Taxpayers Union Foundation 1,080,000
American Civil Rights Institute 1,075,000
Institute for Health Freedom 1,075,000
Federation for American Immigration Reform 1,025,000
Johns Hopkins University 965,000
Center for Individual Rights 950,000
University of Rochester 937,000
Law and Economics Center 860,000
Center for Media and Public Affairs, Inc. 860,000
New England Legal Foundation 855,000
Center for the Study of the Presidency 850,000
American Academy for Liberal Education 835,000
Duquesne University 820,000
Allegheny Conference on Community Development 785,000
Maldon Institute, Inc. 775,000
Statistical Assessment Service 750,000
Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh Foundation, The 700,000
Goodwill Industries of Pittsburgh 700,000
University of South Carolina 695,000
Rockford Institute 675,000
Institute for Humane Studies 670,000
University of Pittsburgh 610,000
Washington Legal Foundation 610,000
Gateway Rehabilitation Center 600,000
FreedomWorks Foundation 600,000
Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, Inc. 575,000
Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) 575,000
Center for Equal Opportunity 570,000
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. 557,000
Alaska Pacific University 550,000
Michigan State University 538,000
Foundation Endowment 535,000
Environmental Literacy Council 525,000
George Washington University 515,000
Center for Immigration Studies 515,000
Stanford University 500,000
Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies 500,000
Western Pennsylvania Conservancy 500,000
Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union 500,000
Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation 500,000
Tax Foundation 485,000
Defenders of Property Rights 475,000
California, University of, Berkeley 470,000
National Legal and Policy Center 465,000
New Citizenship Project, Inc. 452,400
Safe Streets Alliance 450,000
Institute for Educational Affairs 420,000
Media Institute 420,000
Johns Hopkins University — SAIS 410,000
National Affairs, Inc. 410,000
Clemson University Foundation 410,000
American Foreign Policy Council 400,000
UCLA Foundation 400,000
Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Inc. 400,000
Southwest Missouri State University Foundation 390,000
Americans for Tax Reform Foundation 375,000
Clemson University 370,000
Invest-In-America National Council, Inc. 355,000
Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation 350,000
Heartland Institute 325,000
ETV Endowment of South Carolina, Inc. 325,000
Saint Vincent College 325,000
Foundation for Teaching Economics 315,000
Evergreen Freedom Foundation 310,000
American Bar Association Fund for Public Education 305,000
Corporation for Educational Radio and Television 300,000
Tufts University-Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy 300,000
Shady Side Academy 300,000
California, University of, Los Angeles (UCLA) 285,000
Patrick Henry Center for Individual Liberty 275,000
KCET Television 275,000
Mid-America Institute for Public Policy Research 271,000
American Civil Rights Union 250,000
Capital Legal Foundation 250,000
Betty Ford Center at Eisenhower, The 250,000
High Frontier 250,000
Mineral Information Institute 250,000
Counterterrorism & Security Education and Research Foundation 250,000
War for Empire, Inc. 250,000
American Council of Trustees and Alumni 250,000
Americans for Effective Law Enforcement 250,000
Galen Institute, Inc. 240,000
One Nation/One California Research and Education Fund 240,000
Claremont McKenna College 235,300
USS Constitution Museum Foundation, Inc. 232,500
Institute for Policy Innovation 225,000
Vanderbilt University 225,000
Fraser Institute, The 225,000
Center for Peace and Freedom 220,000
National Center for Public Policy Research, Inc. 210,000
Committee on the Present Danger 210,000
American Council on Science and Health 205,000
Washington University 205,000
Thoreau Institute, The 200,000
Empower.org 200,000
Kansas University Endowment Association 200,000
Center for Neighborhood Enterprise 200,000
Whidbey Island Films 200,000
Historical Society (Philadelphia, PA) 200,000
Foundation for Economic Education 196,500
Center for Security Studies 192,000
Downtown Management Organization, The 190,000
Johns Hopkins University, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced and International Studies 187,000
Texas A&M University 182,500
Mid-Atlantic Legal Foundation 180,000
Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow 175,000
Citizens for a Sound Economy Educational Foundation 175,000
America’s Future Foundation 170,000
Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc. 160,000
Mercatus Center 160,000
Salvation Army Western Pennsylvania Division, The 150,000
Institute for Philosophical and Social Research 150,000
Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) 150,000
Georgetown University 147,000
Ligonier Valley School District 142,500
Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee 135,000
Committee for the Free World, Inc. 135,000
Harvard University 130,000
University of Toronto 130,000
Council for Basic Education 120,000
American Jewish Committee 120,000
United States Global Strategy Council 120,000
Carnegie Institute 116,000
National Defense University Foundation, Inc. 100,000
UPG Foundation 100,000
University of South Carolina Educational Foundation 100,000
University of Kentucky 100,000
St. Francis General Hospital 100,000
Pacific Academy for Advanced Studies 100,000
George C. Marshall Foundation 100,000
Acton Institute For The Study of Religion and Liberty 100,000
California, University of, Irvine 100,000
Mackinac Center for Public Policy 100,000
Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change 100,000
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 100,000
Frontiers of Freedom Institute 100,000
Philanthropy Roundtable 100,000
National Aviary Pittsburgh, Inc. 100,000
Center for Market Processes, Inc 100,000
Education Policy Institute 100,000
Public Research, Syndicated 100,000
NumbersUSA Education and Research Foundation 100,000
American Red Cross Emergency Services of Southwestern Pennsylvania 100,000
Association of Literary Scholars and Critics 90,000
Geneva College 85,000
Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute 85,000
National Legal Center for The Public Interest 80,000
Princeton University 75,000
Mountain States Legal Foundation 75,000
Women for Freedom 75,000
Grove City College 75,000
Sequoia Institute 75,000
Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh 75,000
Foundation for Endowment 75,000
Americans Against Discrimination and Preferences, Inc. 75,000
Corporation for Maintaining Editorial Diversity in America 70,000
Toward Tradition 70,000
University of Hull American Foundation 60,000
Center for a Free Cuba 60,000
Economic Education for Clergy, Inc. 56,000
National Flag Foundation 55,000
Philadelphia Society, The 55,000
City of Pittsburgh 50,000
British American Arts Association, Inc. 50,000
Allegheny County, Office of the District Attorney 50,000
Pennsylvania District Attorney’s Institute 50,000
University of Southern California 50,000
Center for Judicial Studies 50,000
International Policy Network 50,000
Campus Coalition for Democracy 50,000
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 50,000
Claremont Graduate University 50,000
Women’s Freedom Network 50,000
Americans Back In Charge 50,000
Ebenezer Development Corporation 50,000
Cinema Foundation, Inc., The 50,000
America’s Survival, Inc. 50,000
Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America 50,000
American Defense Institute, Inc. 50,000
Center for Freedom and Prosperity Foundation 45,000
Better Government Association, Inc 43,500
Nantucket Sustainable Development Corporation 40,000
Global Foundation, Inc. 40,000
National Endowment for Democracy 40,000
United States Strategic Institute 40,000
City of Greensburg 37,500
Cornell University 34,700
Pittsburgh Leadership Foundation 32,500
Coalition for Local Sovereignty 30,000
Claremont University Center 25,000
Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve 25,000
Pennsylvania Economy League, Inc. 25,000
Lafayette College 25,000
Rutgers University 25,000
Research Center for Government Financial Management 25,000
Naval War College Foundation, Inc. 25,000
International Institute for Economic Research 25,000
Pennsylvanians for Effective Government Education Committee 25,000
American Trust for Oxford University 25,000
Criminal Justice Legal Foundation 25,000
Indiana University 25,000
Mid-America Legal Foundation 25,000
Helen Dwight Reid Educational Foundation 25,000
Mont Pelerin Society, The 25,000
GREATER PITTSBURGH OFFICE OF PROMOTION 25,000
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh 20,000
United States Naval Academy Alumni Association 16,000
Catholic University of America 15,000
University of Texas at Austin 12,800
Universities Field Staff International 12,000
Critical Review Foundation, Inc. 10,000
The MS Awareness Foundation 10,000
Executive Council on Foreign Diplomats 10,000
Thomas Jefferson Research Center 10,000
Foundation for the Advancement of Monetary Education, Ltd. 10,000
Villanova University 8,000
Navy League of the United States 5,000
Animal Care of Westmoreland County 5,000
Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs 5,000

FUNDER PROFILE
Sarah Scaife Foundation

ein: 25-1113452

108 institutional roles for $6,117,557

301 Grant Street
One Oxford Centre
Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, PA 15219

and
The Scaife Foundations
This page encompasses all Scaife Family Foundations: the Allegheny, the Sarah Scaife, Carthage, and Scaife Family foundations
From The Feeding Trough:

Richard Mellon Scaife Financed by the Mellon industrial, oil and banking fortune. At one time its largest single holding was stock in the Gulf Oil Corporation. Became active in funding conservative causes in 1973, when Richard Mellon Scaife became chairman of the foundation. In the 1960s, Richard had inherited an estimated $200 million from his mother, Sarah. Forbes magazine has estimated his personal net worth at $800 million, making him the 138th richest person in the U.S. He controls the Scaife, Carthage and Allegheny foundations. In 1993, Scaife and Carthage reportedly gave more than $17.6 million to 150 conservative think tanks. As of December 31, 1992, Scaife assets were $212,232,888 and Carthage assets were $11,937,862.

Sarah Mellon Scaife Foundation — This foundation is financed by the Mellon industrial, oil and banking fortune. At one time, its largest single holding was stock in Gulf Oil Corporation. It was estimated some years ago to be a $200 million foundation. It became active in supporting conservative causes in 1973, when Richard Mellon Scaife became chairman. Since then, Scaife has been a leading financier of New Right causes. He controls not one — but three (the Scaife, Carthage, and Allegheny) — conservative family foundations. The Sarah Scaife Foundation is considered to be one of the top four conservative foundations.

According to a recent article, In 1993, the Carthage and Sarah Scaife Foundations…gave more than $17.6 million to 150 conservative think tanks.

Scaife inherited an estimated $200 million from his mother, Sarah Mellon Scaife, in the 1960s. A recent issue of Forbes estimated his personal net worth at $800 million, ranking him as the 138th richest man in the United States. According to an article in the June/July 1981 issue of Columbia Journalism Review, Scaife travels in his personal DC-9 jet between his homes in Pittsburgh, Pa. and Pebble Beach, Ca.
All at the same address:

One Oxford Center
301 Grant Street, Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15219-6401
(412) 392-2900

108 institutional roles for $6,117,557

(show all | hide all)
Year Role Hrs/week Pay Source 990 src
Battle, T. Westray III
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 3,000
2005 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Bennett, William J.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (20) | profile total pay: $ 6,000
2005 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Empower America
1996 Trustee $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
Empower America
Bly, Yvonne M.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (6) | profile total pay: $ 173,500
2005 Assistant Treasurer 32 $ 60,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Assistant Treasurer 32 $ 57,467 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Assistant Treasurer 20 $ 56,033 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Assistant Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Assistant Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Assistant Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
Cribb, T. Kenneth Jr.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (39) | profile total pay: $ 25,500
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 4,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Intercollegiate Studies Institute
1996 Trustee $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Intercollegiate Studies Institute
Feulner, Edwin J. Jr.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (27) | profile total pay: $ 24,000
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 3,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
The Heritage Foundation
1996 Trustee $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
The Heritage Foundation – President
Gleba, Michael W.
7 roles; show | hide | all roles (15) | profile total pay: $ 722,048
2005 Executive Vice President 32 $ 229,107 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Executive Vice President 32 $ 210,733 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Executive Vice President 20 $ 193,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Executive VP 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Executive VP 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Vice President Programs 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Assistant Secretary 20 $ 89,208 990-PF Part VIII-1
Konkol, Alexis J.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (14) | profile total pay: $ 313,416
2005 Employee 32 $ 67,967 990-PF Part VIII-2
2004 Employee 32 $ 66,000 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 20 $ 64,567 990-PF Part VIII-2
1999 Employee 20 $ 58,522 990-PF Part VIII-2
1998 Employee 20 $ 56,360 990-PF Part VIII-2
Larry, Richard M.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (13) | profile total pay: $ 854,800
1999 President/Trustee 20 $ 396,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 President/Trustee 20 $ 396,800 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 President / Trustee $ 62,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
McMichael, R. Daniel
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (25) | profile total pay: $ 979,000
2005 Secretary 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Secretary 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Secretary/Consul 20 $ 240,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Board Secretary 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Board Secretary 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Board Secretary 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 241,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Board Secretary 20 $ 266,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Secretary / Trustee $ 232,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Meltzer, Allan H.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (14) | profile total pay: $ 24,750
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 3,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Carnegie Mellon University
1996 Trustee $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Carnegia Mellon University, Graduate School of Industrial Administration
Meszaros, Jo Ann
4 roles; show | hide | all roles (4) | profile total pay: $ 487,794
2004 Employee 40 $ 93,334 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 40 $ 148,083 990-PF Part VIII-2
1999 Employee 20 $ 127,002 990-PF Part VIII-2
1998 Employee 20 $ 119,375 990-PF Part VIII-2
Milbury, E. Van R.
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (1) | profile total pay: $ 1,500
2005 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Nolan, Carol L.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 310,330
2005 Employee 32 $ 68,533 990-PF Part VIII-2
2004 Employee 32 $ 66,000 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 20 $ 63,300 990-PF Part VIII-2
1999 Employee 20 $ 56,497 990-PF Part VIII-2
1998 Employee 20 $ 56,000 990-PF Part VIII-2
Robinson, Roger W. Jr.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (15) | profile total pay: $ 12,750
2005 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 3,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Roddey, James C.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 18,760
2005 Trustee 2 $ 4,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990 Part VIII-1
1996 Trustee $ 2,260 990-PF Part VIII-1
Ruffing, Mary M.
2 roles; show | hide | all roles (2) | profile total pay: $ 131,959
2004 Employee 40 $ 68,417 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 40 $ 63,542 990-PF Part VIII-2
Scaife, Richard M.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (34) | profile
2005 Chairman and Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Chairman and Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Chairman / Trustee 990-PF Part VIII-1
Sipp, Donald C.
2 roles; show | hide | all roles (3) | profile total pay: $ 309,400
1998 Vice President/Treasurer 20 $ 155,400 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Vice President / Treasurer $ 154,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Slaney, Barbara L.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (9) | profile total pay: $ 1,691,300
2005 Vice President /Treasurer 32 $ 280,988 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 319,127 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 313,600 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Senior Fellow – Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 VP/Treasurer 40 $ 277,835 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 266,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Vice President / Assistant Secretary 40 $ 233,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Walton, James M.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (6) | profile total pay: $ 11,250
2005 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
MMC Group, Inc.
1996 Trustee $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
MMC Group, Inc.
Ziegler, Arthur P. Jr.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (11) | profile total pay: $ 16,500
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 4,500 990-PF Part VIII-1

OTHER LINKS
Scaife Foundations at SourceWatch


http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=3

****

Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations, one of the earliest attempts to study the rise of industry and commercial development in Europe, was a precursor to the modern academic discipline of economics. In this and other works, Smith expounded on how rational self-interest and competition can lead to economic prosperity and well-being. It also provided one of the best-known intellectual rationales for free trade and capitalism, greatly influencing the writings of later economists.[8][9]

In 19th century Britain, laissez-faire capitalism found a small but strong following by Manchester Liberals such as Richard Cobden and Richard Wright. In 1867, this resulted in a free trade treaty being signed between Britain and France, after which several of these treaties were signed among other European countries. The newspaper The Economist was founded in 1843, partly in opposition to the Corn Laws. Free trade was discussed in places such as The Cobden Club, founded in 1866.[10][11] However, Austrian scholars argue that laissez-faire was never the main doctrine of any nation, and at the end of the 1800s, European countries reintroduced economic protectionism and interventionism.

The centre-right Gaullists in post-World War II France advocated considerable social spending on education and infrastructure development, as well as extensive economic regulation and a limited amount of the wealth redistribution measures more characteristic of social democracy.

[edit] Variations

The spectrum of right-wing politics ranges from from centre-right to far right.

By the late 19th century, the French political spectrum classified the center-right as Constitutional Monarchists, Orleanists, and Bonapartists, and the far right as Ultra-Royalists and Legitimists.

Today, the definition of the term centre-right is necessarily broad and approximate because political terms have varying meanings in different countries. Parties of the centre-right generally support liberal democracy, capitalism, the market economy, private property rights and the existence of the welfare state in some form. They generally oppose socialism and extreme secularism. Such a definition generally includes political parties that base their ideology and policies upon conservatism and economic liberalism.

The term far right has been used by different scholars in conflicting ways.[12] The term far right is mostly used to describe ultra-nationalist, religious extremist, and reactionary groups as well as fascism and Nazism.[13][14][15][16] The BBC has called politician Pim Fortuyn’s politics (Fortuynism) far right because of his policies on immigration and Muslims.[17] The term far right has been used by some, such as National Public Radio, to describe certain authoritarian governments that promote free market capitalism, such as that of Augusto Pinochet in Chile.[18][19] Left-wing publication New Left Review has called Ronald Reagan’s policies radical right .[20] The term radical right has also been used to refer to a libertarian movement which places the individual squarely in the center and has even attacked such sacred taboos as taxation .[21]

Right-wing populism is a combination of ethno-nationalism with anti-elitist populist rhetoric and a radical critique of existing political institutions.[22][23][24][25]

[edit] Positions around the world

[edit] Economics

To a Libertarian, the right supports a decentralized economy based on economic freedom, and advocates policies such as property rights, free markets, and free trade; some claim that Economic freedom correlates with right-leaning governments.[26]. They accuse the left of supporting regulatory economics and egalitarianism. To a liberal, the right is seen as supporting conservative authoritarians and the far-right as supporting corporatisms.[27] Theories of economic liberalism, which is the economic component of classical liberalism, were largely developed by Adam Smith during the Age of Enlightenment. Smith advocated minimal interference by government in the economy, but did not oppose the state’s provision of a few basic public goods such as roads, canals, schools, bridges and other infrastructure that cannot be efficiently implemented by private entities. [28][29] Smith preferred that these goods should be paid proportionally to their consumption (e.g., with tolls), but accepted the necessity of taxes, and wrote that taxes should be levied proportional to a person’s ability to pay. Private property and individual contracts form the basis of economic liberalism. These theories began in the eighteenth century with the claim that if everyone is left to their own economic devices to pursue their self-interest (the invisible hand), instead of being controlled by the state, then the result would be a harmonious and more equal society of ever-increasing prosperity (spontaneous order).[30]. This theory includes the caveat that minimum standards of public information and justice should exist, and that no-one should be allowed to coerce or steal. Smith also advocated retaliatory tariffs to bring about free trade, and copyrights and patents to encourage innovation.[29] Economic liberal ideas underpinned the move towards a capitalist economic system in the late 18th century and the subsequent demise of the mercantilist system. Right-wing libertarianism has focused on the preservation of rights through constraints on government power. Libertarian conservatism, also known as conservative libertarianism, describes certain movements. Ronald Reagan said in an interview: I believe the very heart and soul of conservatism is libertarianism. [31] Some right wing movements and parties have support protectionism such as France’s National Front.

[edit] Tradition
The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article or discuss the issue on the talk page.

A common charcateric of the right is support for tradition.

Traditionalist conservatism in Western culture could be said to have begun with the thought of Edmund Burke, whose political principles were rooted in moral natural law and the Western tradition. He believed in prescriptive rights and what he referred to as ordered liberty as well as a strong belief in trascendent values that found support in such institutions as the church, the family, and the state.[32] He was a fierce critic of the principles behind the French Revolution and in 1790 his observations on the excesses and radicalism of the French Revolution were collected in Reflections on the Revolution in France. In Reflections he took to task the radical innovations of the revolutionaries, such as the Rights of Man . American social critic and historian Russell Kirk wrote that …the Reflections burns with all the wrath and anguish of a prophet who saw the traditions of Christendom and the fabric of civil society dissolving before his eyes. [33]

Burke’s influence would extend to later thinkers and writers both in his native Britain and in Continental Europe. Among those influenced by this thought were the English Romantic poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, and Robert Southey, Scottish Romantic author Sir Walter Scott,[34] French counter-revolutionaries Francois-Rene de Chateaubriand, Louis de Bonald, and Joseph de Maistre,[35] and in America President John Adams and those associated with the Federalist Party[36]

Burkean traditionalism was transported to the American colonies where today it is characterized by an adherence to the principles of prescription (law), custom (law), social order, hierarchy, faith, the natural family, ordered liberty, and tradition. It may be said to have affinities with reactionary thought, and some adherents of this movement perhaps embrace that label, defying the stigma that has attached to it in Western culture since the Enlightenment.

[edit] Relationship with religion

It is common for those with strong religious views to be associated with right-wing causes.

The United States has the Christian right with are primarily interested in what they describe as family values. They believe that the United States was founded as a Christian nation, believe that abortion is wrong, favor teacher-led Christian prayer in state schools, define marriage as between one man and one woman (rejecting same-sex marriage), and desire regulation of the public media to reduce profanity and sexual references. They strongly oppose LGBT rights. The Cornerstone Group (or Faith, Flag and Family), in the United Kingdom gets it’s support from the Church of England. They emphasise the country’s Anglican heritage. The Kiwi Party of New Zealand advocates a return to the Judeo-Christian ethic in democracy . Likewise the Family Party advocates Christian-based social conservatism and describes its support base as pro-family, traditional Christian [37] voters.

The Likud party in Israel is inclined towards the Torah and expresses support for it within the context of civil Judaism, as a result of its Irgun past, which aligned itself according to the word of the Tanakh. Hindu nationalism has been a part of right-wing politics in India.[38] It believes that ancient Hindu culture and values will make India a more enlightened society. Irans right wing[39][40] Combatant Clergy Association/Association of Militant Clergy (‘Jame’e-ye Rowhaniyat-e Mobarez) includes the nation’s foremost politicized clerics (including the current Ayatollah) and was the majority party in the fourth and fifth parliaments after the Islamic revolution.[41] It was founded in 1977 by a group of clerics with intentions to use cultural approaches to overthrow the Shah.

[edit] Relationship to fascism and nationalism
This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia’s quality standards.

