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In Oklahoma, there 1, 342, 293 households which include -

A household includes all of the people who occupy a housing unit. A housing unit is a house, an apartment, a mobile home, a group of rooms, or a single room occupied (or if vacant, intended for occupancy) as separate living quarters.

(from)

http://www.census-charts.com/HF/Oklahoma.html

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Total number of households in the US – according to census data -

105,480,101

U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census.

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It is now 2013 – I bet there are a few more than that.

However, this is to indicate a known relationship about these households and the available storm shelters or adequately protective housing in areas commonly impacted by tornadoes and other extreme weather events – (Oklahoma just happens to be an easy example currently because of the recent ef5 tornado that devastated a 17 mile swath over a mile wide throught the length of it.)

The 2012 estimate for the population of Oklahoma was – 3,814,820 people.

For the US estimated population (2012) was – 313,914,040 people

(from)

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/40000.html

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Number of housing units in Oklahoma as of 2011 were – 1,674,685

Number of Households in Oklahoma 2007-2011 were – 1,432,735

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Number of housing units in the US as of 2011 were – 132,312,404

Number of Households in the US 2007-2011 were –  114,761,359

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Above numbers also from -

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/40000.html

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Oklahoma Safe Room Program Reveals Shortcomings of Local Preparedness Efforts (May 24, 2013)

FEMA spokesman Dan Watson told Homeland Security Today that FEMA remains a strong supporter of public safe rooms.

“In Oklahoma alone, since 1993, FEMA has invested more than $57 million in 11,768 private and public safe rooms in the state, more structures than any other state. Many of those safe rooms constructed with FEMA dollars were in the same area as this week’s tornado and most were funded through FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP).”

Watson called the State of Oklahoma “a great partner” in providing innovative mitigation solutions to residents, and characterized the state’s SoonerSafe Safe Room Rebate Program as a model for supporting the construction of safe rooms through the HMGP program. The SoonerSafe-Safe Room Rebate Program provides a 75-percent rebate — up to $2,000 — to eligible Oklahomans who install above-ground or below-ground safe rooms. The program delivered more than $1 million in rebates to eligible homeowners in 2012.

But a senior FEMA official, who spoke to Homeland Security Today on background, said at the end of the day it is the state and local authorities who are, by law, responsible for prioritizing mitigation projects and spending.

But even in “tornado alley,” a large region of the plains that stretches from the Texas Panhandle to South Dakota, where dozens of life-threatening twisters are a near certainty every year, preparedness often comes down to state and local investment decisions. And as seen by the deaths of seven children at the Plaza Towers Elementary School because it was not equipped with a storm shelter, the sluggish nature of state, local and school board politics often leads to tragedy.

http://www.hstoday.us/industry-news/general/single-article/oklahoma-safe-room-program-reveals-shortcomings-of-local-preparedness-efforts/df80881f57fefb21d8348d6d33864b1f.html

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And I found this – (but there are over 1.4 million housing units in Oklahoma as of 2011 along with how many public and government buildings, business structures where people work, hospitals, schools, nursing homes?)

une 7, 2011

Study of Tornado Shelter Needed and Available Incentives

Oklahoma House of Representatives

In 1999, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) began the Oklahoma Residential Shelter Initiative. The rebate program was funded with $12 million in federal hazard mitigation funds. It resulted in the creation of 6,016 safe room shelters throughout Oklahoma.

In 2003, Oklahoma authorized Operation Safe Room, which was a similar rebate program giving more than $3 million in rebates by paying 75 percent of the cost of a storm shelter, up to a $2,000 maximum. Residents were given 30 days to register with the program and had to complete construction within 14 months.

That same year, the Tornado Shelters Act authorized the use of community development block grant funds for the creation of tornado shelters in manufactured home parks.

http://paulsvalleydailydemocrat.com/governmentnews/x1697312937/Study-of-Tornado-Shelter-Needed-and-Available-Incentives

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Of course, in the above article from 2007, they were funding another study to figure out how to incentivize the public to buy storm shelters and although FEMA has two different programs for grants to offer money that covers the cost of storm shelters and safe rooms for homeowners, some states offer up to $4,000 each to homeowners where Oklahoma has created a ton of paperwork, stalling and no more than $2,000 per shelter regardless of how much FEMA has given the state in grants for that purpose to distribute to the public -

Also noted in the Homeland Security article – (and I don’t know what the expect people to do every day between now and 2015 or thereafter when building codes might be adopted to require safe rooms / storm shelters for new schools)

Kiesling said he expects building codes will “eventually” change to require all new schools to be equipped with a safe room, but it will be a long process. In fact, a provision in the 2015 International Building Code (IBC) would require all new schools and emergency response facilities in high-risk areas to be equipped with safe rooms.