Some associate ethnic nationalism and certain forms of populism with the right.[22][42] According to some libertarian scholars of fascism, there are both left and right influences on fascist ideology, and fascism has historically attacked communism, liberalism and conservatism. A prominent potential link between the right and fascism is corporatism. But many scholars argue that fascism is a search for a third way among these all these views.[43][44][45][46][47][48][49][50][51] Roger Griffin claims that fascist movements have become more monolithically right-wing, and fascism has become intertwined with the radical right.[52][53]

The French National Front supports greater independence from the European Union and other international organizations; the end of non-European immigration and the establishment of the jus sanguinis. The party opposes immigration, particularly Muslim immigration from North Africa, West Africa and the Middle East. In a standardized pamphlet delivered to all French electors in the 1995 presidential election, Jean-Marie Le Pen proposed the sending back of three million non-Europeans out of France, by humane and dignified means .[54] Observers in the media describe the party as far right [55] or extreme right .[56][57] The French party National Front the end of non-European immigration and the establishment of the jus sanguinis. The party opposes immigration, particularly Muslim immigration from North Africa, West Africa and the Middle East. In a standardized pamphlet delivered to all French electors in the 1995 presidential election, Jean-Marie Le Pen proposed the sending back of three million non-Europeans out of France, by humane and dignified means .[58] Observers in the media describe the party as far right [59] or extreme right .[60][61]

The far right Swedish National Democrats (Nationaldemokraterna, ND) describes itself as a democratic nationalist ( national democratic ) and ethnopluralist party. It has small support and holds in all five seats in three different City councils (2009).[62][63][64][65] The mainstream media and other observers frequently designate the party as xenophobic and/or racist[66][67][68][69][70][71] and the Stephen Roth Institute has described it as neo-Nazi [72], while the party itself rejects these descriptions.[73][74]
The India’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) advocates a foreign policy driven by a nationalist agenda, and strong national defense. The Likud of Israel emphasize such nationalist themes as the flag and the victory in Israel’s 1948 war with neighbouring Arab states. The Likud advocates teaching values in childhood education. The Likud endorses press freedom and promotion of private-sector media, which has grown markedly under governments Likud has led. Another party, the Yisrael Beiteinu, takes a hard line towards Arab citizens of Israel and other Palestinians for their perceived denial of the right of the Jewish State to exist through maintenance of a Jewish majority in Israel. It promotes the transfer of Arab citizens of Israel to a future Palestinian state, in conjunction with efforts to increase Jewish immigration. It also promotes the idea that all Israeli citizens should swear loyalty to the country and its symbols.

[edit] See also

* Ideology
* Political spectrum
* World’s Smallest Political Quiz

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right-wing_politics

***

***
Slaney, Barbara L.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (9) | profile total pay: $ 1,691,300

2005 Vice President /Treasurer 32 $ 280,988 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 319,127 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 313,600 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Senior Fellow – Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 VP/Treasurer 40 $ 277,835 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 266,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Vice President / Assistant Secretary 40 $ 233,500 990-PF Part VIII-1

***
108 institutional roles for $6,117,557

(show all | hide all)
Year Role Hrs/week Pay Source 990 src
Battle, T. Westray III
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 3,000
2005 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Bennett, William J.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (20) | profile total pay: $ 6,000
2005 Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Empower America
1996 Trustee $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
Empower America
Bly, Yvonne M.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (6) | profile total pay: $ 173,500
2005 Assistant Treasurer 32 $ 60,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Assistant Treasurer 32 $ 57,467 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Assistant Treasurer 20 $ 56,033 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Assistant Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Assistant Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Assistant Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
Cribb, T. Kenneth Jr.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (39) | profile total pay: $ 25,500
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 4,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Intercollegiate Studies Institute
1996 Trustee $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Intercollegiate Studies Institute
Feulner, Edwin J. Jr.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (27) | profile total pay: $ 24,000
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 3,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
The Heritage Foundation
1996 Trustee $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
The Heritage Foundation – President
Gleba, Michael W.
7 roles; show | hide | all roles (15) | profile total pay: $ 722,048
2005 Executive Vice President 32 $ 229,107 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Executive Vice President 32 $ 210,733 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Executive Vice President 20 $ 193,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Executive VP 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Executive VP 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Vice President Programs 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Assistant Secretary 20 $ 89,208 990-PF Part VIII-1
Konkol, Alexis J.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (14) | profile total pay: $ 313,416
2005 Employee 32 $ 67,967 990-PF Part VIII-2
2004 Employee 32 $ 66,000 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 20 $ 64,567 990-PF Part VIII-2
1999 Employee 20 $ 58,522 990-PF Part VIII-2
1998 Employee 20 $ 56,360 990-PF Part VIII-2
Larry, Richard M.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (13) | profile total pay: $ 854,800
1999 President/Trustee 20 $ 396,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 President/Trustee 20 $ 396,800 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 President / Trustee $ 62,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
McMichael, R. Daniel
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (25) | profile total pay: $ 979,000
2005 Secretary 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Secretary 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Secretary/Consul 20 $ 240,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Board Secretary 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Board Secretary 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Board Secretary 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 241,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Board Secretary 20 $ 266,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Secretary / Trustee $ 232,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Meltzer, Allan H.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (14) | profile total pay: $ 24,750
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 3,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Carnegie Mellon University
1996 Trustee $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Carnegia Mellon University, Graduate School of Industrial Administration
Meszaros, Jo Ann
4 roles; show | hide | all roles (4) | profile total pay: $ 487,794
2004 Employee 40 $ 93,334 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 40 $ 148,083 990-PF Part VIII-2
1999 Employee 20 $ 127,002 990-PF Part VIII-2
1998 Employee 20 $ 119,375 990-PF Part VIII-2
Milbury, E. Van R.
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (1) | profile total pay: $ 1,500
2005 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Nolan, Carol L.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 310,330
2005 Employee 32 $ 68,533 990-PF Part VIII-2
2004 Employee 32 $ 66,000 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 20 $ 63,300 990-PF Part VIII-2
1999 Employee 20 $ 56,497 990-PF Part VIII-2
1998 Employee 20 $ 56,000 990-PF Part VIII-2
Robinson, Roger W. Jr.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (15) | profile total pay: $ 12,750
2005 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 3,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Roddey, James C.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 18,760
2005 Trustee 2 $ 4,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 3,000 990 Part VIII-1
1996 Trustee $ 2,260 990-PF Part VIII-1
Ruffing, Mary M.
2 roles; show | hide | all roles (2) | profile total pay: $ 131,959
2004 Employee 40 $ 68,417 990-PF Part VIII-2
2003 Employee 40 $ 63,542 990-PF Part VIII-2
Scaife, Richard M.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (34) | profile
2005 Chairman and Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Chairman and Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Chairman / Trustee 990-PF Part VIII-1
Sipp, Donald C.
2 roles; show | hide | all roles (3) | profile total pay: $ 309,400
1998 Vice President/Treasurer 20 $ 155,400 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Vice President / Treasurer $ 154,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Slaney, Barbara L.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (9) | profile total pay: $ 1,691,300
2005 Vice President /Treasurer 32 $ 280,988 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 319,127 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 313,600 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Senior Fellow – Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Vice President and Treasurer 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 VP/Treasurer 40 $ 277,835 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Vice President/Treasurer 40 $ 266,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1996 Vice President / Assistant Secretary 40 $ 233,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Walton, James M.
6 roles; show | hide | all roles (6) | profile total pay: $ 11,250
2005 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 2 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 2 $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
MMC Group, Inc.
1996 Trustee $ 2,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
MMC Group, Inc.
Ziegler, Arthur P. Jr.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (11) | profile total pay: $ 16,500
2005 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 2 $ 6,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 4,500 990-PF Part VIII-1

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=3

***
Barbara L. Slaney
Barbara L. Slaney current relationships:
Sarah Scaife Foundation – VP, treasurer

Barbara L. Slaney connections, once removed:
Barbara L. Slaney is connected to …
T. Westray Battle III >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
T. Kenneth Cribb Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Edwin J. Feulner Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Michael W. Gleba >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Allan H. Meltzer >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
E. Van R. Milbury >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Roger W. Robinson Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
James C. Roddey >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Richard Mellon Scaife >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
James M. Walton >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
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http://www.muckety.com/Barbara-L-Slaney/147213.muckety

Richard Mellon Scaife, Allan H. Meltzer
Allan H. Meltzer current relationships:
Sarah Scaife Foundation – trustee
Richard Mellon Scaife personal relations:
Cordelia Scaife May – brother
Other current Richard Mellon Scaife relationships:
Allegheny Foundation – chairman
Carthage Foundation – chairman
Heritage Foundation – trustee
Pepperdine University – life regent
Sarah Scaife Foundation – chairman
Tribune-Review Publishing Co. Inc. – publisher & owner
Richard Mellon Scaife past relationships:
1964 Barry Goldwater presidential campaign – supporter
American Spectator – major donor
Richard M. Larry – aide
Sacramento Union – owner
U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy – member
Allan H. Meltzer connections, once removed:
Allan H. Meltzer is connected to …
T. Westray Battle III >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
T. Kenneth Cribb Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Edwin J. Feulner Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Michael W. Gleba >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
E. Van R. Milbury >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Roger W. Robinson Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
James C. Roddey >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Richard Mellon Scaife >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Barbara L. Slaney >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
James M. Walton >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Note: This may be a partial list. Click on the map above to explore more connections.
Richard Mellon Scaife connections, once removed:
Richard Mellon Scaife is connected to …
Douglas F. Allison >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Larry P. Arnn >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
David L. Asher >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
T. Westray Battle III >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Belden Bell >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Peter Brookes >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
David R. Brown >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Holland H. Coors >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
T. Kenneth Cribb Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Midge Decter >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Becky Norton Dunlop >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Edwin J. Feulner >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Edwin J. Feulner Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Malcolm S. Forbes Jr. >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Michael W. Gleba >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Robert J. Herbold >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
William J. Hume >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Lee M. Klinetobe >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Walter B. Lohman >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Edwin Meese III >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Allan H. Meltzer >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
J. William Middendorf II >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
E. Van R. Milbury >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Nersi Nazari >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Andrew Lewis Peek >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
J. Frederic Rench >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Roger W. Robinson Jr. >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
James C. Roddey >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Thomas A. Saunders III >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Frank Shakespeare >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Barbara L. Slaney >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Brian Tracy >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Phillip N. Truluck >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Barb Van Andel-Gaby >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
James M. Walton >> through Sarah Scaife Foundation >> Map it
Marion G. Wells >> through Heritage Foundation >> Map it
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review >> through Tribune-Review Publishing Co. Inc. >> Map it
Note: This may be a partial list. Click on the map above to explore more connections.

http://www.muckety.com/Query?SearchResult=147207&SearchResult=19968&graph=MucketyMap?_r=2D

***
RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
Allegheny Foundation

301 Grant Street
Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6401

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

Total contributed: $ 36,110,060
Name Total
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 2,693,500
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc. 2,442,000
Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation 2,306,000
Extra Mile Education Foundation 1,797,000
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra 1,675,000
American Legislative Exchange Council 1,595,000
Salvation Army 1,110,000
Pennsylvania Trolley Museum, Inc. 954,340
River City Brass Band 876,500
Nantucket Atheneum 820,000
Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, The 806,125
Goodwill Industries of Pittsburgh 795,500
Carnegie Library of Homestead 739,675
Pennsylvania Railway Museum Association, Inc. 730,600
Boys and Girls Clubs of Western Pennsylvania 729,300
Allegheny Institute for Public Policy 690,000
Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research 635,000
Westmoreland Museum of Art 618,500
David Horowitz Freedom Center 600,000
Enterprise and Education Foundation 503,000
Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union 500,000
Braddock’s Field Historical Society 465,000
Frick Art & Historical Center 460,000
Brownsville Area Revitalization Corporation 433,800
Youth Opportunities Unlimited, Inc. 356,900
Children Requiring a Caring Kommunity 330,000
Historic Red Clay Valley, Inc. 315,000
Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank 300,000
Vandergrift Improvement Program, Inc. 300,000
Asticou Terraces Trust 275,000
Duquesne University 263,000
Crossroads Foundation 250,000
Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh Foundation, The 250,000
United States Industrial Council Educational Foundation 235,000
Center for Neighborhood Enterprise 225,000
Philanthropy Roundtable 205,000
Pittsburgh Board of Public Education 200,000
Washington Legal Foundation 200,000
Tutwiler Community Education Center 190,000
Railroader’s Memorial Museum 181,000
Western Pennsylvania Conservancy 158,000
Fund for Animals, Inc., The 151,000
Manchester Citizens Corporation, The 150,000
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc. 144,000
Light of Life Rescue Mission, Inc. 135,000
Saint Vincent Archabbey 125,000
Imani Christian Academy 125,000
Point Park College 125,000
Carnegie Mellon University 125,000
Pennsylvania State University 123,000
South Side Local Development Company 117,000
Maldon Institute, Inc. 115,000
Allegheny Conference on Community Development 112,000
Rangeley Foundation 105,000
Free Enterprise Partnership 100,000
Gilda’s Club Western Pennsylvania 100,000
Gateway Rehabilitation Center 100,000
Kiskiminetas Springs School 100,000
John P. Murtha Institute for Homeland Security 100,000
Epiphany Catholic Church 100,000
Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild 100,000
Pittsburgh Model Railroad Historical Society 96,000
Union Project, The 95,000
Pennsylvania Association of Nonprofit Organizations 95,000
Rosedale Block Cluster, Inc. 95,000
Public Policy Education Fund, Inc. 85,000
Homestead of Nantucket 83,000
Westmoreland County Food Bank 80,000
City of Greensburg 75,620
Nantucket Conservation Foundation, Inc. 75,000
Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, Inc. 75,000
Commonwealth Education Organization 75,000
Mon Yough Riverfront Entertainment & Cultural Council 75,000
Boy Scouts of America, Greater Pittsburgh Council 70,000
Loyalhanna Watershed and Environmental Association, Inc. 70,000
Westmoreland Fayette Historical Society 70,000
Animal Rescue League of Western Pennsylvania, Inc., The 70,000
Best Friends Foundation 65,000
Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor 60,500
American Literary Society 60,000
Institute for Functional Medicine 60,000
Youth Guidance 55,000
Southside Local Development Company 52,000
Bidwell Training Center 50,000
Andrew Carnegie Free Library 50,000
Friends of George C. Marshall, Inc., The 50,000
Ellis School 50,000
Point Park University 50,000
John Bartram Association, The 50,000
Boy Scouts of America, Westmoreland – Fayette Council, Inc. 50,000
Bay Area Electric Railway Association 50,000
Westmoreland Trust 50,000
Capital Center for the Arts 50,000
Manchester Bidwell Corporation 50,000
Nantucket Boys and Girls Club, Inc. 50,000
UCLA Foundation 50,000
Bill of Rights Institute 50,000
Carriage House Children’s Center Inc. 50,000
Bishop’s Education Fund 50,000
Salvation Army-Pittsburgh 50,000
Cleveland Police Historical Society, Inc. 47,800
Carnegie Institute 47,500
Ladew Topiary Gardens, Inc., The Trustees of the 40,000
Landmark Legal Foundation 40,000
Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives 40,000
Braddock Housing Task Force 40,000
Boys & Girls Clubs of America 40,000
Midway Boys Club 40,000
Ligonier Township Volunteer Fire Company No. 1 35,000
Northside Leadership Conference 35,000
Historical Society of Carnegie, Pennsylvania 35,000
Ligonier Valley Rail Road Association 35,000
Church of the Good Sheperd 35,000
Great Harbor Collection, Inc. 35,000
Pittsburgh Civic Garden Center 30,000
Indiana University of Pennsylvania 30,000
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh 25,500
Community Design Center of Pittsburgh, Inc. 25,500
East Liberty Development, Inc. 25,000
Housing Opportunities, Inc. 25,000
Student Conservation Association, Inc. 25,000
Beginning With Books, Inc. 25,000
Perry Hilltop Assocation for Successful Enterprises, Inc. 25,000
Civic Light Opera 25,000
Pennsylvania Economy League, Inc. 25,000
American Chestnut Foundation 25,000
Former Agents of the FBI Foundation 25,000
Pennsylvania Right-To-Work Defense and Education Foundation 25,000
National Forum Foundation 25,000
Light of Life Mission, Inc. 25,000
Mountain Watershed Association 25,000
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund 25,000
Ligonier Borough Volunteer Hose Company No. 1 25,000
Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial Hall and Museum Trust, Inc. 25,000
Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc. 25,000
National Association for Olmsted Parks 25,000
City Theatre Company 25,000
Salvation Army Western Pennsylvania Division, The 25,000
Dunbar Historical Society 25,000
Grow Pittsburgh 25,000
Aquidneck Island Land Trust 25,000
Carnegie Library of McKeesport 25,000
Pennsylvanians for Effective Government Education Committee 25,000
Auberle 24,000
Maryland Historical Society 23,000
Garden Club of McKeesport, The 21,000
Action for Animals, Inc. 20,000
Business and Industrial Development Corporation 20,000
Pittsburgh Project, The 20,000
Guiding Eyes for the Blind 20,000
Mel Blount Youth Home of Washington County, Inc. 20,000
Johns Hopkins University 20,000
National Academy of Social Insurance 20,000
Holy Trinity School 20,000
Pennsylvania Junior Academy of Science 20,000
Operation Outward Reach 20,000
Lemington Home for the Aged 18,000
Bach Choir of Pittsburgh, Inc. 17,500
Fayette County Society Prevention Cruelty to Animals 17,500
Cornerstone Church of Muskegon 15,500
Western Pennsylvania Humane Society 15,000
Allegheny Youth Development 15,000
Go Greensburg Community Development Corporation 15,000
Monroeville Council of Senior Citizens 15,000
Humane Society of Westmoreland County 15,000
Girl Scouts 15,000
Crime Prevention Offices of Western Pennsylvania 15,000
University of Pittsburgh 15,000
Western Pennsylvania Model Railroad Museum 12,000
First Presbyterian Church 11,000
Operation Dig, Inc. 10,000
Meyersdale Area Historical Society 10,000
Fineview Citizens Council 10,000
Neighborhood Academy, The 10,000
Community Foundation of Westmoreland County, The 10,000
Community College of Allegheny County Educational Foundation 10,000
Western Pennsylvania School for the Blind 10,000
Holy Family Foundation 10,000
Golden Triangle Radio Information Center 10,000
Woodlawn Foundation, The 10,000
Latrobe Area Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation 10,000
Pittsburgh Mercy Foundation 10,000
Women’s Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh 10,000
Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Inc. 10,000
Pittsburgh Leadership Foundation 10,000
Johnstown Flood Museum Association 10,000
Pittsburgh Urban Leadership Service Experience (PULSE) 10,000
Ligonier Valley Historical Society 9,300
South Hills Interfaith Ministries 8,600
Ryerss Farm for Aged Equines 6,000
Animal Friends, Inc. 5,000
McKeesport Heritage Center 5,000
U.S.S. Constitution Museum Foundation, Inc. 5,000
St. Peter’s Child Development Centers 5,000
Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre, Inc. 5,000
Easter Seal Society of Allegheny County 5,000
Neighborhood House Club 5,000
Johnstown Area Heritage Association 5,000
University of Pennsylvania 5,000
Saint Vincent College 5,000
West Chester Railroad Heritage Association 5,000
Pittsburgh Architects Workshop, Inc. 5,000
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Museum 5,000
Northeastern Educational Television of Ohio, Inc. 5,000
United Service Organizations 5,000
Veterans of Foreign Wars Foundation 5,000
Mexican War Streets Society, Inc., The 5,000
Mars Area History and Landmark Society 5,000
Animal Guardians 4,500
Associated Artists of Pittsburgh 4,000
Ligonier Valley Association of Churches 2,500
Homestead Carnegie Library 2,500
Blatent Image Gallery 2,000
American Daffodil Society 1,000

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=5

RELATED LINKS

Recipients of grants from Allegheny Foundation

Funders and recipients who share official people with Allegheny Foundation
Financials*
year: 2006
asts: $ 51,520,996
rev: $ 5,143,784
exp: $ 2,724,133
grnts pd: $ 2,211,800

show 9+ years | graph | w/o assets | pastable data
year: 2005
asts: $ 47,002,956
rev: $ 2,831,067
exp: $ 2,726,049
grnts pd: $ 2,294,500

year: 2004
asts: $ 43,156,164
rev: $ 3,156,367
exp: $ 1,750,962
grnts pd: $ 1,364,000

year: 2003
asts: $ 38,862,681
rev: $ 564,197
exp: $ 1,831,003
grnts pd: $ 1,482,300

year: 2002
asts: $ 32,189,890
rev: $ 1,738,090
exp: $ 1,291,359
grnts pd: $ 963,100

year: 2001
asts: $ 40,398,096
rev: $ -209,110
exp: $ 1,180,991
grnts pd: $ 845,500

year: 2000
asts: $ 42,098,138
rev: $ 4,284,140
exp: $ 1,692,010
grnts pd: $ 1,294,500

year: 1999
asts: $ 37,504,049
rev: $ 1,868,985
exp: $ 1,807,607
grnts pd: $ 1,394,340

year: 1998
asts: $ 44,933,129
rev: $ 1,154,109
exp: $ 2,090,243
grnts pd: $ 1,687,125

year: 1997
asts: $ 39,265,733
rev: $ 1,215,202
exp: $ 1,120,126
grnts pd: $ 784,500

* All from IRS 990 PF. Assets = line I; Revenue = line 12; Expenses = line 26; Grants paid = line 25.
Internal Links

FUNDER PROFILE
Allegheny Foundation

ein: 25-6012303

69 institutional roles for $708,654

301 Grant Street
Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6401

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

divider
69 institutional roles for $708,654

(show all | hide all)
Year Role Hrs/week Pay Source 990 src
Bell, Peter B.
2 roles; show | hide | all roles (2) | profile
1999 Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
Beyer, Joanne B.
8 roles; show | hide | all roles (12) | profile total pay: $ 350,389
2006 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 President $ 69,717 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 President 20 $ 65,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 President 20 $ 111,298 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 President 20 $ 97,624 990-PF Part VIII-1
Goettler, Ralph H.
8 roles; show | hide | all roles (8) | profile total pay: $ 12,000
2006 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Goettler Associates, Inc.
2000 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Goettler Associates, Inc.
1999 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Goettler Associates, Inc.
1998 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Goettler Associates, Inc.
Groll, Matthew A.
5 roles; show | hide | all roles (5) | profile total pay: $ 229,015
2006 Executive Director 25 $ 70,900 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Executive Director 16 $ 60,200 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Executive Director 20 $ 51,600 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Executive Director $ 46,315 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Executive Director 990-PF Part VIII-1
O’Donnell, Doris
8 roles; show | hide | all roles (8) | profile total pay: $ 12,000
2006 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Roesch, Jane
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (1) | profile total pay: $ 1,500
2006 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Scaife, Margaret R.
7 roles; show | hide | all roles (7) | profile total pay: $ 10,500
2005 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Scaife, Richard M.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (34) | profile total pay: $ 12,000
2006 Chairman & Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Chairman & Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Chairman & Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Chairman $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Chairman 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Chairman $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Chairman 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Chairman 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Chairman 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Sipp, Donald C.
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (3) | profile total pay: $ 64,750
1998 Treasurer 20 $ 64,750 990-PF Part VIII-1
Stark, Nathan J.
4 roles; show | hide | all roles (4) | profile total pay: $ 4,500
2001 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
Weymouth, George A.
8 roles; show | hide | all roles (8) | profile
2006 Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Trustee 990-PF Part VIII-1
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc.
2000 Trustee 990-PF Part VIII-1
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc.
1999 Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc.
1998 Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc.
Ziegler, Arthur P. Jr.
8 roles; show | hide | all roles (11) | profile total pay: $ 12,000
2006 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Trustee $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
PGH History & Landmarks Foundation
2000 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
PGH History & Landmarks Foundation
1999 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
PGH History & Landmarks Foundation
1998 Trustee 3 $ 1,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
PGH History & Landmarks Foundation

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=5

***

RECIPIENTS OF FUNDER

recipients by amount granted from:
The Carthage Foundation

301 Grant Street
One Oxford Centre
Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6401

Media Transparency Profile

For years:

1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006

Total contributed: $ 84,563,420
Name Total
Free Congress Research and Education Foundation, Inc. 11,650,000
Judicial Watch 4,475,000
Maldon Institute, Inc. 3,664,000
Washington Legal Foundation 3,060,000
Heritage Foundation, The 2,759,000
Landmark Legal Foundation 2,000,000
American Spectator Foundation, Inc. 1,969,000
Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, Inc. 1,818,000
Accuracy in Media, Inc. 1,720,000
Federation for American Immigration Reform 1,654,500
Brandywine Conservancy, Inc. 1,500,000
Allegheny Institute for Public Policy 1,393,500
Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace 1,223,400
Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow 1,105,000
Atlas Economic Research Foundation 1,075,000
University of Virginia Law School Foundation 1,054,000
Counterterrorism & Security Education and Research Foundation 1,025,000
Center for Individual Rights 1,000,000
American Jewish Committee 995,000
Center for Security Policy, Inc. 960,000
Foundation for Research on Economics and the Environment (FREE) 930,000
American Foreign Policy Council 930,000
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research 900,000
Defenders of Property Rights 885,000
Institute on Religion and Democracy, Inc. 835,000
Hudson Institute, Inc. 825,000
National Center for Public Policy Research, Inc. 815,000
Pacific Legal Foundation 700,000
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. 693,000
Claremont Institute for the Study of Statesmanship 675,000
George Mason University Foundation, Inc. 665,000
David Horowitz Freedom Center 625,000
National Legal and Policy Center 622,000
George C. Marshall Institute 607,500
Center for Immigration Studies 607,500
Harvard University 594,000
High Frontier 585,000
Collegiate Network, Inc. 580,000
American Defense Institute, Inc. 560,000
Americans Back In Charge 550,000
Institute for Health Freedom 550,000
Social Philosophy and Policy Foundation 550,000
Freedom House, Inc. 540,000
Institute on Religion and Public Life, Inc. 535,000
Michigan State University 532,000
National Center for Policy Analysis 525,000
Center for Media and Public Affairs, Inc. 512,000
California, University of, Los Angeles (UCLA) 500,000
Southeastern Legal Foundation, Inc. 500,000
Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation 500,000
Bowling Green State University 480,500
National Defense University Foundation, Inc. 476,000
Jamestown Foundation 460,000
Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. 436,300
Institute for Humane Studies 430,000
Defense Forum Foundation, Inc. 430,000
Criminal Justice Legal Foundation 375,000
Reason Foundation 366,000
American Civil Rights Union 350,000
Americans for Tax Reform Foundation 325,000
National Institute for Public Policy 325,000
America’s Survival, Inc. 325,000
University of Virginia 316,000
Independent Women’s Forum 300,000
Foundation Endowment 295,000
Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) 275,000
Cinema Foundation, Inc., The 275,000
National Taxpayers Union Foundation 275,000
Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies 275,000
Mountain States Legal Foundation 255,000
Institute for International Studies 255,000
Institute for Contemporary Studies 250,500
Cato Institute 245,000
Institute for Policy Innovation 245,000
National Strategy Information Center, Inc. 240,000
Johns Hopkins University — SAIS 237,000
Capital Research Center 225,000
Media Institute 225,000
ETV Endowment of South Carolina, Inc. 225,000
Foreign Policy Research Institute 220,000
New York University 215,000
United States Global Strategy Council 210,000
Patrick Henry Center for Individual Liberty 210,000
Tax Foundation 205,000
Committee on the Present Danger 200,000
National Affairs, Inc. 200,000
American Studies Center, The 200,000
Institute of the North 200,000
Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America 195,000
Center for Security Studies 190,000
Association of Literary Scholars and Critics 180,000
Foundation for Cultural Review, Inc. 179,500
Capital Legal Foundation 175,000
Morley Publishing Group, Inc. 175,000
American Bar Association Fund for Public Education 175,000
Foundation for American Communications 175,000
Smith College 173,000
Toward Tradition 155,000
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 150,000
Pacific Forum, CSIS 145,000
Carnegie Mellon University 140,000
Foundation for the Advancement of Monetary Education, Ltd. 135,000
Women for Freedom 134,500
Naval War College Foundation, Inc. 127,000
Women’s Freedom Network 125,000
Center for Individual Freedom Foundation 125,000
Center for Peace and Freedom 125,000
Institute for Educational Affairs 120,000
One Nation/One California Research and Education Fund 120,000
Pacific Academy for Advanced Studies 110,000
New Citizenship Project, Inc. 105,000
Critical Review Foundation, Inc. 105,000
Statistical Assessment Service 100,000
United States Strategic Institute 100,000
Safe Streets Alliance 100,000
Evergreen Freedom Foundation 100,000
Foundation for Democratic Education, Inc. 100,000
Gallatin Writers, Inc. 100,000
University of Texas at Arlington 100,000
Southwest Missouri State University Foundation 100,000
Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, Inc. 100,000
Clemson University Foundation 100,000
Mid-America Institute for Public Policy Research 100,000
Wheaton College 100,000
Drug Free America Foundation, Inc. 100,000
Society for the Education of Physicians and Patients 95,000
Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute 95,000
National Forum Foundation 85,000
Ethics and Public Policy Center, Inc. 80,000
International Projects Assistance Services 80,000
Villanova University 77,300
Issues and Views Open Forum Foundation, Inc. 75,000
George Mason University 75,000
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh 75,000
Center for Neighborhood Enterprise 71,000
Committee for the Free World, Inc. 70,000
Better Government Association, Inc 68,500
American Legal Foundation 66,500
Louisiana Foundation for Excellence in Science, Technology and Education 66,500
New York Law School 61,000
New England Legal Foundation 60,000
George Washington University 60,000
First Principles, Inc. 60,000
University of San Diego 60,000
Competitive Enterprise Institute 60,000
Claremont McKenna College 54,500
Boston University (Boston) 54,000
Citizens Committee for the Pro-Democratic Coalition in Central America 50,000
Institute for Philosophical and Social Research 50,000
Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank 50,000
Coalition for Local Sovereignty 50,000
American Council of Trustees and Alumni 50,000
University of Southern California 50,000
FreedomWorks Foundation 50,000
Institute for Political Economy 50,000
University of South Carolina 50,000
Freedom Federation, Inc. 50,000
Fraser Institute, The 50,000
Public Research, Syndicated 50,000
Center for Strategic and International Studies 50,000
American Security Council Foundation 40,000
Center for a Free Cuba 40,000
Discovery Institute for Public Policy 40,000
American Civil Rights Institute 40,000
Taxpayers’ Foundation 35,000
Foundation for Economic Education 35,000
Mont Pelerin Society, The 35,000
Center for the Study of Public Choice Foundation 35,000
Frontiers of Freedom Institute 35,000
National Strategy Forum 30,000
Institute for the Study of the Americas 30,000
American Foundation for Resistance International 30,000
Council for Basic Education 30,000
American Association for Small Property Ownership 30,000
League for Industrial Democracy 28,000
Pro Demca 25,000
Pepperdine University 25,000
Center for Judicial Studies 25,000
Lawyers for the Republic, Inc. 25,000
Institute for Humane Studies (Menlo Park) 25,000
American Tort Reform Foundation 25,000
Center for Education Reform 25,000
Washington University 25,000
Florida State University 22,500
Sabre Foundation, Inc. 20,000
Philadelphia Society, The 20,000
Boston College 19,920
National Legal Center for The Public Interest 15,000
Catholic University of America 15,000
American Society of Local Officials, The 15,000
Alexis de Tocqueville Institution 15,000
European American Institute for Security Research 15,000
Heartland Institute 10,000
Commonwealth Foundation for Public Policy Alternatives 10,000
American Geological Institute 10,000
Media Research Center, Inc. 10,000
Winston Churchill Travelling Fellowships Foundation 10,000
Connecticut Association of Scholars 5,000
John Locke Institute 5,000
National Flag Foundation 5,000
Texas A&M University 5,000
Johns Hopkins University 4,000

http://www.mediatransparency.org/recipientsoffunder.php?funderID=4

RELATED LINKS

Recipients of grants from The Carthage Foundation

Funders and recipients who share official people with The Carthage Foundation
Financials*
year: 2006
asts: $ 30,108,877
rev: $ 5,631,853
exp: $ 5,025,690
grnts pd: $ 4,227,500

show 8+ years | graph | w/o assets | pastable data
year: 2005
asts: $ 27,623,535
rev: $ 5,885,778
exp: $ 6,464,818
grnts pd: $ 5,855,500

year: 2004
asts: $ 26,262,050
rev: $ 7,557,721
exp: $ 6,696,979
grnts pd: $ 6,126,000

year: 2003
asts: $ 24,050,911
rev: $ 7,229,050
exp: $ 4,192,004
grnts pd: $ 3,663,500

year: 2002
asts: $ 21,379,950
rev: $ 7,684,220
exp: $ 6,020,474
grnts pd: $ 5,552,500

year: 2001
asts: $ 23,705,949
rev: $ 5,618,441
exp: $ 3,853,679
grnts pd: $ 3,452,000

year: 2000
asts: $ 24,565,077
rev: $ 553,161
exp: $ 776,706
grnts pd: $ 360,000

year: 1999
asts: $ 19,828,470
rev: $ 3,045,035
exp: $ 2,502,091
grnts pd: $ 1,807,420

year: 1998
asts: $ 27,009,421
rev: $ 5,412,557
exp: $ 6,872,953
grnts pd: $ 6,267,100

* All from IRS 990 PF. Assets = line I; Revenue = line 12; Expenses = line 26; Grants paid = line 25.
Internal Links

FUNDER PROFILE
The Carthage Foundation

ein: 25-6067979
58 institutional roles for $1,274,084

301 Grant Street
One Oxford Centre
Suite 3900
Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6401

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

divider
58 institutional roles for $1,274,084

(show all | hide all)
Year Role Hrs/week Pay Source 990 src
Gleba, Michael W.
8 roles; show | hide | all roles (15) | profile total pay: $ 352,152
2006 Treasurer/Trustee 8 $ 61,167 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Treasurer/Trustee 8 $ 57,217 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Treasurer/Trustee 8 $ 52,683 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Treasurer/Trustee 10 $ 48,250 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Treasurer/Trustee 8 $ 43,200 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Treasurer 20 $ 36,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Treasurer/Trustee 20 $ 31,333 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Assistant Secretary – Programs 20 $ 22,302 990-PF Part VIII-1
Konkol, Alexis J.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (14) | profile total pay: $ 139,065
2006 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 17,196 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 16,992 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 16,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Assistant Secretary 2 $ 16,130 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 15,794 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 15,412 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 15,073 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Assistant Secretary 3 $ 11,878 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Assistant Secretary 8 $ 14,090 990-PF Part VIII-1
Larry, Richard M.
3 roles; show | hide | all roles (13) | profile total pay: $ 254,367
2000 Treasurer 20 $ 56,167 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Treasurer/Trustee 20 $ 99,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Treasurer/Trustee 20 $ 99,200 990-PF Part VIII-1
McCullough, George R.
1 roles; show | hide | all roles (1) | profile total pay: $ 3,500
1998 Trustee 3 $ 3,500 990-PF Part VIII-1
McMichael, R. Daniel
10 roles; show | hide | all roles (25) | profile total pay: $ 400,000
2006 Secretary/Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
2006 Consulting $ 64,000 990-PF Part VIII-3
2005 Secretary/Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Secretary/Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 60,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Secretary/Trustee 8 $ 60,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 54,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 54,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 54,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Secretary/Trustee 20 $ 54,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Miller, W. McCook Jr.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (9) | profile total pay: $ 59,000
2006 Trustee 3 $ 10,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Trustee 1 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Trustee 1 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Trustee 2 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Trustee $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Trustee $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Trustee 2 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Trustee 3 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
Robinson, Roger W. Jr.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (15) | profile total pay: $ 66,000
2006 Assistant Treasurer/Trustee 3 $ 10,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Assistant Treasurer/Trustee 1 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Assistant Treasurer/Trustee 1 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Assistant Treasurer/Trustee 2 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Assistant Treasurer/Trustee $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Assistant Treasurer 3 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Assistant Treasurer 8 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Assistant Treasurer/Trustee 3 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Trustee 3 $ 7,000 990-PF Part VIII-1
Scaife, Richard M.
9 roles; show | hide | all roles (34) | profile
2006 Chairman/Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
2005 Chairman/Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2004 Chairman/Trustee 1 990-PF Part VIII-1
2003 Chairman/Trustee 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2002 Chairman/Trustee 990-PF Part VIII-1
2001 Chairman 2 990-PF Part VIII-1
2000 Chairman 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
1999 Chairman/Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1
1998 Chairman/Trustee 3 990-PF Part VIII-1

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funderprofile.php?funderID=4

***
MCMICHAEL R DANIEL

* Assn. Former Intelligence Officers. Membership Directory. 1991
* Herman,E. O’Sullivan,G. The Terrorism Industry. 1989 (109)
* National Reporter 1985-W (35)
* Resource Center. GroupWatch 1989-NSIC (1)
* Saloma,J. Ominous Politics. 1984 (30-2)
* Tarpley,W.G. Chaitkin,A. George Bush. 1992 (389)

pages cited this search: 8
Order hard copy of these pages

Show a social network diagram for this name

http://www.namebase.org/xmcf/R-Daniel-Mcmichael.html

Herman, Edward S. and O’Sullivan, Gerry. The Terrorism Industry: The Experts and Institutions That Shape Our View of Terror. New York: Pantheon Books, 1989. 312 pages.
If they don’t support U.S. interests we call them terrorists, but wrap the same activity in a different flag it is always done by counter- terrorists or freedom fighters. This is the first vocabulary lesson to be learned from Washington’s McMedia talking heads and think tank mandarins.

The authors describe the experts, examine their many overlapping links with Western intelligence, lobbyists, the security industry, and corporate foundations, and even tabulate their usage of the word terrorism in some of their books. They also look at state vs. nonstate terrorism, and the PLO’s overpublicized terrorism as opposed to Israel’s sacred terrorism in terms of the numbers killed, to make the point that media coverage is highly selective. The mass media, whose structural links to government and the corporate system are already potent, and who are therefore already inclined to accept a state line, are driven further toward closure by the fact that the experts, whose credentials are from affiliation with institutions specializing in terrorism, are supplied them by the industry collective. These experts all follow the approved semantics and model and select and fit facts accordingly…. This reflects an effective propaganda system.
ISBN 0-679-72559-8

http://www.namebase.org/sources/OC.html

***

***
Western Hemisphere Stability
The Latin American Connection
by R. Daniel McMichael, John D. Paulus
Published in January 1982, World Affairs County of

Format: Paperback
ISBN 10: 9995314150
ISBN 13: 9789995314156

http://openlibrary.org/b/OL13339179M/Western-Hemisphere-Stability

Sarah Scaife Foundation

Financed by the Mellon industrial, oil and banking fortune. At one time its largest single holding was stock in the Gulf Oil Corporation. Became active in funding conservative causes in 1973, when Richard Mellon Scaife became chairman of the foundation. In the 1960s, Richard had inherited an estimated $200 million from his mother, Sarah. Forbes magazine has estimated his personal net worth at $800 million, making him the 138th richest person in the U.S. He controls the Scaife, Carthage and Allegheny foundations. In 1993, Scaife and Carthage reportedly gave more than $17.6 million to 150 conservative think tanks. As of December 31, 1992, Scaife assets were $212,232,888 and Carthage assets were $11,937,862.
$ 289,533,932 total assets at end of 2005
$ 13,871,000 grants paid
$ 14,998,082 total revenue
$ 16,197,272 total expenses
Scaife Family Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

Note: The Scaife Family Foundation seems to have broken off from Richard Mellon Scaife’s control. It moved to Palm Beach, and is no longer listed at the Scaife Foundations’ website.

$ 87,465,105 total assets at end of 2006
$ 3,301,777 grants paid
$ 9,332,335 total revenue
$ 4,165,614 total expenses

The Carthage Foundation

Please see the Scaife Foundations page for more information on the Allegheny Foundation and Richard Mellon Scaife.

$ 30,108,877 total assets at end of 2006
$ 4,227,500 grants paid
$ 5,631,853 total revenue
$ 5,025,690 total expenses

**

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Inc.

With $706 million in assets (2005), the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation of Milwaukee, Wisconsin is the country’s largest and most influential right-wing foundation. As of the end of 2005, it was giving away more than $34 million a year [The Bradley Foundation 2005 IRS 990 PF].

$ 706,076,838 total assets at end of 2005
$ 34,829,501 grants paid
$ 116,204,016 total revenue
$ 49,187,087 total expenses

http://www.mediatransparency.org/funders.php

***
Carthage Foundation
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Carthage Foundation is one of the American Scaife Foundations. It is controlled by Richard Mellon Scaife. The foundation does not award grants to individuals. It concentrates its efforts towards causes focused on public policy at a national and international level. From 1985 to 2003 the organization awarded over $68 million USD to other organizations.

External links

* Scaife Foundations: Carthage Foundation
* Carthage Foundation grant recipients from 1985-2003

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carthage_Foundation

***
National Association of Secretaries of State
http://www.nass.org/

***
FACTSHEET: George C. Marshall Institute, GMI
DETAILS

1625 K Street, NW, Suite 1050 Washington, DC 20006
Phone: 202-296-9655
Fax: 202-296-9714

Founded in 1984, The George Marshall Institute primarily focused on defense issues, advocating funding for Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative and Star Wars. GMI has since branched out and is one of the leading think tanks trying to debunk climate change.

GMI works on a range of issues, including civic environmentalism, climate change, national defense, bioterrorism, and missile defense. GMI publishes papers and holds roundtables. Many of these roundtables have featured climate change skeptics such as Roger Bate, Willie Soon, Margo Thorning, and GMI’s own Sallie Baliunas.

In 1989, the Marshall Institute released a report arguing that cyclical variations in the intensity of the sun would offset any climate change associated with elevated greenhouse gases. Although it was refuted by the IPCC, the report was used by the Bush Sr. Administration to argue for a more lenient climate change policy. GMI has since published numerous reports and articles attacking the Kyoto protocol and undermining the climate science. GMI is a former member of the Cooler Heads Coalition.

GMI used to restrict its funding sources to private foundations and individual donars to avoid conflict of interest, but in the late nineties, then GMI President Jeffrey Salmon wrote, when the Institute turned its attention to the science of global warming, it decided it would appeal successfully to industry for financial support. This fall, the Institute received its first-ever grant from a corporate foundation– the Exxon Education Foundation. (http://web.archive.org/web/20020913050409/http://www.marshall.org/funding.htm)

According to Media Transparency.org, the Institute received $5,757,803 since 1985 from conservative foundations including the Castle Rock Foundation (Coors), Earhart Foundation, John M. Olin Foundation, the Sarah Scaife Foundation, Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, and the Carthage Foundation.

KEY QUOTES

Wise, effective climate policy flows from a sound scientific foundation and a clear understanding of what science does and does not tell us about human influence and about courses of action to manage risk. Many of the temperature data and computer models used to predict climate change are themselves uncertain. Reducing these many uncertainties requires a significant shift in the way climate change research is carried out in the U.S. and elsewhere.
Source: George Marshall Institute website 4/04

2 February, 2007
Surface temperature records over recent decades and projections for the future are subject to continuing debate. The number of surface measuring stations has declined dramatically and the loss of that data may seriously affect the accuracy of surface temperature measurements. Without better, more accurate, and spatially comprehensive global surface measurements and the factors that influence them, the computer models used to project future temperatures do not have the certainty that is asserted for them. While the [IPCC] SPM’s underlying assessment documents should provide an improved basis for evaluating the benefits of additional actions, the underlying state of knowledge does not justify scare tactics or provide sufficient support for proposals of the kind of actions being proposed by some industrial companies, environmental organizations and members of Congress to suppress energy use and impose large economic burdens on the US economy.
Source: George Marshall Institute, Statement on the IPCC Fourth Assessment SPM, Feb 2007 [PDF]

Wise, effective climate policy flows from a sound scientific foundation and a clear understanding of what science does and does not tell us about human influence and about courses of action to manage risk. Many of the temperature data and computer models used to predict climate change are themselves uncertain. Reducing these many uncertainties requires a significant shift in the way climate change research is carried out in the U.S. and elsewhere.
Source: George Marshall Institute website 4/04

KEY DEEDS

12 April, 2004
Sponsored a Washington Roundtable on Science and Public Policy at which Dr. David Legates gave a presentation entitled Global Warming and the Hydrological Cycle. Legates argued that climate change is unlikely to cause increased extreme weather.
Source: Global Warming and the Hydrological Cycle, David Legates 4/12/04

14 December, 2005
Published the book Shattered Consensus: The True State of Global Warming, edited by Patrick J. Michaels and containing essays by global warming skeptics Sallie L. Baliunas, Robert C. Balling Jr., Randall S. Cerveny, John Christy, Robert E. Davis, Oliver W. Frauenfeld, Ross McKitrick, Patrick J. Michaels, Eric S. Posmentier, Willie Soon.
Source: George Marshall Institute, Shattered Consensus , Dec 2005

12 April, 2004
Sponsored a Washington Roundtable on Science and Public Policy at which Dr. David Legates gave a presentation entitled Global Warming and the Hydrological Cycle. Legates argued that climate change is unlikely to cause increased extreme weather.
Source: Global Warming and the Hydrological Cycle, David Legates 4/12/04

FUNDING

George C. Marshall Institute has received $840,000 from ExxonMobil since 1998.
1999
$50,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
‘support for science and public policy education programs’
Source: ExxonMobil Foundation 1999 IRS 990

2000
$50,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
general support
Source: ExxonMobil Foundation 2000 IRS 990

2001
$60,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
‘climate change work’
Source: ExxonMobil 2001 Worldwide Giving Report

2002
$80,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
‘global climate change program’
Source: ExxonMobil 2002 Worldwide Giving Report

2002
$10,000 ExxonMobil Corporate Giving
Awards Dinner
Source: ExxonMobil 2002 Worldwide Giving Report

2003
$95,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Global Climate Change Program
Source: ExxonMobil 2003 Worldwide Giving Report

2004
$25,000 Exxon Corporation
Awards Dinner — Climate Change Activities
Source: ExxonMobil 2004 Worldwide Giving Report

2004
$145,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Climate Change
Source: ExxonMobil 2004 Worldwide Giving Report

2005
$90,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
DISCREPANCY: 2005 Corporate Giving Report: General Operating Support. IRS 990 form 2005: Climate Change.
Source: ExxonMobil 2005 Worldwide Giving Report
2005
$25,000 ExxonMobil Corporate Giving
Awards Dinner and General Operating Support
Source: ExxonMobil 2005 Worldwide Giving Report

2006
$85,000 ExxonMobil Corporate Giving
General support and annual dinner
Source: ExxonMobil 2006 Worldwide Giving Report

2007
$125,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2007 Worldwide Giving Report

http://www.exxonsecrets.org/html/orgfactsheet.php?id=36

***

FACTSHEET: Atlas Economic Research Foundation, Atlas; AERF
DETAILS

4084 University Drive Suite, 103 Fairfax, VA 22030
Phone: 703-934-6969
Fax: 703-352-7530

Atlas’ vision is to achieve a society of free and responsible individuals, based upon private property rights, limited government under the rule of law and the market order (www.atlasusa.org).