“But in order for that to be effective, a municipality or building code jurisdiction must adopt the 2015 building code,” said Kiesling. “Some will and some will be slow to act. And at best, it will take a number of years.”

Homeland Security Today’s review of meeting minutes from the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission dating back to 2009 confirmed the lengthy, sluggish process by which building codes are changed — even for the most high-risk areas like Oklahoma. Commission meetings, even those focusing on the adoption of standards for the construction of safe rooms, often revolved around debates about whether to issue new rules or wait for the 2015 IBC.

http://www.hstoday.us/industry-news/general/single-article/oklahoma-safe-room-program-reveals-shortcomings-of-local-preparedness-efforts/df80881f57fefb21d8348d6d33864b1f.html

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“Oklahoma is tornado central; we just saw another set of devastating tornadoes hit the center of the state recently,” Ownbey (R-Ardmore) said. “I think it is important to see what the best options we have to address tornado deaths, to see if there isn’t something we can do to better protect Oklahomans.”

He has requested (in July of 2011) a legislative study to determine how the state can better incentivize greater access to storm shelters during severe weather.

http://paulsvalleydailydemocrat.com/governmentnews/x1697312937/Study-of-Tornado-Shelter-Needed-and-Available-Incentives

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Why would any more studies be required when it is known that storm shelters, storm safe rooms and public EF5 tornado resistant structures save lives and keep people from the vast number of injuries that can leave them permanently maimed and disabled from the few minutes of a tornado event?

The decision-makers know what works. States have been receiving money from FEMA grants to their State Hazard Mitigation Offices and State Budgets every year since somewhere before 1999 without distributing those funds in any reasonable nor appropriate way to get those storm shelters and safe rooms provided to people in their states. That is a problem. Not even schools have these safe shelters from storms – including over 1700 schools in Oklahoma. Is everyone supposed to move to where the 100 schools exist in Oklahoma that have been provided safe rooms for their students, faculty and staff?

Over 1.4 million households – over 1.6 million houses – in Oklahoma and there are how many with shelters, basements or safe rooms?

Number of housing units in Oklahoma as of 2011 were – 1,674,685

Number of Households in Oklahoma 2007-2011 were – 1,432,735

11,768 private and public safe rooms in the state as of 2013

more or less

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Death/Injury
 The Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) rates
the value of a person’s
injuries, from a minor
injury to a fatality.
 The Willingness to Pay
(WTP) values are based
on four levels of severity.
 FEMA will update these
values periodically.

Injury Severity Levels         $ WTP Value
(rounded)
Self Treat                                    $12,000

Treat and
Release                                       $90,000
Hospitalized                        $1,088,000
Dead – Fatal                        $5,800,000
Injury Severity
Levels
Federal Aviation Administration, 2008. Revised Department Guidance: Treatment of
the Value of Preventing Fatalities and Injuries in Preparing Economic Analysis

(from The document being used by decision-makers and politicians, legislators and school boards to determine cost to benefit analysis of putting in storm shelters where tornadoes are known to be common)

http://www.bchelpline.com/Documents/SM4-BCA-Tornado.pdf

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This also includes a really creepy, but nifty chart showing that they expect 35% of the population to be injured when an EF4 or EF5 tornado with 200 mph winds targets an area. (or hurricanes with those high winds.)

Wind Speed  =  200 mph

Degree of Damage  =  10

Description  =  Complete Destruction

Fatal %  =  35%

Hospitalized %  =  30%

Treat & Release %  =  10%

Self Treat %  =  10%

(and strangely enough – for the next level of total collapse still expect 10% of the population in fatalities and 50% injured severely enough to be hospitalized either treat and release or admitted with another 30% self-treating their own wounds and not requiring a hospital’s help to do it. That is staggering. And that from winds at 170 mph.)

This chart can be found on page 20 of this publication / pdf, but I’m sure it can be found elsewhere as well because cities, states, counties, emergency managers and budget decision-makers as well as legislators at the state level are using these charts to determine whether it is worth spending any of the FEMA money on the public building these shelters at all – despite the fact that the huge millions of dollars grants are being given to them from Federal funds to do it. (my note)

http://www.bchelpline.com/Documents/SM4-BCA-Tornado.pdf

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