Atlas promotes international development of free market think tanks and provides support and networking opportunities for existing organizations. Atlas brings freedom to the world through workshops, publications, awards, and a global directory of conservative/free market think tanks. Atlas is a member of both the Cooler Heads Coalition and the State Policy Network. Atlas is funded by conservative foundations, including the Sarah Scaife Foundation, Earhart Foundation and the Carthage Foundation (www.mediatransparency.org).

DEEDS

2 August, 2002
Wrote to President Bush, discouraging him from attending the UN Summit on Sustainable Development. Bush did not attend.
Source: Corporate-funded Lobbyists Aimed to Sabotage Johannesburg Summit, Africa News, 8/19/2002

2 August, 2002
Wrote to President Bush, discouraging him from attending the UN Summit on Sustainable Development. Bush did not attend.
Source: Corporate-funded Lobbyists Aimed to Sabotage Johannesburg Summit, Africa News, 8/19/2002

FUNDING

Atlas Economic Research Foundation has received $880,000 from ExxonMobil since 1998.

1998
$65,000 ExxonMobil Corporate Giving
global climate conference and other support
Source: Exxon Education Foundation Dimensions 1998 report

2000
$50,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
general support
Source: ExxonMobil Foundation 2000 IRS 990

2001
$150,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2001 Worldwide Giving Report

2002
$50,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2002 Worldwide Giving Report

2003
$190,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2003 Worldwide Giving Report

2004
$75,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2004 Worldwide Giving Report

2005
$100,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2005 Worldwide Giving Report

2006
$100,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2006 Worldwide Giving Report

2007
$100,000 ExxonMobil Foundation
Source: ExxonMobil 2007 Worldwide Giving Report

KEY PEOPLE

Jo Kwong
Director of Institute Relations
Source: Atlas website 4/04

Leonard Liggio
Executive Vice President
Source: Atlas website 4/04

Paul Driessen
Senior Fellow
Source: Center for the Defense of Free Enterprise website 4/04

Charles Koch
Big Donor
Source:

Becky Norton Dunlop
senior fellow
Source:

PEOPLE

Alejandro Chafuen
President, CEO
Source: 990

Bradley Lips
VP, COO
Source: 990

John Blundell
Director
Source: 990

Timothy Browne
Director
Source: 990

Alejandro Garza Laguera
Director
Source: 990
Linda Whetstone
Director
Source: 990

George Pearson
Director
Source: 990

James A. Pope
Director
Source: 990

Rene Scull
Director
Source: 990

William Sumner
Chairman, Board of Directors
Source: Atlas website 4/04

Curtin Winsor
Member, Board of Directors
Source: Atlas website 4/04

SOURCES

ExxonMobil 2001 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4388

ExxonMobil 2001 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4388

ExxonMobil 2002 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4386

ExxonMobil 2002 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4386

ExxonMobil Foundation 2000 IRS 990
ExxonMobil Foundation 2000 IRS 990
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4390
ExxonMobil Foundation 2000 IRS 990
ExxonMobil Foundation 2000 IRS 990
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4390

Exxon Education Foundation Dimensions 1998 report
Exxon Dimensions report 1998- Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4385

Exxon Education Foundation Dimensions 1998 report
Exxon Dimensions report 1998- Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4385

990
990

990
990

Corporate-funded Lobbyists Aimed to Sabotage Johannesburg Summit, Africa News, 8/19/2002

Corporate-funded Lobbyists Aimed to Sabotage Johannesburg Summit, Africa News, 8/19/2002

Atlas website 4/04
http://www.atlasusa.org

Atlas website 4/04
http://www.atlasusa.org

ExxonMobil 2003 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4389

ExxonMobil 2003 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4389

Center for the Defense of Free Enterprise website 4/04
http://www.cdfe.org

Center for the Defense of Free Enterprise website 4/04
http://www.cdfe.org

http://gcep.stanford.edu/sponsors_exxonmobil.html

http://gcep.stanford.edu/sponsors_exxonmobil.html

ExxonMobil 2004 Worldwide Giving Report
2004 Worldwide Contributions and Community Investments Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4380

ExxonMobil 2004 Worldwide Giving Report
2004 Worldwide Contributions and Community Investments Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4380

ExxonMobil 2005 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4387

ExxonMobil 2005 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4387

ExxonMobil 2006 Worldwide Giving Report
Public Information and Policy Research downloaded from Exxon website
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=view&d=4381

ExxonMobil 2007 Worldwide Giving Report
http://research.greenpeaceusa.org/?a=download&d=4586

http://www.exxonsecrets.org/html/orgfactsheet.php?id=17

***
Leonard Liggio
Executive Vice President
Source: Atlas website 4/04

http://www.exxonsecrets.org/html/orgfactsheet.php?id=17

Leonard Liggio
Leonard Liggio current relationships:
Mont Pelerin Society – director
Leonard Liggio connections, once removed:
Leonard Liggio is connected to …
Dennis L. Bark >> through Mont Pelerin Society >> Map it
Robert J. Barro >> through Mont Pelerin Society >> Map it
Edwin J. Feulner >> through Mont Pelerin Society >> Map it
Walter E. Williams >> through Mont Pelerin Society >> Map it
Note: This may be a partial list. Click on the map above to explore more connections.

http://www.muckety.com/Leonard-Liggio/19520.muckety

***

Strategic minerals and international security / contributors, R. Daniel McMichael … [et al.] ; editors, Uri Ra’anan and Charles M. Perry
Book
Bib ID 196332
Format Book
Publisher Washington : Pergamon-Brassey’s International Defense Publishers, c1985.
Description viii, 90 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN 0080331572 (pbk.) :
Series Special report (Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis) On the agenda ; 1.
Notes Papers presented at a forum held on Sept. 17, 1984, sponsored by the International Securities Study Program of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis. Includes bibliographical references.
Subjects Strategic materials – Government policy – United States – Congresses. | Mineral industries – Government policy – United States – Congresses. | National security – United States – Congresses. | United States – Foreign relations – 1981-1989 – Congresses.
Other Authors Ra’anan, Uri, 1926- | Perry, Charles M | McMichael, R. Daniel | Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis | Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. International Security Studies Program

http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/196332

***
000 01785nam a2200397 a 4500
001 196332
005 19940829000000.0
008 850613s1985 dcua b 100 0 eng
010 |a 85012336 //r944
019 1 |a3948959
020 |a0080331572 (pbk.) :|c$9.95
035 |9000003948959
035 |9834625
040 |aLC|beng|cLC
043 |an-us—
050 0 |aHC110.S8|bS78 1985
082 0 0 |a333.8/5/0973|219
245 0 0 |aStrategic minerals and international security /|ccontributors, R. Daniel McMichael … [et al.] ; editors, Uri Ra’anan and Charles M. Perry.
260 |aWashington :|bPergamon-Brassey’s International Defense Publishers,|cc1985.
300 |aviii, 90 p. :|bill. ;|c23 cm.
490 1 |aOn the agenda ;|v1 (June 1985)
490 1 |aSpecial report / Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis
500 |aPapers presented at a forum held on Sept. 17, 1984, sponsored by the International Securities Study Program of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis.
504 |aIncludes bibliographical references.
650 0 |aStrategic materials|xGovernment policy|zUnited States|xCongresses.
650 0 |aMineral industries|xGovernment policy|zUnited States|xCongresses.
650 0 |aNational security|zUnited States|xCongresses.
651 0 |aUnited States|xForeign relations|y1981-1989|xCongresses.
700 1 |aRa’anan, Uri,|d1926-
700 1 |aPerry, Charles M.
700 1 |aMcMichael, R. Daniel.
710 2 |aInstitute for Foreign Policy Analysis.
710 2 |aFletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.|bInternational Security Studies Program.
830 0 |aSpecial report (Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis)
830 0 |aOn the agenda ;|v1.
984 |aANL|c333.850973 S898

http://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/196332/Details?&#details

National Library of Australia catalogue

Details Collect From
333.850973 S898 Main Reading Room (Overseas Monograph Collection)

***

cross-referenced news and research resources about
Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis

Founded in 1976, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis (IFPA) is an independent and nonpartisan research and strategic planning organization that specializes in issues of national security, foreign policy, political economics, and government-industrial relations. Building on thorough and innovative analysis, the Institute and its small-business subsidiary, National Security Planning Associates (NSPA), provide programs and services that include the following:
* Tailored briefings for government agencies, military planners, and corporate executives
* Public forums for the broader discussion of issues critical to the U.S. policy-planning process
* Reports, point papers, policy recommendations, and monograph- or book-length studies for dissemination to a wide audience of key policy makers
* Major conferences, seminars, training workshops, and simulation exercises
* Quick-reaction assessments of breaking events

A nonprofit organization, IFPA is associated with The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, in Medford, Massachusetts. IFPA and NSPA have offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Washington, D.C.

ifpa.org/about

from Schema.root.org
encyclopedia of current events

Mon. March 16, 2009

China-US military contacts gaining momentum
China Daily
March 5, 2009
… and China will not agree with all Washington does, said McVadon, director of Asia-Pacific Studies at Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis. …
An alliance in need of attention
International Herald Tribune
January 22, 2009
James L. Schoff is associate director of Asia-Pacific studies at the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Charles Dharapak/AP.
Yorum: Küresel ve Bölgesel Aktörler Gazze Konusunda Neden Suskun?
USAK Stratejik G?ndem
January 20, 2009
… the Foreign Policy Research Institute, the Heritage Foundation, the Hudson Institute, the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis ve the Jewish Institute …

Who calls the shots?
21st Century Socialism
January 18, 2009

the Heritage Foundation, the Hudson Institute, the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis and the Jewish Institute For National Security Affairs (JINSA). …
voir les Archives Vous êtes ici » Accueil » Divers » Le lobby pro …
Tout sur l’Alg?rie
January 9, 2009
… à l’Heritage Foundation, à l’Hudson Institute, à l’Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis et au Jewish Institute For National Security Affairs (JINSA). …
An alliance in need of attention
International Herald Tribune
January 22, 2009
James L. Schoff is associate director of Asia-Pacific studies at the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Yorum: Küresel ve Bölgesel Aktörler Gazze Konusunda Neden Suskun?
USAK Stratejik G?ndem
January 21, 2009
… the Foreign Policy Research Institute, the Heritage Foundation, the Hudson Institute, the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis ve the Jewish Institute …
Who calls the shots?
21st Century Socialism
January 19, 2009
… the Heritage Foundation, the Hudson Institute, the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis and the Jewish Institute For National Security Affairs (JINSA). …
voir les Archives Vous êtes ici » Accueil » Divers » Le lobby pro …
Tout sur l’Alg?rie
January 9, 2009
… à l’Heritage Foundation, à l’Hudson Institute, à l’Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis et au Jewish Institute For National Security Affairs (JINSA). …
Japan Apprehensive About State of US Relations
World Politics Review
December 17, 2008
… high up on the negotiating agenda, says James Schoff, associate director of Asia-Pacific studies at the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis. …
La incipiente crisis indopaquistaní
Cubamatinal
November 30, 2008
Es miembro del Instituto Internacional de Estudios Estratégicos (IISS) de Londres, del Consejo Internacional del Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis …
Genocidas unidos
Cubamatinal
September 28, 2008
Es miembro del Instituto Internacional de Estudios Estratégicos (IISS) de Londres, del Consejo Internacional del Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis …
Iran: The spark that ignites the Middle East
Talk Radio News Service
June 16, 2008
Jackie Davis of the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis said that Iran’s pursuit of nuclear capabilities has substantial implications for the US and its …
Burma (Myanmar) aid logjam riles donors
ReliefWeb (press release)
May 9, 2008
… think it’s the solution,’ says James Schoff, associate director of Asia-Pacific studies at the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis in Cambridge, Mass. …
Disaster may loosen junta’s grip in Burma (Myanmar)
Sedona.biz
May 8, 2008
You could develop a long-term humanitarian program that opens up other forms of dialogue, says Charles Perry, of the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis …
Analysis: Nominations signal faith in strategy
Stars and Stripes
April 24, 2008
… needed to head US Central Command, said Charles Perry, of the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis, a nonpartisan think-tank based in Cambridge, Mass. …
Book Burning By Our Zionist Parasite By Edward W. Miller, MD
Coastal Post
January 30, 2008
… the Heritage Foundation, the Hudson Institute, the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis and the Jewish Institute For National Security Affairs (JINSA). …
South Korea set to elect new president
France24
December 19, 2007
The Korean presidential elections are no longer a choice between democracy and autocracy, says Jim Schoff of the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis, …
SOUTH KOREA – PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS
France24
December 18, 2007
The Korean presidential elections are no longer a choice between democracy and autocracy, says Jim Schoff of the Institute For Foreign Policy Analysis, …

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***
The National Reporter, Winter 1985
Tufts University: Students Counter Spies
by John Roosa

When the director of the CIA’s regional recruiting office visited Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts the night of October 3, he received a surprise. Twenty-five students staged a nonviolent direct action, stopping him from speaking at what had been advertised as a CIA informational meeting. The protestors formed a human wall between the CIA recruiter, Stephen L. Conn, and the students who had come to hear the presentation. Conn told a Tufts newspaper reporter that such sessions had occasionally been met with protests on other campuses, but that this was the first time that students actually prevented us from giving the presentation.

The Tufts administration reacted by calling the protestors before a disciplinary panel. The protestors in turn defended their action, using the hearing to publicize CIA crimes and denounce Tufts’ policy of allowing the Agency to recruit on campus. In arguing before a supportive audience of about 90 people that their action was justified, the students noted that under Tufts’ disciplinary guidelines persons are punished only when their actions have breached the standards of the community, so that any decision would be a political judgement on what those standards are. They argued further that the administration, not the students, was violating the standards of the community in allowing the CIA on campus.

Faced with this defense, the disciplinary panel chose not to discipline the students but at the same time stated that the protestors had violated university rules.
After the disciplinary process was over, the protestors met with three deans and confronted them with specific university policies violated by the CIA’s campus recruitment activities. The deans, deciding that some important points had been raised and knowing that the CIA was not planning to return to Tufts until at least the following semester anyhow, temporarily suspended CIA recruitment of undergraduates until a panel of deans could determine if university policies were in fact being violated.

After the protestors issued a press release on the deans’ decision and the actions of October 3, the Associated Press, National Public Radio and other national and local media picked up the story. The Boston Herald, the local Rupert Murdoch paper, was outraged enough to run a lead editorial tided: Tufts Wimps Out with Its CIA Ban.

The next day Tufts president Jean Mayer rescinded the temporary suspension. In a written statement, he denied that CIA recruitment had ever been banned, explaining that any policy on recruitment must be a University policy, not policy of an individual school. One dean told protest leaders that Mayer had been pressured to take the action after receiving complaints from Tufts trustees. Privately Mayer admitted, It would be difficult pragmatically and ideologically for Tufts to ban agencies of the federal government from its campus.

Mayer’s decision is easily explained. Although a small school, Tufts sends a large number of students each year to the CIA. A 1981 survey by Tufts’ student newspaper reported that twelve undergraduates had been interviewed by the Agency during the previous year, four had received offers, and two had accepted jobs. Even more recruiting takes place at the university’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, an institution Mayer himself acknowledges to have a hawkish reputation. As America’s oldest graduate school of diplomacy, Fletcher has been an important training center for future Foreign Service officers. The last three U.S. ambassadors to El Salvador — Thomas Pickering, Deane Hinton and Robert White — are Fletcher alumni, as are five other current ambassadors, several high-level State Department officials and over 250 other officers. At the same time, Fletcher is also an important training center for potential CIA employees. The most recent Fletcher alumni book lists nineteen graduates who acknowledge currently holding positions at the Agency. Probably an equal number of graduates have left the CIA over the last decade while others hold deep cover positions and cannot admit their true employer.

Documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show that there are high-level ties between Fletcher and the CIA related to recruitment going back at least to 1972. In that year, according to letters and memos, Fletcher officials took great pains, in preparing for the school’s annual Washington placement trip for graduating students, to include the CIA on the group’s itinerary. Recruiter Harry L. Russell reported to Langley that Fletcher Dean Edmund Gullion and Assistant Dean Larry Griggs are extremely happy about having their students invited to the Agency and are quite honored. Wanting not to pass up such a good opportunity to cultivate two important university administrators (as well as potential student recruits), the Agency arranged an unusual two-hour briefing by top-level officials.

Over the next four years, Fletcher officials apparently developed ever closer ties with the CIA — and the CIA reciprocated by recruiting for Fletcher. In late 1976 an undergraduate at one New England college, recruited by the CIA for its summer intern program, was encouraged by his Agency contact, recruiter Charles R. Pecinovsky, to consider attending Fletcher. Pecinovsky then arranged for Fletcher’s Larry Griggs, whom he described in a letter as a working acquaintance, to send the student admissions material. At the same time, Griggs and other Tufts personnel were receiving free research materials from the Agency. As the Tufts newspaper noted in reporting these gifts, the CIA has been known to provide nonpublic information to academics for use in their work, increasing their prestige and promotion prospects, and sometimes their sense of obligation to the Agency.

It is easy to see why CIA recruiters would seek ties to Fletcher and encourage students to go there. Fletcher’s faculty includes a handful of present and former government officials, some of whom have held posts requiring high security clearances. Material from their courses would be useful in intelligence work, while their backgrounds could help them spot students with potential talent for such work. Such professors include:

* William Griffith, who also teaches at M.I.T., was the main CIA liaison at Radio Free Europe until 1958, when he left to join M.I.T.’s Center for International Studies, then sponsored and partially funded by the CIA. Griffith’s International Communism project and his M.I.T. salary were paid by the CIA until the mid-l960s. He continued to be a consultant for the Agency thereafter. At Fletcher, he teaches courses on radical and communist theories and practice.

* Richard Shultz was a research associate with two CIA-linked think tanks, the National Strategy Information Center and Roy Godson’s Consortium for the Study of Intelligence, before his recent appointment at Fletcher. The Fletcher catalog reports that he is also a consultant to various U.S. government agencies concerned with national security affairs and that his professional interests include U.S. foreign and national security policy, contemporary military strategy, intelligence and national security, unconventional war and power projection in the Third World, and propaganda and political warfare. The CIA’s projection of power into the Third World formed the basis of the students’ criminal charges against the Agency. His most recent book, written with Godson, is Dezinformatsia: Active Measures in Soviet Strategy, and his contribution to the national security section of the Heritage Foundation’s blueprint for the second Reagan term is currently receiving much press attention. At this time, Shultz is conducting a Fletcher seminar on intelligence methods.

* John Roche came to Fletcher from Brandeis in 1973. Before that he had served as a special consultant to Lyndon Johnson — in part, he says, dealing with disinformation with the great North Vietnamese ‘peace offensive’ — and as a member of Richard Nixon’s commission, headed by Milton Eisenhower to oversee the removal of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty from CIA control. During his first four years at Fletcher, he served on the Board for International Broadcasting, overseeing Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty operations.

* Leonard Unger, who came to Fletcher after retiring from the Foreign Service, had been deeply involved in U.S. war planning for Indochina — as Ambassador to Laos (1962-64), as chairman of the State Department’s Vietnam coordinating committee (1965-67) and as Ambassador to Thailand (1967-73). In Thailand, he is known to have supervised the counterinsurgency operations.

* Hewson Ryan was deputy director at the United States Information Agency during the Johnson Administration, and later, under Nixon, became U.S. Ambassador to Honduras, where he played a relatively positive role supporting military reform, according to knowledgeable sources in Tegucigalpa. Since leaving the Foreign Service and coming to Fletcher in 1977, he has headed the Murrow Center for Public Diplomacy and taught courses on propaganda and on Central America. At the Murrow Center, he replaced Philip Horton, a former CIA Officer and the longtime editor of the now-defunct CIA-funded magazine, The Reporter.

* Theodore Eliot joined Fletcher as dean in 1979 after retiring from the Foreign Service, and has since been appointed Professor of Diplomacy. Though Eliot had never published, Tufts officials are said to have been more interested in the clout Eliot had accumulated over his long career, especially as inspector general of the Foreign Service from 1978 to 1979. He replaced Edmund Gullion, who had also enjoyed a long Foreign Service career (including a 1961 stint as Ambassador to the Congo). Gullion had been serving with Roche on the Eisenhower Commission at the time of the 1973 Fletcher placement trip to the CIA.

Another faculty group at Fletcher consists of those who specialize in strategic studies and who, though they have not necessarily served in government, are nonetheless well-known in government circles. They are affiliated with Fletcher’s Program in International Security Studies and with a think tank associated with the school, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis. Their courses, too, would be useful to students wanting to enter the intelligence community. Uri Ra’anen heads the Fletcher program, and Robert Pfaltzgraff heads the Institute. The two, who have collaborated on several books, served on Ronald Reagan’s advisory team on foreign policy and intelligence during the 1980 campaign, although they insisted they did not want government posts. One strategist who did join the Reagan Administration was W. Scott Thompson, a former assistant to the secretary of defense, who took the post of associate director for programs at USIA at a time when that agency has been increasingly used for propaganda and political-action projects that might in earlier times have been carried out by the CIA.

It is very likely that some of these Fletcher faculty members are active consultants for the CIA. The Agency’s current Coordinator for Academic Relations, Ralph E. Cook, is after all himself a Fletcher alumnus. The CIA documents released under the Freedom of Information Act, which run only up through 1978, confirm that several Tufts political scientists did have consulting relationships with the Agency at least during the mid-1970s. One was former Fletcher professor Geoffrey Kemp, who left to join the National Security Council in 1981. The documents reveal that Kemp was paid $1250 to attend a CIA conference on nuclear proliferation in October 1978. That was an academic exercise, he told the Tufts newspaper. Very rarely are they on classified subjects. I have participated in several of these.

The Agency was embarked on a campaign at that time to improve its standing with universities, which had been in decline ever since Congress had begun its inquiries into CIA activities in 1974. Kemp’s conference was part of that effort. Another part was a series of meetings by CIA Director Stansfield Turner with university presidents. It was at this time, Tufts President Jean Mayer says, that the Tufts president met his good friend former CIA chief Stansfield Turner, who has since joined Mayer on an advisory board to Monsanto Corporation. Soon afterward, CIA tried to forge financial ties with Tufts. Turner offered the school an undisclosed sum of money for a research project on world famine — an offer perhaps made to impress Mayer, who is a nutritionist by profession. In 1978, the CIA also offered $100,000 to $200,000 to assist a Fletcher international economics class studying the impact of the then newly discovered Mexican oil fields.

Mayer rejected both offers. He said that the Agency link, which would have been open, would have made much of our work abroad very much more difficult.

Fletcher has been eager however to take money from the two foundations most active in recent years in publicly promoting the need for a strong CIA. One of them, the Scaife Foundation (together with the closely linked Scaife Family Charitable Trusts and Allegheny Foundation) has provided the largest part of Fletcher’s foundation backing since 1977, donating over $1.5 million. The other, the Smith Richardson Foundation, contributed over $100,000 from 1979 to 1981 for two projects it describes as a project on [the] history of Vietnamese communism and the completion of [a] study of communist propaganda and political warfare. Since 1978, these two foundations have also provided most of the private funding to Pfaltzgraff’s Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, with Scaife alone donating over $500,000.

The promotional efforts of the CIA by these foundations, consisting so far of at least eleven separate projects together costing over $500,000, appear to have begun on October 30, 1978, when Scaife president Richard Larry phoned Ernest Lefever (an IFPA research consultant ) to ask if his Ethics and Public Policy Center at Georgetown University would supervise a study of media treatment of the CIA and the KGB. This work resulted in the pro-CIA collection by Lefever and Roy Godson, The CIA and the American Ethic.

Six months later, Scaife sponsored a conference of Fletcher’s International Security Studies Program entitled: Intelligence: Deception and Surprise. In attendance was an assortment of scholars and former spies, including Reginald Jones, Director of British Scientific Intelligence during World War II; former CIA officer Thomas Latimer, staff director of the House Intelligence Committee; former CIA Director William Colby; former Czech intelligence officer Ladislav Bittman (contributing the obligatory exposition on KGB active measures ), Richard Perle, soon to be Assistant Secretary of Defense; and Harvard’s Richard Pipes, a CIA consultant who soon afterwards joined the NSC.

Fletcher programs also receive corporate support, with most of that support for the International Security Studies Program coming from four companies which hold intelligence-related government contracts: Raytheon, EG&G, Hughes Aircraft and United Technologies. The first three have representatives on Fletcher boards; their presence gives the companies a say in school affairs. Raytheon has a particularly close relationship with Fletcher. The maker of missiles, electronic warfare devices and other military products, Raytheon is represented by its former chairman, Charles Adams, on both Fletcher’s Board of Visitors, where he is chairman, and on IFPA’s Board of Directors. Adams is also a trustee emeritus of Tufts. Philip Phalon, a Raytheon senior vice president, sits on the Advisory Council to the International Security Studies Program. Theodore Eliot, in turn, is a Raytheon director.

Just as there has been no known funding by the CIA at Fletcher, there are no current CIA employees known to be on its boards. Still, some members have former ties and many are supporters of a strong CIA. Besides Adams, the Board of Visitors includes Gerald Blakeley, longtime business partner of CIA lawyer Paul Hellmuth; Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Vice Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee; Hadyn Williams, president of the former CIA proprietary, the Asia Foundation; former CIA employee Joseph Sisco; Henry Cabot Lodge, the former ambassador to South Vietnam; and Winston Lord, president of the Council on Foreign Relations and former top aide to Henry Kissinger. Besides Phalon, the 19-member Advisory Council to the Program in International Security Studies includes former CIA analyst William Bundy; Stansfield Turner; former CIA Deputy Director Bobby Inman; U. Alexis Johnson, longtime member of the 40 Committee, the CIA oversight group of the NSC; R. Daniel McMichael of the Scaife Foundation; Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway, a former Scaife trustee; Reginald Jones; Rear Adm. Jonathan Howe, Director of the State Department’s Bureau of Politico-Military Affairs; Ret. Gen. Andrew Goodpaster; Robert Everett, president of the CIA-linked MITRE Corporation; Charles Wilcox of Hughes Aircraft; and Ret. Adm. Elmo Zumwalt. With members such as these, the complaints to Mayer over the temporary CIA recruitment ban should come as no surprise.

There is evidence, in fact, that many connected with Fletcher see the opportunity the school offers for jobs with the CIA not only as a right of students (as Mayer has argued) but as a national duty as well. Robert Pfaltzgraff contends, for example, that the idea of courses in intelligence in schools of international affairs, and especially in professional schools, emerges from the consideration of the needs of the intelligence community set forth [at the Fletcher intelligence conference].

Despite its many CIA ties, Tufts does not have any formal guidelines governing those ties. A number of universities established such rules in the wake of congressional revelations in the 1970s about abuses in the CIA’s academic relationships. Tufts was not one of them. We will evolve a [comprehensive policy] out of practical experiences, Mayer told the Tufts newspaper in 1981, but at this point any rules would be premature. It is understood [though] that if people are approached by intelligence groups of any kind, they should report it to the President. We don’t want our professors to be arrested as spies.

But even without specific guidelines, CIA recruitment currently violates several Tufts policies. The university’s Student Handbook states: Tufts exists in a larger society and provides no immunity from city, state or national laws. The university will not play the role of policeman ferreting out crime. But neither will the university serve as an accomplice.

The CIA is currently in violation of the Neutrality Act, the War Powers clause of the Constitution, the Boland Amendment (prohibiting the overthrow of the Nicaraguan government), other statutes and several treaties. Even former CIA Director Stansfield Turner has acknowledged that the CIA is in the business of breaking the law. He used this fact in his argument against the Reagan Administration’s proposal to permit CIA covert operations inside the United States.

The principles of the College Placement Council, principles to which Tufts adheres, requires recruiters to honor the policies and procedures of individual institutions and for organizations to take responsibility for the ethical and legal conduct of their representatives throughout the recruiting process. Despite this, the CIA conducts covert recruitment, involving surveillance of students, and fails even to conduct overt recruitment openly. While Director, Turner noted candidly, If I were required to abide by the rule of . . . every academic institution in the country . . . it would become impossible to do the required job of our country.

Several Tufts deans in their discussions with protestors acknowledged the validity of these arguments. Mayer’s decision to rescind the ban on recruitment was not based on Tufts rules, however, but on pragmatics and ideology. The case of Tufts and the CIA illustrates how some universities have sacrificed their independence and academic freedom for the chance to become servants of the state. Even now, Fletcher is making plans for its annual Washington placement trip in January 1985. Once again, the CIA is likely to be included on the itinerary.

Despite the wide student opposition to CIA recruitment and the initial promise of a consideration of the matter on its merits, there is now little likelihood that the CIA will be banned from the Tufts campus, no matter what its foreign atrocities or domestic abuses. Tufts’ powerful patrons have spoken.
_________________

John Roosa is a student at Tufts University.

Back to home page

http://www.cia-on-campus.org/tufts.edu/roosa.html

***
CIA on Campus

General articles

CounterPunch, 2003-04-07: The CIA is Back on Campus

Los Angeles Times op-ed, January 2001: Academics and Spies: The Silence that Roars

An article from Lingua Franca on the state of the CIA-on-campus issue in year 2000

Another general overview of CIA on campus (1989)

Excerpts from the Church Committee on the CIA in academia (1976)
CIA skips Church — Harvard and all the rest can go to hell (1979)

Michigan State University

The Ramparts article that started the controversy (1966)

National Student Association

Another Ramparts scoop: NSA is funded by the CIA (1967)

CIA destabilizes Ramparts, plus more on the NSA scandal (1991)

Tracking Student Activists

Gloria Steinem spies on students for the CIA (1961)

Operation CHAOS: Spying on the student movement (1975)

International Studies and Area Studies

Spooky funding started this entire field (Ramparts, 1969)

MIT, Berkeley, Harvard, Cornell, Syracuse, U.Kentucky help Ford/CIA overthrow Sukarno (1970)

Scholars target Africa for the CIA (1976)

CIA recruitment ad Social Science

From Project Camelot to the coup in Chile: An unbroken thread

Scholars perfect psychological warfare techniques (1945-1955)

CIA and the American Anthropological Association (1951)

MKULTRA and such: CIA’s behavior caper (1977)

History

A short list of history scholars who worked for the OSS

Documents

CIA document on how to co-opt academia (1968)

The Agency has a wide range of contacts with academics… (1991)

Officer-in-Residence Program (2001)

Columbia University

Research by the student strikers (1968)

Harvard University

Harvard in service to the national security state (1991)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

How to start a war (1954)

Princeton University

Dulles papers reveal CIA consulting network (1980)

Rochester Institute of Technology

Is RIT a CIA subsidiary? (1991)

Rutgers University

By the way, class, that term paper you did was for the CIA (1984)

Tufts University

Students counter spies (1985)

University of California

UCLA asks CIA for affirmative action funds (1992)

University of Cincinnati

Brown-nosing the spooks (1990)

University of Massachusetts

Arrested protesters put CIA on trial – and win (1987)

University of Southern California

A leaflet on the career of USC trustee John McCone (1977)

University of Texas at San Antonio

CIA cold warrior woos UTSA students (1994)

Yale University

Doug Henwood reviews Robin Winks’ Cloak and Gown

http://www.cia-on-campus.org/

***

Political organizations
Countrywide Credit Industries PAC

Businesses
Countrywide Bank
Countrywide Capital Markets
Countrywide Credit Industries Inc.
Countrywide Financial Corporation
Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.
Countrywide Treasury Bank

http://www.muckety.com/Query?name=Countrywide&prev=Anthony+Mozila&Search.x=36&Search.y=8&Search=search

***
Countrywide Financial Corporation

Countrywide Financial Corporation is based in Calabasas, CA
Business sector:
mortgage bankers & loan correspondents
Countrywide Financial Corporation financial information:
Securities and Exchange Commission filings
Stock quote and chart
People related to Countrywide Financial Corporation:
James E. Clyburn – mortgage recipient
Kent Conrad – mortgage recipient
Jeffrey M. Cunningham – director
Christopher J. Dodd – mortgage recipient
Robert J. Donato – director
Richard C. Holbrooke – mortgage recipient
James A. Johnson – received five real-estate loans
Martin R. Melone – director
Angelo R. Mozilo – chairman & CEO
Robert T. Parry – director
Adam H. Putnam – mortgage recipient
Oscar P. Robertson – director
Keith P. Russell – director
David Sambol – president
Donna E. Shalala – mortgage recipient
Harley W. Snyder – director
Other current Countrywide Financial Corporation relationships:
Bank of America Corp. – acquirer
Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh – lobby firm
Burson-Marsteller – client
California state government – sued
Dewey Square Group – lobby firm
Financial Services Roundtable – member company
Illinois state government – sued
Washington state government – sued
Countrywide Financial Corporation past relationships:
Barbara Boxer – mortgage recipient
Kathleen Brown – director
Henry G. Cisneros – director
Michael E. Dougherty – director
Gwendolyn S. King – director
Stanford L. Kurland – president
Paul Pelosi Jr. – mortgage recipient
David Spector – senior managing director

http://www.muckety.com/Countrywide-Financial-Corporation/5004346.muckety

**
David Spector
David Spector current relationships:
Private National Mortgage Acceptance Company, LLC – chief investment officer
David Spector past relationships:
Countrywide Financial Corporation – senior managing director
Fannie Mae – advisory committee member
Freddie Mac – advisory committee member
Morgan Stanley – co-head of global residential mortgages

http://www.muckety.com/David-Spector/162602.muckety

***
Angelo R. Mozilo
Angelo R. Mozilo personal relations:
James A. Johnson – friend
Other current Angelo R. Mozilo relationships:
American Ballet Theatre – trustee
California Commission for Jobs and Economic Growth – member
Corporate Library 2008 Pay Survey – No. 3
Countrywide Financial Corporation – chairman & CEO
Gonzaga University – trustee
Graziadio School of Business and Management – board of visitors member
Horatio Alger Association – member
National Italian American Foundation – director
Angelo R. Mozilo past relationships:
Fannie Mae – national adviser
Home Depot Inc. – director
House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform – testified before
Angelo R. Mozilo connections, once removed:
Angelo R. Mozilo is connected to …
Bank of America Corp. >> through Countrywide Financial Corporation >> Map it!
Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh >> through Countrywide Financial Corporation >> Map it!

[and others . . . ]

http://www.muckety.com/Angelo-R-Mozilo/4846.muckety

***
Corporate Library 2008 Pay Survey
People related to Corporate Library 2008 Pay Survey:
Daniel P. Amos – No. 8
William R. Berkley – No. 6
Lloyd C. Blankfein – No. 9, No. 11
George A.L. David – No. 12
Barry Diller – No. 2
Lawrence J. Ellison – No. 1
Richard S. Fuld Jr. – No. 13
Mario J. Gabelli – No. 15
Nabeel Gareeb – No. 7
Angelo R. Mozilo – No. 3
Steven Roth – No. 14
Jeffrey C. Sprecher – No. 10
Robert J. Ulrich – No. 5
Margaret C. Whitman – No. 4
Other current Corporate Library 2008 Pay Survey relationships:
The Corporate Library – list

http://www.muckety.com/Corporate-Library-2008-Pay-Survey/5058258.muckety

Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh
People related to Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh:
Doyle Bartlett – founder
Other current Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh relationships:
Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum – lobby firm
America’s Community Bankers – lobby firm
Amgen, Inc. – lobby firm
Black Warrior – Cahaba Rivers Land Trust – lobby firm
Calera (AL) – lobby firm
California Healthcare Institute – lobby firm
California High Speed Rail Authority – lobby firm
Countrywide Financial Corporation – lobby firm
Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta – lobby firm
Financial Services Institute – lobby firm
Genentech, Inc. – lobby firm
Love Terminal Partners – lobby firm
MetLife, Inc. – lobby firm
Metropolitan Water District of Southern California – lobby firm
Morgan Stanley – lobby firm
Motion Picture Association of America – lobby firm
National Center for Victims of Crime – lobby firm
NBC Universal Inc. – lobby firm
Platinum Advisors – lobby firm
PMI Group, Inc. – lobby firm
Resources Legacy Fund Foundation – lobby firm
SoundExchange – lobby firm
South Coast Air Quality Management District – lobby firm
Southern California Edison Company – lobby firm
Tejon Ranch Company – lobby firm
Universal Music Group – lobby firm
Western Union Company – lobby firm


Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh past relationships:
Freddie Mac – lobby firm
Washington Mutual Inc. – lobby firm

http://www.muckety.com/Bartlett-Bendall-Kadesh/5028079.muckety

***
Doyle Bartlett
Doyle Bartlett personal relations:
Bill McCollum – chief of staff
Other current Doyle Bartlett relationships:
Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh – founder
Doyle Bartlett connections, once removed:
Doyle Bartlett is connected to …
MetLife, Inc. >> through Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh >> Map it!
Countrywide Financial Corporation >> through Bartlett Bendall & Kadesh >> Map it!

[and others . . . ]

http://www.muckety.com/Doyle-Bartlett/101027.muckety

***

Bill McCollum
Bill McCollum
Bill McCollum personal relations:
Doyle Bartlett – chief of staff
Bill McCollum past relationships:
U.S. House of Representatives – member

http://www.muckety.com/Bill-McCollum/101011.muckety

***

Bill McCollum –

As Florida’s Attorney General, I am committed to serving the State of Florida, its residents and its guests with the highest quality of services my Office can provide. Please contact the Attorney General’s Office for assistance or to file a complaint about fraud or scams.

[Among other things on this page – ]

03/17/2009
Orlando Company Sued for Violations of Foreclosure Rescue Fraud Prevention Law

http://myfloridalegal.com/

***

Bill McCollum is the 36th Attorney General of Florida, elected in November 2006. Since taking office, he has positioned Florida as a national leader in the fight against child pornography and internet child predators. At his request, the Florida Legislature provided the resources to greatly expand the Attorney General’s Child Predator CyberCrime Unit (CPCU) and passed laws giving law enforcement new tools and greater punishments for those who prey on children over the internet. Additionally, with the cooperation of the state’s school superintendents and school resource officers, the Attorney General’s Office has prepared a cybersafety program to present in all of Florida’s middle and high schools.

As Attorney General, Bill’s other priorities include developing a statewide gang reduction strategy; consumer protection; combating Medicaid fraud; improving the state’s security against terrorist threats, and fighting crimes against the elderly, especially identity theft.

Bill McCollum is a native Floridian, born in Brooksville. He graduated from Hernando High School and earned his bachelor’s degree and law degree from the University of Florida.

After graduating from law school, Bill served on active duty in the U.S. Navy from 1969-1972. In 1992, he retired from the Naval Reserve as a Commander, having served 23 years as an officer in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAG).

From 1981 to 2001, Bill represented the people of Central Florida in the United States Congress. He founded the U.S. House Task force on Terrorism and Unconventional Warfare and was recognized as an expert on terrorism. Bill also served on the Judiciary Committee, where he chaired the Subcommittee on Crime, as well as the Intelligence and Banking committees. Upon retiring from the House of Representatives in 2001, he was a partner with Baker and Hostetler, LLP, until he was elected as the Attorney General.

Bill is married to Ingrid Seebohm McCollum. They have three sons, two daughters-in-law and two grandsons.

http://myfloridalegal.com/pages.nsf/4492d797dc0bd92f85256cb80055fb97/1515ce372e59d1e885256cc60071b1c4!OpenDocument

***
Bill McCollum
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This biography needs references that appear in reliable third-party publications. Primary sources or sources affiliated with the subject are generally not sufficient for a Wikipedia article. Please add more appropriate citations from reliable sources. (August 2007)
Bill McCollum
Bill McCollum

Florida Attorney General
Florida Attorney General
In office
2007 – present
Preceded by Charlie Crist
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida’s 8th district
In office
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 2001
Preceded by Bill Young
Succeeded by Ric Keller
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida’s 5th district
In office
January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1993
Preceded by Richard Kelly
Succeeded by Karen Thurman
Political party Republican
Spouse Ingrid Seebohm McCollum
Children 3
Residence Florida

Ira William “Bill” McCollum, Jr. (born July 12, 1944 in Brooksville, Florida) is the current Florida Attorney General and a former Republican Congressman from Florida.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Early life
* 2 Congressional career
* 3 Bids for U.S. Senate
* 4 Florida Attorney General
* 5 External links

[edit] Early life

Born and raised in Brooksville, Florida, McCollum graduated from Hernando High School and earned his bachelor’s degree and law degree from the University of Florida. While at the University of Florida, he was inducted into the University of Florida Hall of Fame, the most prestigious honor a student leader could receive, and served as president of Florida Blue Key. McCollum began his professional career on active duty with the United States Navy’s Judge Advocate General Corps from 1969 to 1972. In 1992, he retired from the United States Naval Reserve as a Commander, having served 23 years. In 1973, he entered private practice in Orlando and immediately became involved in local politics, serving as Chairman of the Seminole County Republican Party from 1976 to 1980.

[edit] Congressional career

In 1980 McCollum was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from a district including Walt Disney World and most of Orlando.

While in Congress, McCollum founded the House Republican Task Force on Terrorism and Unconventional Warfare, chairing it for six years. He also served three terms on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, two of which as Chairman of its Subcommittee on Human Intelligence, Analysis and Counterintelligence. Additionally, McCollum served as Vice Chairman of the House Banking Committee and served on the Judiciary Committee, where he was Chairman of the Subcommittee on Crime.

While serving the House, McCollum was also selected for a variety of Republican leadership positions, including three terms as Vice Chairman of the House Republican Conference. McCollum gained national attention as one of 15 members selected to serve on the House Committee to Investigate the Iran-Contra Affair, and, in 1998 – 1999, as one of the House Managers of President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial. Rather than seek reelection to the House in 2000, McCollum ran unsucessfully for an open United States Senate seat, bringing to an end his 20-year Congressional career.

[edit] Bids for U.S. Senate

McCollum launched an unsuccessful bid in 2000 for the seat of retiring Republican Senator Connie Mack, narrowly losing to former Congressman Bill Nelson.

McCollum made his second run for the Senate in the U.S. Senate election, 2004. During the early months of 2004, he competed with former Bush administration official Mel Martinez for the position of Republican front-runner: by mid-summer, businessman Doug Gallagher began approaching McCollum and Martinez in support as well. McCollum stressed his own experience on homeland security issues, and contrasted his position on tort reform against Martinez’s background as a plaintiff’s lawyer. Inexplicably, McCollum, who was considered one of the most conservative members of Congress for many years, was lambasted by Martinez as “the darling of homosexual extremists” due to his vote in favor of gay hate crimes legislation. Connie Mack appeared with McCollum at a press conference to denounce Martinez’s comments. Martinez went on to win the primary on August 31 by a wide margin, defeating McCollum in most parts of Florida with the exception of the Tampa Bay area. Shortly thereafter, McCollum endorsed Martinez for the general election.

[edit] Florida Attorney General

In 2006, McCollum ran for the office of Attorney General of the State of Florida, defeating State Senator Skip Campbell in the general election. McCollum ran on the message of “making Florida a safer place to live, work, and raise a family.”

Since taking office, McCollum has positioned Florida as a national leader in the fight against child pornography and internet child predators. At his request, the Florida Legislature provided the resources to greatly expand the Attorney General’s Child Predator CyberCrime Unit (CPCU) and passed laws giving law enforcement new tools and greater punishments for those who prey on children over the internet. Additionally, with the cooperation of the state’s school superintendents, the Attorney General’s office has prepared a cybersafety program to present in all of Florida’s middle schools and high schools. McCollum also launched a cybersafety website for children, teens and adults, located at http://www.safeflorida.net/safesurf.

As Attorney General, McCollum’s other priorities include developing a statewide gang reduction strategy; consumer protection; combating Medicaid fraud; improving the state’s security against terrorist threats, and fighting crimes against the elderly, especially identity theft. More information on his statewide strategy to combat gang violence is available online at http://www.safeflorida.net/safestreets.

In 2008, McCollum served as the Florida Chairman for the Rudy Giuliani presidential campaign. [1]

Prior to his election as Florida Attorney General, McCollum served as a partner with the Baker & Hostetler LLP law firm, practicing in the federal policy area. In addition to his duties as the state’s chief legal officer, he serves as President and Chairman of the Healthy Florida Foundation, chartered in 2002 to find consensus on long-term solutions to the nation’s health care system. He is also a board member of the James Madison Institute.

McCollum is married to Ingrid Seebohm McCollum. They have three sons: Douglas, Justin and Andrew, two daughters-in-law and two grandsons.

[edit] External links
Sister project Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Bill McCollum

* Bill McCollum, official profile, Office of the Attorney General of Florida

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Richard Kelly Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida’s 5th congressional district
1981–1993 Succeeded by
Karen Thurman
Preceded by
Bill Young Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Florida’s 8th congressional district
1993–2001 Succeeded by
Ric Keller
Party political offices
Preceded by
Lynn Morley Martin
Illinois
Vice-Chairman of House Republican Conference
1989–1995 Succeeded by
Susan Molinari
New York
Legal offices
Preceded by
Charlie Crist Florida Attorney General
2007 – present Incumbent
[show]
v • d • e
State Attorneys General in the United States

AL: Troy King
AK: Rick Svobodny (acting)
AZ: Terry Goddard
AR: Dustin McDaniel
CA: Jerry Brown
CO: John Suthers
CT: Richard Blumenthal
DE: Beau Biden
FL: Bill McCollum
GA: Thurbert Baker

HI: Mark J. Bennett
ID: Lawrence Wasden
IL: Lisa Madigan
IN: Greg Zoeller
IA: Thomas John Miller
KS: Stephen Six
KY: Jack Conway
LA: Buddy Caldwell
ME: Janet T. Mills
MD: Doug Gansler

MA: Martha Coakley
MI: Mike Cox
MN: Lori Swanson
MS: Jim Hood
MO: Chris Koster
MT: Mike McGrath
NE: Jon Bruning
NV: Catherine Cortez Masto
NH: Kelly Ayotte
NJ: Anne Milgram

NM: Gary King
NY: Andrew Cuomo
NC: Roy A. Cooper
ND: Wayne Stenehjem
OH: Richard Cordray
OK: Drew Edmondson
OR: John Kroger
PA: Tom Corbett
RI: Patrick C. Lynch
SC: Henry McMaster

SD: Larry Long
TN: Robert E. Cooper, Jr.
TX: Greg Abbott
UT: Mark Shurtleff
VT: William Sorrell
VA: Bob McDonnell
WA: Rob McKenna
WV: Darrell McGraw
WI: J. B. Van Hollen
WY: Bruce Salzburg

AS: Afa Ripley, Jr.
GU: Alicia Limtiaco
NMI: Matt Gregory
PR: Antonio Sagardía
VI: Vincent Frazer
DC: Peter Nickles
[show]
v • d • e
Current statewide political officials of Florida
U.S. Senators
Bill Nelson  Mel Martinez
Great seal of Florida
State government
Charlie Crist, Governor  Jeff Kottkamp, Lieutenant Governor  Alex Sink, Chief Financial Officer  Bill McCollum, Attorney General  Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner of Agriculture
Senate
Jeffrey Atwater, President  Alex Diaz de la Portilla, Majority Leader  Alfred Lawson, Jr., Minority Leader
House
Larry Cretul, Speaker  Adam Hasner, Majority Leader  Franklin Sands, Minority Leader
Supreme Court
(appointed)
Peggy Quince Chief Justice  Barbara Pariente  R. Fred Lewis  Charles T. Canady  Ricky Polston  Jorge Labarga

Persondata
NAME McCollum, Bill
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Florida Attorney General, former Republican Florida
DATE OF BIRTH 1944-07-12
PLACE OF BIRTH Brooksville, Florida
United States
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_McCollum&#8221;
Categories: University of Florida alumni | 1944 births | Living people | Florida Republicans | Members of the United States House of Representatives from Florida | Florida Attorneys General | Florida Blue Key initiates | People from Florida

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***
Angelo Mozilo
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Angelo R. Mozilo (born 1938 in New York City) was the chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Countrywide Financial until July 1, 2008[1].

He is the son of a Bronx butcher. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Fordham University in 1960 and holds an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Pepperdine University.[citation needed]

In 1978 he and his former mentor David S. Loeb, who had already started a mortgage lending company, founded Countrywide Credit Industries in New York. They later moved the headquarters to Calabasas, California in Los Angeles County. Mozilo and Loeb also cofounded IndyMac Bank, which was founded as Countrywide Mortgage Investment, before being spun off as an independent bank in 1997. IndyMac collapsed and was seized by federal regulators on July 11, 2008.[2]

Since Countrywide was listed on the NYSE in 1984, Mozilo has sold $406 million worth of its stock, mostly obtained through stock option grants. $129 million of this was realized in the 12 months ending August 2007.[3]

Perhaps more than any single individual, Mozilo has come to symbolize, and bear the blame for, the subprime mortgage crisis. In a New York Times feature on October 20, 2008, Henry G. Cisneros, a former HUD chairman and member of the Countrywide board of directors, describes Mr. Mozilo as “sick with stress — the final chapter of his life is the infamy that’s been brought on him, or that he brought on himself.” CNN named Mozilo as one of the “Ten Most Wanted: Culprits” of the 2008 financial collapse in the United States.[4]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Compensation
* 2 Insider Sales
* 3 E-mail Controversy
* 4 “Friends of Angelo” VIP program
* 5 See also
* 6 References
* 7 External links

[edit] Compensation

Mozilo’s compensation during the United States housing bubble of 2001–06 has come under scrutiny. During that period, his total compensation (including salary, bonuses, options and restricted stock) approached $470 million.[5]

His compensation also includes payment of his annual country club dues at Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, CA, The Quarry at La Quinta golf club in La Quinta, CA and Robert Trent Jones Golf Club in Gainesville, VA.[6]

Shortly after University of San Diego invited Mozilo to be the keynote speaker a conference for “sustainable real estate,” DisinviteMozilo.com was created in protest on January 10, 2008. Mozilo pulled out six days later. Shortly after that, Congress invited Mozilo to testify about his compensation.

Mozilo testified before the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on March 7, 2008, calling reports of their pay “grossly exaggerated” in some instances and pointing out that they lost millions as well. He defended the pay: The compensation was a function of how the company did ahead of the mortgage crisis.[7]

[edit] Insider Sales

Over many years, Mozilo sold hundreds of millions of dollars in stock personally[8], even while publicly touting the stock and using shareholder funds to buy back stock to support the share price.

[edit] E-mail Controversy

In May 2008, Mozilo made the news by accidentally hitting “reply” instead of “forward” in response to an e-mail from a CountryWide customer under mortgage stress.

“This is unbelievable. Most of these letters now have the same wording. Obviously they are being counseled by some other person or by the internet. Disgusting.”[9]

[edit] “Friends of Angelo” VIP program
Further information: Countrywide financial political loan scandal

In June 2008 Conde Nast Portfolio reported that several influential lawmakers and politicians, including Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Kent Conrad, and Fannie Mae former CEO Jim Johnson, received favorable mortgage financing from Countrywide by virtue of being “Friends of Angelo.”[10][11]

Senator Dodd received a $75,000 reduction in mortgage payments from Countrywide at allegedly below-market rates on his Washington, D.C. and Connecticut homes.[10][12] Dodd nonetheless called for stronger regulation of mortgage lenders and proposed that predatory lenders should face criminal charges. [13]

Clinton Jones III, senior counsel of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity, and “an adviser to ranking Republican members of Congress responsible for legislation of interest to the financial services industry and of importance to Countrywide.” was given special treatment. Jones is now state director for federal residential-mortgage bundler Freddie Mac. Alphonso Jackson, acting secretary of HUD at the time and long time friend and Texas neighbor of President Bush, received a discounted mortgage for himself and sought one for his daughter. “In 2003, using V.I.P. loans for nearly $1 million apiece, Franklin Raines, Fannie Mae’s chairman and C.E.O. from 1999 to 2004, twice refinanced his seven-bedroom home, which has a pool and movie theater.” [13]

[edit] See also

* Subprime mortgage crisis
* Countrywide financial political loan scandal

[edit] References

1. ^ Countrywide’s Mozilo exits stage a fallen hero – Los Angeles Times
2. ^ LA Biz Observed: *IndyMac taken over
3. ^ Gretchen Morgenson (2007-08-29). “Inside the Countrywide Lending Spree”. New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/26/business/yourmoney/26country.html?hp=&pagewanted=all. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
4. ^ Culprits of the Collapse
5. ^ [1]
6. ^ Countrywide Financial Corp Form 8-K, 9/8/2004
7. ^ “Inside Mortgage mess CEOs defend pay”. CNN. 2008-03-07. http://money.cnn.com/2008/03/07/news/newsmakers/ceo_pay/index.htm?cnn=yes. Retrieved on 2008-03-08.
8. ^ “Why is Countrywide possibly going bankrupt?”. HousingPanic. 2007-09-09. http://housingpanic.blogspot.com/2007/09/why-is-countrywide-possibly-going.html.
9. ^ “Countrywide Financial Chairman Angelo Mozilo’s e-mail sets off a furor”. LA Times. 2008-05-21. http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mozilo21-2008may21,0,3064002.story. Retrieved on 2008-05-22.
10. ^ a b “Countrywide’s Many ‘Friends'”. Conde Nast Portfolio. 2008-06-12. http://www.portfolio.com/news-markets/top-5/2008/06/12/Countrywide-Loan-Scandal.
11. ^ “Countrywide Friends Got Good Loans”. Wall Street Journal. 7 June 2008. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121279970984353933.html?loc=interstitialskip.
12. ^ “Angelo’s Angel”. Wall Street Journal. 2008-06-19. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121383295591086669.html?mod=googlenews_wsj.
13. ^ a b “Angelo’s Many ‘Friends'”. http://www.portfolio.com/news-markets/national-news/portfolio/2008/07/16/Countrywide-Deals-Exposed?print=true.

[edit] External links

* Businessweek Biography
* Forbes 2006 information
* Forbes 2005 information
* Business Biography, answers.com
* Bloomberg News Video
* Official Countrywide Biography

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Mozilo&#8221;
Categories: 1938 births | Living people | People from New York City | American businesspeople | American chief executives | American bankers | Italian-Americans | American Roman Catholics | Businesspeople in real estate | Fordham University alumni | United States housing bubble

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Mozilo

***
American International Group
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Semi-protected
“AIG” redirects here. For other uses, see AIG (disambiguation).
This event documents a current event. Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.
American International Group, Inc.
Type Public (NYSE: AIG)
Founded 1919 in Shanghai, China
Founder(s) Cornelius Vander Starr
Headquarters Flag of the United States American International Building
New York City, New York
Area served Worldwide
Key people Edward M. Liddy (Chairman and CEO)
David L. Herzog (CFO and EVP)
Industry Insurance, financial services
Products Insurance annuities, mutual funds
Market cap US$ 941.76 million (March 6, 2009)[1]
Revenue ? US$ 110.064 billion (2008)[2]
Operating income ? US$ -106.761 billion (2008)[2]
Net income ? US$ -99.289 billion (2008)[2]
Total assets ? US$ 860.418 billion (2008)[2]
Total equity ? US$ 52.710 billion (2008)[2]
Employees 116,000 (2008)[2]
Website AIG.com

American International Group, Inc. (AIG) (NYSE: AIG) is a major American insurance corporation based at the American International Building in New York City. The British headquarters are located on Fenchurch Street in London, continental Europe operations are based in La Défense, Paris, and its Asian HQ is in Hong Kong. According to the 2008 Forbes Global 2000 list, AIG was the 18th-largest public company in the world. It was on the Dow Jones Industrial Average from April 8, 2004 to September 22, 2008.

It suffered from a liquidity crisis after its credit ratings were downgraded below “AA” levels, and the Federal Reserve Bank on September 16, 2008, created an $85 billion credit facility to enable the company to meet collateral and other cash obligations, at the cost to AIG of the issuance of a stock warrant to the Federal Reserve Bank for 79.9% of the equity of AIG. In November 2008 the U.S. government revised its loan package to the company, increasing the total amount to $152 billion. AIG is attempting to sell assets to repay the loans. So far the U.S. government has given the company over $170 billion.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
* 2 Financial crisis
o 2.1 Chronology of September 2008 liquidity crisis
o 2.2 Federal Reserve bailout
o 2.3 Additional Bailouts of 2008
o 2.4 Amounts paid to counterparties using bailout funds
o 2.5 Post-bailout spending
o 2.6 Settlement of credit default swaps
o 2.7 Attempts to sell assets
o 2.8 Record losses
o 2.9 2009 bonus payments
* 3 Business
o 3.1 Auto insurance
* 4 International holdings
o 4.1 Australia
o 4.2 China
+ 4.2.1 Hong Kong
o 4.3 India
o 4.4 Indonesia
o 4.5 Pakistan
o 4.6 Philippines
o 4.7 Singapore
o 4.8 United Kingdom
* 5 Insurance holdings by state
o 5.1 California
o 5.2 Pennsylvania
o 5.3 West Virginia
* 6 Holdings
o 6.1 Mortgage lending
o 6.2 Aerospace
o 6.3 Real estate
o 6.4 Telecommunications
o 6.5 Ports
o 6.6 Skiing
* 7 Other holdings
o 7.1 Subsidiary Holdings
* 8 Litigation
o 8.1 Accounting fraud claims
* 9 Corporate governance
o 9.1 Board of directors
* 10 See also
* 11 Notes
* 12 References and further reading
* 13 External links

History
The American International Building in lower Manhattan

AIG’s history dates back to 1919, when Cornelius Vander Starr established an insurance agency in Shanghai, China. Starr was the first Westerner in Shanghai to sell insurance to the Chinese, which he continued to do until AIG left China in early 1949—as Mao Zedong led the advance of the Communist People’s Liberation Army on Shanghai.[3][4] Starr then moved the company headquarters to its current home in New York City.[5] The company went on to expand, often through subsidiaries, into other markets, including other parts of Asia, Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East.[6]

In 1962, Starr gave management of the company’s lagging U.S. holdings to Maurice R. “Hank” Greenberg, who shifted its focus from personal insurance to high-margin corporate coverage. Greenberg focused on selling insurance through independent brokers rather than agents to eliminate agent salaries. Using brokers, AIG could price insurance according to its potential return even if it suffered decreased sales of certain products for great lengths of time with very little extra expense. In 1968, Starr named Greenberg his successor. The company went public in 1969.[7]

In the mid-2000s AIG became embroiled in a series of fraud investigations conducted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Justice Department, and New York State Attorney General’s Office. Greenberg was ousted amid an accounting scandal in February 2005; he is still fighting civil charges being pursued by New York state.[8][9] The New York Attorney General’s investigation led to a $1.6 billion fine for AIG and criminal charges for some of its executives.[10] Greenberg was succeeded as CEO by Martin J. Sullivan, who had begun his career at AIG as a clerk in its London office in 1970.[11]

On June 15, 2008, under intense pressure due to financial losses and a falling stock price, Sullivan resigned and was replaced by Robert B. Willumstad, Chairman of the AIG Board of Directors since 2006. Willumstad was forced to step down and was replaced by Edward M. Liddy on September 17, 2008.[12]

Financial crisis
Further information: Subprime mortgage crisis, Financial crisis of 2007–2009, and Liquidity crisis of September 2008

Chronology of September 2008 liquidity crisis

On September 16, 2008, AIG suffered a liquidity crisis following the downgrade of its credit rating. Industry practice permits firms with high credit ratings to enter swaps with limited margin. When its credit rating was downgraded, the company was required to post collateral with its trading counter-parties, and this led to a liquidity crisis. AIG’sLondon unit sold credit protection in the form of credit default swaps (CDSs) on collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) that had declined in value.[13] The United States Federal Reserve, to prevent the company’s collapse, and in order for AIG to meet its obligations to post additional collateral to credit default swap trading partners, announced the creation of a secured credit facility of up to US$85 billion, secured by the assets of AIG subsidiaries, in exchange for warrants for a 79.9% equity stake, the right to suspend dividends to previously issued common and preferred stock.[11][14][15] AIG announced the same day that its board accepted the terms of the Federal Reserve Bank’s rescue package and secured credit facility.[16] This was the largest government bailout of a private company in U.S. history, though smaller than the bailout of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac a week earlier.[17][18]

AIG’s share prices fell over 95% to just $1.25 on September 16, 2008, from a 52-week high of $70.13. The company reported over $13.2 billion in losses in the first six months of the year.[19][20] The AIG Financial Products division headed by Joseph Cassano had entered into credit default swaps to insure $441 billion worth of securities originally rated AAA. Of those securities, $57.8 billion were structured debt securities backed by subprime loans.[21] CNN named Cassano as one of the “Ten Most Wanted: Culprits” of the 2008 financial collapse in the United States.[22]

As Lehman Brothers (the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history) suffered a major decline in share price, investors began comparing the types of securities held by AIG and Lehman, and found that AIG had valued its Alt-A and sub-prime mortgage-backed securities at 1.7 to 2 times the rates used by Lehman.[19] On September 14, 2008, AIG announced it was considering selling its aircraft leasing division, International Lease Finance Corporation, in an effort to raise necessary capital for the company.[19] The Federal Reserve has hired Morgan Stanley to determine if there are systemic risks to a failing AIG, and has asked private entities to supply short-term bridge loans to the company. In the meantime, New York regulators have approved AIG for $20 billion in borrowing from its subsidiaries.[23][24]

On September 16, AIG’s stock dropped 60 percent at the market’s opening.[25] The Federal Reserve continued to meet that day with major Wall Street investment firms to broker a deal to create a $75 billion line of credit to the company.[26] Rating agencies Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s downgraded their credit ratings on AIG’s credit on concerns over continuing losses on mortgage-backed securities, forcing the company to deliver collateral of over $10 billion to certain creditors.[27][26] The New York Times later reported that talks on Wall Street had broken down and AIG may file for bankruptcy protection on Wednesday, September 17.[28] Just before the bailout by the US Federal Reserve, AIG former CEO Maurice (Hank) Greenberg sent an impassioned letter to AIG CEO Robert B. Willumstad offering his assistance in any way possible, ccing the Board of Directors. His offer was rebuffed.[29]

Federal Reserve bailout

On the evening of September 16, 2008, the Federal Reserve Bank’s Board of Governors announced that the Federal Reserve Bank of New York had been authorized to create a 24-month credit-liquidity facility from which AIG may draw up to $85 billion. The loan is collateralized by the assets of AIG, including its non-regulated subsidiaries and the stock of “substantially all” its regulated subsidiaries, and has an interest rate of 850 basis points over the three-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) (i.e., LIBOR plus 8.5%). In exchange for the credit facility, the U.S. government will receive warrants for a 79.9 percent equity stake in AIG, and has the right to suspend the payment of dividends to AIG common and preferred shareholders.[11][15] The credit facility was created under the auspices of Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act.[15][30][31] AIG’s board of directors announced approval of the loan transaction in a press release the same day. The announcement did not comment on the issuance of a warrant for 79.9% of AIG’s equity, but the AIG 8-K filing of September 18, 2008, reporting the transaction to the Securities and Exchange Commission stated that a warrant for 79.9% of AIG shares had been issued to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.[32][16][11] AIG drew down US$ 28 billion of the credit-liquidity facility on September 17, 2008.[33] On September 22, 2008, AIG was officially removed from the Dow Jones Industrial Average.[34] An additional $37.8 billion loan was extended in October. As of October 24, AIG has drawn a total of $90.3 billion from the emergency loan, of a total $122.8 billion.[35]

Maurice Greenberg, former CEO of AIG, on September 17, 2008, characterized the bailout as a nationalization of AIG. He also stated: he was “bewildered” by the situation and was at a loss over how the entire situation got out of control as it did.[36] On September 17, 2008, Federal Reserve Bank chair Ben Bernanke asked Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson join him, to call on members of Congress, to describe the need for case for a congressionally authorized bailout of the nation’s banking system. Weeks later, Congress approved the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008.

Bernanke said to Paulson on September 17:[37]

We can’t keep doing this, both because we at the Fed don’t have the necessary resources and for reasons of democratic legitimacy, it’s important that the Congress come in and take control of the situation.

Additional Bailouts of 2008

On October 9, 2008, the company borrowed an additional $37.8 billion via a second secured asset credit facility created by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY).[38] From mid September till early November, AIG’s credit-default spreads were steadily rising, implying the company was heading for default.[39]

On November 10, 2008, the U.S. Treasury announced it would purchase $40 billion in newly issued AIG senior preferred stock, under the authority of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act’s Troubled Asset Relief Program.[40][41][42] The FRBNY announced that it would modify the September 16th secured credit facility; the Treasury investment would permit a reduction in its size from $85 billion to $60 billion, and that the FRBNY would extend the life of the facility from three to five years, and change the interest rate from 8.5% plus the three-month London interbank offered rate (LIBOR) for the total credit facility, to 3% plus LIBOR for funds drawn down, and 0.75% plus LIBOR for funds not drawn, and that AIG would create two off- balance-sheet Limited Liability Companies (LLC) to hold AIG assets: one will act as an AIG Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities Facility and the second to act as an AIG Collateralized Debt Obligations Facility.[42][40] Federal officials said the $40 billion investment would ultimately permit the government to reduce the total exposure to AIG to $112 billion from $152 billion.[40]

Amounts paid to counterparties using bailout funds

A key aspect of the AIG scandal is that over $100 billion taxpayer dollars have been channeled through AIG to major global financial institutions that have already received separate, significant bailout dollars in many cases. In other words, funds are provided to AIG by the U.S. government so that it can pay other companies, in effect making it a “bailout clearinghouse.” Members of the U.S. Congress demanded that AIG indicate to whom it is distributing taxpayer bailout funds and to what extent these trading partners are sharing in losses.[43]

As an insurer, AIG pays out claims to third parties based on various types of financial contracts, including derivatives like credit default swaps. Depending on the contract, it may be required to post (i.e., obtain and deposit) a certain amount of cash collateral, a proximate cause for the initial bailout. In addition, AIG insures many types of financial assets for all types of companies and governments. If the insurance on these assets were canceled due to an AIG failure, the assets and the institutions holding them would be at risk of credit rating downgrades and related asset markdowns. A concern is that the vicious cycle of credit rating downgrades, mark-to-market accounting adjustments, and asset fire sales that have been a hallmark of this crisis (i.e., forced deleveraging) would be made worse by an AIG failure. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke stated in March 2009: “We had no choice but to try to stabilize the system because of the implications that the [AIG] failure would have had for the broad economic system. We know that failure of major financial firms in a financial crisis can be disastrous for the economy.”[44]

Key institutions receiving additional bailout funds channeled through AIG included a “who’s who” of major global institutions.[45] This included $12.9 billion paid to Goldman Sachs, which reported a profit of $2.3 billion for 2008.[46] A list of the amounts by country and counterparty is here: Business Week – List of Counterparties and Payouts

Post-bailout spending

The following week (of September bailout), AIG executives participated in a lavish California retreat which cost $444,000 and featured spa treatments, banquets, and golf outings.[47][48]

It was reported that the trip was a reward for top-performing life-insurance agents planned before the bailout.[49] Less than 24 hours after the news of the party was first reported by the media, it was reported that the Federal Reserve had agreed to give AIG an additional loan of up to $37.8 billion. [50]

AP reported on October 17 that AIG executives spent $86,000 on a luxurious English hunting trip. News of the lavish spending came just days after AIG received an additional $37.8 billion loan from the Federal Reserve, on top of a previous $85 billion emergency loan granted the month before. Regarding the hunting trip, the company responded, “We regret that this event was not canceled.”[51]

An October 30, 2008 article from CNBC reported that AIG had already drawn upon $90 billion of the $123 billion allocated for loans.[52]

On November 10, 2008, just a few days before renegotiating another bailout with the US Government for $40 billion, ABC News reported that AIG spent $343,000 on a trip to a lavish resort in Phoenix, Arizona. [53]

Settlement of credit default swaps

On October 22, 2008, those creditors of Lehman Brothers who bought credit default swaps to hedge them against Lehman bankruptcy settled those accounts. The net payments were $5.2 billion[54] even though initial estimates of the amount of the settlement were between $100 billion and $400 billion.[55]

On March 15, 2009, under mounting pressure from Congress and after consultation with the Federal Reserve, AIG disclosed a list of major recipients of collateral postings and payments under credit default swaps, guaranteed investment plans, and securities lending agreements.[56] During December 2008, AIG paid $18.7 billion to various financial institutions, including Goldman Sachs and Société Générale to retire obligations related to credit default swaps (CDS). As much as $53.5 billion related to swap payouts are part of the bailout.[57]

Attempts to sell assets

AIG is attempting to sell assets to pay off its government loans. However a global fall in the valuation of insurance businesses, and the weakening financial condition of potential bidders, has put this process in doubt. If the U.S. government decides to continue to protect the company from falling into bankruptcy, it may have to take the assets itself in exchange for writing off the loans, or offer further direct financial support.[58]

Record losses
The lobby of AIG’s headquarters in the American International Building.

On March 2, 2009, AIG reported a fourth quarter loss of $61.7bn (£43bn) for the final three months of 2008. This was the largest quarterly loss in corporate history.[59] The announcement of the loss had an impact on morning trading in Europe and Asia, with the FTSE100, DAX and Nikkei all suffering sharp falls. In the US the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell to below 7000 points, a twelve-year low.[60][61] The news of the loss came the day after the U.S. Treasury Department had confirmed that AIG was to get an additional $30 billion in aid, on top of the $150 billion it has already received.[62] The Treasury Department suggested that the potential losses to the US and global economy would be ‘extremely high’ if it were to collapse[63] and has suggested that if in future there is no improvement, it will invest more money into the company, as it is unwilling to allow it to fail.[64] The firm’s position as not just a domestic insurer, but also one for small businesses and many listed firms, has prompted US officials to suggest its demise could be ‘disastrous’ and the Federal Reserve said that AIG posed a ‘system risk’ to the global economy.[65] The fourth quarter result meant the company made a $99.29 billion loss for the whole of 2008,[66] with five consecutive quarters of losses costing the company well over $100 billion.[67] In a testimony before the Senate Budget Committee on March 3, 2009, the Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke stated that “AIG exploited a huge gap in the regulatory system,” … and “to nobody’s surprise, made irresponsible bets and took huge losses”.[68]

2009 bonus payments
Main article: AIG bonus payments controversy

In March 2009, AIG announced that they were paying out $165 million in executive bonuses. Total bonuses for the financial unit could reach $450 million and bonuses for the entire company could reach $1.2 billion.[69] This quickly led to what many label a “populist outrage.”[70] President Barack Obama responded to the planned bailouts by saying “[I]t’s hard to understand how derivative traders at A.I.G. warranted any bonuses, much less $165 million in extra pay. How do they justify this outrage to the taxpayers who are keeping the company afloat?” and “In the last six months, A.I.G. has received substantial sums from the U.S. Treasury. I’ve asked Secretary Geithner to use that leverage and pursue every legal avenue to block these bonuses and make the American taxpayers whole.”[71]

Politicians on both sides of the Congressional aisle reacted with outrage to the planned bailouts. Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said “I would suggest the first thing that would make me feel a little bit better toward them if they’d follow the Japanese example and come before the American people and take that deep bow and say, I’m sorry, and then either do one of two things: resign or go commit suicide.”[72] Senator Chuck Schumer (D-New York) accused AIG of “Alice in Wonderland business practices” and said “It boggles the mind.” He has threatened to tax the bonuses at up to 100%.[73] Senator Richard Shelby (R-Alabama) said “These people brought this on themselves. Now you’re rewarding failure. A lot of these people should be fired, not awarded bonuses. This is horrible. It’s outrageous.”[74] Senator Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) echoed his comments, saying “This is an outrage.”[75] Senator Jon Tester (D-Montana) said “This is ridiculous.” and AIG executives “need to understand that the only reason they even have a job is because of the taxpayers.”[76] Senator Dick Durbin (D-Illinois) said “I’ve had it.” and “The fact that they continue to do it while we pour in billions of dollars is undefensible.”[77]

Representative Barney Frank (D-Massachusetts), Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, said paying these bonuses would be “rewarding incompetence”[78] and “These people may have a right to their bonuses. They don’t have a right to their jobs forever.”[79] Representative Mark Kirk (R-Illinois) said “AIG should not be on welfare from Uncle Sam, and yet paying bonuses and transferring a considerable amount of taxpayer funds to entities overseas.”[80] Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said “It makes me angry. I slammed the phone more than a few times on discussing AIG.”[81] Lawrence Summers, Director of the National Economic Council, said “The easy thing would be to just say, you know, ‘Off with their heads,’ and violate the contracts.”[82] Austan Goolsbee, of the Council of Economic Advisers said “I don’t know why they would follow a policy that’s really not sensible, is obviously going to ignite the ire of millions of people.” and “You worry about that backlash.”[83]

Political commentators and journalists have expressed an equally bipartisan outrage.[84][85][86][87][88][89][90][91][92][93][94]

Business

In the United States, AIG is the largest underwriter of commercial and industrial insurance, and AIG American General is a top-ranked life insurer..[citation needed]

Auto insurance

AIG sold auto insurance policies through its subsidiary unit, AIG Direct (aka aigdirect.com). The policies they offered included insurance for private automobiles, motorcycles, recreational vehicles and commercial vehicles.

AIG purchased the remaining 39% that it did not own of online auto insurance specialist 21st Century Insurance in 2007 for $749 million.[95] With the failure of the parent company and the continuing recession in late 2008, AIG rebranded its insurance unit to 21st Century Insurance.[96][97]

International holdings

Australia

AIG Life (Australia) underwrites over one million life insurance policies in Australia held through industry pension plans. The general insurance arm offers mainly corporate insurance and is among the top 10 insurers in Australia.[98]

China

AIG owns 19.8% of People’s Insurance Company of China (PICC) through direct and indirect holdings. PICC P&C[clarification needed] is China’s largest insurer of casualty insurance.[citation needed]

AIG owns a controlling share pack of Beijing PanAm International Aviation Academy or BPIAA. BPIAA was established in 2004 as the largest privately-owned flight training academy in China. Its bases located in Wuhai, Bautou, Shijajuan and Handan. In 2008, following the global crisis and economic recession, BPIAA has stopped it’s operation awaiting company re-purchase from other, more capable investors.

Hong Kong

AIG’s American International Assurance operations include 2.2 million policy holders.[99]

India

AIG is the minority partner with the Tata Group in two insurance companies in India, holding 26 percent each in Tata AIG Life Insurance Co Ltd and Tata AIG General Insurance Co Ltd.[100]

Indonesia

There are three companies under AIG brands in Indonesia: AIG LIFE; AIA, which sells life insurance; and AIU, which sells general insurance. AIG LIFE currently is voted the best insurance company in Indonesia by the Bisnis Indonesia newspaper. In Indonesia, various major banks, both international and local, are part of their distribution channel, such as ABN AMRO (now RBS bank), Bank Central Asia (one of the biggest banks in Indonesia), and Commonwealth Bank.

Pakistan

Principal office is in Karachi and branch offices are in Karachi, Lahore, Islamabad, Faisalabad and Sialkot. Selling automobile insurance in Pakistan since 1949.

Philippines

AIG owns Philippine American Life and General Insurance Company (Philamlife), the Philippines’ biggest insurance company. It has a total asset of P170 billion ($3.6 billion). Philamlife serves over a million customers and maintains the widest network of over 200 offices and sales agencies nationwide.[101]

Philamlife, on October 3, 2008, announced it is among the assets being sold by AIG to pay off debt to the U.S. government: “it had been identified for possible divestment along with some of its affiliates.” AIG identified Philamlife as one of “extremely valuable” assets intended for sale. Philamlife president and CEO Jose Cuisia Jr. said in a statement: “Philamlife remains to be (a) stable and strongly capitalized organization. Our policy owners and clients can be assured that their interests are protected because of the company’s financial strength. A change of ownership will not in anyway diminish policy owners’ benefits and security. We will remain focused on daily execution of our business and continue to provide our policy owners and clients with the highest levels of service. Philamlife, the largest and most profitable insurance company in the country and the undisputed market leader for over 60 years, is a crown jewel for AIG and will surely attract local and international interest.”[102] Cuisia said groups expressed interest to buy Philamlife, including the Yuchengco family which owns Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation. Another possible contender is the formidable Ayala Corporation that owns Bank of the Philippine Islands, Globe Telecom, and Ayala Land among others. Philamlife has total assets of 170 billion pesos ($3.6 billion), also has interests in banking, asset management and outsourcing.[103] But contrary to the report, Philamlife doesn’t have any interest on AIG BPSI, an AIG owned outsourcing company based in the Philippines, that services other subsidiary companies of AIG like American General and others.

Singapore

AIA Singapore is a wholly owned subsidiary of AIG in Singapore. It has more than two million policies in force, more than 3,800 financial services consultants and 800 employees in its Singapore offices. General manager Mark O’Dell resigned on September 18, 2008 in response to policy holders queuing up to cash in their policies in the face of concern of the future of AIG.[104]

United Kingdom

AIG operates in the UK with the brands AIG UK, AIG Life and AIG Direct. It has about 3,000 employees, and sponsored the Manchester United football club, paying them the largest amount by a sponsor in history.[105]

In response to redemption demands, AIG Life (UK) suspended redemptions of its AIG Premier Bond money market fund on September 19, 2008 in order to provide an orderly withdrawal of assets.[106]

Insurance holdings by state

California

AIG owns more than two dozen companies licensed to offer insurance in California, according to the California Insurance Commissioner. They include 21st Century Casualty Co.; 21st Century Insurance Co.; AIG Casualty Co.; AIG Centennial Insurance Co.; AIG Premier Insurance Co.; AIU Insurance Co.; American General Indemnity Co.; American Home Assurance Co.; American International Insurance Co. of California Inc.; Birmingham Fire Insurance Co. of Pennsylvania; Commerce And Industry Insurance Co.; GE Auto & Home Assurance Co.; GE Indemnity Insurance Co.; Granite State Insurance Co.; Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co.; Insurance Co. of the State of Pennsylvania; Landmark Insurance Co.; National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa; New Hampshire Insurance Co.; Pacific Assurance; Putnam Reinsurance Co.; Transatlantic Reinsurance Co.; United Guaranty Commercial Insurance Co. of North Carolina; United Guaranty Credit Insurance Co.; United Guaranty Residential Insurance Co.; and Yosemite Insurance Co.[107]

Pennsylvania

Twenty AIG subsidiaries are licensed to do business in Pennsylvania, including National Union Fire Insurance Co. in Pittsburgh, believed to be the second largest AIG underwriter in the nation. Other subsidiaries include New Hampshire Insurance, Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania, Granite State Insurance and New Hampshire Indemnity.[108]

West Virginia

AIG writes property and casualty insurance, life and annuity, and workers’ compensation insurance in West Virginia. It has 4.7% of the life insurance market and 2.7% of the property and casualty market, as of the end of 2007.[109].

Holdings

Mortgage lending

Since 2001 AIG has owned American General Finance Inc., an Evansville, Indiana firm with $29 billion of mortgage backed assets and more than 1,500 branches nationwide.[110][111]

Aerospace
AIG owns International Lease Finance Corporation (ILFC) , the world’s largest aircraft leasing company, with hundreds of aircraft including the full range of Boeing and Airbus jetliners, as well as the McDonnell Douglas MD-11 and MD-80 Series. Total assets under lease are $55 billion as of June 30, 2008. Estimates of its value range from $5 billion to $14 billion based on a comparison with rivals.[112][113]

AIG was one of the owners of London City Airport, along with GE and Credit Suisse. The airport was purchased for £750m in 2006 and AIG reportedly sold its 50% stake for an undisclosed sum on September 30, 2008.[citation needed]

Real estate

AIG/Lincoln was established in 1997 as a strategic partnership between AIG Global Real Estate Investment Corporation, New York, a subsidiary of AIG – American International Group, New York, and Lincoln Property Company, a Dallas based commercial real estate manager.[114].[115]. It has developed or is currently developing over 2.2 million square meters of real estate in Poland, Hungary, Romania, Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Austria and Russia.[citation needed]

Telecommunications

As of August 2007, AIG Investments (through its member company AIG Capital Partners, Inc.) acquired a 90% stake in Bulgarian Telecommunications Company (BTC) from Viva Ventures Holding GmbH and certain minority shareholders. At the time, the estimated value of BTC was 1.7 billion euros ($2.3 billion).[116]

Ports

As of March 16, 2007, AIG Investments, a division of AIG, completed the purchase of 100% of the stock of P&O Ports North America from Dubai-based Dubai Ports World. At the time, the estimated price was $700m, though AIG did not disclose the exact figure because the number was too low to be deemed significant to the company’s asset base.[117]

On July 2, 2007, Marine Terminals Corporation became part of the AIG Global Investment Group through its acquisition by AIG Highstar Capital. MTC provides the shipping community with a comprehensive network of stevedoring, terminal operating and related cargo handling services. Terms were not disclosed.[118]

Skiing

AIG owns Stowe Mountain Resort, its only ski business.

AIG’s connection to Stowe started when C.V. Starr, the company’s founder, invested in the resort in 1946. A $300m, 10 year expansion was started in 2005.[119]

Other holdings

AIG owns Ocean Finance, a British provider of home owner loans, mortgages and remortgages. [120]

AIG is the principal sponsor of English football team Manchester United[121] and the Japan Open Tennis Championships[citation needed].

Subsidiary Holdings

* AIG American General Life Companies
* AIG Annuity Insurance Company
* AIG UK Limited
* AIG Financial Products Corp.
* AIG Hawaii Insurance Company, Inc.
* AIG Investments
o Utilities, Inc.
* AIG Retirement Services, Inc.
o AIG SunAmerica Life Assurance Company
o The Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company
* American General Finance Corporation
* American Life Insurance Company
* Brazos Capital Management, L.P., a mutual fund manager[122]
* HSB Group, Inc., a specialty insurance company[123]
* International Lease Finance Corporation
* Lexington Insurance Company
* SunAmerica Ventures, Inc.
o AIG Financial Advisors
* Transatlantic Holdings, Inc.
o Transatlantic Re (Brasil) Ltda.
o Transatlantic Reinsurance Company (NYSE: TRH), 58% owned by AIG[124]
* United Guaranty Corporation

Litigation
This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references (ideally, using inline citations). Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2008)

In November 2004, AIG reached US$126 million settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Justice Department partly resolving a number of regulatory matters, but the company still must cooperate with investigators continuing to probe the sale of a non-traditional insurance product[125].

On June 11, 2008, three stockholders, collectively owning 4% of the outstanding stock of AIG, delivered a letter to the Board of Directors of AIG seeking to oust CEO Martin Sullivan and make certain other management and Board of Directors changes. This letter was the latest volley in what the Wall Street Journal deemed a “public spat” between the Company’s Board and management, on the one hand, and its key stockholders, and former CEO Maurice “Hank” Greenberg on the other hand. [126]

Accounting fraud claims

On October 14, 2004 the New York State Office of Attorney General Eliot Spitzer announced that it had commenced a civil action against Marsh & McLennan Companies for steering clients to preferred insurers with whom the company maintained lucrative payoff agreements, and for soliciting rigged bids for insurance contracts from the insurers. The Attorney General announced in a release that two AIG executives pleaded guilty to criminal charges in connection with this illegal course of conduct. In early May 2005, AIG restated its financial position and issued a reduction in book value of USD $2.7 billion, a 3.3 percent reduction in net worth.

On February 9, 2006, AIG and the New York State Attorney General’s office agreed to a settlement in which AIG would pay a fine of $1.6 billion.[127]

There is an ongoing fraud investigation that has been launched by the FBI after the collapse in stock price.[128]

Corporate governance

Board of directors

* Edward M. Liddy – Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer, American International Group
* Stephen F. Bollenback – Former Co-Chairman and CEO, Hilton Hotels Corporation
* Martin S. Feldstein – Professor of Economics, Harvard University
* George L. Miles – President and Chief Executive Officer, WQED Multimedia
* Morris W. Offit – Chairman, Offit Capital Advisors LLC
* Michael H. Sutton – Consultant
* Fred H. Langhammer – Chairman, Global Affairs, and former CEO of The Estee Lauder Companies, Inc.
* Virginia M. Rometty – Senior Vice President, Global Business Services, IBM Corporation
* James F. Orr, III – Chairman of the Board of Trustees, The Rockefeller Foundation
* Edmund S.W. Tse – Senior Vice Chairman, Life Insurance, American International Group
* Suzanne Nora Johnson

See also

* For a list of counterparties receiving U.S. taxpayer dollars, see: Business Week – List of Counterparties and Payouts

* AIG Advisor Group
* AIG Retirement
* Bailout (finance)
* Global financial crisis of 2008-2009
* Lemon socialism
* List of United States insurance companies
* Planned economy
* Tsarist autocracy

Notes

1. ^ “AIG Company Profile”. http://www.google.com/finance?q=AIG. Retrieved on 2009-03-06.
2. ^ a b c d e f “Form 10-K”. http://idea.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/5272/000095012309003734/y74794e10vk.htm. Retrieved on 2009-03-06.
3. ^ Thompson, Clifford; Block, Maxine; Moritz, Charles; Rothe, Anna Herthe; Candee, Marjorie Dent (1941). Current Biography Yearbook. Current Biography (60th ed.). H. W. Wilson Company. p. 247. http://books.google.com/books?id=P4oYAAAAIAAJ&q=%22AIG+abandoned+China+completely+in+1949%22&pgis=1. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.
4. ^ “Foreign Office Files for China, 1949-1976”. Part 1: Complete Files for 1949: Publisher’s Note. Adam Matthew Publications. http://www.adam-matthew-publications.co.uk/digital_guides/fo_china_part_1/Publishers-Note.aspx. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.
5. ^ “AIG: What does this US giant do?”. BBC News. 17 September 2008. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7621574.stm. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.
6. ^ “American International Group Inc (New York Stock Exchange)”. Company profile (New York City: Thomson Reuters). http://www.reuters.com/finance/stocks/companyProfile?symbol=AIG.N. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.
7. ^ Hoover’s Handbook of American Business (9th ed.). Austin, Texas: Hoover’s Business Press. 1999. p. 134. ISBN 9781573110457. http://books.google.com/books?id=0okYAAAAIAAJ&q=%22AIG+went+public+in+1969%22&pgis=1. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.
8. ^ MSNBC
9. ^ Reuters
10. ^ Yahoo
11. ^ a b c d Andrews, Edmund L.; Michael J. de la Merced and Mary Williams Walsh (2008-09-16). “Fed’s $85 Billion Loan Rescues Insurer”. New York times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/17/business/17insure.html?hp. Retrieved on 2008-09-17.
12. ^ “Former AIG CEO Willumstad foregoes some stock awards”. New York City: Thomson Reuters. 30 December 2008. http://www.reuters.com/article/ousivMolt/idUSTRE4BT5CL20081230. Retrieved on 2009-03-18.
13. ^ Gretchen, Morgenson (2008-09-27). “Behind Insurer’s Crisis, Blind Eye to a Web of Risk”. NY Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/28/business/28melt.html. Retrieved on 2008-09-17.
14. ^ Kaiser, Emily (2008-09-17). “After AIG rescue, Fed may find more at its door”. Reuters. http://www.reuters.com/article/idUKN1644235820080917. Retrieved on 2008-09-17.
15. ^ a b c United States Federal Reserve Board of Governors, Press release: Federal Reserve Board, met with full support of the Treasury Department, authorizes the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to lend up to $85 billion to the American International Group (AIG), September 16, 2008
16. ^ a b “AIG Statement on Announcement by Federal Reserve Board of $85 Billion Secured Revolving Credit Facility: Addresses Liquidity Issues and Policyholder Concerns”. American International Group, Inc.. 2008-09-16. http://ir.aigcorporate.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=76115&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1197918&highlight=. Retrieved on 2008-09-16.
17. ^ Clobbered: Dow Plummets 449 on Credit Fears Fox Business News
18. ^ “Adding to the Government’s Books”. New York Times. 2008-09-18. http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/09/18/business/20080918_FED_GRAPHIC.html. Retrieved on 2008-09-18. (Graphic comparing size of government credit facilities or asset guarantees)
19. ^ a b c Gretchen Morgensen; Mary Williams Walsh (2008-09-14). “Rush Is On to Prevent A.I.G. From Failing”. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/15/business/15aig.html?hp. Retrieved on 2008-09-14.
20. ^ Andrew Ross Sorkin (2008-09-14). “AIG to Plan Restructuring and Asset Sales”. The New York Times. http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/14/aig-to-plan-massive-restructuring/. Retrieved on 2008-09-14.
21. ^ Mark Pittman (2008-09-29). “”Goldman, Merrill Collect Billions After Fed’s AIG Bailout Loans””. Bloomberg News. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aTzTYtlNHSG8. Retrieved on 2008-10-12.
22. ^ Culprits of the Collapse – Joe Cassano
23. ^ “Fed Seeks At Least $70 Billion to Help A.I.G.”. The New York Times DealBook. 2008-09-15. http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/15/fed-hires-morgan-stanley-to-evaluate-aig-options/. Retrieved on 2008-09-15.
24. ^ “Goldman, JPMorgan Try to Arrange $75 Billion AIG Loan”. Bloomberg.com. 2008-09-15. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=a8IBBQJiLJag. Retrieved on 2008-09-15.
25. ^ Andrew Ross Sorkin (2008-09-16). “A.I.G. Plummets Again as Options Fade”. The New York Times. http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/16/aig-plummets-again-as-options-fade/. Retrieved on 2008-09-16.
26. ^ a b Michael Grynbaum (2008-09-16). “Wall Street Holds Steady; Fed to Meet”. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/17/business/worldbusiness/17markets.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin. Retrieved on 2008-09-16.
27. ^ “S&P: Ratings on American International Group Lowered and Kept on CreditWatch Negative”. MarketWatch. 2008-09-16. http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/sp-ratings-american-international-group/story.aspx?guid=%7B8C56118F-B5ED-4211-9AEF-1242D2F292F5%7D&dist=hppr. Retrieved on 2008-09-16.
28. ^ Michael Merced; Eric Dash (2008-09-16). “Industry Efforts to Rescue A.I.G. Said to Falter”. The New York Times. http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/16/industry-efforts-to-rescue-of-aig-said-to-falter/. Retrieved on 2008-09-16.
29. ^ Many blame the financial problems on the legal problems AIG began having as a result of a number of goverment investigations alleging fraud and other inproprieties which went all the way to the office of its then chairman, Maurice Greenberg. These problems placed such a focus on AIG’s activities that it created a level of required transparency and fear of getting caught, which many believe forced the company to be less active and willing to cheat its way out of these problems. A manner of doing business it learned with its core activity of denying legitimate insurance claims and then pressuring its insureds, their witnesess and anyone else coming to their support while trying to intimidate judges and insurance commissioners. So who began all this? In may 2001 an insurance claimant and shareholder by the name of Cesar Balbin stepped into the annual shareholders meetings. For the first time ever in the company’s history, AIG was publicly accused and exposed for criminal and civil racketeering activities including: extortion, blackmale, claims fraud, theft of company equity and so on. Balbin, knew the company was fragil. The ball of snow he started came down hill and grew as it did. It took with it the chairman, billions of dollars and led to a greater transparency and fear that possibly contribuited to inaction by many at AIG to participate in its typically less that legal and proper activities required to keep the company afloat. “Letter from Maurice Greenberg to AIG Ceo and Board of Directors” (PDF). WikiLeaks. 2008-09-16. https://secure.wikileaks.org/wiki/Image:AIG09162008.pdf. Retrieved on 2008-09-17.
30. ^ Federal Reserve Act: Section 13. Powers of Federal Reserve Banks Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Retrieved September 17, 2008.
31. ^ 12 U.S.C. ch.3 subch.IX
32. ^ FORM 8-K Current Report, American International Group (September 18, 2008). EDGAR United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Retrieved September 20, 2008.
33. ^ Son, Hugh (2008-09-20). “AIG Filing on Takeover Omits Reference to Shareholder Meeting”. Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aqHdJVu3.4gY. Retrieved on 2008-09-20.
34. ^ “AIG booted out of the Dow”. CNN Money. 2008-09-18. http://money.cnn.com/2008/09/18/news/companies/aig_dow/index.htm.
35. ^ Son, Hugh (2008-10-24). “AIG Taps $90.3 Billion From Fed, CEO Says More May Be Needed”. Bloomberg. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aBUTyJp.qgLI&refer=home. Retrieved on 2008-10-24.
36. ^ Mark Ruquet, “Greenberg Pans AIG “Nationalization”, National Underwriter Life & Health, September 18, 2008]
37. ^ Cassidy, John (2008-12-01). “Anatomy of a Meltdown: Ben Bernanke and the financial crisis.”. The New Yorker. http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/12/01/081201fa_fact_cassidy. Retrieved on 2008-11-29.
38. ^ “Press Release (AIG)”. Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 2008-10-08. http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/press/other/20081008a.htm. Retrieved on 2008-November-10.
39. ^ “How AIG got Uncle Sam over a barrel”. The Economist. 2008-11-13. http://www.economist.com/finance/displaystory.cfm?story_id=12607251. Retrieved on 2008-November-20.
40. ^ a b c Sorkin, Andrew Ross; Mary Williams Walsh (2008-11-10). “U.S. Provides More Aid to Big Insurer”. New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/11/business/economy/11aig.html. Retrieved on 2008-November-10.
41. ^ “Treasury to Invest in AIG Restructuring Under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act”. Press Release (United States Department of the Treasury). 2008-11-10. http://www.ustreas.gov/press/releases/hp1261.htm. Retrieved on 2008-November-12.
42. ^ a b “Press Release (AIG)”. Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 2008-11-10. http://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/press/other/20081110a.htm. Retrieved on 2008-November-10.
43. ^ Bloomberg – Senators Dodd & Shelby Demand Information
44. ^ CNN-Congress Wants AIG Answers
45. ^ Business Week-AIG’s Counterparties
46. ^ Goldman Q4 Press Release
47. ^ Taylor, Andrew (2008-10-08). “AIG execs’ retreat after bailout angers lawmakers”. Associated Press. http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5iCBEplezRU4MUlI3wKRd0IZ9GCgQD93M2CP00.
48. ^ “AIG execs waste bailout portion”. 2008-10-11. http://thecoffeedesk.com/news/index.php/archives/76.
49. ^ Lapidos, Juliet (2008-10-08). “Can Paulson Fire Naughty Executives? How much control does the Treasury have over personnel at AIG?”. Slate. http://www.slate.com/id/2201853/.
50. ^ Fed grants AIG $37.8 billion loan, International Herald Tribune, October 8, 2008
51. ^ AUGSTUMS, IEVA (2008-10-17). “AIG executives spent thousands during hunting trip”. AP. http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5g3InVeHoYnmXZnM2ACXSgjG0-nIQD93R68VO0.
52. ^ AIG Already Running Through Government Loans, CNBC, October 30, 2008
53. ^ Another AIG Resort “Junket”: Top Execs Caught on Tape , ABC News, November 10, 2008
54. ^ [1]
55. ^ [2]
56. ^ AIG – Related Resources
57. ^ AIG CDS Payouts and Retirements
58. ^ Bansal, Paritosh. “AIG may rethink asset sales in tough markets”. Reuters UK. http://uk.reuters.com/article/americasDealsNews/idUKTRE51N6DW20090224. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
59. ^ “AIG reports record $61.7bn loss”. BBC News. 2009-03-03. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7918643.stm. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
60. ^ “Dow slides below 7,000; AIG takes $62B hit”. CNN. 2009-03-02. http://edition.cnn.com/2009/BUSINESS/03/02/markets/index.html?iref=mpstoryview. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
61. ^ “US stocks slide to 12-year trough”. BBC News. 2009-03-02. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7918168.stm. Retrieved on 2008-03-02.
62. ^ “Markets routed as AIG reveals $62B loss”. CNN. 2009-03-02. http://edition.cnn.com/2009/BUSINESS/03/02/markets/index.html. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
63. ^ “AIG gets new aid after record $61.7 billion loss”. Reuters. 2009-03-02. http://uk.reuters.com/article/businessNews/idUKTRE5210SZ20090302. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
64. ^ “AIG makes America’s largest loss amid new rescue”. The Times. 2009-03-02. http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/banking_and_finance/article5831864.ece. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
65. ^ “AIG reports record $61.7bn loss”. BBC News. 2009-03-03. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7918643.stm. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
66. ^ “AIG gets new aid after record $61.7 billion loss”. Reuters. 2009-03-02. http://uk.reuters.com/article/businessNews/idUKTRE5210SZ20090302. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
67. ^ “AIG makes America’s largest loss amid new rescue”. The Times. 2009-03-02. http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/banking_and_finance/article5831864.ece. Retrieved on 2009-03-02.
68. ^ “Fed Chief Says Insurance Giant Acted Irresponsibly”. The New York Times. 2009-03-03. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/04/business/economy/04webecon.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&src=igw. Retrieved on 2009-03-04.
69. ^ http://emac.blogs.foxbusiness.com/2009/03/17/american-inconscionable-group/
70. ^ http://news.google.com/news?pz=1&ned=us&hl=en&q=AIG+%22populist+outrage%22
71. ^ http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/16/obamas-statement-on-aig/
72. ^ http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Grassley_to_AIG_execs_Resign_or_0317.html
73. ^ http://www.nydailynews.com/money/2009/03/17/2009-03-17_aig_bonus_checks_may_be_taxed_at_up_to_1.html
74. ^ http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iNRov4y45sOcxD19w5vzO3FJIixwD96V7QSG3
75. ^ http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=am.7NqbUHqO4
76. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/mar2009/db20090317_032819.htm
77. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29725267/
78. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/mar2009/db20090317_032819.htm
79. ^ http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iNRov4y45sOcxD19w5vzO3FJIixwD96V7QSG3
80. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29725267/
81. ^ http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iNRov4y45sOcxD19w5vzO3FJIixwD96V7QSG3
82. ^ http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=am.7NqbUHqO4
83. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,509314,00.html
84. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,509523,00.html
85. ^ http://www.cbs.com/late_show/video/video.php?cid=446418043&pid=d1juzTEYE9OgDgVgp6hjc7wDbYDwQEh1&play=true
86. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/mar2009/db20090317_032819_page_2.htm
87. ^ http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2009/03/17/1839061.aspx
88. ^ http://www.thedailyshow.com/video/index.jhtml?videoId=220548&title=aig-gives-bailout-money-as
89. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/mar2009/db20090317_032819_page_2.htm
90. ^ http://blog.nj.com/njv_editorial_page/2009/03/aigs_arrogance_is_stunning.html
91. ^ http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Grassley_to_AIG_execs_Resign_or_0317.html
92. ^ http://voices.washingtonpost.com/postpartisan/2009/03/aig_bonus_babies.html
93. ^ http://www.forbes.com/2009/03/17/maurice-hank-greenberg-personal-finance-investing-ideas-aig-derivatives.html
94. ^ http://www.thebigmoney.com/blogs/sausage/2009/03/17/bigger-question-raised-aig-s-bonuses
95. ^ “AIG buys 21st Century Insurance”. Los Angeles Times. 2007-09-28. http://articles.latimes.com/2007/sep/28/business/fi-aig28.
96. ^ “AIG rebrand US auto insurance unit to 21st Century Insurance, and cut jobs”. November 26, 2008. http://www.tradingmarkets.com/.site/news/Stock%20News/2053392/. Retrieved on Dec. 3, 2008.
97. ^ “AIG renaming auto insurance division, cutting jobs”. November 26, 2008. http://www.ifawebnews.com/articles/2008/11/26/news/property/doc492c16082e4df440597990.txt. Retrieved on Dec. 3, 2008.
98. ^ Susan Murdoch of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES (2008-09-17). “AIG Life Australia: Cap Position Remains Strong”. CNN Money. http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/djf500/200809170204DOWJONESDJONLINE000243_FORTUNE5.htm.
99. ^ AIG Hong Kong Unit AIA: No Management Buyout Plans;Co Finances Sound, CNN Money, 2008-09-17
100. ^ http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssFinancialServicesAndRealEstateNews/idUSDEL12195120080918
101. ^ Philamlife company profile, Philamlife
102. ^ business.inquirer.net, Philamlife up for sale
103. ^ reuters.com/article, AIG’s Philippine unit says to be sold off
104. ^ AIG’s AIA Unit Says O’Dell Resigns as Singapore Head, Bloomberg, 2008-08-19
105. ^ Insurance giant AIG teetering on the brink as it attempts to mount rescue plan, The Scotsman, September 17, 2008
106. ^ Redemption demands freeze AIG bond fund, Dow Jones Financial News, September 19, 2008
107. ^ Insurance Commissioner monitors AIG impact in Golden State, MSN MoneyCentral, 2008-09-17
108. ^ State tells policyholders not to worry, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 2008-09-18
109. ^ AIG rescue a relief to state agencies, policyholders, Charleston Daily Mail, 2008-09-17
110. ^ [3]
111. ^ [4]
112. ^ Wall Street crisis ruffles Boeing, Airbus, Reuters, September 17, 2008.
113. ^ Buffett, Greenberg May Find AIG Rummage-Sale Bargains, Bloomberg, 2008-09-18
114. ^ [5]
115. ^ [6]
116. ^ “AIG Goes To Bulgaria”. Forbes. 2007-08-17. http://www.forbes.com/markets/2007/08/17/aig-bulgaria-telecom-markets-equity-cx_vr_0817markets14.html.
117. ^ “AIG unit to buy Dubai company’s U.S. ports”. USA Today (Reuters). 2006-12-12. http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/2006-12-11-dubai-ports_x.htm.
118. ^ “AIG Highstar Capital Enters Into Agreement to Purchase MTC Holdings from Christopher Redlich, Jr.”. 2007-07-02. http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/05-10-2007/0004585964&EDATE=.
119. ^ At Stoic Old Stowe, a New Era New York Times
120. ^ BBC – Business – AIG buys Ocean Finance
121. ^ “Man Utd sign £56m AIG shirt deal”. BBC.co.uk. 2006-04-06. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4882640.stm. Retrieved on 2008-10-24.
122. ^ [7]
123. ^ [8]
124. ^ [9]
125. ^ “AIG Forks Up $126 Million to SEC on PNC Deals”. 2004-11-24. http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2004/11/24/47993.htm. Retrieved on 2008-09-18.
126. ^ “AIG Investors Seek Ouster of Chief Executive Sullivan”. Bloomberg.com. 2008-06-11. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=asOzAMceAsiY&refer=us. Retrieved on 2008-07-21.
127. ^ “AIG to Pay $800 Million to Settle Securities Fraud Charges by SEC; Over $1.6 Billion to be Paid to Resolve Federal and New York State Actions”. Securities and Exchange Commission. 2006-02-09. http://www.sec.gov/news/press/2006-19.htm.
128. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,426783,00.htmll

References and further reading

* Sjostrom, Jr., William K., The AIG Bailout, http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1346552 (2009)
* “An Insurance Giant, Brought Down”. New York Times. 2008-09-27. http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/09/27/business/20080928_MELT_GRAPHIC.html. Retrieved on 2008-09-27. (Graphic)
* “Losses in Perspective” New York Times. September 17, 2008. (Graphic of AIG quarterly net profit & losses over five years, comparing Finance vs. Insurance activities.)

Companies portal

* Marsh, Bill (2008-09-28). “A Tally of Federal Rescues”. New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/09/28/weekinreview/20080928_MARSH_GRFK.html. Retrieved on 2008-09-28.
* Schneiderman, R.M; Philip Caulfield, Celena Fang, Elisabeth Goodridge and Vikas Bajaj (2008-09-15). “How a Market Crisis Unfolded: Some of the key events in the upheaval.”. New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/09/15/business/20080915_TURMOIL_TIMELINE.html. Retrieved on 2008-09-17. (Graphic and interactive timeline.)

* Shelp, Ronald Kent (2006). Fallen Giant: The Amazing Story of Hank Greenberg and the History of AIG. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. ISBN 047191696X.

External links
Sister project Wikinews has related news: Treasury, Congress go after AIG bonuses

* AIG LIFE Indonesia Website
* AIG Pakistan website
* AIG Website
* Corporate information
* AIG at Google Finance
* AIG at Yahoo! Finance
* AIG at New York Times.
* Reuters, Profile, American International Group Inc (New York Stock Exchange)

[show]
v • d • e
Major insurance and reinsurance companies
General Insurers
Allianz  PICC  Generali  BNP Paribas  AIG  ING  Zurich Financial Services  Mapfre  Aegon  CNP Assurances  IF P&C Insurance  Swiss Life  Fortis
Life Insurers
AXA  Aviva  Bupa  China Life  Swiss Life  Legal & General  Old Mutual  Prudential  Standard Life  Scottish Widows  metlife
Reinsurers

Hannover Re  Munich Re  Swiss Re  General Re
[show]
v • d • e
American International Group
Board of Directors
Robert B. Willumstad – Stephen F. Bollenback – Marshall A. Cohen – Martin S. Feldstein – Ellen V. Futter – Richard C. Holbrooke – George L. Miles – Morris W. Offit – Michael H. Sutton – Frank G. Zarb – Stephen L. Hammerman – Fred H. Langhammer – Virginia M. Rometty – James F. Orr, III – Edmund S.W. Tse
People
Cornelius Vander Starr – Maurice R. Greenberg – Martin J. Sullivan – Edward M. Liddy – Joseph Cassano
Insurance
AIG American General – AIG Retirement – Lexington Insurance Company – AIG Korea Insurance – American International Assurance – People’s Insurance Company of China
Buildings
American International Building – AIG Tower – American General Center – No.1 Croydon
In Crisis
Subprime mortgage crisis – 2008 economic crisis
Aerospace
International Lease Finance Corporation – London City Airport
Financial Services
AIG Financial Products – AIG Advisor Group
[show]
v • d • e
Financial crisis of 2007–2009
Late 2000s recession  2008 G-20 Washington summit  APEC Peru 2008
Specific issues
United States housing market correction  World food price crisis  Energy crisis (Central Asia)  Subprime mortgage crisis (timeline, List of writedowns)  Global financial crisis  Automotive industry crisis  List of entities involved (Bankrupt or acquired banks, Bankrupt retailers)  Effects upon museums  Banking revelations in Ireland  Resurgence of Keynesianism
By country or area
Belgium  Iceland  Ireland  Latvia  Russia  Spain  Europe  Africa  Americas  Asia  Australasia
Legislation and
policy responses
Banking (Special Provisions) Act 2008  Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008  Commercial Paper Funding Facility  Economic Stimulus Act of 2008  Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008  Troubled Assets Relief Program  Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility  Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program  2008 United Kingdom bank rescue package  2008 Chinese economic stimulus plan  2008 East Asian meetings  Anglo Irish Bank Corporation Bill 2009  American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009  Green New Deal
Companies and banking institutions
Company failures
New Century Financial Corporation  American Freedom Mortgage  American Home Mortgage  Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC  Charter Communications  Lehman Brothers (bankruptcy)  Linens ‘n Things  Mervyns  NetBank  Terra Securities (scandal)  Sentinel Management Group  Washington Mutual  Icesave  Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander  Yamato Life  Circuit City  Allco Finance Group  Waterford Wedgwood  Saab Automobile  BearingPoint  Tweeter  Babcock & Brown
Government bailouts
and takeovers
Northern Rock (nationalisation)  IndyMac Federal Bank  Fannie Mae (takeover)  Freddie Mac (takeover)  AIG  Bradford & Bingley  Fortis  Glitnir  Hypo Real Estate  Dexia  CL Financial  Landsbanki  Kaupthing  Straumur  ING Group  Citigroup  General Motors  Chrysler  Bank of America  Anglo Irish Bank (nationalisation)  Bank of Antigua  ACC Capital Holdings (reorganization)
Company acquisitions
Ameriquest Mortgage  Countrywide Financial  Bear Stearns  Alliance & Leicester  Merrill Lynch  Washington Mutual  Derbyshire Building Society  Cheshire Building Society  HBOS  Wachovia  Sovereign Bank  Barnsley Building Society  Scarborough Building Society  National City Corp.
Other topics
Alleged frauds
and fraudsters
Stanford Financial Group (Allen Stanford)  Fairfield Greenwich Group  UBS AG  Sean FitzPatrick (Anglo Irish Bank)  Kazutsugi Nami (Enten controversy)  Nicholas Cosmo  Arthur Nadel  Marc Dreier  Joseph S. Forte  Paul Greenwood  Stephen Walsh
Proven or
admitted frauds
and fraudsters
Bernard Madoff (Ponzi scheme)  Satyam Computer Services (accounting scandal) (Ramalinga Raju)
Related entities
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation  Federal Reserve System  Federal Housing Administration  Federal Housing Finance Agency  Federal Housing Finance Board  Government National Mortgage Association  Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight  Office of Financial Stability  UK Financial Investments Limited  Federal Home Loan Banks
Securities involved
and financial markets
Auction rate securities  Collateralized debt obligations  Collateralized mortgage obligations  Credit default swaps  Mortgage-backed securities  Secondary mortgage market
Related topics : Bailout  Credit crunch (credit crisis)  Economic bubble  Financial contagion  Financial crisis  Interbank lending market  Liquidity crisis
Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_International_Group
Categories: Companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange | American International Group | Companies established in 1919 | Companies based in New York City | Former components of the DJIA | Insurance companies of the United States | Corporate crime | Media and communications in Croydon | Entities involved in United States housing bubble | Government-owned companies in the United States

Major insurance and reinsurance companies
General Insurers
Allianz  PICC  Generali  BNP Paribas  AIG  ING  Zurich Financial Services  Mapfre  Aegon  CNP Assurances  IF P&C Insurance  Swiss Life  Fortis
Life Insurers
AXA  Aviva  Bupa  China Life  Swiss Life  Legal & General  Old Mutual  Prudential  Standard Life  Scottish Widows  metlife
Reinsurers

Hannover Re  Munich Re  Swiss Re  General Re
[hide]
v • d • e
American International Group
Board of Directors
Robert B. Willumstad – Stephen F. Bollenback – Marshall A. Cohen – Martin S. Feldstein – Ellen V. Futter – Richard C. Holbrooke – George L. Miles – Morris W. Offit – Michael H. Sutton – Frank G. Zarb – Stephen L. Hammerman – Fred H. Langhammer – Virginia M. Rometty – James F. Orr, III – Edmund S.W. Tse
People
Cornelius Vander Starr – Maurice R. Greenberg – Martin J. Sullivan – Edward M. Liddy – Joseph Cassano
Insurance
AIG American General – AIG Retirement – Lexington Insurance Company – AIG Korea Insurance – American International Assurance – People’s Insurance Company of China
Buildings
American International Building – AIG Tower – American General Center – No.1 Croydon
In Crisis
Subprime mortgage crisis – 2008 economic crisis
Aerospace
International Lease Finance Corporation – London City Airport
Financial Services
AIG Financial Products – AIG Advisor Group

Financial crisis of 2007–2009
Late 2000s recession  2008 G-20 Washington summit  APEC Peru 2008
Specific issues
United States housing market correction  World food price crisis  Energy crisis (Central Asia)  Subprime mortgage crisis (timeline, List of writedowns)  Global financial crisis  Automotive industry crisis  List of entities involved (Bankrupt or acquired banks, Bankrupt retailers)  Effects upon museums  Banking revelations in Ireland  Resurgence of Keynesianism
By country or area
Belgium  Iceland  Ireland  Latvia  Russia  Spain  Europe  Africa  Americas  Asia  Australasia
Legislation and
policy responses
Banking (Special Provisions) Act 2008  Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008  Commercial Paper Funding Facility  Economic Stimulus Act of 2008  Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008  Troubled Assets Relief Program  Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility  Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program  2008 United Kingdom bank rescue package  2008 Chinese economic stimulus plan  2008 East Asian meetings  Anglo Irish Bank Corporation Bill 2009  American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009  Green New Deal
Companies and banking institutions
Company failures
New Century Financial Corporation  American Freedom Mortgage  American Home Mortgage  Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC  Charter Communications  Lehman Brothers (bankruptcy)  Linens ‘n Things  Mervyns  NetBank  Terra Securities (scandal)  Sentinel Management Group  Washington Mutual  Icesave  Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander  Yamato Life  Circuit City  Allco Finance Group  Waterford Wedgwood  Saab Automobile  BearingPoint  Tweeter  Babcock & Brown
Government bailouts
and takeovers
Northern Rock (nationalisation)  IndyMac Federal Bank  Fannie Mae (takeover)  Freddie Mac (takeover)  AIG  Bradford & Bingley  Fortis  Glitnir  Hypo Real Estate  Dexia  CL Financial  Landsbanki  Kaupthing  Straumur  ING Group  Citigroup  General Motors  Chrysler  Bank of America  Anglo Irish Bank (nationalisation)  Bank of Antigua  ACC Capital Holdings (reorganization)
Company acquisitions
Ameriquest Mortgage  Countrywide Financial  Bear Stearns  Alliance & Leicester  Merrill Lynch  Washington Mutual  Derbyshire Building Society  Cheshire Building Society  HBOS  Wachovia  Sovereign Bank  Barnsley Building Society  Scarborough Building Society  National City Corp.
Other topics
Alleged frauds
and fraudsters
Stanford Financial Group (Allen Stanford)  Fairfield Greenwich Group  UBS AG  Sean FitzPatrick (Anglo Irish Bank)  Kazutsugi Nami (Enten controversy)  Nicholas Cosmo  Arthur Nadel  Marc Dreier  Joseph S. Forte  Paul Greenwood  Stephen Walsh
Proven or
admitted frauds
and fraudsters
Bernard Madoff (Ponzi scheme)  Satyam Computer Services (accounting scandal) (Ramalinga Raju)
Related entities
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation  Federal Reserve System  Federal Housing Administration  Federal Housing Finance Agency  Federal Housing Finance Board  Government National Mortgage Association  Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight  Office of Financial Stability  UK Financial Investments Limited  Federal Home Loan Banks
Securities involved
and financial markets
Auction rate securities  Collateralized debt obligations  Collateralized mortgage obligations  Credit default swaps  Mortgage-backed securities  Secondary mortgage market
Related topics : Bailout  Credit crunch (credit crisis)  Economic bubble  Financial contagion  Financial crisis  Interbank lending market  Liquidity crisis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_International_Group

U.S. Department of the Treasury

People related to U.S. Department of the Treasury:

Other current U.S. Department of the Treasury relationships:

U.S. Department of the Treasury past relationships:

***

It does just about get on my last nerve that these hundreds of billions of dollars and in some cases trillions of dollars worth of bailouts are being done to save companies that will ultimately fail because their fundamental core businesses have been compromised by their leverage and securitization practices. The necessary changes to that process are not being mandated, nor are they being done voluntarily by the businesses involved. [ and why does it require five crates of paperwork in America in order to be homeless “officially” and get any help for it when AIG and Citigroup can make a phone call and have a blank check into our Treasury?

What kind of America is that? – my thoughts] – cricketdiane